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Posts Tagged ‘vet school’

Friday, November 28th, 2014

Sydney Veterinary School webinar

Are you considering studying veterinary medicine at the University of Sydney?

University of Sydney Veterinary School

Learn more about Sydney Veterinary School

Great news! Sydney Uni is offering an informative webinar for everyone interested in the Doctor of Veterinary Medicine! This webinar will cover studying in Australia, the University of Sydney, the Faculty of Veterinary Sciences, scholarship opportunities and life in Sydney.

When: Monday, December 1, 2014
Time: 7 p.m. (Ontario); 4 p.m. (Vancouver)

Do you have questions about this webinar? Email OzTREKK’s Australian Veterinary Schools Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com for more information and to register!

University of Sydney Veterinary School is a world leader in veterinary education, animal science and research that advances the health and welfare of animals and benefits the community. The faculty’s values include

  • student life-long learning, supported by inspirational teaching
  • research excellence in creating new knowledge
  • service to the profession and the community, as they value and develop key relationships
  • a culture built on academic excellence, integrity, respect and encouragement
  • animal well-being to guide their work

Study Veterinary Medicine at the Sydney Veterinary School

Program title: Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM)
Location: Sydney, New South Wales
Semester intake: March 2015
Program duration: 4 years
Application deadline: December 5, 2014

Apply to the Sydney Veterinary School!

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Do you have questions about the new Doctor of Veterinary Medicine program at the Sydney Veterinary School? Please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Veterinary Schools Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or 1-866-698-7355 to find out more!

Monday, September 22nd, 2014

Melbourne Vet School visit to Canada

What’s it like to study veterinary medicine at the prestigious University of Melbourne? Well, wonder no more because the Melbourne Veterinary School representatives will be visiting Canada! Everyone is welcome to attend!

University of British Columbia
Date: Tuesday, September 30
Time: 6pm
Venue: Macmillan 350, University of British Columbia

University of Alberta
Date: Thursday, October 2
Time: 5pm
Venue: University of Alberta

University of Guelph
Date: Monday, October 6
Time: 11pm – 2pm
Venue: University Centre (UC), University of Guelph

This is a great opportunity for you to find out more about the Melbourne DVM!

About the University of Melbourne’s Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM) program

Program title: Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM)
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Semester intake: Late February/early March 2015
Program duration: 4 years
Application deadline: December 23, 2014. It is recommended that students apply at least three months prior to the program start date.

Entry Requirements

Eligible applicants must have completed

  • an undergraduate science degree (minimum three-year degree with majors in Agriculture, Animal Science, Biochemistry, Biomedicine, Physiology or Zoology); and
  • prerequisite subjects including at least one semester of study in each of cell biology or general biology, and biochemistry.

Selection into the University of Melbourne’s Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM) program will be primarily based on academic achievement. Selection will be based on results (grades) obtained in your final year undergraduate science subjects as well as your second last year (penultimate) undergraduate science subjects, weighted 75:25 toward the final year subjects. Applicants with a 75% average or above should apply.

The University of Melbourne may conduct interviews in order to clarify aspects of an applicant’s application, and students may be asked to provide references or evidence to demonstrate their interest in a veterinary career.

Apply to Melbourne Veterinary School!

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Do you have questions about Melbourne Veterinary School and the DVM program? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Veterinary Schools Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or call 1-866-698-7355 (toll free in Canada) and find out how you can study in Australia.

Friday, July 18th, 2014

Melbourne Veterinary School: supporting dairy production

A partnership between the University of Melbourne and dairy industry groups is creating new research and training opportunities for the next generation of dairy veterinarians. Andi Horvath and Clemmie Wetherall report:

From the field to the fridge, the Australian dairy industry is growing to become a world leader in innovation, sustainability and best practice in food production. The industry is the third largest exporter of dairy in the world and Australia’s third largest agricultural export product.

Melbourne Veterinary School

Melbourne Vet School partners with dairy industry groups to aid next generation of dairy veterinarians

Research has played a key role in helping the industry find its way to the front of the pack, but back in 2010 a looming shortage of specialist dairy vets prompted a collaboration between the University of Melbourne, the Gardiner Foundation and Dairy Australia.

The partnership provided $1.4 million for research in areas of importance to local dairy communities and the future of the wider dairy industry, and out of this funding, a unique training scheme called the ‘Dairy Residents Program’ was initiated.

The ‘Dairy Resident’s Program’ involves on-farm research and practice for students as part of their course work for a Master of Veterinary Studies and Master of Veterinary Science by research.

The dairy residents are embedded for three years in one of four rural veterinary practices in Maffra, Warrnambool, Rochester and Timboon. During this time they conduct an on-farm research project, acquire knowledge and skills through advanced clinical training and develop expertise in whole-farm production programs.

The students also attend conferences and farmer meetings to update their knowledge and present their research to various industry stakeholders. In addition they are involved in the training of the next generation of dairy practitioners, hosting final year students from the Melbourne Veterinary School  Doctor of Veterinary Medicine course.

Associate Professor Michael Pyman is senior lecturer in Dairy Cattle Medicine and Production at the University of Melbourne and supervisor of the residencies program. He believes the project will begin to address the shortage of experienced vets in rural areas by providing career opportunities in dairy practices and the wider dairy industry.

“The rural training scheme enables all veterinary students undertaking the Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM) to gain firsthand practical experience in dairy cattle medicine in practices managed by dedicated and skillful practitioners,” he says.

“We see this world-class training as crucial to maximising movement of these students into dairy and rural practice after graduation, an outcome vital to the productivity and sustainability of our rural sector.”

The four dairy resident vets enrolled in the second iteration of the project are now entering the second year of the three-year program and are already having positive impacts on farms, farmers, vet clinics, the next generation of vets, rural communities, the industry and the University.

Dr Kelly Plozza is a dairy resident at the Warrnambool Veterinary Clinic. She is conducting clinical trials in improving the reproductive performance of cows who do not display visible fertility cycles, known as non-cycling cows.

Dr Plozza says on-farm research has helped her build a better relationship with local farmers.

“That’s something you don’t have time for in a regular vet practice—you tend to be too busy running between jobs. It’s really nice to be able to revisit the farmers with your latest results and they are really excited about the scientific investigations. They love hearing about the research outcomes as much as we do because it opens up ideas for proactive intervention measures.”

Dr Plozza has been comparing current approaches for managing non-cycling cows, and the results are revealing useful information and more options for farmers. This is particularly important as non-cyclying cows can present problems for farmers trying to decide when they can be mated.

Over in Timboon, Dr Andy Hancock, is undertaking his residency with The Vet Group. He is studying how farmers manage bulls up to and during the breeding period and investigating if there is a correlation between bull management and fertility. As part of his research Dr Hancock has worked with 32 herds and examined 256 bulls prior to, and after, mating.

“As a vet you usually go out to farms to see a sick or problem animal but with this project I am usually seeing healthy animals, so the farmers are happy to see me,” he says.

Dr Hancock hopes his work will help refine the guidelines for fertility risk assessment in bulls, and says the residency has also helped him become a better vet.

“I’ve picked up a lot of extra skills that I would not necessarily learn during day-to-day vet practice, things like project management, time management and building rapport with clients, and of course technical research skills like conducting literature reviews and scientific report writing. The research gives your work a goal whilst ensuring you develop useful technical expertise.

“If you can contribute something to the knowledge base, that’s great in itself, but if your results improve farming practices that is a real bonus and on top of that we will be sharing it with fellow vets and trainee vets.”

Though only in their second year of research, the ‘Dairy Residents’ are already receiving industry recognition for their work.

Maffra based Dr Stephanie Bullen earned the title of 2013 Rural Ambassador, an award that recognises outstanding individuals dedicated to making contributions to the local community. Dr Bullen and her partner live on a 340-cow Holstein dairy farm and her research focuses on improving parasite control in young stock.

Resident Dr Ashley Phipps who is based at the Rochester Veterinary clinic was awarded a Greenham’s Dairy Scholarship, to help finance his research studies. Dr Phipps is investigating colostrum volume and management practices and its effect on the quality of the harvested colostrum.

He says he applied for the residency because he always had a strong interest in calves and calf health.

“This was a real interest area of mine and I thought there were gaps in our knowledge. Calves are the future of a herd, so I think we need to give more thought to how they are raised.”

Dr Phipps has already made inroads into understanding colostrum management practices on the four farms and 442 cows he is working with in Northern Victoria.

About the University of Melbourne’s Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM) program

Program title: Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM)
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Semester intake: Late February/early March 2015
Program duration: 4 years
Application deadline: December 23, 2014. It is strongly recommended that students apply at least three months prior to the program start date.

Entry Requirements

Eligible applicants must have completed

  • an undergraduate science degree (minimum three-year degree with majors in Agriculture, Animal Science, Biochemistry, Biomedicine, Physiology or Zoology); and
  • prerequisite subjects including at least one semester of study in each of cell biology or general biology, and biochemistry.

Selection into the University of Melbourne’s Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM) program will be primarily based on academic achievement. Selection will be based on results (grades) obtained in your final year undergraduate science subjects as well as your second last year (penultimate) undergraduate science subjects, weighted 75:25 toward the final year subjects. Applicants with a 75% average or above should apply.

Apply to Melbourne Veterinary School!

*

Learn more about studying veterinary medicine at Melbourne Veterinary School. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Veterinary Schools Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or call 1-866-698-7355 (toll free in Canada) to find out how you can study in Australia!

Monday, July 14th, 2014

Sydney Veterinary School calls for action on harmful preservatives in pet food

Continually feeding your cat pet meat runs the risk of exposing them to a thiamine (vitamin B1) deficiency and its associated serious health problems.

University of Sydney Veterinary School

Study veterinary medicine at Sydney

“In this day and age, with the knowledge that pet food manufacturers have, this is an entirely preventable condition,” said Dr Anne Fawcett, companion animal veterinarian at the Sydney Faculty of Veterinary Science.

“Sulphite preservatives are added to some pet meats, sometimes at very high levels, to mask the signs of putrefaction, giving it a longer shelf life, but long-term consumption endangers the well-being of our pets,” Dr Fawcett is lead author of an article on the issue, recently published in the Australian Veterinary Practitioner.

The article highlights a case of thiamine deficiency in a cat treated at the University of Sydney. The cat was exclusively fed a commercial, kangaroo meat pet food purchased from a supermarket. The food was tested and demonstrated high concentrations of sulfur dioxide, a known cause of thiamine deficiency in cats.

The paper was co-authored by veterinarian Dr Ye Yao and pathologist Richard Miller from IDEXX Laboratories.

Products sold as pet meat, pet mince or processed pet food rolls, which continue to be very popular with pet owners, may contain potentially harmful levels of sulphite preservatives.

“Despite awareness of the problem in Australia for over two decades, sulphite preservatives continue to be found in some pet foods at harmful concentrations. We need to ensure that the levels of these preservatives in all pet foods are regulated,” said Dr Fawcett.

“We need to manage the safety of imported and domestically produced pet meat and food.”

Animals need thiamine, also known as B1, to convert carbohydrates into energy and it also plays an important role in the production of neurotransmitters which are essential in the function of the nervous system. It is not produced by the body so has to come from food.

Tips to avoid exposing your pet to sulfides:

  • Avoid feeding pet meat high in sulphides and feed a premium commercial tinned or dry food that complies with the Australian Standard for Manufactured Pet Food.
  • If you do feed pet meat, vary the types and brands to reduce the overall dose of sulphides in the diet.
  • If you wish to feed fresh meat, purchase meat sold for human consumption as legislation precludes the addition of these preservatives.
  • You can supplement your pet’s diet with natural sources of thiamine such as pork, organ meats (such as liver, heart, brain and kidney), or even yeast, but this does not protect against thiamine deficiency if sulphites are contained in food fed at the same time.

Clinical signs of thiamine deficiency vary between dogs and cats, with more consistent and recognisable signs in cats. Early signs of thiamine deficiency include vomiting, diarrhea, loss of appetite and depression. As the condition progresses, signs may include impaired vision, a wobbly gait, head tilt or seizures. In some cases, affected animals develop a cardiac syndrome and die suddenly.

“For vets this underlies the importance of taking a full dietary history when treating an animal,” said Dr Fawcett.

“It also highlights the need for vets to have a standard reference of what are healthy levels of blood thiamine concentration in cats and dogs, which does not yet exist.”

About the Sydney Veterinary School

The Sydney DVM is an exciting new graduate-entry veterinary program, commencing in 2015. The DVM replaces the Sydney Veterinary School’s existing Bachelor of Veterinary Science, and is open to applicants with a completed Bachelor’s degree who wish to study veterinary medicine in a postgraduate learning environment. The program is internationally recognised and accredited so graduates can work around the world.

Program title: Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM)
Location: Sydney, New South Wales
Semester intake: March 2015
Program duration: 4 years
Application deadline: October 31, 2014

Apply to the Sydney Veterinary School!

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Do you have questions about Sydney Veterinary School and the new Doctor of Veterinary Medicine for the 2015 intake? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Veterinary Schools Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or 1-866-698-7355.

Tuesday, June 3rd, 2014

Melbourne veterinary student working and networking in Nepal

Dr Sarah Hall never imagined she would become a vet, so how did she find herself in Nepal at the forefront of animal disease management?

Animal disease management is a specialist area becoming increasingly important in the 21st Century. Globalisation has brought the world closer together, making travel, communication and trade between nations and countries easier and faster—but it has also increased the risk of disease travelling rapidly across continents.

University of Melbourne Veterinary School

Learn more about Melbourne Veterinary School

Australia has been free of foot-and-mouth disease for over 100 years, but local governments and farmers around the country have been vigilant in preparing for an outbreak.

Dr Sarah Hall, a Masters of Veterinary Public Health (Emergency Disease Management) student at the University of Melbourne Veterinary School, has recently returned from foot-and-mouth control training in Nepal.

She says there is a constant threat of an outbreak in Australia but preparedness training is the key.

“Every day there is a risk of foot-and-mouth disease coming into the country, you simply have to bring home a ham sandwich, or accidentally step in some cow droppings in a country like Nepal or India and then catch a plane back to Australia.”

Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a highly contagious viral disease that affects cloven-hooved animals such as cattle and sheep. While not often fatal it is debilitating and it has the potential to quickly cause widespread illness.

“Foot-and-mouth disease is the biggest, most economically damaging threat to Australia’s livestock industries,” Dr Hall says. “Our quarantine system is highly effective but even a small outbreak in Australia could have devastating consequences to our communities in lost production, trade and tourism; we could even face global trade restrictions.”

In response to the risk the Commonwealth Federal Department of Agriculture Fisheries and Forestry (DAFF) convened and funded a FMD training program for veterinarians in Nepal. Dr Hall was nominated for a place and supported in her travel by the Melbourne Faculty of Veterinary Science.

Twenty vets from Australia took part in the training program, visiting communities in Nepal with active foot-and-mouth outbreaks.

Dr Hall says they worked in epidemiological and clinical teams, took samples and used the local reference laboratories and ‘penside tests’ to confirm the disease.

“We also asked farmers questions about livestock movements to understand how the disease spreads in Nepal.

“The idea was, if there was an outbreak in Australia the vets involved in the program would be our front-line response team, with real experience in identifying foot-and-mouth disease, in implementing biosecurity strategies and in conducting initial disease investigations.”

As well as preparing Australian vets for the management of an outbreak, Dr Hall says the trip was also an incredible networking opportunity.

“My current boss was one of the private practice vets invited to go to Nepal. We got talking about our careers and got to know each other quite well and after returning to Australia he offered me a job.”

Dr Hall moved to Bendigo to work in a mixed practice clinic after finishing her veterinary science degree at the University of Melbourne in 2009.

“While I enjoyed my job I started to realise my real passion was in trying to solve the mystery of disease outbreaks.

“As the local vet you are first on the scene when a local farmer calls saying he has five dead cows.

“The farmer is worried about his livelihood and his animals’ welfare so it’s rewarding to play Sherlock Holmes and get to figure out the cause of the disease. That was what gave me that kick, that thrill, and doing vaccinations all day and removing grass-seeds from cats and dogs just wasn’t for me in the long-term.

“I was interested in epidemiology and emergency animal disease so I looked at the courses available and the Master’s degree at the Faculty of Veterinary Science fitted my interest and had the flexibility I needed to be able to continue working.”

Dr Hall says she never imagined she would become a vet, let alone find herself in advanced training in Nepal; a cancelled work experience placement in Year 10 was the twist of fate that led her to pursue a career as a veterinarian.

“The Royal Children’s Hospital cancelled on me because they had overbooked, so my careers coordinator suggested that if I wanted to be a doctor I should go to a vet clinic because I’d get to see surgery.

“So I ended up at an equine practice for work experience with Dr Charlie El-Hage, who is now a lecturer in Veterinary Clinical Studies with the Faculty.

“I remember being a quiet little Year 10 student trying not to get in the way when Charlie took me under his wing. He told me all about the best vet schools in the world and by the end of the week I was convinced I was going to be a vet even though I’d walked in upset I couldn’t get into the Royal Children’s Hospital.”

Dr Hall now follows in Dr El-Hage’s footsteps, having recently taken up a position with the Department of Environment and Primary Industries as a District Veterinary Officer in Geelong.

(Original story by Clemmie Wetherall from University of Melbourne VOICE)

University of Melbourne’s Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM) program

Program title: Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM)
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Semester intake: Late February/early March
Program duration: 4 years
Application deadline: December 23, 2014. Note: If you are interested in the Melbourne DVM program for the 2015 intake, it is advised that you apply as soon as possible in order to allow yourself time for the pre-departure process should you receive an offer.

Apply to Melbourne Veterinary School!

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Do you have questions about Melbourne Veterinary School and the Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM) program? Would you like more information about studying veterinary programs at Australian universities? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Veterinary Schools Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or call 1 866-698-7355 (toll free in Canada).

Monday, May 26th, 2014

About the Sydney Centre for Veterinary Education

The Post Graduate Committee in Veterinary Science was formed in 1961 by a group of forward-thinking veterinarians—university lecturers, professional association members and those from associated industries who recognised during the 1950s the growing need for continuing veterinary education.

Sydney Veterinary School

Study veterinary science at Sydney

This led in 1965 to the formation of the Post Graduate Foundation in Veterinary Science (PGF) at the University of Sydney, which was established under the authority of the university’s Senate and governed by a Council elected by its members. Its aim of funding continuing education for the profession led to the expansion many more services.

These initiatives of 40 years ago established the world’s first and leading organisation dedicated to postgraduate veterinary education. The first activity was organizing the delivery of regular refresher courses of two to five days’ duration. In the first year, two courses were held and by 1996 there were 68. In 1997 this grew to 94, and by 1998, 102 courses were held. There has been comparable growth in our other activities covering publishing, technical information search and dissemination, distance and online education.

From its inception the PGF enjoyed the support and participation of our New Zealand colleagues. Veterinarians from many other countries around the world also use our resources and attend our courses. With the expansion of veterinary practice and new communications technology we are looking forward to increasing involvement in fulfilling the continuing education requirements of veterinarians everywhere.

On August 4, 2008 the Post Graduate Foundation in Veterinary Science officially became the Centre for Veterinary Education.

Sydney Centre for Veterinary Education

As an established and recognized leader in continuing veterinary education, the Centre for Veterinary Education has been a worldwide provider of continuing professional development to the veterinary community for over 40 years. Formerly the Post Graduate Foundation in Veterinary Science (PGF), we officially became the Centre for Veterinary Education (CVE) on August 4, 2008.

The centre provides up-to-date education and information to veterinarians, vet nurses, technicians, carers, support staff and all those involved in the care of animals, and are committed to helping improve the health, well-being and welfare of all animals.

Education and information streams include a variety of innovative educational deliveries, from distance education and online courses to events and publications.

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Learn more about the Sydney Veterinary School and about Australian Veterinary Schools.

Do you have questions about Sydney Veterinary School and about studying veterinary programs at Australian universities? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Veterinary Schools Officer Rachel Brady by emailing rachel@oztrekk.com or by calling 1 866-698-7355 (toll free in Canada).

Tuesday, May 6th, 2014

Melbourne Veterinary Science and Hospital Open Day through my eyes as an OzTREKK student – Part 3

This story is a continuation of Melbourne Veterinary Science and Hospital Open Day through my eyes as an OzTREKK student – Part 2, a blog written by OzTREKK and Melbourne DVM student Ashley Saunders.

University of Melbourne Veterinary School

Visiting the radiology room

After I had my horse fill, we moved on to the exciting part of the campus, the radiology room! This room really excites me as there are so many machines and neat technology.

Across the hall from these two rooms is a padded recovery room for large animals. This is for when they are recovering from anesthesia, they have a safe place to wake up. It is padded all the way around so if they stumble to their feet and fall, they are protected by a soft landing. There was a Melbourne Veterinary School student volunteering to explain how this room works.

University of Melbourne Veterinary School

Incubator for newborn animals

They also had a display of x-rays for the public to see, and professors there to show the different bones in the pictures. They also had lead aprons for people to try on to see how heavy they actually are.

There was also an atom infant incubator set up for people to see how newborn animals are incubated if born with problems.

Open Day was very interactive for the public, children and future students to be involved. They had a station set up to learn how to administer IV fluids as well as learn how to bandage paws.

We started to get hungry so we ventured out to the lawn for barbecued sausage from the Veterinary Students Society of Victoria (VSSV) barbecue. The weather had once again changed and now it was about 25 degrees and sunny! While we were eating lunch, Edgar’s Mission Group had one of their pigs for show. We got to enjoy “Polly” the pig beg for treats and make little kids laugh.

University of Melbourne Veterinary School

Holding “Angus,” the python

Another special appreciation group of the University of Melbourne had a booth set up. This was the Wildlife Appreciation group. Trent had his python “Angus” there for people to see and touch. I was brave enough to get up close and personal with “Angus.”

After our lunch and a few minutes in the nice sunshine, we headed back inside to complete our campus tour. Our next stop was the Anesthesia room, where final-year Melbourne DVM and OzTREKK student Jenah Drew was showing the public how to anesthetize an animal and how the machines work to monitor their heart rate.

They also had an endoscope demonstration. This was a really interactive demonstration as they had a cardboard dog with candy in his stomach, and the public was able to use the endoscope to find the candy that they wanted that was in the stomach. The little kids really enjoyed learning about endoscopy!

After we got to view the Daily Procedures room. Then we headed to the Consult rooms.

University of Melbourne Veterinary School

With fellow OzTREKK student Amanda (right)

On the way out of the small-animal hospital, the lobby had a booth of PR assistant dogs. I was so happy to see so many happy dogs. I got a nice snuggle with “Tigger.”

Our next stop was the Reptile Education of Victoria exhibit.

Here they had a brown snake for the public to see. They discussed to importance of not handling these snakes as they are extremely poisonous. This snake had no venom and they explained to children that many movies/shows etc. show people handling these non-venomous snakes and that the ones in the wild are extremely dangerous.

We went inside to check out the snakes and crocodiles. I had to admit—I didn’t like this exhibit much!

We then headed to the Student Welfare Appreciation Group’s exhibit, which was a petting zoo. I was extremely happy because I cannot get enough of animal snuggles!

University of Melbourne Veterinary School

Heading back to Melbourne, Rachel at the wheel

We also got so see some chickens—but they were very hard to get pictures with. My favourite part was holding the baby rabbit. He was so soft and cute!

We Melbourne DVM students were in our glory with all the animals around! We sure did pick the right profession to be in!

The day was coming to an end and the open house had a great turnout! I got to meet lots of new people and some OzTREKK upper-year students.

University of Melbourne Veterinary School

Sally Mujaj, myself, Amanda Mamo

Anna, Amanda, Sally and I decided to head back to Melbourne. We were going to take the train back when a fourth-year student overheard our conversation. She so kindly volunteered to drive us back to the city. It is so nice to be a part of a school where all the students are so friendly and help each other out! Rachel drove us home and I thought I would document the steering wheel on the opposite side. (See photo on right.)

Overall, I couldn’t have picked a better school to do my Doctor of Veterinary Medicine!  Even though the weather changes a million times a day, I have made the most amazing friends ever! The city is so clean and so multicultural that you can find almost anything you need! I say “almost” because I am missing my Tim Hortons! Ha ha!

OzTREKK prepared me for everything I needed to adapt to my new home in Melbourne. I am so thankful for their company and all of their hard work helping me along the way. I would be pleased to help anyone interested in applying to the Melbourne DVM! You can ask OzTREKK Admissions Officer Rachel Brady or anyone else at OzTREKK for my email address if you have any questions about the program, the city, or how I am coping living so far away from home!

Cheers,
Ashley Saunders
OzTREKK Student DVM year 1, from Wasaga Beach, Ontario

University of Melbourne Veterinary School

Jenah shows how to anesthetize

University of Melbourne Veterinary School

Cuddling with sweet “Tigger”

University of Melbourne Veterinary School

How to administer IV fluids

University of Melbourne Veterinary School

Pretty “Polly” made kids laugh

University of Melbourne Veterinary School

Reptile exhibit, yay!

University of Melbourne Veterinary School

Padded recovery room

About the University of Melbourne’s Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM) program

Program title: Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM)
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Semester intake: Late February/early March 2015
Program duration: 4 years
Application deadline: December 20, 2014. It is strongly recommended that students apply at least three months prior to the program start date.

Entry Requirements

Eligible applicants must have completed

  • an undergraduate science degree (minimum three-year degree with majors in Agriculture, Animal Science, Biochemistry, Biomedicine, Physiology or Zoology); and
  • prerequisite subjects including at least one semester of study in each of cell biology or general biology, and biochemistry.

Selection into the University of Melbourne’s Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM) program will be primarily based on academic achievement. Selection will be based on results (grades) obtained in your final year undergraduate science subjects as well as your second last year (penultimate) undergraduate science subjects, weighted 75:25 toward the final year subjects. Applicants with a 75% average or above should apply.

Apply to Melbourne Veterinary School!

*

Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Veterinary Schools Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or call 1-866-698-7355 (toll free in Canada) to find out how you can study in Australia! Learn more about studying veterinary medicine at Melbourne Veterinary School.

Tuesday, April 15th, 2014

Melbourne Veterinary Science and Hospital Open Day through my eyes as an OzTREKK student – Part 2

This story is a continuation of Melbourne Veterinary Science and Hospital Open Day through my eyes as an OzTREKK student – Part 1, a blog written by OzTREKK and Melbourne DVM student Ashley Saunders.

University of Melbourne Veterinary School

Poster for the Canine Blood Bank

Next I headed to the lawn where all of the school animal clubs and community clubs were set up for the public to see.

My first stop was at the Canine Blood Bank booth. Here they had information about the greyhounds used at the hospital for donating blood for blood transfusions to sick patients. They also had a simulation of a dog giving blood and showed the public how a transfusion was done. They have stuffed dogs for practicing on at the university.

They also had staff of the blood bank there to answer any questions anyone had about the program. This program helps thousands of dogs every year by having a readily available supply of blood at the university hospital. The greyhounds have been rescued after they were claimed to be unsuitable for racing. They are re-homed after about a year at the university by the Victoria Greyhound Adoption program.

University of Melbourne Veterinary School

Ashley with a sweet greyhound

This booth attracted a lot of attention because they had some of the greyhounds for the public to see. In Victoria, it is illegal to have greyhounds without a muzzle because of their racetrack backgrounds—not because they are aggressive. They had a sign to notify the public why they were wearing muzzles.

In my first week of class, we had a practical with the greyhounds and we learned how to properly handle dogs and give oral medications. They are very docile and lovely dogs and I really enjoyed my practical working with them.

University of Melbourne Veterinary School

Veterinary Students Society of Victoria

Another great program they have at the university is called Gotcha Greyhounds. This is a student-run club which allows students to spend their lunch breaks with the greyhounds. After taking a mandatory induction course, the students are allowed to walk the greyhounds on lunch hours at Werribee campus. This is great because it helps the greyhounds become socialized, which gives them a better chance to be adopted in the future. It also gives them exercise and it allows DVM students to have some much-needed cuddle time with some dogs!

The Veterinary Students Society of Victoria (VSSV) is a not-for-profit student-run society that provides support, services, and social and educational activities for the student body. For a small payment each year, you become a VSSV member, which includes fun activities throughout the year, discounted prices for formal-themed dinners, and embroidered vet clothing (they organized our orientation week with fun-filled events). They also provided a lot of help and tips for our future four years of vet school. At open day they had a barbecue to raise money for the society.

University of Melbourne Veterinary School

Fuzzy ferrets!

The next booth I went to was the Victorian Ferret Society, which is an association of members from the suburbs of Melbourne and country towns throughout Victoria that rescue ferrets. They also educate and teach the public about the welfare of ferrets and how to care for re-homed rescued ferrets. I had the pleasure of speaking with Graham, who informed me about the care for ferrets. I also got to hold some of the rescue ferrets they had at their booth.

Australian Rat Fanciers Society Inc. also had an information booth set up with rescued lab rats for the public to see. They promoted the adoption of unwanted lab rats that needed good homes. A young man, James, volunteers in the community and was informing me, Anna, and Sondra Luck (an OzTREKK student Melbourne DVM 3 from Brampton, Ontario) all about the rats for adoption.

University of Melbourne Veterinary School

Listening to the rumen

Special appreciation groups of the university also had booths set up providing students and the public with information about what their groups do. When you become a student at the University of Melbourne, you are encouraged to become a part of groups that interest you. I have joined the Small Animal Appreciation group, the Equine Appreciation group and the Wildlife Appreciation group. The Bovine Appreciation group also had a booth set up, selling milk for a fundraiser.

Bovine Appreciation group also had a bovine demonstration of how to palpate a cow, how to hear their heart rate and also how to hear their gut sounds. Amanda Mamo, an OzTREKK student from Bowmanville, Ontario, was volunteering. She is also classmate of mine and we have become great friends.

Jenah Drew is also an OzTREKK student from Niagara Falls, Ontario. She is in her last year of her DVM at the Melbourne Veterinary School, and she is extremely happy with her choice of university. Here she is volunteering at the Bovine Appreciation Group’s demonstration.

University of Melbourne Veterinary School

OzTREKK/Melbourne DVM student Amanda Mamo

They also had information on dentistry procedures for horses and a demonstration of some of the equipment used during the procedure.

We also got to go through the stalls where the horse patients are kept while in hospital. They also had previous equine patients there for open day, including “Ticket,” a pony who was previously treated for colic surgery.

Also, a very special race horse, named “Doriemus” was there for Open Day. He survived a lifesaving colic surgery at the university. He was a winner of the Melbourne Cup in 1995 and, thanks to the University of Melbourne, he was able to live happily after his surgery.

University of Melbourne Veterinary School

Anna and Sondra learning about rats from James

University of Melbourne Veterinary School

Ashley with happy pony, “Ticket”

University of Melbourne Veterinary School

Melbourne Cup winner “Doriemus”

University of Melbourne Veterinary School

OzTREKK student Jenah Drew is in her last year of the DVM

Cheers,
Ashley Saunders
Oztrekk Student DVM year 1, from Wasaga Beach, Ontario

Don’t miss Part 3 of Ashley’s Melbourne Veterinary School Open Day blog! Coming soon!

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Would you like to study veterinary medicine at Melbourne Veterinary School? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Veterinary Schools Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or call 1-866-698-7355 (toll free in Canada) and find out how you can study in Australia! Keep up to date with the OzTREKK Australian Veterinary Schools Newsletter.

Friday, April 11th, 2014

Sydney Veterinary School wants to improve the survival of orphaned Australian wildlife

Have you ever wondered what happens to Australia’s orphaned animals when they are finally re-released into the wild? How successfully do  they manage to fend for themselves without the help of their mothers to guide them? And can we do something to dramatically increase their chances of survival?

University of Sydney Veterinary School

How long could this joey live without its mother?

The answer is yes.

Each year, thousands of baby marsupials are left orphaned as a result of injury or death to their mothers. In the 1990s it was estimated that more than 14,000 animals each year were taken into care in New South Wales and Victoria alone. The nationwide figures in 2014 are likely to be  staggering; however, this data is not readily accessible, and as a result, the sheer size of this issue is often ignored. The care of orphaned marsupials is  almost exclusively conducted by a dedicated group of volunteers who are licensed by State Government wildlife management agencies. Researchers in the Sydney Faculty of Veterinary Science have estimated that these volunteers spend an average of 34 hours and $185 per week caring for these orphans.

Despite this significant personal investment, the long-term fate of these orphans remains largely unknown. The key reason for this is the lack of resources to adequately monitor the fate of rehabilitated animals post-release. This research will significantly increase understanding of the impact of different hand-rearing and release strategies on the survival of orphaned marsupials after release. This information will assist in developing optimum strategies that will decrease the risks associated with releasing hand-reared animals into the wild.

Dr Catherine Herbert from the Sydney Faculty of Veterinary Science is passionate about providing better support for wildlife carers. Dr Herbert feels that it is important that carers are given the appropriate tools to ensure that their investment produces the best possible welfare outcomes for these vulnerable animals. The overall aim of the proposed project is to develop a “toolkit” that will help wildlife carers to identify the best care strategies for orphaned wildlife.

The first step in developing this toolkit is to evaluate which models of care best meet the needs of this vulnerable group of animals. More  specifically, this project will evaluate the fate of orphaned marsupials post-release to determine whether specific aspects of the hand-rearing and release process influence survival rates.

The Sydney Veterinary Science researcher will do this by fitting groups of hand-reared animals with state-of-the-art global positioning system (GPS) transponders that will log the time and location of individual animals at 10-minute intervals after release. Their movement patterns, health, reproductive status and survival will be compared to a group of wild, mother-reared animals over a period of at least 12 to 18 months.

Dr Herbert and her team will initially study two marsupial species with differing life-history strategies: the brush-tail possum, a solitary, small- to medium-sized arboreal marsupial; and the eastern grey kangaroo, a large, social, terrestrial marsupial. This will allow them to determine  whether a one-size-fits-all approach is likely to be successful, or whether tailor-made hand-rearing strategies need to be implemented on a species-by-species case.

There is little doubt that funding for this project would provide significant benefits to wildlife carers, enabling them to employ hand-rearing practices with the confidence of knowing they have been critically evaluated. This will offer these orphans the best chance of survival. The potential of this research to inform government policy cannot be understated. While legislative guidelines currently exist for the care of orphaned marsupials, there is little evidence underpinning them. This research will provide a strong evidence base to inform and influence State Government wildlife management agencies, therefore influencing policy, and ensuring that there is broad-scale uptake of the outcomes of this research.

About the Sydney Veterinary School

The Sydney DVM is an exciting new graduate entry veterinary program, commencing in 2015. The DVM replaces the Sydney Veterinary School’s existing Bachelor of Veterinary Science, and is open to applicants with a completed Bachelor’s degree who wish to study veterinary medicine in a postgraduate learning environment. The program is internationally recognised and accredited so graduates can work around the world.

The Sydney Faculty of Veterinary Science has a strong commitment to provide students with an exceptional learning environment. This ensures the very best start to a fulfilling, diverse and successful veterinary career.

Sydney Veterinary School’s aim is to ensure students are able to view issues from a population health framework, with a strong animal welfare consciousness, and provide influence and expertise at a local, national and global level.

Program title: Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM)
Location: Sydney, New South Wales
Semester intake: March 2015
Program duration: 4 years
Application deadline: TBC by the faculty. In previous years, the application deadline for the vet science program was Oct. 31.

Apply to the Sydney Veterinary School!

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If you have questions about Sydney Veterinary School and the new Doctor of Veterinary Medicine program, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Veterinary Schools Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or 1-866-698-7355. Find out how you can study in Australia!

Friday, April 4th, 2014

Melbourne Veterinary Science and Hospital Open Day through my eyes as an OzTREKK student – Part 1

Today, we thought we’d try something different.

Instead of interviewing an OzTREKK student and just getting his or her answers to our questions, we thought it would be more fun (and educational) to have a real, live OzTREKKer write the blog herself as the OzTREKK Guest Blogger.

Melbourne Doctor of Veterinary Medicine student Ashley Saunders applied through OzTREKK in 2013 and began her journey to study veterinary medicine in Australia in March 2014. OzTREKK heard through the grapevine that the Melbourne Veterinary School was hosting an Open Day on Sunday, March 16, and we asked Ashley to be our lead correspondent. Here is her story!

University of Melbourne Veterinary School

Ashley on the train and her $1 coffee!

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So today I was asked by OzTREKK, the Canadian company that helped me apply to the University of Melbourne, to take part in the University of Melbourne Veterinary Science and Hospital Open Day on behalf of the future applicants. I went to the open day event and I documented everything I saw, as if I was a new Canadian student applying to the university. This is what I saw….

I headed from my UniLodge apartment in North Melbourne at 8:20 a.m. and took a 20-minute tram ride to Flinders Street train station. If you have never been to Melbourne, Australia before, the thing you will notice is the weather is very unusual. You can experience four seasons all in one day, so I checked the weather and saw it was supposed to be 28 degrees Celsius and sunny. I put on a nice dress and headed outside to find out that it was actually 12 degrees Celsius and not so sunny. Good thing I am Canadian because I was able to adapt to the chilly morning even though I was wearing a dress and sandals.

University of Melbourne Veterinary School

From the train window

I met Anna Donlan, my classmate from the USA, at the train station and we got ourselves a coffee and a muffin and prepared for the 43-minute-long train ride to Hoppers Crossings. There are two campuses for Melbourne Veterinary School: one is located in Parkville, which is close to the downtown (CBD is what the Australians call it); and the other campus is in Werribee, which is about a 45-minute train ride from the CBD. When you are in first and second years, four out of five days a week are spent at the Parkville campus, and once a week you have lectures and practicals at the Werribee campus—this is where the live animal practicals are held. In third and fourth years of the Melbourne DVM program, all of your classes are held at Werribee campus, so it is recommended to move to Werribee as it is a lot closer than Melbourne.

During the journey on the train you get to see the city, then the suburbs, and then the middle of nowhere.

After 43 minutes on the train, we arrived at Hoppers Crossing. This is a town close to Werribee. After you get off the train there is a 20-minute walk to campus, but it is very easy to find your way as there are signs everywhere.

Once you start school it is very easy to make friends with some of the Australian students that have cars. This makes the travel to Werribee campus much easier and saves about 30 minutes of travel. If you don’t end up making a carpool, then there are always students traveling together on the train, so it is not as lonely going by yourself. This also is a good time to get some studying done and pop quiz your friends.

University of Melbourne Veterinary School

On the platform

When we got off the train we ran into Melissa Pearson. She is the University of Melbourne’s Student and Academic Programs Coordinator. After I was accepted to University of Melbourne, she was my main contact and helped me through each step of the way. The faculty at the university are all very nice and they make a special effort to make you feel welcome and try their hardest to get to know everyone. Melissa walked with us to campus and was kind enough to ask us how our first two weeks of classes were going and how our living was going. She was also full of great tips on our future four years spent in vet school. One of the things I like so much about the Melbourne DVM program is how personable all the faculty are. It makes it so much nicer and easier to approach professors and staff members when they have taken the time to get to know you. This is a big difference from my undergrad, as I didn’t know any of the faculty at the University of Guelph.

University of Melbourne Veterinary School

Where to now?

When we arrived at Werribee campus the sun had started to come out, (again the four seasons in one day), and there were a lot of people coming to check out the Open Day. The Melbourne Veterinary Science and Hospital Open Day was not just for future students, but also an opportunity for the public to come and have a look at the facilities and see what the students are learning. This is great, as it shows the public the wonderful facilities that the University of Melbourne has, as well as the new technology, and most important, the friendly and hardworking students and staff.

The lawn had several booths set up with community organizations and school clubs that all involve animals. Then there was a self-guided tour of the campus where you followed paw prints and signs, which took you throughout the vet school. Staff greeted you and asked you what your plans were for the future. There were kids from the age of 4, to young adults my age—approximately 26—all there for future interest in class. The staff gave a sticker to anyone interested in veterinary-related classes and wrote their names on it. This made it feel more personable and the young children really enjoyed it. We were also given a map with all the exhibits located throughout the campus.

University of Melbourne Veterinary School

Heading to the parasitology display

Anna and I decided to start off with the self-guided tour, which was easily marked with arrows and signs. There was also third- and forth-year students there to help point anyone in the right direction.

There were scheduled lectures throughout the day with course and career advice for any interested future students. Since OzTREKK does an amazing job with providing the details for the DVM course, I decided it was more important for me to document the facilities of the campus.

My first stop was the Parasitology Lab. Here they had microscopes set up with parasite specimens and also information about the specimens that were on display. It was really neat to see all the different parasites of different species, all out for the public to compare. They had Petri dishes and forceps on display as well for the public to be able to have a closer look at the parasites.

University of Melbourne Veterinary School

Ashley looking at parasites through a microscope

After the Parasitology Lab, I ran into my friend, Sondra Luck, from my class at the University of Guelph. She is in her third year of the Melbourne DVM and also applied through OzTREKK. She was volunteering as a tour guide, so I got her to take Anna and I for a tour.

Our next stop was the Pathology Lab. Unfortunately, I was unable to take photos in this lab as they had specimens of animals that were donated to the university after they had passed away from illness etc. The nice thing about the University of Melbourne is all of their animal cadavers have been donated from animal hospitals and pet owners. No animal is euthanized for the sake of learning; they have all been donated to the university for teaching purposes.

In the pathology display there were unusual cases for the students to see, such as a horse head with hydrocephalus, a cat with mammary hyperplasia, fetuses, and much more. They also had a bone display which I was allowed to document.

Until my next installment….

Cheers,
Ashley Saunders
OzTREKK and Melbourne DVM Year 1 student, from Wasaga Beach, Ontario

Stay tuned for Part 2 of  Ashley’s blog!

University of Melbourne Veterinary School

Roundworm parasites—ew!

University of Melbourne Veterinary School

Anna having a look

University of Melbourne Veterinary School

Pathology bone display

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Do you have questions about Melbourne Veterinary School and the DVM program? You can receive a monthly OzTREKK Australian Veterinary Schools Newsletter to keep you up to date! Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Veterinary Schools Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or call 1-866-698-7355 (toll free in Canada) and find out how you can study in Australia!