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Posts Tagged ‘Sydney’

Friday, June 21st, 2013

OzTREKK Funny Friday

A university physics professor was explaining a particularly complicated concept to his class when a pre-med student interrupted him.

“Why do we have to learn this stuff?” the young man blurted out.

“To save lives,” the professor responded before continuing the lecture.

A few minutes later the student spoke up again. “So how does physics save lives?”

The professor stared at the student for a long time without saying a word. Finally, the professor continued. “Physics saves lives,” he answered, “because it keeps the idiots out of medical school.”

University of Sydney Medical School application deadline

Yes, we’ve reminded you. Many times. Over and over. Well, what can we say? We like our students to be prepared!

The deadline to have all of your application documents at the OzTREKK office is Friday, July 5, 2013 in order to have your complete application submitted to Sydney Medical School by Sunday, July 7, 2013.

If you have any questions or need assistance with your application, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Broghan Dean. Email Broghan at broghan@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1 866-698-7355.

Find out more about Australian Medical Schools and about how you can study in Australia!

Friday, June 21st, 2013

Two weeks left until Sydney Medical School application deadline

Hey, future Australian medical school OzTREKKers! You’ve got two weeks left to submit all of your Sydney Medical School application documents to the OzTREKK office, as the application deadline is Friday, July 5, 2013 in order to meet the Sydney application deadline of July 7.

Assessment Criteria

Admission into the Sydney Medical Program is offered based on three criteria:

  1. Performance in an undergraduate degree
  2. Performance in a medical admissions test (MCAT or GAMSAT)
  3. Performance in an interview

1. Performance in an undergraduate degree
Students can apply to Sydney if they have completed a bachelor’s degree in any discipline, and achieve a Grade Point Average (GPA) of 5.5 out of 7 (or equivalent) from a recognized university. The grade requirement is generally equivalent to a GPA of 2.7 out of 4.0 in Canada (OzTREKK is aware that there are variations in 4.0 scales in Canada, so this is a general guideline provided by Sydney Medical School).

Students from a wide variety of undergraduate studies are welcome and encouraged to apply.

NEW: Master’s Degree by Coursework Sydney Medical School have decided to trial including the results from coursework master degrees in the calculation of the GPA. The trial will be limited to international applicants who are applying in 2013 for enrollment in the Sydney medical program in 2014. During the trial, international applicants who hold a master’s degree by coursework as well as a bachelor’s degree will be permitted to either

  • nominate their bachelor’s degree for use in the GPA calculation, or
  • nominate that both their master’s and their bachelor’s degree be used in the GPA calculation.

2. Performance in a medical admissions test (MCAT or GAMSAT)
Students must achieve a minimum performance in a medical school admissions test.

Most North American-based applicants choose to sit the Medical College Admissions Test (MCAT), although international applicants can complete either the MCAT or the Graduate Australian Medical Schools Admissions Test (GAMSAT).

Applicants must meet a minimum level of achievement in the admissions test to be eligible. The minimum scores required for the MCAT for the 2014 intake is 8/8/8 or 8/8/M/8.

GAMSAT and MCAT results are valid for two years when the date the test is taken.

3. Performance in an online interview
The Multiple Mini-Interview (MMI) aims to sample a candidate’s competencies in order to gain a more accurate picture of strengths, weaknesses and suitability for the Sydney medical program.

Interviews for all international students will be conducted via Skype. There will be five interview stations.

Apply now to Sydney Medical School!

Application deadline for the 2014 intake: July 7, 2013 (Please note: All Sydney MBBS application documents must be received at the OzTREKK office by Friday, July 5.)
Last test date of MCAT for 2014 entry: May 30, 2013
Interview invitations: July 19 – 22, 2013
Interviews held: July 29 – Aug. 2, 2013
Offers will begin to be sent: August 12, 2013
Second round of interview offers: Sept. 13 – 16, 2013
Second round of interviews held: Sept. 23 – 25, 2013
Offers for second round: Sept. 30, 2013

Successful Sydney Medical School applicants will have approximately six weeks from the date of offer to accept and pay a deposit.

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If you have any questions, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Broghan Dean. Email Broghan at broghan@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1 866-698-7355.

Find out more about Australian Medical Schools and about how you can study in Australia!

 

Thursday, June 20th, 2013

OzTREKK student travels the world – Part 2

Thinking of travelling the world but not sure if you could really do it? Read on and be encouraged and inspired!

Sydney Public Health School

Jennifer Avery and husband Ted enjoying their adventure of a lifetime!

If you missed our previous blog posting about future University of Sydney Master of International Public Health student Jennifer Avery, please check out OzTREKK student travels the world – Part 1.

What were you most afraid of before you left on your journey?

Our biggest fears were definitely about having something bad happen to us while travelling. We were beginning our journey in Colombia, South America. We basically decided to go on this trip with the mindset that something bad will happen – always picturing the worst-case scenario of being robbed of everything we had. We are more than half-way through our journey now and came out unscathed from South America, although Ted did recently have his iPhone stolen just days after we arrived in Madrid, Spain. It happens, but it is a risk we knew existed while doing something like this.

The biggest fear is the lack of job connections we’ll have upon our arrival in Sydney. Having a major gap in employment and not being able to find a job that will help compensate for the higher cost of living there is a worry that sits in the back of our minds. Fortunately, Ted’s previous employers have all offered him to be able to work remotely immediately upon our arrival. So there is a backup plan at least!

Sleepy seal on the Galapagos Islands

Sleepy seal on the Galapagos Islands

I have been worried about transitioning in my job as a Registered Nurse, a job that varies from country to country. Every day things in my job that were once thoughtless familiarities like drug names and all the medical abbreviations used, will be totally different. Now that I’m beginning the daunting process of transferring my nursing license, I am worried about even being able to successfully transfer let alone find part-time work. My main fear though is how challenging it could be working in such a foreign environment and I hope it’s not terribly different. But we’ll see!

Did you have a travel “plan” i.e., did you have a map of where you were going and when?

Usually when we travel (for our brief two-week trips), I am planning crazy. I have each day, destination, and activities planned. For a trip like this, that was a nearly impossible task and also would constrain us more if we planned a really exact itinerary. We knew we would go through South America, then to Europe (or South Africa, pending on whichever was cheaper), then Asia where we would fly to Sydney.

Afternoon siesta

Hammocks in South America just scream “afternoon siesta!”

For the South America leg, a professor that I worked with while teaching at UOIT helped me out big time. He’s originally from Colombia and helped me string together a logical order of countries to see. So that was kind of set for us, and we followed the order but stopped in random cities on the fly. We planned as we went, taking advice from other travellers on what was good and stayed as long as we wanted in each place. The order was as follows: Colombia, Ecuador (Galapagos), Peru, Bolivia, Chile, Argentina, and Brazil. We were originally going to spend about two months in each continent (South America, Europe, and Asia). Shortly after arriving to South America, we learned a few things – flights are expensive there, the land distances are huge, and the buses are slow. So we changed our plans and ended up spending an incredible three months there!

For Europe, we had no order and no plans for what to see. We knew some countries that we wanted to go to, but are being purposely plan-free here. When you don’t have plans, you can take advantage of incredible flight and train deals to all kinds of destinations. Currently, our wish list is too long for this trip, but includes France, Germany, Amsterdam, Turkey, and Greece. But just the other day we saw a cheap flight to Morocco and booked it – and that wasn’t originally in our bucket list!

Penguins of Isla Magdalena in Punta Arenas

Jennifer and her husband with the penguins of Isla Magdalena in Punta Arenas

For anyone interested, we have maintained a detailed map on our website with every city we have visited, how many days we stayed, and how we departed that city to get to the next. We’re also working on constructing miniature “shoestring” city guides for major places we’ve been to – including Machu Picchu and Galapagos, which are available on our website.

Check out our next installment of Jennifers travels, when the soon-to-be Sydney International Public Health student chats with OzTREKK about travelling through South America and her medical experiences in Nicaragua! Stay tuned!

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Find out more about the Master of International Public Health program at the University of Sydney. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Public Health Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady for more information about other public health programs at Australian universities. Email Rachel at rachel@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Wednesday, June 19th, 2013

Sydney Pharmacy School does well in world rankings

The University of Sydney Pharmacy School confirmed its place as an elite teaching and research institution for pharmacy on the international stage, when it ranked 16th in the QS World University Rankings by Subject for pharmacy and pharmacology.

According to the results, Sydney climbed six places from the previous year and was second only to Monash University (seventh) as the top two Australian Pharmacy Schools on the list. In fact, over the last few years, the University of Sydney Pharmacy School has seen an increase in international applicants and new and exciting international research collaborations which reflect the quality of the Sydney Pharmacy program.

Harvard University sat atop the rankings, followed by Oxford and Cambridge.

“This result reaffirms the University of Sydney‘s place as a leading school of pharmacy, not only in Australia, but in the highly competitive world stage,” said Professor Iqbal Ramzan, Dean of the Faculty of Pharmacy, and added that the faculty has a proven record in teaching and learning excellence and world-leading research, which is evidenced by the high calibre of the Sydney Pharmacy graduates and the excellent academic reputation of the staff.

The rankings were calculated on several different categories, including academic reputation in which the University of Sydney was ranked third in the world, behind Harvard and the National University of Singapore, with an exceptionally high score of 97.6.

Of the institutions featured in the rankings offering degrees in pharmacy (and not only pharmacology), Sydney was ranked 10th in the world, and along with Monash were the only Australian Pharmacy Schools to appear in the list.

“Our key objective is delivering quality educational and research output, and this emphasis on quality shows us to be a truly world school for pharmacy,” said the Sydney Pharmacy dean.
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Do you have questions about University of Sydney Pharmacy School and about studying pharmacy at Australian universities? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Pharmacy Schools Officer Rachel Brady: Email Rachel at rachel@oztrekk.com, or phone Rachel toll free at 1 866-698-7355. Find out how you can study in Australia!

Tuesday, June 18th, 2013

New Sydney Doctor of Veterinary Medicine program for 2015

Each year, OzTREKK assists a number of Canadians who want to study in Australia to become a vet. Most of our students who wish to study veterinary medicine in Australia already have an undergraduate degree, and they are seeking a graduate-entry option, which is usually a Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM) program.

In Australia, universities offer options in veterinary medicine for students who already have an undergraduate degree and for those who have just graduated from high school. Bachelor of Veterinary Science programs in Australia welcome students who have just completed high school and they also welcome those who have already undertaken university studies. These Bachelor of Veterinary Science programs are five years in length. Four-year Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM) programs in Australia require their students to have already completed an undergraduate degree, and many OzTREKK students have completed a DVM program in Australia.

The University of Sydney has offered a five-year, Bachelor of Veterinary Science in past years. Sydney is now transitioning its vet program from a Bachelor of Veterinary Science to a Doctor of Veterinary Medicine program. In 2013, Sydney offered its last Bachelor of Veterinary Science intake. In 2015, it is planned that the faculty will offer a four-year, graduate-entry Doctor of Veterinary Medicine degree.

As this transition takes place, the University of Sydney Faculty of Veterinary Science has introduced a new combined degree program, the Bachelor of Veterinary Biology/Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (BVetBiol/DVM) for the 2014 intake. This new 6-year program allows students to enter into the veterinary program directly from high school. As it encompasses the biological sciences aspect of studies prior to the DVM portion, it is perfectly designed for recently graduated high school students who are high achieving and ready to become knowledgeable and successful veterinarians.

Also being discussed within the Faculty of Veterinary Science at the university is the implementation of a 4-year Doctor of Veterinary Medicine program for the 2015 intake. Dr Peter White of the University of Sydney Faculty of Veterinary Science has stated that while options for entry requirements (e.g., GPA only or combination of other factors) are currently being finalized by the faculty, it is likely that the applications for this program will be open in 2014. This DVM program will be a stand-alone, graduate-entry degree, aimed at students who have already attained a bachelor degree and who are accustomed to the challenge of university studies.

If you are a high school student interested in studying veterinary science, the Bachelor of Veterinary Biology/Doctor of Veterinary Medicine may be right for you; however, if you currently hold a bachelor degree, or will have acquired your bachelor degree in 2014, you may be interested in the new Doctor of Veterinary Medicine program for the 2015 intake.

OzTREKK will post information regarding the new DVM program as soon as it is received from the University of Sydney Veterinary School.

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If you’d like more information about Australian Veterinary Schools, and would like veterinary school updates emailed to you, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Veterinary Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or by calling toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

 

Tuesday, June 11th, 2013

Sydney biomolecular engineers creating cleaner plastics

Are the engineers at the University of Sydney taking their cue from Stepford?

Not quite.

But biomolecular engineers at the University of Sydney are creating cleaner, more cost-effective PPC polymers that promise to transform the biodegradable polymer industry.

The plastics being developed will have a broad range of usability—for fully recyclable shopping bags and as restorative implants in the human body. The synthetic polymer can be used as an alternative for a range of biomedical applications such as musculoskeletal tissue engineering and drug delivery. The product could be used to treat many bone diseases such as osteoporosis and musculoskeletal injuries.

A team led by Associate Professor Fariba Dehghani from the Faculty of Engineering and Information Technologies has commenced a project to design a process for creating purified biodegradable, renewable and CO2 based polypropylene carbonate (PPC) polymers. The Sydney professor believes the outcomes of the project will have enormous significance for both our environment and human health.

“The project’s aim is to minimize reliance on fossil fuels and address the current problems with commercial production of sustainable bio plastics PPC starch not just in Australia but globally,” stated Prof Dehghani.

The team is developing large scale solvent free technologies that reduce the levels of heavy metal used in PPC.

“The clean technologies we develop will make it possible to produce environmentally friendly plastics utilizing waste CO2.

“Converting captured CO2 into products such as chemicals, plastics or other commodities is pivotal in our attempts to reduce the need for volatile organic compounds (VOCS),” says Professor Dehghani, and pointed out that VOCs include chemicals which can have short or long-term adverse health effects and are also potentially disastrous for our environment.

The process being developed by the Sydney team could have international reach with its adaptation assisting in reducing carbon emissions in countries where geologic storage of CO2 is impossible.

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Get more information about Engineering and Information Technology at the University of Sydney and at other Australian universities. Contact OzTREKK to find out how you can study in Australia!


Friday, June 7th, 2013

Sydney Medical School application deadline is in one month!

Only four more weeks!

Interested in studying medicine at the University of Sydney? Have you already applied to the medical program, or are you thinking of applying? OzTREKK encourages all applicants to submit their documents to the OzTREKK office by Friday, June 5, 2013 in order to meet the Sydney application deadline of June 7.

About the University of Sydney’s Bachelor of Medicine Bachelor of Surgery (MBBS) program

Undertaken once students have already completed an undergraduate degree, the Bachelor of Medicine Bachelor of Surgery (MBBS) at the Sydney Medical School is a world-class, graduate-entry degree in medicine.

The four-year medical program includes weekly clinical experience in leading hospitals from the very first weeks, regular PBL (problem-based learning) exercises in small groups, traditional lectures with expert practitioners, and ongoing opportunities to participate in research.

Application deadline for the 2014 intake: July 7, 2013 (Please note: All Sydney MBBS application documents must be received at the OzTREKK office by Friday, July 5.)
Last test date of MCAT for 2014 entry: May 30, 2013
Interview invitations: July 19 – 22, 2013
Interviews held: July 29 – Aug. 2, 2013
Offers will begin to be sent: August 12, 2013
Second round of interview offers: Sept. 13 – 16, 2013
Second round of interviews held: Sept. 23 – 25, 2013
Offers for second round: Sept. 30, 2013

Successful Sydney Medical School applicants will have approximately six weeks from the date of offer to accept and pay a deposit.

Apply now to Sydney Medical School!

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If you have any questions, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Broghan Dean. Email Broghan at broghan@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1 866-698-7355.

Find out more about Australian Medical Schools and about how you can study in Australia!

Tuesday, June 4th, 2013

University of Sydney boosts student housing

Hundreds more domestic and international students will be able to access affordable student housing as they pursue their university studies thanks to a decision by the NSW government to sell a decommissioned health facility in Camperdown to the University of Sydney.

Last year, Sydney expressed its interest in purchasing the Queen Mary Building—a former nursing accommodation site for the Royal Prince Alfred Hospital—as part of its strategy to increase available affordable student beds in and around its main campus from 2,500 to 6,000 by 2015. It has since been successful in a NSW government tender process.

Find out what it's like to study at the University of Sydney

Find out what it’s like to study at the University of Sydney

The sale of the building to the university will enable its renovation to a student accommodation centre in 2015.

University of Sydney Vice-Chancellor Dr Michael Spence said the sale agreement was a major breakthrough in the affordable student accommodation crisis. He praised the NSW government for recognizing the need for the building to be used for this purpose and partnering with him to find student accommodation solutions.

“With today’s announcement the University of Sydney and the NSW government have signalled their determination to tackle the critical issue of affordable student housing in partnership. The University thanks the NSW government for recognizing the urgency of the issue and being open to options to remedy it,” Dr Spence said.

Dr Spence said there is clear acknowledgment across the education sector and government that suitable accommodation plays a key role in overall student satisfaction and success in their tertiary studies. The accommodation will be targeted at both international and domestic students who are seeking a greater level of independence and responsibility within proximity of the university’s main campus.

The Queen Mary Building, on the corner of Grose and Church streets, Camperdown, was decommissioned by the NSW Department of Health in 2005 and was becoming neglected as it remained vacant. The building is situated in the health precinct between the university’s main campus, the Sydney Nursing School, and Brain and Mind Research Institute. Close to other student colleges it is a natural extension to the university’s presence, offering students easy access to campus, and medical and allied health students an immediate proximity to Royal Prince Alfred Hospital.

The university’s concept for the accommodation includes a manager’s office and approximately one residential assistant for every 25 students. Planned spaces include single rooms with large common living and study spaces, sky lounges and sky-gardens, communal kitchens that permit independent living but with higher than normal social interaction, theatre, gym and music room.

Why Canadians Enjoy Studying at the University of Sydney

Canadians interested in studying abroad favour the University of Sydney above many other universities because of its international reputation and commitment to teaching excellence. With the largest endowment of all Australian universities, $1.3 billion AUD, the University of Sydney has technologically advanced facilities and a world-renowned staff, as well as over 200 student union organizations and 43 sporting clubs!

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Would you like more information about the University of Sydney and about how OzTREKK can help you to study in Australia? Contact OzTREKK at info@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1 866-698-7355. Learn more about Australian universities!

 

Monday, June 3rd, 2013

Sydney’s Doctor of Dental Medicine disciplinary areas

The Doctor of Dental Medicine (DMD) at the University of Sydney is based on a full recognition of the greater level of academic maturity and higher level analytical, clinical and communication skills of postgraduate students. This allows for higher order learning with a greater emphasis on independent, self-directed study. Consequently it is expected that students will achieve quantitatively and qualitatively greater clinical—patient-based experience. The content is organized according to seven broadly defined disciplinary areas consisting of smaller Units of Study (UoS). These disciplinary areas constitute discipline clusters of closely related/cognate disciplines to promote/facilitate the delivery of the degree. While the didactic teaching is discipline based, once students commence patient-based training, disciplines are integrated as students acquire a greater scope of clinical skills.

The following is a brief overview of the disciplinary areas:

  • Integrated Life Sciences
  • Research
  • Professional and Community Practice
  • Comprehensive Care Dentistry A
  • Comprehensive Care Dentistry B
  • Orthodontics and Pediatric Dentistry
  • Oral Surgical and Diagnostic Sciences
  • Integrated Clinical Dentistry

Integrated Life Sciences (total of 41 credit points)
This unit of study occupies a significant portion of learning in Year 1 and is incrementally replaced by clinically focused units of study as the course progresses. Foundation learning in addition to relevant online medical lectures are provided by the Sydney Medical School. A hybrid problem-based learning model is followed by the acquisition of an understanding of the human organ systems. Dentistry students review information obtained from lectures, in small groups, facilitated by dentistry educators, to gain an integrated understanding of common medical problems and their dental relevance.

Research (total of 12 credit points)
This unit of study commences in Semester 1 of Year 1 with familiarizing students with the library, conducting literature searches and managing information, followed by Evidence-Based Dental Practice and research methodology. Students, working in groups, submit a literature review during Year 2 and commence engaging in hands-on research.

Professional and Community Practice (total of 13 credit points)
This unit of study comprises three cognate disciplines namely Professional Practice, Population Oral Health and Primary Care Dentistry. The unit of study will commence in Year 1 by providing students with the knowledge, skills and attributes as members of a dental team, motivational communication skills, initial skills for managing anxious patients, together with oral health promotion and disease prevention. Students will also be introduced to the study of disease from a population perspective. Finally, students will be equipped with the necessary skills to successfully run a private practice.

Comprehensive Care Dentistry A (total of 35 credit points)
This unit of study comprises the disciplines of Tooth Conservation, Endodontics, and a combined module of Trauma. It commences in Year 1 with simulation based training in Tooth Conservation, with patient-based restorative clinical experience commencing in Semester 2 Year 2 and continuing in an integrated manner as skills in other clinical disciplines are acquired.

Comprehensive Care Dentistry B (total of 31 credit points)
This unit of study is a combination of Prostodontics, Implantology, Periodontology, Occlusion, and Geriatric Dentistry. The latter is a combined module and will be presented together with the discipline of Orthodontics.

Orthodontics and Pediatric Dentistry (total of 17 credit points)
Both of these disciplines commence in Year 1 with an emphasis on the introduction of oral health education and disease prevention in childhood.

Oral Surgical and Diagnostic Sciences (total of 19 credit points)
This unit of study comprises Oral Radiology, Oral Pathology and Medicine, Orofacial Pain, and Oral Surgery. The latter three disciplines are presented in an integrated manner in Years 3 and 4, while Oral Radiology is primarily delivered in Years 1 and 2 and subsequent to this is integrated in clinical practice.
Local Anaesthesia and a component of Exodontia are introduced in Year 2.

Integrated Clinical Dentistry (24 credit points)
This unit of study builds on the discipline-specific training and the integrated clinic sessions completed in earlier years, this unit will enhance the student’s ability to integrate all aspects of patient care within the full range of teaching environments, including metropolitan and rural placements, as well as the main teaching centres of SDH and WCOH. The UoS will enhance the development of a clear understanding of the scope of specialist services available to patients in each of the disciplines. In light of this, students will understand their limitations in providing aspects of patient care and will know when and where to refer patients for more specialized treatment. Students will also become competent in integrating their knowledge in treatment of medically compromised patients and be able to communicate effectively with a range of health practitioners to ensure the best possible standard of dental care.

Doctor of Dental Medicine (DMD) at the Sydney Dental School

Program: Doctor of Dental Medicine (DMD)
Location: Sydney, New South Wales Dental Hospital campus (Surry Hills, a suburb of Sydney) and Camperdown/ Darlington campus (main campus)
Semester intake: February
Duration: 4 years
Application deadline: July 7, 2013 (All Sydney DMD application documents must be received at the OzTREKK office by Friday, July 5. 2013.)

Apply now to Sydney Dental School!

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If you have any questions regarding Sydney Dental School or other Australian Dental Schools, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Dental Schools Admissions Officer Adam Smith. Email Adam at adam@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1 866-698-7355.

Find out more about Australian Dental Schools and about how you can study in Australia!

 

Wednesday, May 29th, 2013

Sydney Law School leads Myanmar democracy workshop

A Sydney Law School-led workshop in Yangon, attended by politicians and decision makers across Myanmar’s political spectrum, has agreed to promote constitutional reform in that country.

The Myanmar Constitutional Democracy Workshop is seen as the first major stepping stone to constitutional reform, considered key to ensuring a smooth and enduring transition to democracy. The workshop was well received by its diverse and influential participants and widely reported in South East Asian media.

Myanmar’s current constitution, adopted in 2008 after a lengthy convention, is generally regarded as needing amendment or an outright change if it is to support a robust democracy. Key representatives from the ruling USDP party, Aung San Suu Kyi’s NLD party, the military and minority ethnic groups agreed at the workshop that a stronger form of federalism is critical to addressing ethnic tensions threatening Myanmar’s stability. A more federal system would give ethnic groups, largely divided along geographic lines, greater autonomy.

Participants said the workshop was an important trigger in stimulating constitutional change and the law school intends to continue leading the dialogue with Myanmar’s key political players to help cement constitutional reform.

On of the most pressing topics discussed was the need to reduce the stringency around amending the constitution. Currently three quarters of Myanmar’s parliament needs to approve constitutional change.

“The 75 percent required to change the constitution is unusually and absurdly rigorous and unprecedented in the world’s constitutions today. It was clearly introduced for specific political reasons,” says Wojciech Sadurski, Challis Professor in Jurisprudence at the Sydney Law School and workshop director.

Workshop participants also reached consensus around strengthening the separation of powers in Myanmar. They were generally receptive to relaxing executive control over the judiciary, promoting judicial independence and loosening the links between the military and the executive.

“These were just some of the specific points of the constitutional agenda for Myanmar which were discussed and around which a consensus or near-consensus emerged,” says Professor Sadurski. “We hope to cement positive constitutional change through conferences and workshops in Yangon.”

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For information about Sydney Law School’s entry requirements, application deadlines, tuition fees, scholarships, please visit OzTREKKs Law Schools in Australia page.

Questions about studying law at the University of Sydney? Contact OzTREKK Australian Law Schools Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston. You can email Shannon at shannon@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.