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Posts Tagged ‘UQ School of Population Health’

Tuesday, January 13th, 2015

UQ School of Population Health: fruit a depression-buster for women

Women who eat fewer than two servings of fruit a day face a greater risk of developing depression, University of Queensland research shows.

UQ School of Population Health’s Professor Gita Mishra said the findings of a six-year study of more than 6,000 Australian women revealed a clear link between fruit consumption and the development of depressive symptoms.

UQ School of Population Health

Have you had your two servings today?

“We found that women who ate at least two servings of fruit a day were less likely to suffer from depression than women who ate fewer servings, even after taking into account other factors such as smoking, alcohol, body mass index, physical activity, marital status and education,” Professor Mishra said.

“We also found that eating two or more servings of fruit a day protected women from developing depression in the future.”

Professor Mishra said researchers had not found a link between vegetable intake and depression.

“More research is needed on the different effects of fruit and vegetables, but this may be because fruit has higher levels of anti-inflammatory compounds and antioxidants, such as resveratrol, which is not found in vegetables.”

She said the findings highlighted the importance of a diet high in fruit to avoid the development of depression in middle age.

“Women experience depression at about twice the rate of men, and the rate of depression is growing rapidly.

“By 2030 it is expected to be one of the world’s top three diseases, making it a priority area for public health interventions.”

Researchers surveyed participants in the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women’s Health, an Australian Government-funded project that is one of the world’s largest and longest-running studies of women’s health and well-being.

The research is published in the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition in a paper by Professor Mishra, UQ School of Population Health’s Professor Annette Dobson and the University of Sydney’s Dr Seema Mihrshahi.

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If you have any questions about the University of Queensland’s public health program, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Public Health Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Wednesday, November 19th, 2014

UQ public health researcher acknowledged for taking a stand on poor health habits

A University of Queensland researcher taking a stand for office workers has been recognised for work that is influencing public health guidelines in Australia, the UK and the US.

Dr Genevieve Healy, from the UQ School of Population Health, won the Griffith University Discovery award category at the annual Research Australia Award ceremony in Sydney on Nov. 5.

UQ Public Health School

Sitting for long periods of time can have negative health effects according to UQ researcher Dr Genevieve Healy

Dr Healy has  developed the “breaks hypothesis,” which provides some of the first evidence that too much uninterrupted sitting increases risk factors for many chronic diseases, including type 2 diabetes, heart disease and some cancers.

UQ School of Population Health Head Professor Charles Gilks said Dr Healy’s research had changed thinking about exercise among professionals across the globe.

“Dr Healy’s research has been hailed as ground-breaking and paradigm-shifting by the world’s leading exercise scientists,” Professor Gilks said.

“Her findings have influenced changes to the recommendations and guidelines regarding sitting in many countries including Australia, the UK and the US.

“The Australian physical activity guidelines now include specific recommendations to break up long periods of sitting as often as possible.”

Dr Healy said people should stand up at least every 30 minutes.

She is now researching just how much activity is needed to break up sitting time.

“We are keen to investigate whether just standing up regularly is enough or whether some walking needs to occur and at what intensity,” Dr Healy said.

“My team and I will also develop practical guidelines on how to get us all sitting less and moving more in real-world settings, particularly in sitting hot spots such as offices.”

Research Australia is an independent alliance of 160 members and supporters advocating for health and medical research in Australia.

About the Master of Public Health program at the University of Queensland

The Master of Public Health program prepares health professionals from a broad range of backgrounds, with knowledge and skills from a variety of disciplines, to define, critically assess and resolve public health and nutrition problems. Various fields of study allow students to focus on Australian public health issues or on international public health, including nutrition and tropical health in the Asia Pacific region.

Program: Master of Public Health
Location: Brisbane, Queensland
Semester intake: February and July
Duration: 1 – 1.5 years (depending on candidate’s background)

Apply to the University of Queensland Public Health School!

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If you have any questions about the Master of Public Health program at the UQ School of Population Health, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Public Health Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Wednesday, June 4th, 2014

Health Economics at the University of Queensland

Public health is society’s response to threats to the collective health of its citizens. Public health practitioners work to enhance and protect the health of populations by identifying their health problems and needs, and by providing programs and services to address these needs.

University of Queensland Public Health School

Study at the University of Queensland, Brisbane

Health economics is an applied field of study that examines of the problems faced in promoting health for all. By applying economic theories of consumer, producer and social choice, health economics aims to understand the behavior of individuals, health care providers, public and private organizations, and governments in decision-making.

Health economics is used to evaluate how certain social problems, such as market failure and unjust allocation of resources, can impact on the health of our communities. Health economics can then be used to directly inform the government on the best course of action regarding regulation, national health packages, defining health insurance packages and other national health programs.

Master of Health Economics at the University of Queensland

This program provides graduate training in all aspects of health economics, meeting the clear need for comprehensive programs in Australia and internationally. A joint initiative of the UQ School of Economics and the UQ School of Population Health, this program is designed for people intending to work in the health sector. This program is accessible to those with undergraduate qualifications in economics or other disciplines. The program offers students the opportunity to develop strong analytical skills and is a qualification which may further career opportunities in national and international health agencies.

This highly specialised program provides critical insight into the complex economic issues in health sector administration, and the economic impacts of decisions. Students may take elective courses in analytical techniques, including advanced applied econometrics, public economics, health finance, epidemiology, business and economic decision techniques, burden of disease methods, benefit-cost analysis and health and economic development.

Program: Master of Health Economics
Location: Brisbane, Queensland
Semester intake: July and February
Duration: 1.5 years
Application deadlines: November 30 for February intake; May 31 for July intake

Entry requirements

Bachelor degree in any field with a GPA of at least 4.50 on a 7 point scale; or a Graduate Diploma in Health Economics with a GPA of at least 4.50 on a 7 point scale.

Career Opportunities

Graduates can expect to find employment as Health economics managers in pharmaceutical companies, health departments, private health facilities or government and development agencies.

UQ School of Economics

The UQ School of Economics offers an innovative range of programs from the Bachelor of Economics to UQ’s flagship honours program, a range of postgraduate coursework masters, some with a multidisciplinary focus and a world-class PhD. The school offers more than 60 courses, with study areas including business economics, economic history, econometrics, environmental and resource economics, financial markets, public finance, regulatory economics, labour economics, health economics, economics of professional sport, international trade and development, macroeconomics and microeconomics.

Through these courses students gain an in-depth understanding of the factors affecting economic performance, the business environment and the role and effectiveness of governments, while developing critical scientific skills including cost/benefit analysis, statistics and econometrics—all highly sought after by private and public sector employers. The UQ School of Economics consistently strives to improve these course offerings based on student feedback sought each semester.

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Would you like more information about the UQ School of Economics or the UQ School of Population Health? Contact OzTREKK Admissions Officer Rachel Brady, who specializes in public health and business degrees at Australian universities.

Email Rachel at rachel@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355 to find out how you can study in Australia!

Thursday, April 10th, 2014

UQ Public Health study shows lack of exercise adds to women’s healthcare costs

A lack of exercise is costing the Australian healthcare system $40 million a year for women alone, according to new research from the University of Queensland.

UQ Public Health School

Study public health at the University of Queensland

Researchers from the Centre for Research Excellence in Women’s Health in the 21st Century (CREWH21) at the UQ School of Population Health found that even a moderate increase in physical activity could reverse the costs.

Dr Geeske Peeters and colleagues used data from more than 6,000 middle-aged Australian women to investigate how long periods of sitting and too little activity were impacting on direct health care costs.

“We know that physical inactivity is associated with numerous physical and mental health conditions and accounts for up to three per cent of total direct health care costs,” Dr Peeters said.

Data from 2010 showed the median annual health care cost for inactive participants was $741 per year, versus just $689 per year for active participants.

Comparisons of participant data between 2001 and 2010 also showed the median cost of health care for inactive participants was $94 higher than that of highly active participants.

The UQ Public Health researcher said that while up to 15 per cent of Australian women aged between 45 and 65 were inactive, the data showed that their direct health costs could be reduced by increasing physical activity.

“If these women increased their activity levels, their reduced direct health care costs would translate to a saving of nearly forty million dollars a year in the country’s health care costs,” Dr Peeters said. “The cost savings could be even higher if women with the highest health care costs could improve their activity levels.”

She said findings were consistent among women of normal weight and those that were overweight or obese.

“We found that physical inactivity, rather than prolonged sitting or body weight, was the most important predictor of high health care costs for middle-aged women,” Dr Peeters said.

The study collected data from participants in the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women’s Health and linked it with data from Medicare.

Participating women answered questions about time spent sitting, walking, and in moderate and vigorous leisure activities in surveys completed at three yearly intervals from 2001 to 2010.

Health-related costs averaged over the survey year were used to calculate annual costs.

The study was published in the March 2014 edition of the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

About the Master of Public Health program at the University of Queensland

The Master of Public Health program prepares health professionals from a broad range of backgrounds, with knowledge and skills from a variety of disciplines, to define, critically assess and resolve public health and nutrition problems. Various fields of study allow students to focus on Australian public health issues or on international public health, including nutrition and tropical health in the Asia Pacific region.

Program: Master of Public Health
Location: Brisbane, Queensland
Semester intake: February and July
Duration: 1 – 1.5 years (depending on candidate’s background)
Application deadline: May 31, 2014 for July 2014 intake; November 1, 2014 for the February 2015 intake

Apply to the University of Queensland Public Health School!

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If you have any questions about the Master of Public Health program at the UQ School of Population Health, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Public Health Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Wednesday, March 19th, 2014

UQ Public Health researcher finds diabetic women face higher risk of stroke

A review of more than 60 studies has shown that women with type 2 diabetes have a 27 per cent higher risk of stroke than men with diabetes.

UQ Public Health School

Sunrise at the University of Queensland

Professor Rachel Huxley, from the University of Queensland, collaborated with researchers from leading public health units at the University of Cambridge (UK) and The George Institute for Global Health.

The UQ School of Population Health researcher said the study was the first to reveal that the risk of diabetes-related stroke significantly differs in women and men.

“Research has previously shown that diabetes confers a greater risk of having a heart attack in women than men, and now we have shown that this gender difference also extends to stroke,” Professor Huxley said. “Data was pooled from three-quarters of a million people, including more than 12,000 individuals who had suffered strokes, both fatal and non-fatal.

“Our analysis of the data showed, in comparison to men with diabetes, women with the condition had a 27 per cent higher relative risk of stroke even after taking into account other risk factors such as age and blood pressure.”

Diabetes is a global health concern, currently affecting an estimated 347 million people worldwide.

It is predicted to increase by more than fifty per cent over the next decade due to the prevalence of overweight, obese and physically inactive people.

“With diabetes on the rise, there is an urgent need to establish why the condition poses a greater cardiovascular health threat for women than men,” she said.

“We don’t yet understand why diabetes is more hazardous for women in determining their cardiovascular risk compared with men, but existing studies suggest that it may be linked to obesity.

“Men tend to become diabetic at lower levels of body mass index compared with women.

“Consequently, by the time women develop diabetes and begin receiving intervention from a GP, their levels of other cardiovascular risk factors—including BMI—are higher than in men with diabetes who may have been picked up and treated at an earlier stage of the condition.

“It may be this chronic exposure to high levels of cardiovascular risk factors in the lead up to developing diabetes that may be responsible for the greater risk of stroke that we see in women with diabetes than in similarly affected men,” said the UQ Public Health professor.

UQ School of Population Health

The UQ School of Population Health’s postgraduate programs in public health give health professionals the knowledge and skills they need to define, critically assess and resolve public health problems in a changing world.

The Master of Public Health program prepares health professionals from a broad range of backgrounds, with knowledge and skills from a variety of disciplines, to define, critically assess and resolve public health and nutrition problems. Various fields of study allow students to focus on Australian public health issues or on international public health, including nutrition and tropical health in the Asia Pacific region.

Program: Master of Public Health
Location: Brisbane, Queensland
Semester intake: February and July
Duration: 1 – 1.5 years (depending on candidate’s background)
Application deadline: The application deadline for UQ’s Master of Public Health program is May 15, 2014 for July 2014 intake.

Apply to the University of Queensland Public Health School!

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If you have any questions about the University of Queensland’s Master of Public Health program, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Public Health Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Thursday, May 30th, 2013

UQ Public Health study links depression and stroke risk

Middle-aged women who have depression are almost twice as likely to have a stroke as women the same age who are not depressed, according to new research from the University of Queensland.

The study, led by Dr Caroline Jackson from UQ’s School of Population Health, found that even after accounting for other stroke risk factors such as high blood pressure and diabetes, middle-aged women who were depressed were 1.9 times more likely to have a stroke than women without depression.

Dr Jackson said the findings highlight the serious impact poor mental health can have on physical health.

“Current guidelines for stroke prevention tend to overlook the potential role of depression,” she said. “This research is the first large-scale study to examine the association between depression and stroke in women in their forties and fifties.

It draws upon the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women’s Health, a 12-year study of more than 10,000 Australian women aged between 47 and 52 years old.

Approximately 24 percent of study participants were reported as being depressed, based on their responses to a standardized depression scale and recent use of medication for depression.

Dr Jackson said it was unclear why depression was so strongly linked to stroke in this age group but the body’s inflammatory and immunological processes and their effects on blood vessels may play a part.

Dr Jackson said although the absolute risk of stroke for this age group was still very low — about two percent — the study did suggest the impact of depression may be stronger on younger women.

“Further research is needed on women of different ages within the same population to help us identify how depression impacts their risk of stroke at different stages in life,” she said.

The findings highlight the need for better and more targeted approaches to preventing and treating depression in middle-aged women.

The study, co-authored by Professor Gita Mishra also of UQ’s School of Population Health, will be published in Stroke: Journal of the American Heart Association.

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For more information about public health degrees, international public health degrees and epidemiology degrees, including Master of Public Health entry requirements, application deadlines, tuition fees, scholarships, please visit OzTREKK’s Australian Public Health Schools page.

If you have any questions, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Public Health Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady: Email Rachel at rachel@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1 866-698-7355.