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Posts Tagged ‘UQ School of Public Health’

Monday, September 21st, 2015

Public health excellence in research awarded to UON and UQ

The CAPHIA 2015 Team Award for excellence in public health research was awarded jointly to the University of Newcastle and the University of Queensland for their work on the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women’s Health.

This award was accepted at the 2015 Public Health Teaching and Learning Forum in Hobart by Professor Julie Byles, University of Newcastle and Professor Gita Mishra, University of Queensland.

University of Newcastle Public Health School

The award was given jointly to the University of Newcastle and the University of Queensland for their work on the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women’s Health

This award recognises the study as an exceptional public health resource that provides an evidence base for government and other decision-makers to formulate public health policy.

The latest report from the study was released in early September and examines chronic conditions, physical function and health care use across four different cohorts of Australian women.

The Australian Longitudinal Study on Women’s Health is a long-term study of over 58,000 women which began in 1996. The four cohorts studied were aged 18–23, 45–50 and 70–75. In 2012/13 a new cohort of women aged 18–23 was introduced.

The study assesses the women’s physical and mental health, along with psychosocial aspects of health (including lifestyle factors and socio-demographic factors).

The CAPHIA 2015 Award for PhD excellence in public health was awarded to Dr Ashleigh Guillaumier, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Newcastle.

Dr Ashleigh Guillaumier receives this award for the high quality of her thesis on An exploration of socioeconomically disadvantaged smokers’ responses to three tobacco control strategies.

The research, which has resulted in six published papers in international journals, was the first in Australia to examine the responses from highly socioeconomically disadvantaged smokers to several tobacco control policies (mass media, plain packs and pricing and tax).

The research highlights the ways current policies could be improved to increase their effectiveness among highly disadvantaged groups.

About the Master of Public Health program at the University of Newcastle

The Master of Public Health program at the University of Newcastle provides its students with opportunities to undertake professional development and develop a strong foundation in public health. The program will be of interest to individuals of all ages, at any stage of their career, who have a basic undergraduate degree in health and are working in, or intending to work in, the area of public health.

Program: Master of Public Health
Location: Newcastle, New South Wales
Semester intake: February
Duration: 1 year
Application deadline: While there is no set application deadline for this public health program, applicants are strongly encouraged by the University of Newcastle to submit their applications a minimum of three months prior to the program’s start date.

Apply to the University of Newcastle Public Health School!

About the Master of Public Health program at the University of Queensland

The Master of Public Health program prepares health professionals from a broad range of backgrounds, with knowledge and skills from a variety of disciplines, to define, critically assess and resolve public health and nutrition problems. Various fields of study allow students to focus on Australian public health issues or on international public health, including nutrition and tropical health in the Asia Pacific region.

Program: Master of Public Health
Location: Brisbane, Queensland
Semester intakes: February and July
Duration: 1.5 years
Application deadline: November 1, 2015 for the February 2016 intake; however, it is strongly recommended that applicants apply as early as possible to allow time for visa and travel arrangements.

Apply to the University of Queensland Public Health School!

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Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Public Health Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355 for more information.

Wednesday, September 9th, 2015

UQ Public Health says stand up for your heart health

Stand up and be counted: That’s the message from a University of Queensland study that found more time standing could improve blood sugar and cholesterol levels while lowering fats in the blood.

Led by UQ School of Public Health’s Dr Genevieve Healy, the study found spending time stepping rather than sitting could have additional health benefits for the waistline.

UQ Public Health School

UQ study results show benefits of an active lifestyle

While the study couldn’t show that less time spent sitting improved health, Dr Healy said the associations it revealed were consistent with what was already known about the benefits of an active lifestyle.

“To get our results, we gave activity monitors to more than 780 men and women aged between 36 and 80,” she said.

”Participants wore the monitors for 24 hours a day for one week, and from this data we were able to accurately determine how long each participant spent sleeping, sitting or lying down, standing and stepping, which included walking and running.

”We also took blood samples and measured blood pressure, height, weight and waist circumference.”

An extra two hours a day spent standing rather than sitting was associated with approximately two per cent lower average fasting blood sugar levels and 11 per cent lower average triglycerides (fats in the blood).

“Extra standing time was also associated with higher average levels of the good type of cholesterol known as HDL, and replacing two hours a day of sitting time with stepping was associated with about an 11 per cent lower average BMI and a 7.5 cm smaller average waist circumference,” she said.

The study also found average blood sugar and triglyceride levels fell significantly for every two hours spent stepping rather than sitting.

“These findings provide important preliminary evidence that strategies to increase the amount of time spent standing or walking rather than sitting may benefit the heart and metabolism,” Dr Healy said.

“Get up for your heart health and move for your waistline.”

The research is published in the European Heart Journal, which also carries an editorial by the Mayo Clinic and Mayo College of Medicine’s Professor Francisco Lopez-Jimenez, who praised the UQ study.

About the Master of Public Health program at the University of Queensland

The Master of Public Health program prepares health professionals from a broad range of backgrounds, with knowledge and skills from a variety of disciplines, to define, critically assess and resolve public health and nutrition problems. Various fields of study allow students to focus on Australian public health issues or on international public health, including nutrition and tropical health in the Asia Pacific region.

Program: Master of Public Health
Location: Brisbane, Queensland
Semester intakes: February and July
Duration: 1.5 years
Application deadline: November 1, 2015 for the February 2016 intake; however, it is strongly recommended that applicants apply as early as possible to allow time for visa and travel arrangements.

Apply to the University of Queensland Public Health School!

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Wondering about the Master of Public Health program at the UQ School of Public Health? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Public Health Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or call 1-866-698-7355.

Thursday, February 12th, 2015

UQ public health study finds type 1 diabetes more risky for women than men

Type 1 diabetes is much more deadly for women than men, a study of more than 200,000 people with the condition has found.

UQ School of Public Health research has shown that women with type 1 diabetes have a 40 per cent increased risk of death from any cause and that they have more than twice the risk of dying from heart disease compared with men with this type of diabetes.

UQ Public Health School

Learn more about the UQ public health program

Study leader Professor Rachel Huxley said the marked difference between the genders could change how women with type 1 diabetes were treated and managed.

“It is speculated that women with type 1 diabetes tend to have greater difficulties with insulin management and glycaemic control than men—factors that could contribute to their increased risk of heart disease,” Professor Huxley said. “However, more research is needed to determine why the disease poses a greater risk to women than men.”

Professor Huxley said the study findings were based on an analysis of data from 26 studies involving more than 200,000 men and women with type 1 diabetes.

“We already knew that people with type 1 diabetes have shorter life expectancies than the general population, but this study was able to determine for the first time that the risk of mortality is greater in women than men with the disease,” she said.

The UQ School of Public Health professor said the study also found that women with type 1 diabetes were at greater risk of strokes and were 44 per cent more likely to die from kidney disease than men.

“Interestingly, however, type 1 diabetes was not linked to an increased risk of death from cancers in either gender,” she said.

Type 1 diabetes is on the rise. Worldwide, the incidence of type 1 diabetes in children aged 14 years and younger has increased by three per cent every year since 1989.

Australia has one of the highest rates of type 1 diabetes in the world and its incidence is increasing. There are more than 120,000 Australians living with type 1 diabetes, and about 1825 Australians are diagnosed with the disease every year.

About the Master of Public Health program at the University of Queensland

The Master of Public Health program prepares health professionals from a broad range of backgrounds, with knowledge and skills from a variety of disciplines, to define, critically assess and resolve public health and nutrition problems. Various fields of study allow students to focus on Australian public health issues or on international public health, including nutrition and tropical health in the Asia Pacific region.

Program: Master of Public Health
Location: Brisbane, Queensland
Semester intakes: February and July
Duration: 1.5 years
Application deadline: May 31, 2015 for July 2015 intake; November 1, 2015 for the February 2016 intake; however, it is strongly recommended that applicants apply as early as possible to allow time for visa and travel arrangements.

Apply to the University of Queensland Public Health School!

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If you have any questions about the Master of Public Health program at the UQ School of Public Health, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Public Health Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.