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Posts Tagged ‘University of Sydney Faculty of Dentistry’

Friday, July 28th, 2017

Sydney Faculty of Dentistry lab’s 3D printing may revolutionise root canal therapy

Researchers have created 3D-printed artificial blood vessels that could revolutionize root canal therapy to help people retain fully functioning teeth.

Sydney Dental School

Learn more about Sydney Dental School

Professor Luiz Bardessono and his team published the breakthrough in Scientific Reports. He leads The Bertassoni Lab at Oregon Health and Science University and the Bioengineering Laboratory in the University of Sydney Faculty of Dentistry.

While current root canal therapy is effective in saving an infected or decayed tooth, the procedure may cause teeth to become brittle and susceptible to fracture over time.

Based on previous work fabricating artificial capillaries, the researchers placed a fibre mould made of sugar molecules across the root canal of extracted human teeth and injected a material similar to proteins found in the body filled with dental pulp cells.

The researchers removed the fiber to make a long microchannel in the root canal and inserted endothelial cells (cellls that are involved in filtering gases, fluid and molecules across cell membranes) isolated from the interior lining of blood vessels.

They then removed the fibre to make a long microchannel in the root canal and inserted endothelial cells isolated from the interior lining of blood vessels. After seven days, dentin-producing cells appeared near the tooth walls and artificial blood vessels formed inside the tooth.

Professor Bertassoni said the research proved artificial blood vessels can be used to treat root canals.

“This result proves that fabrication of artificial blood vessels can be a highly effective strategy for fully regenerating the function of the teeth.

“We believe that this finding may change the way that root canal treatments are done in the future,” said Professor Bertassoni.

Current root canal treatment involves removing infected dental tissues and replacing them with synthetic biomaterials covered by a protective crown, which often results in further decay over time.

“This process eliminates the tooth’s blood and nerve supply, rendering it lifeless and void of any biological response or defence mechanism.

“Without this functionality, adult teeth may be lost much sooner, which can result in much greater concerns, such as the need for dentures or dental implants,” he said.

Research at the Sydney Faculty of Dentistry

Sydney Dentistry’s multidisciplinary research approach brings together the complementary expertise of the university’s faculties, centres and institutes with that of their affiliated teaching hospitals, institutes and international research partnerships. Sydney dentistry researchers are not limited by the confines of the mouth, but enhance studies in fundamental cell biology, microbiology, molecular biology and biomechanics with their dental expertise—it is their goal to “put the mouth into health!”

Research areas

Dentistry research at the University of Sydney is structured around a number of cross-disciplinary themes that are focused on improving health outcomes. These themes encompass microbial pathogenicity, biomaterials, implant technology, cell biology, pathology, minimal intervention therapies for management of caries, education, and public health.

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Do you think studying at the University of Sydney Faculty of Dentistry is right for you? Please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Dental Schools Admissions Officer Caitlin Sargeant at caitlin@oztrekk.com for more information!

Friday, January 15th, 2016

Gift empowers research linking oral health and chronic diseases

Leadership for good meets philanthropy for good

A $3.6-million donation to the University of Sydney has been the stimulus for a bold plan to establish a $20-million world-class research centre spearheading research, policy, advocacy and education initiatives to prevent and reduce chronic diseases caused by poor oral health.

The gift by the Abrahams family through their Rosebrook Foundation funds the establishment of a new Chair of Lifespan Oral Health in the University of Sydney Faculty of Dentistry and Charles Perkins Centre. Dr Alex Abrahams, an alumnus of the university’s Faculty of Dentistry, graduated from the University of Sydney with a Bachelor of Dental Surgery in 1982 and has been a practising dentist for more than 30 years.

Sydney Dental School

Professor Chris Peck, Dean of Dentistry with Dr Alex Abrahams, alumnus and philanthropist (Photo credit: University of Sydney)

Based at Westmead Centre for Oral Health, the soon to be appointed Chair of Lifespan Oral Health will investigate all aspects of preventable dental disease and its links to whole-of-body health.

The Chair’s research will be incorporated into the university’s dentistry curricula, as well as new clinical treatment guidelines for future dental professionals, and in continuing professional development programs for current practitioners.

“Our current understanding reveals profound associations between oral health and a range of chronic diseases,” says Professor Chris Peck, Dean, Faculty of Dentistry.

“Our research is revealing how the mouth and teeth can be markers for systemic illness, and how chronic infections, inflammation and degeneration in the mouth help explain disease processes throughout the body.

“The Chair of Lifespan Oral Health will advance our understanding of the specific causal connections between oral health and diseases such as cardiovascular disease, stroke, diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, dementia and adverse pregnancy outcomes.”

The university has also released a prospectus describing plans to translate the research findings of the Chair of Lifespan Oral Health into real-world impacts by raising $20 million to establish a world-class research centre.

“The centre will build on the work of the new Chair and develop a whole-of-health disease prevention strategy that defines benefits to individuals, the community and government through improved health, reduced costs and evidence-based health policy development,” Chris Peck says.

Academic Director of the university’s Charles Perkins Centre, Professor Stephen Simpson said, “The new Chair will be responsible for developing strategies to improve the health of current and future generations of Australians. This task goes beyond traditional dentistry and medicine and extends to education, nutrition, agriculture, economics, the built environment and communication technologies.

University of Sydney Doctor of Dental Medicine (DMD)

The Sydney Dental School’s Doctor of Dental Medicine is a graduate-entry program that has been purposefully designed to adhere to the well-rounded course structure of the North American postgraduate model, but has also maintained the sophisticated clinical training for which the University of Sydney has come to be renowned, giving students an applicable knowledge of dental health from the community to the laboratory.

Program: Doctor of Dental Medicine
Location: Sydney, New South Wales
Semester intake: February
Duration: 4 years

Apply to the 2017 intake of the Sydney DMD!

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University of Sydney Dentistry and Medicine events in Canada

Would you like to meet the Dean of Sydney Dental School? Everyone is welcome to join us in Vancouver on Monday, Jan. 25 or in Toronto on Wednesday, Jan, 27, where the Sydney Dental School Dean Professor Chris Peck and Sydney Medical School Professor/Co-Director Inam Haq will speak about the dentistry and medicine programs offered at the University of Sydney.

Vancouver

Date: Monday, Jan. 25, 2016
Time: 6 – 9 p.m.
Venue: Sheraton Wall Centre, Port McNeill Room, 1088 Burrard St., Vancouver, BC V6Z 2R9
RSVP for this event

Toronto

Date: Wednesday, Jan, 27 2016
Time: 6 – 9 p.m.
Venue: Sheraton Centre, Simcoe/Dufferin Room, 123 Queen St. W., Toronto, ON M5H 2M9
RSVP for this event!

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Do you have any questions regarding Sydney dentistry? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Dental Schools Admissions Officer Adam Smith at adam@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Wednesday, January 14th, 2015

Sydney dentistry alumnus’ gift helps fill the gap in oral health care

Dental disease is one of society’s most common chronic diseases and impacts the well-being of many Australians. One in seven Australians experience toothache, more than half of our children experience dental decay, resulting in many avoidable hospitalisations and Indigenous Australians suffer from more caries and tooth loss than our non-Indigenous population.

Sydney Dental School

Learn more about Sydney Dental School

A recent gift to the University of Sydney Faculty of Dentistry and Charles Perkins Centre will allow the university to push the boundaries of our understanding of dental and systemic health and find new ways to prevent chronic disease. The generous gift worth $3.6 million, from an alumnus of the Faculty of Dentistry, will establish the Chair of Lifespan Oral Health which will improve oral health and related-health outcomes through multidisciplinary research and education.

Building on the University of Sydney‘s research strengths, the new chair will facilitate research collaborations between laboratory, clinical and social scientists and disseminate findings to effectively improve health care outcomes. Sited at Westmead Centre for Oral Health, the chair will work across the adult, children’s and private hospitals, research institutes and health facilities across NSW and beyond. The chair will link with dental researchers investigating oral-systemic interactions including those with arthritis, cardiovascular disease and psychological well-being. Ultimately, research conducted by the chair will change the place of dentistry in health care and investigate the dental origins of chronic disease.

“This is very exciting for both the Faculty of Dentistry and Charles Perkins Centre,” says Professor Chris Peck, Dean, Faculty of Dentistry. “The Chair of Lifespan Oral Health will revolutionise our understanding of dentistry and our ability to prevent diseases.”

The chair will lead the Charles Perkins Centre dental node, with a bold vision to stop the onset of chronic disease using new methods of preventative disease management, and focus on preventing a disease before its impact takes full effect.

“Traditionally, health care focuses on managing the treatment of established diseases with little emphasis on prevention, but the chair will turn this around.

“Through our understanding of the profound influence of oral health on chronic disease, it is evident dental interventions must be part of a disease prevention strategy. Far greater community health gains and cost saving will also be achieved by concentrating on prevention,” says Professor Peck.

By understanding how to stop chronic disease at the point of inception, researchers will have the means to transform the health trajectories of entire generations of Australians—a disease prevention strategy will provide benefits to individuals, the community and government through improved health, reduced costs and evidence-based health policy development.

The impact will extend further than Australia. The knowledge will be filtered through the University of Sydney Dental School‘s international outreach activities and, more broadly, through the publication of research in scientific journals and presentations at international conferences—promoting the adoption of new practices on a global scale.

In addition, the chair’s research will be incorporated into the Faculty of Dentistry’s curricula and new clinical treatment guidelines for future dental professionals and professional development of current practitioners.

The appointment of the new chair will be announced this year.

Sydney Doctor of Dental Medicine

Program: Doctor of Dental Medicine (DMD)
Location: Sydney, New South Wales Dental Hospital campus (Surry Hills, a suburb of Sydney) and Camperdown/ Darlington campus (main campus)
Next semester intake: February 2016
Duration: 4 years

Apply to the University of Sydney Dental School!

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If you have any questions regarding Sydney Dental School, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Dental Schools Admissions Officer Adam Smith at adam@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355. Find out more about the Sydney DMD program and about how you can study dentistry in Australia!

Wednesday, February 20th, 2013

Sydney dentistry researchers discover increase in dental decay

Have you ever heard of “Texas teeth”—teeth with lots of wide open spaces? Well, it seems that tooth decay is worse now than it was in prehistoric times!

University of Sydney Faculty of Dentistry researchers claim that prehistoric and medieval skeletons have revealed the incidence of dental decay could be worse than ever because of a decline in modern human’s oral microbiota levels.

Results of the four-year PhD study by Dr Christina Adler of the University of Sydney Faculty of Dentistry have been published online recently in the journal Nature Genetics.

A major shift in our dietary habits has altered the oral microbiota composition in our mouths said Sydney Dentistry Associate Lecturer Dr Adler, who worked with an international team including researchers from the University of Adelaide’s Australian Centre for Ancient DNA on the research project.

The team, including archaeologists and anthropologists, collected and analyzed calculus samples (calcified dental plaque) from skeletons dating from prehistoric and medieval times.

“The composition of oral microbiota underwent a distinct shift with the introduction of farming in the Neolithic era with the earlier hunter-gatherer groups displaying fewer caries (tooth decay)— and periodontal disease associated bacteria,” Dr Adler said.

“We found that the composition of oral microbiota remained surprisingly constant between Neolithic and Medieval times, after which cariogenic (tooth-decay promoting) bacteria became dominant, we think during the Industrial Revolution.”

Dr Adler said modern oral microbiotas are markedly less diverse than our historic populations and this might be contributing to the current state of chronic oral disease associated with post-industrial lifestyles.

“Imagine your mouth is like a forest,” Dr Adler said. “In the past our mouths were like a very diverse forest, with a huge variety of trees. Today our mouths are like a sparser and less varied forest, and with this loss of diversity we are less able to cope with stresses, and hence are more likely to be in a disease state.

“Caries (tooth decay) has become a major endemic disease, affecting sixty to ninety percent of school-aged children in industrialized countries, whilst periodontal disease occurs in five to twenty percent of the adult population worldwide. Importantly, oral bacteria are also associated with many systemic diseases including arthritis, cardiovascular disease and diabetes, in addition to diseases of the oral cavity, which gives this research further significance,” the Sydney Dentistry associate lecturer added.

About the University of Sydney Doctor of Dental Medicine (DMD)

The University of Sydney‘s Doctor of Dental Medicine (DMD) is a graduate-entry dental program that focuses on teaching dental health with a strong emphasis on clinical skills. Throughout the four-year dental program, students develop their clinical skills through early patient-based teaching and are given the necessary foundations for independent learning through simulated exercises at a research hospital.

Entry Requirements for the Sydney Dentistry Program

Performance in an Undergraduate Degree

Students can apply to Sydney Dentistry if they have completed a bachelor’s degree in any discipline, and achieve a grade point average (GPA) of 5.5 out of 7.0 (or equivalent) from a recognized university. The grade requirement is generally equivalent to a GPA of 2.7 out of 4.0.

The GPA will be calculated on the last three full-time years, or six semesters, of the most recent bachelor’s degree, including an honours year if undertaken. Postgraduate research or coursework qualifications are excluded from the GPA calculation. There is no standardized GPA scale used by Canadian universities, and grading systems differ among post-secondary institutions here in Canada.

Students from a wide variety of undergraduate studies are welcome and encouraged to apply.

Program Prerequisite

Candidates are required to have completed a human biological science subject at a credit level, equivalent to the University of Sydney unit of study “Human Biology” (BIOL1003). This may be achieved as part of the undergraduate degree or may be studied on a non-degree basis through a winter or summer school program. A degree in medical science will be deemed equivalent.

Contact Broghan at OzTREKK to discuss whether you meet the Sydney DMD program prerequisite.

Performance in an Admissions Test: MCAT, Canadian DAT, US DAT, or GAMSAT

Students must achieve a minimum performance in one of the following admissions tests:

  • the Medical Colleges Admission Test (MCAT);
  • the Canadian Dental Aptitude Test (DAT);
  • the US Dental Admission Test (DAT); or
  • the Graduate Australian Medical Schools Admissions Test (GAMSAT).

Most Canadian applicants choose to sit the Medical Colleges Admission Test (MCAT) or the DAT. Any of the tests are acceptable, and there is no need to sit more than one of the above.

The minimum scores required to be considered for an interview:

  • MCAT: 8/8/M/8 or a computerized numerical aggregate of 24 with a grade of M
  • CDAT or DAT: minimum score of 15 in each section (carving score will not be used)
  • GAMSAT: a minimum level of 50 in each of the three sections

Test scores will not be considered if the exam results are more than two years old.

Performance in an Online Interview

The Multiple Mini-Interview (MMI) aims to sample a candidate’s competencies in order to gain a more accurate picture of strengths, weaknesses and suitability for the Sydney DMD program. International applicants’ interviews will be conducted via an online link using Skype.

Application deadline for the 2014 intake: June 28, 2013

How to Apply to the University of Sydney Dental School!

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If you have any questions at all, please contact OzTREKK Dental School Admissions Officer Adam Smith at any time to assist you with your University of Sydney Dental School application, or to answer any questions you may have regarding dental school in Australia.

Email Adam at adam@oztrekk.com

Telephone 1 866 698-7355

Learn more about the Sydney dental program and about Australian dental schools. Contact OzTREKK to find out how you can study in Australia.