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Posts Tagged ‘veterinarian’

Friday, February 21st, 2014

OzTREKK Funny Friday

Welcome to (your veterinarian’s) automated telephone system!

Australian Veterinary Schools in Australia

Study veterinary medicine – help a hot dog!

To make an appointment, please press 1.

To tell us your life history as well as your pet’s before making your appointment, please press 2.

To speak directly to a veterinarian, press 3.

If you feel your pet’s condition warrants pulling a doctor away from the patient he/she is currently seeing or operating on, press 4.

For a listing of the doctor’s home telephone number and beeper number, please press 5.

To schedule emergency after-hours surgery, press 6.

If your regular veterinarian is on vacation, press 7.

If your pet’s condition has persisted for 2 to 6 months but has suddenly become an emergency and he needs to be seen this evening after 6 p.m., please press 8.

For a toenail trim on your 100-lb aggressive dog, press 9. If it is before 7 a.m. or after 7 p.m., please press 10 for our treatment technician’s home phone number.

If you would like us to hold a cheque for you until the following month, please press 11.

If you would like us to postdate a previously held postdated cheque,  press 12.

If you would like us to mail back your postdated cheque so that you can send us one for less money, or to make other payment arrangements, please press 13 for our office manager.

Also, press 13 if you need to bring in 10 unvaccinated puppies with vomiting and bloody diarrhea and you have $10 in your pocket.

If you have been on hold for 10 minutes, press 14.

If you have been on hold for 20 minutes, press 15.

If you have been on hold for 30 minutes or longer, press 16 for the receptionist or e-mail her at receptionist@yourvetclinic.com.

If you are under stress and need to project your anger at someone, press 17 for a receptionist.

To determine if your pet’s condition (i.e., hit by car, grand mal seizures, or unconsciousness) is serious and it needs to be seen today, press 18. Our team of experts are standing by waiting to debate the issue with you for as long as it takes.

If your animal has not eaten in 10 days, press 19.

If you have accidentally taken your animal’s flea control pill or heartworm medicine, press 20.

If your reptile (snake, Savannah monitor, iguana, chameleon, etc.) has been living in a dark, 30 degree room and has not eaten in 60 days, press 21.

If you have a 200+ lb pot-bellied pig or other large farm animal, please press 22 for drive-through surgery service.

If you live in a rural area and your “rock walder gots the mange,” press 23.

If  just want to talk, press 24 and our receptionist will set up a private home appointment for you with a vet.

If your mouse was eaten by your snake, your snake killed by your cat, your cat attacked by your dog, and your dog was kicked by your horse, please press 25.

None of these numbers will give you a real person, but they’ll take your mind off your problems for a while. Our automated telephone service allows us to serve your pet’s needs 24 hours a day, 7 days a week!

Learn more about these Australian Veterinary Schools:

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Are you interested in becoming a veterinarian?

If you have any questions or would like veterinary school updates emailed to you, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Veterinary Schools Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or call 1-866-698-7355 (toll free in Canada).

Friday, December 6th, 2013

OzTREKK Funny Friday

Would you like to become a veterinarian? Consider studying at an Australian Veterinary School! Once you graduate, however, be prepared to receive some pretty unconventional questions:

Australian Veterinary Schools

Admissions Coordinator Molly McNulty’s “Deaner”

My dog has pimples on his belly. How do I get rid of them?

My cat just came in from the garage and I was wondering…how many calories are in a mouse?

I have a neutered male cat. How old should he be before I can breed him?

What should I feed a borderline collie?

Is it normal for a dog to shed?

How can I keep my cat from stealing my husband’s toothbrush?

My budgie gets really nervous when I vacuum his cage. What should I do?

My cat passed a stool on the indoor rug and it’s stuck in the vacuum cleaner. Any suggestions?

How can I get the secret recipe for your special dog food?

How do I stop my cat from purring?

How do I stop my cat from giving food to the dog?

Your food turned my dog into a stud. Now what do I do?

Should I bring my bird inside during winter?

Do you know how to toilet train a cat?

Why does my dog bark?

I have three cats. Is it true that a special brand of cat food makes the poop smell better?

Will chewing pop cans remove enamel from my puppy’s teeth?

Where can I get a six-toed cat?

This is my dog, Max. He’s pregnant. I want to know how many puppies there are.

About Australian Veterinary Schools

Veterinary science programs at Australian Veterinary Schools are suitable for students who wish to gain entry into a veterinary professional program directly from high school or after having completed undergraduate studies.

Canadian students wishing to become a veterinarian have the option of applying to the Bachelor of Veterinary Science (BVSc) program directly from high school or after having completed Bachelor of Science courses or a degree.

The Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM) program is offered only to students who have already obtained an undergraduate science degree.

Learn more about these Australian Veterinary Schools:

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Are you interested in becoming a veterinarian?

If you have any questions or would like veterinary school updates emailed to you, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Veterinary Schools Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or callt 1 866-698-7355 (toll free in Canada).

Contact OzTREKK for more information about studying in Australia and about veterinary programs at Australian universities.

Friday, September 6th, 2013

OzTREKK Funny Friday

Some Lesser-known Cat Laws

Law of Cat Inertia: A cat at rest will tend to remain at rest, unless acted upon by some outside force—such as the opening of cat food, or a nearby scurrying mouse.

Australian Veterinary Schools

An example of Cat Liquefaction

Law of Cat Motion: A cat will move in a straight line, unless there is a really good reason to change direction.

Law of Cat Magnetism: All blue blazers and black sweaters attract cat hair in direct proportion to the darkness of the fabric.

Law of Cat Allergens: All cats will immediately rub up against and crawl on those who are extremely allergic to them.

Law of Cat Liquefaction: A cat can take the form of whatever it happens to crawl into: bowl, box, basket…

Law of Cat Thermodynamics: Heat flows from a warmer to a cooler body, except in case of a cat, in which case all heat flows to the cat.

Law of Cat Stretching: A cat will stretch to a distance proportional to the length of the nap just taken.

Law of Cat Sleeping: All cats must sleep with people whenever possible, in a position as uncomfortable for the people involved, and as comfortable for the cat as possible.

Law of Cat Elongation: A cat can make its body long enough to reach any counter top that has anything remotely interesting on it.

Law of Cat Obstruction: A cat must lie on the floor in a position to obstruct the maximum amount of human foot traffic.

Law of Cat Regurgitation: A cat will only vomit on items/carpeting of great value.

Law of Cat Acceleration: A cat will accelerate at a constant rate, until he gets good and ready to stop.

About Australian Veterinary Schools

Veterinary science programs at Australian Veterinary Schools are suitable for students who wish to gain entry into a veterinary professional program directly from high school or after having completed undergraduate studies.

Canadian students wishing to become a veterinarian have the option of applying to the Bachelor of Veterinary Science (BVSc) program directly from high school or after having completed Bachelor of Science courses or a degree.

The Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM) program is offered only to students who have already obtained an undergraduate science degree.

Learn more about these Australian Veterinary Schools!

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Are you interested in becoming a veterinarian?

If you have any questions or would like veterinary school updates emailed to you, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Veterinary Schools Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or callt 1 866-698-7355 (toll free in Canada).

Contact OzTREKK for more information about studying in Australia and about veterinary programs at Australian universities.

Monday, August 12th, 2013

Sydney Veterinary School finds new species of fungus

A new species of fungus that causes life-threatening infections in humans and cats has been discovered by a University of Sydney researcher.

“This all originated from spotting an unusual fungal infection in three cats I was seeing at the university’s cat treatment centre in 2006,” said Dr Vanessa Barrs,  a Senior Lecturer from the Sydney Veterinary School, whose findings have just been published in PLOS One (Public Library of Science, an international, peer-reviewed, open-access, online publication).

Sydney Veterinary School

Learn more about Sydney Veterinary School

“These cats presented with a tumour-like growth in one of their eye sockets, that had spread there from the nasal cavity. The fungal spores are inhaled and in susceptible cats they establish a life-threatening infection that is very difficult to treat.”

Six years of investigation followed, including working with some of the world’s leading fungal experts at the CBS-KNAW fungal biodiversity centre in The Netherlands.

“Finally I was able to confirm this as a completely new species, Aspergillus felis, which can cause virulent disease in humans and cats by infecting their respiratory tract. We were able to demonstrate that this was a new species of fungus on a molecular and reproductive level and in terms of its form. This new species of fungus can reproduce both asexually and sexually—and we discovered both phases of the fungus.”

Since the first sighting of the new species, more than 20 sick domestic cats from around Australia and one cat from the United Kingdom have been diagnosed with the fungus.

The fungus appears to infect otherwise healthy cats but in the two humans identified it attacked an already highly compromised immune system.

The disease is not passed between humans and cats but its study in cats will not only help their treatment but provide a good model for the study of the disease in people. There is only a 15 per cent survival rate of cats with the disease and it has so far proved fatal in humans. To date only one case has been identified in a dog.

“We are right at the start of recognizing the diseases caused by this fungus in animals and humans. The number of cases may be increasing in frequency or it may just be we are getting better at recognizing them,” the Sydney Veterinary School Senior Lecturer stated.

“Fungi like Aspergillus felis can be easily misidentified as the closely related fungus Aspergillus fumigatus, which is a well-studied cause of disease in humans. However, A. felis is intrinsically more resistant to antifungal drugs than A. fumigatus and this has important implications for therapy and prognosis.”

The next step for Dr Barrs and her Sydney Veterinary School team is studying fungi in culture collections throughout Australia to determine the prevalence of A. felis infections in people with previously diagnosed aspergillosis. They will collaborate with researchers at the Westmead Millenium Institute for Medical Research.

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Are you interested in studying veterinary medicine at the Sydney Veterinary School? Find out more about the University of Sydney Faculty of Veterinary Science‘s new combined degree program, the Bachelor of Veterinary Biology/Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (BVetBiol/DVM) for the 2014 intake, and the proposed 4-year Doctor of Veterinary Medicine program for the 2015 intake.

If you’d like more information about Australian Veterinary Schools, and would like veterinary school updates emailed to you, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Veterinary Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or by calling toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Tuesday, August 6th, 2013

UQ Veterinary School supports Gatton Show

The animals at the Gatton Show were in good hands with veterinarians from the University of Queenslands Veterinary Medical Centre working on site throughout the event. Held July 19 and 20, this was the second year that UQ Gatton veterinarian Jo Olm was on call around the clock at the Gatton Show.

UQ Veterinary School

UQ Veterinary School

Similar to North American county fairs, the Gatton Show is a two-day event comprising animal and agricultural exhibitions, crafts and artwork, horse shows, and live entertainment.

UQ Veterinary School vet Jo Olm and his colleagues made sure to conduct health checks on the beef and dairy cattle, sheep, goats and horses in the different pavilions, making sure that the animals were well looked after. If an emergency were to occur, the UQ Veterinary School staff were there to make assessments in the field.

“If the animal requires further treatment there will also be specialist staff available for twenty-four-hour emergency care just five minutes down the road at the UQ Veterinary Medical Centre which has a small animal and equine hospital,” Dr Olm said.

Vice-President of the Gatton Show Society Kath Raymont said it is critical having a veterinarian on hand as there were more than 1,000 animals involved in the Gatton Show.

“Cattle judging, show jumping, dressage and animal displays are a highlight of the show and having a veterinarian on hand makes sure it all runs smoothly,” Ms Raymont said, adding that they were very pleased that the UQ Veterinary Schools medical centre supported the show.

“The university is an important part of our community so it is great to have them involved.”

About the Gatton Campus

The UQs Gatton campus delivers excellence in agricultural, natural resource, and veterinary sciences. Just under a one hour drive west of Brisbane, the campus offers a unique blend of modern teaching facilities, state-of-the-art laboratories and historic buildings.

UQ Gatton operates commercial production units including dairy, poultry, piggery, beef herd, equine precinct and wildlife facilities, to support teaching, research and hands-on training. The programs offered in the areas of agribusiness, agriculture and horticulture, animal studies and environmental management, and veterinary science are internationally recognized as the best in Australia.

Program title: Bachelor of Veterinary Science (BVSc)
Location: Brisbane, Queensland
Semester intake: February
Program duration: 5 years
Application deadline: Nov. 15, 2013; however, as the UQ Bachelor of Veterinary Science (BVSc) program can fill quickly, OzTREKK recommends that students apply as early as possible.

Entry Requirements

UQ Veterinary School applicants must have a secondary school diploma and have fulfilled Grade 12 prerequisites of Chemistry, Physics or Biology, Mathematics, and English for admission into this program. Generally, a B average is required for admission. Please note that the MCAT is not required for entry.

Apply to UQ Veterinary School!

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Do you have questions about UQ Veterinary School and about studying veterinary programs at Australian universities? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Veterinary Schools Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or call 1 866-698-7355 (toll free in Canada). OzTREKK also provides all interested applicants with an Australian Veterinary Schools newsletter. Ask Rachel about our newsletter!

 

 

Friday, July 19th, 2013

OzTREKK Funny Friday

A man rushes his limp dog to the veterinarian. The doctor pronounces the dog dead. The agitated man demands a second opinion.

The vet goes into the back room and comes out with a cat. The cat sniffs the body and meows. The vet says, “I’m sorry, but the cat thinks that your dog is dead, too.”

The man is still unwilling to accept that his dog is dead.

The vet brings in a black Labrador. The lab sniffs the body and barks. The vet says, “I’m sorry, but the lab thinks your dog is dead, too.”

The man finally resigns to the diagnosis and asks how much he owes. The veterinarian answers, “Six hundred and fifty dollars.”

Six hundred and fifty dollars to tell me my dog is dead?” exclaims the man.

“Well,” the vet replies, “I would only have charged you $50 for my initial diagnosis. The additional six hundred is for the cat scan and lab tests.”

Postgraduate Australian Veterinary Program

Duration: 4 years
Number of international places: approximately 50
Program commences: March intake each year
Offered at: University of Melbourne

Undergraduate Australian Veterinary Programs

Duration: 5 years
Number of international places: varies from 5 to 140
Program commences: February intake each year
Offered at: James Cook University, University of Queensland and University of Sydney

Learn more about these Australian Veterinary Schools!

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Are you interested in becoming a veterinarian?

For more information about Australian Veterinary School entry requirements, application deadlines, tuition fees, scholarships, please visit OzTREKK’s Australian Veterinary Schools page. If you have any questions or would like veterinary school updates emailed to you, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Veterinary Schools Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or phone Rachel at 1 866-698-7355 (toll free in Canada).

Contact OzTREKK for more information about studying in Australia and about veterinary programs at Australian universities.

 

Tuesday, July 16th, 2013

Sydney Veterinary School to study horse racing legend

A new chapter in the story of Phar Lap is about to be added by the University of Sydney as it leads an attempt to sequence the famous horse’s DNA. In case you weren’t around for the 1983 film Phar Lap, which depicts the inspirational yet heartbreaking story of the horse’s life, the thoroughbred was a horse racing legend in Australia during the late 1920s and early 1930s. After an extremely successful racing career, and a trip to the United States (where a murder attempt took place!), Phar Lap died of what was reported as “ingestion of a massive dose of arsenic.” Although the arsenic poisoning claims have been challenged repeatedly, one thing remains clear: Phar Lap was “Australia’s Wonder Horse.”

“Phar Lap’s heart is in Canberra, his hide is in Melbourne, and his skeleton in the Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa. Now the museum has agreed to a sixty-milligram piece of tooth from that skeleton coming to Sydney so we can unravel his genetic history,” said Dr Natasha Hamilton, the team leader from the University of Sydney Veterinary School. Professor Claire Wade, also from the Faculty of Veterinary Science, will be in charge of the genetic analysis.

The DNA extraction will be performed at the Australian Centre for Ancient DNA (ACAD), at the University of Adelaide, before being analyzed at the University of Sydney.

“We are doing this out of scientific curiosity and all our data will be made publicly available. The DNA sequence will tell us if Phar Lap’s genetic make-up looks like star racehorses of today, including whether he is a sprinter or a stayer (genetically better suited to running long distances),” Dr Hamilton said.

“We believe that no other southern hemisphere racehorses have had their whole genome sequenced before. By contrast, in Europe this research is quite popular and DNA analysis has been performed on notable horses such as Eclipse, racing’s first superstar and an ancestor of 95 percent of today’s thoroughbreds, and Hyperion, a popular sire from the 1930-1950s who is found in numerous pedigrees.”

The information will be used in current Faculty of Veterinary Science research such as international studies to understand the basis of genetic diversity in different breeds of horses, the structure of the thoroughbred breed and the genetics underlying the physiology of exercise across all horse species.

The skeleton was treated by being boiled in a corrosive solution which will have fragmented the DNA.

“There is a possibility that we will not be able to get much usable DNA, as they were obviously not thinking about the possibility of future DNA extraction when they prepared Phar Lap’s skeleton in the 1930s,” said Professor Alan Cooper, ACAD director.

Professor Claire Wade said that despite this limitation current whole genome sequencing methods can work with small pieces of DNA, so the researchers are hopeful they will be able to generate usable information.

The fragmentation of the DNA also means it would not be usable in other projects that require large amounts of good quality DNA such as cloning.

“So, sorry punters, there is no hope of Phar Lap II running around a few years from now,” Dr Hamilton said.

This is not Phar Lap’s first association with the University of Sydney. The horse was named by Aubrey Ping, a medical student at the Sydney Medical School in the 1920s. The name Phar Lap derives from the common Zhuang and Thai word for lightning—literally, “sky flash.”

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Curious about studying veterinary science at the Sydney Veterinary School?

If you’d like more information about Sydney Veterinary School, and would like veterinary school updates emailed to you, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Veterinary Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or by calling toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

 

Thursday, July 4th, 2013

Melbourne Veterinary School examines shared health

Veterinary science at the University of Melbourne—and around the world—is moving toward a more integrated, “one health model,” with vets and human doctors sharing research and treatment techniques for diseases such as cancers and immune disorders, to benefit both humans and their pets.

To keep companion animals healthy and happy, veterinary knowledge and treatments have rapidly expanded and accelerated, becoming tightly linked with human medicine and enabling the two professions to inform each other—the “one health model.”

Head of the Neurology and Neurosurgery service at the University of Melbourne’s Melbourne Veterinary Hospital in Werribee, Dr Sam Long notes that dogs suffer from more than 350 genetic disorders, many of which resemble human conditions. The most common diseases among purebred dogs include cataracts, cancer, epilepsy, heart disease, and allergies.

Dr Long says that humans and dogs share more than 80 per cent of their genes, particularly developmental genes, and what they know from human medicine can often benefit the treatment of pets. The University of Melbourne veterinarian adds that dogs are more genetically similar to a person than a mouse.

Dr Long set up the Neurology and Neurosurgery service in Werribee after training in the UK and working in the US. The service is the only university-based teaching and training neurology service for animals in Australia.

To keep up with the latest in human medicine, and how it can be put into practice to treat animals, Dr Long attends weekly neurological surgery and imaging rounds at a number of Melbourne hospitals.

He says research at the university’s Veterinary Hospital is driven by the clinical cases referred to it, as well as by collaboration with human doctors, treating brain tumours, epilepsy, trauma, slipped discs and other neurological conditions. The Melbourne Veterinary Hospital boasts Australia’s first 1.5-Tesla veterinary magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) unit.

When treating brain tumours, the neurology team is also taking another cue from human medicine to improve cancer treatments for dogs. In many human brain tumours, doctors see changes in specific proteins due to gene mutations. Such proteins are known as a “biomarkers,” because they can be used to identify particular disease processes.

Dr Long and his colleagues at the veterinary hospital and are now studying whether protein mutations can be used to diagnose brain tumour types in dogs, as biomarker presence may possibly indicate a better response to chemotherapy or radiotherapy.

Many other animal diseases considered equivalent of the human conditions, such as ALS, diabetes, and inflammatory bowel disease, are treated at the University of Melbourne Veterinary Hospital. The Small Animal Internal Medicine section at the university’s vet hospital is also an incredibly busy place, seeing more than 700 animals each year, with many requiring repeat assessment and treatment.

While some people are amazed at the similarities between human hospitals and animal hospitals, Melbourne Veterinary Science Associate Professor Caroline Mansfield points out that animals also have accidents and get the same diseases as humans, so it makes sense to have a 24-hour emergency service and all of the same clinical services as a major hospital for people.

“The one health model is now very beneficial to our work as vets or doctors,” the Melbourne professor added. “It means that as our understanding of human and animal biology increases, the potential to do clinically relevant research is only limited by our imagination and funds available.”

University of Melbourne’s Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM) program

Program title: Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM)
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Semester intake: Late February/early March
Program duration: 4 years
Application deadline: December 20, 2013

Entry Requirements

Eligible applicants must have completed

  • an undergraduate science degree (minimum three-year degree with majors in Agriculture, Animal Science, Biochemistry, Biomedicine, Physiology or Zoology); and
  • prerequisite subjects including at least one semester of study in each of cell biology or general biology, and biochemistry.

Selection into the University of Melbourne’s Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM) program will be primarily based on academic achievement. Selection will be based on results (grades) obtained in your final year undergraduate science subjects as well as your second last year (penultimate) undergraduate science subjects, weighted 75:25 toward the final year subjects. Applicants with a 75% average or above should apply.

The University of Melbourne may conduct interviews in order to clarify aspects of an applicant’s application, and students may be asked to provide references or evidence to demonstrate their interest in a veterinary career.

Apply to Melbourne Veterinary School!

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Do you have questions about Melbourne Veterinary School and the Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM) program? Would you like more information about studying veterinary programs at Australian universities? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Veterinary Schools Officer Rachel Brady: Email Rachel at rachel@oztrekk.com or call 1 866-698-7355 (toll free in Canada).

 

Thursday, June 20th, 2013

UQ Veterinary School’s Small Animal Hospital

A UQ Veterinary Medical Centre Small Animal Hospital is a Veterinary Teaching Hospital. Teaching hospitals operate as a veterinary clinic, established to train veterinarians and veterinary nurses/technicians. Undergraduate veterinary students finish their last two years of the Bachelor of Veterinary Science (BVSc) program at the teaching hospital, where they finish the clinical work portion of their degree.

The UQ Veterinary Medical Centre Small Animal Hospital offers more time dedicated to their animal patients, as their problems are discussed and considered by more experts in intensive “rounds” and discussion groups with students, specialists and academics which allows more discussion and consideration of the pet and their individual concerns.

Fourth- or fifth-year students begin the consultations, taking pet history and details of any current issues. The students are then joined by the veterinarian for the remainder of the consultation. Following the consultation the veterinarian may discuss the diagnosis and treatment of the pet with the students as a learning exercise.

The University of Queensland‘s Small Animal Hospital’s 24 hour Intensive Care / Emergency Unit and after hours veterinary service is open to all and is ideally located to service the need of patients from Ipswich to Toowoomba, including Gatton, Esk and Laidley in Queensland. The animal hospital offers unrivalled medical and surgical facilities for dogs, cats, birds, reptiles, small mammals and fish.

In addition to the veterinary hospital’s state-of-the-art facilities, it also boosts a wide variety of local and internationally trained veterinary specialists who take referrals from all around Queensland. The UQ Gatton Veterinary Medical Centre is fully computerized, making the sharing of cases with the specialists in Brisbane a simple task.

Facilities include

  • an intensive care unit;
  • separate wards for dogs, cats, birds and exotic pets;
  • an isolation ward for infectious diseases such as Canine Parvovirus;
  • digital radiology, ultrasound and computerized tomography (CT Scanner);
  • a dedicated dental suite;
  • an in-house laboratory and immediate access to a complete veterinary diagnostic laboratory;
  • chemotherapy ward;
  • flexible and rigid endoscopy; and
  • four operating theatres.

 

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Do you have questions about UQ Veterinary School and about studying veterinary programs at Australian universities? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Veterinary Schools Officer Rachel Brady: Email Rachel at rachel@oztrekk.com or call 1 866-698-7355 (toll free in Canada).


Tuesday, June 18th, 2013

New Sydney Doctor of Veterinary Medicine program for 2015

Each year, OzTREKK assists a number of Canadians who want to study in Australia to become a vet. Most of our students who wish to study veterinary medicine in Australia already have an undergraduate degree, and they are seeking a graduate-entry option, which is usually a Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM) program.

In Australia, universities offer options in veterinary medicine for students who already have an undergraduate degree and for those who have just graduated from high school. Bachelor of Veterinary Science programs in Australia welcome students who have just completed high school and they also welcome those who have already undertaken university studies. These Bachelor of Veterinary Science programs are five years in length. Four-year Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM) programs in Australia require their students to have already completed an undergraduate degree, and many OzTREKK students have completed a DVM program in Australia.

The University of Sydney has offered a five-year, Bachelor of Veterinary Science in past years. Sydney is now transitioning its vet program from a Bachelor of Veterinary Science to a Doctor of Veterinary Medicine program. In 2013, Sydney offered its last Bachelor of Veterinary Science intake. In 2015, it is planned that the faculty will offer a four-year, graduate-entry Doctor of Veterinary Medicine degree.

As this transition takes place, the University of Sydney Faculty of Veterinary Science has introduced a new combined degree program, the Bachelor of Veterinary Biology/Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (BVetBiol/DVM) for the 2014 intake. This new 6-year program allows students to enter into the veterinary program directly from high school. As it encompasses the biological sciences aspect of studies prior to the DVM portion, it is perfectly designed for recently graduated high school students who are high achieving and ready to become knowledgeable and successful veterinarians.

Also being discussed within the Faculty of Veterinary Science at the university is the implementation of a 4-year Doctor of Veterinary Medicine program for the 2015 intake. Dr Peter White of the University of Sydney Faculty of Veterinary Science has stated that while options for entry requirements (e.g., GPA only or combination of other factors) are currently being finalized by the faculty, it is likely that the applications for this program will be open in 2014. This DVM program will be a stand-alone, graduate-entry degree, aimed at students who have already attained a bachelor degree and who are accustomed to the challenge of university studies.

If you are a high school student interested in studying veterinary science, the Bachelor of Veterinary Biology/Doctor of Veterinary Medicine may be right for you; however, if you currently hold a bachelor degree, or will have acquired your bachelor degree in 2014, you may be interested in the new Doctor of Veterinary Medicine program for the 2015 intake.

OzTREKK will post information regarding the new DVM program as soon as it is received from the University of Sydney Veterinary School.

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If you’d like more information about Australian Veterinary Schools, and would like veterinary school updates emailed to you, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Veterinary Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or by calling toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.