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Posts Tagged ‘veterinary program’

Monday, August 12th, 2013

Sydney Veterinary School finds new species of fungus

A new species of fungus that causes life-threatening infections in humans and cats has been discovered by a University of Sydney researcher.

“This all originated from spotting an unusual fungal infection in three cats I was seeing at the university’s cat treatment centre in 2006,” said Dr Vanessa Barrs,  a Senior Lecturer from the Sydney Veterinary School, whose findings have just been published in PLOS One (Public Library of Science, an international, peer-reviewed, open-access, online publication).

Sydney Veterinary School

Learn more about Sydney Veterinary School

“These cats presented with a tumour-like growth in one of their eye sockets, that had spread there from the nasal cavity. The fungal spores are inhaled and in susceptible cats they establish a life-threatening infection that is very difficult to treat.”

Six years of investigation followed, including working with some of the world’s leading fungal experts at the CBS-KNAW fungal biodiversity centre in The Netherlands.

“Finally I was able to confirm this as a completely new species, Aspergillus felis, which can cause virulent disease in humans and cats by infecting their respiratory tract. We were able to demonstrate that this was a new species of fungus on a molecular and reproductive level and in terms of its form. This new species of fungus can reproduce both asexually and sexually—and we discovered both phases of the fungus.”

Since the first sighting of the new species, more than 20 sick domestic cats from around Australia and one cat from the United Kingdom have been diagnosed with the fungus.

The fungus appears to infect otherwise healthy cats but in the two humans identified it attacked an already highly compromised immune system.

The disease is not passed between humans and cats but its study in cats will not only help their treatment but provide a good model for the study of the disease in people. There is only a 15 per cent survival rate of cats with the disease and it has so far proved fatal in humans. To date only one case has been identified in a dog.

“We are right at the start of recognizing the diseases caused by this fungus in animals and humans. The number of cases may be increasing in frequency or it may just be we are getting better at recognizing them,” the Sydney Veterinary School Senior Lecturer stated.

“Fungi like Aspergillus felis can be easily misidentified as the closely related fungus Aspergillus fumigatus, which is a well-studied cause of disease in humans. However, A. felis is intrinsically more resistant to antifungal drugs than A. fumigatus and this has important implications for therapy and prognosis.”

The next step for Dr Barrs and her Sydney Veterinary School team is studying fungi in culture collections throughout Australia to determine the prevalence of A. felis infections in people with previously diagnosed aspergillosis. They will collaborate with researchers at the Westmead Millenium Institute for Medical Research.

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Are you interested in studying veterinary medicine at the Sydney Veterinary School? Find out more about the University of Sydney Faculty of Veterinary Science‘s new combined degree program, the Bachelor of Veterinary Biology/Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (BVetBiol/DVM) for the 2014 intake, and the proposed 4-year Doctor of Veterinary Medicine program for the 2015 intake.

If you’d like more information about Australian Veterinary Schools, and would like veterinary school updates emailed to you, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Veterinary Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or by calling toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Tuesday, June 18th, 2013

New Sydney Doctor of Veterinary Medicine program for 2015

Each year, OzTREKK assists a number of Canadians who want to study in Australia to become a vet. Most of our students who wish to study veterinary medicine in Australia already have an undergraduate degree, and they are seeking a graduate-entry option, which is usually a Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM) program.

In Australia, universities offer options in veterinary medicine for students who already have an undergraduate degree and for those who have just graduated from high school. Bachelor of Veterinary Science programs in Australia welcome students who have just completed high school and they also welcome those who have already undertaken university studies. These Bachelor of Veterinary Science programs are five years in length. Four-year Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM) programs in Australia require their students to have already completed an undergraduate degree, and many OzTREKK students have completed a DVM program in Australia.

The University of Sydney has offered a five-year, Bachelor of Veterinary Science in past years. Sydney is now transitioning its vet program from a Bachelor of Veterinary Science to a Doctor of Veterinary Medicine program. In 2013, Sydney offered its last Bachelor of Veterinary Science intake. In 2015, it is planned that the faculty will offer a four-year, graduate-entry Doctor of Veterinary Medicine degree.

As this transition takes place, the University of Sydney Faculty of Veterinary Science has introduced a new combined degree program, the Bachelor of Veterinary Biology/Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (BVetBiol/DVM) for the 2014 intake. This new 6-year program allows students to enter into the veterinary program directly from high school. As it encompasses the biological sciences aspect of studies prior to the DVM portion, it is perfectly designed for recently graduated high school students who are high achieving and ready to become knowledgeable and successful veterinarians.

Also being discussed within the Faculty of Veterinary Science at the university is the implementation of a 4-year Doctor of Veterinary Medicine program for the 2015 intake. Dr Peter White of the University of Sydney Faculty of Veterinary Science has stated that while options for entry requirements (e.g., GPA only or combination of other factors) are currently being finalized by the faculty, it is likely that the applications for this program will be open in 2014. This DVM program will be a stand-alone, graduate-entry degree, aimed at students who have already attained a bachelor degree and who are accustomed to the challenge of university studies.

If you are a high school student interested in studying veterinary science, the Bachelor of Veterinary Biology/Doctor of Veterinary Medicine may be right for you; however, if you currently hold a bachelor degree, or will have acquired your bachelor degree in 2014, you may be interested in the new Doctor of Veterinary Medicine program for the 2015 intake.

OzTREKK will post information regarding the new DVM program as soon as it is received from the University of Sydney Veterinary School.

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If you’d like more information about Australian Veterinary Schools, and would like veterinary school updates emailed to you, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Veterinary Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or by calling toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

 

Tuesday, May 28th, 2013

Sydney Veterinary School introduces new veterinary program

The Faculty of Veterinary Science at the University of Sydney opened its doors on March 22, 1910. Since then, the Sydney Veterinary School has developed outstanding research and clinical facilities, and strong reciprocal links with academic peers around the world.

The veterinary school is recognized internationally as a leading provider of education and a key contributor to the world’s best practice in the care and welfare of animals. The university’s strong global connections ensure that approximately 20 percent of their veterinary student intakes each year are international students.

New Veterinary Program for 2014

The Faculty of Veterinary Science at the University of Sydney has introduced a new combined degree program, the Bachelor of Veterinary Biology/Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (BVetBiol/DVM). This exciting, innovative course produces graduates with the knowledge as well as the practical, personal, professional and generic skills to enable them to pursue many career options as veterinary scientists participating in the care and welfare of animals.

The BVetBiol/DVM is six years’ duration and graduates are immediately eligible for registration with Veterinary Surgeons’ Boards in each state. The course is also recognized internationally by the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons (UK) and is accredited by the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA).

Students in first, second and third years are given a sound grounding in the basic biomedical sciences relevant to veterinary science. Examples of clinical cases and actual problems in veterinary practice are used to promote integrated learning in many subject areas.

In the fourth, fifth and sixth years, emphasis shifts to applying this knowledge in clinical settings. The University of Sydney’s BVetBiol/DVM program incorporates a lecture-free year in which students are assigned as “interns” in university and commercial partner practices.

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Although complete information regarding this new veterinary program has not yet been released, OzTREKK will post information as soon as it becomes available.

If you’d like more information about Australian Veterinary Schools, and would like veterinary school updates emailed to you, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Veterinary Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or by calling toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.