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Posts Tagged ‘Monash Law School’

Wednesday, February 11th, 2015

Monash Law professors flip the classroom

Students studying the first year unit “Foundations of Law” have been part of an innovative teaching practice.

Monash Law School senior lecturers Ross Hyams and Melissa Castan produced 12 short videos supporting their flipped classroom project for first-year law students. They were funded by the Better Teacher, Better Learning small grants scheme, an innovation from the Office of the Vice-Provost (Learning and Teaching).

The scheme provides funding to promote excellence in learning and teaching, to seed learning and teaching activities, and to link faculties with the Better Teaching, Better Learning Agenda.

With the support of production research assistant Sam Blashki, Mr Hyams and Ms Castan were able to build on their self-recorded video pilot and create a semester’s worth of refined video resources.

The pair shared their experiences and outcomes with Monash University colleagues in an informal presentation you can view on YouTube. They strongly encouraged to keep things simple and above all, maintain consistency.

We’d been talking about it for a year and finally we said let’s just make a movie,” said Ms Castan.

“To begin with we used an iPad and I held it up while Ross spoke. We deliberately used existing lecture notes to avoid rescripting.” 

“We topped and tailed each video so they look the same and are consistently bookended every time. Each begins with ‘today we’re going to look at’ and each ends with ‘so in summary we’ve looked at’,” said Mr Hyams.

Mr Hyams and Ms Castan concluded by answering audience questions on recording and editing, incorporating shelf life into the materials and technology recommendations.

About Monash Law School Juris Doctor

The Monash JD is a graduate law degree designed to teach the knowledge and skills required to practice law. This innovative law degree recognizes the needs of graduates who wish to study law, providing the transferable skills and knowledge only a law degree from one of Australia’s leading universities can provide.

Program: Juris Doctor (JD)
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Semester intakes: January, May, August
Duration: 3 years (accelerated option: a minimum of 2.5 years)
Application deadline: Applications are generally assessed on a rolling admissions basis.

Apply now to  the Monash Law School Juris Doctor program!

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Do you have any questions about Monash Law School and the Juris Doctor program? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Law School Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston by emailing shannon@oztrekk.com or calling 1-866-698-7355 (toll free in Canada).

Thursday, January 22nd, 2015

About the Monash Juris Doctor

The Monash Juris Doctor is a graduate law degree designed to teach the knowledge and skills required to practice law. This innovative law degree recognizes the needs of graduates who wish to study law, providing the transferable skills and knowledge only a law degree from one of Australia’s leading universities can provide.

Monash University Law School

Study law at Monash University, Melbourne

The JD is taught on a trimester basis. Each trimester runs for approximately 12 teaching weeks. Attendance is three years full-time. Students have the opportunity to choose up to eight elective units from an extensive range of options.

Classes are held in the heart of Melbourne’s legal precinct at the Monash University Law Chambers at 555 Lonsdale Street, Melbourne. Small classes, interactive learning and innovative teaching bring together passionate and dedicated individuals with diverse professional experiences in a stimulating and challenging environment.

If you complete a Monash Juris Doctor degree, you are eligible to apply to practice law in Canada. It is imperative that you understand the requirements and procedures associated with entering the legal profession in Canada. For more information, check out Australian Law Schools in Australia.

Monash Law School Juris Doctor

Program: Juris Doctor (JD)
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Duration: 3 years (accelerated option: a minimum of 2.5 years)
Application deadline: Applications are generally assessed on a rolling admissions basis.

Starting semesters for the Monash University JD program:

  • May 2015
  • August 2015
  • January 2016

Apply now to Monash Law School!

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For more information about the Monash Juris Doctor, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Law Schools Admissions Officer Sarah Bridson at sarah@oztrekk.com or call 1-866-698-7355 (toll free in Canada).

Tuesday, December 2nd, 2014

Monash Law School and Harvard collaborate on new subject

In an exciting new initiative, the Monash Law School will be offering the subject “Copyright X: Monash in conjunction with the Harvard Law School.”

Organised by Professor Justin Malbon in consultation with Professor Marilyn Pittard, Associate Dean International and Engagement, this innovative collaboration begins in January 2015 as an elective for JD and Masters students.

Monash Law School

Learn more about Monash Law School

The subject can also be undertaken by non-Monash students as a single unit or as a cross-institutional subject.

Benefits of understanding US copyright law

Professor Justin Malbon said that this unit explores US copyright law which is becoming increasingly relevant within an Australian context.

“As an enormous amount of copyright material is produced in the US, having an understanding of US copyright law offers insights into the ways in which Australian law may develop in the future,” Professor Malbon said.

“Such knowledge may provide a competitive advantage to Australian legal practitioners in the field.”

In the unit, students will be required to view a video lecture each week by Professor William Fisher of the Harvard Law School.

Professor Fisher will be concurrently teaching the subject to his Harvard law students, as well as offering the subject as a Massive Open Online Course (MOOC).

Monash law students will be required to attend a seminar held on Tuesday evenings, convened by Dr George Raitt. They will also be encouraged to engage through an online forum with other students at Harvard and around the world.

Monash students will be required to sit the exam set by Harvard at the same time those students sit the exam. The papers will be marked at Monash.

On successful completion, students will have the subject credited as a normal subject for their degree, or as a single or cross-institutional subject. They will also receive a certificate of completion from Harvard.

Monash will be working with Professor Fisher to develop ongoing activities and linkages for the Copyright X alumni throughout the world.

About Monash Law School Juris Doctor

The Monash JD is a graduate law degree designed to teach the knowledge and skills required to practice law. This innovative law degree recognizes the needs of graduates who wish to study law, providing the transferable skills and knowledge only a law degree from one of Australia’s leading universities can provide.

Program: Juris Doctor (JD)
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Semester intakes: January, May, August
Duration: 3 years (accelerated option: a minimum of 2.5 years)
Application deadline: Applications are generally assessed on a rolling admissions basis.

Apply now to  the Monash Law School Juris Doctor program!

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Do you have any questions about the Monash JD? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Law School Admissions Officer Sarah Bridson by emailing sarah@oztrekk.com or calling 1-866-698-7355 (toll free in Canada).

Thursday, November 6th, 2014

Monash University Castan Centre for Human Rights

The Monash University Castan Centre for Human Rights has released the first two episodes of its new series, Have You Got That Right?

Research shows that many people do not fully understand their rights and these short videos aim to empower people with knowledge in a quick, clear and engaging format.

The innovative project will be broken into a 10-episode series, each with a different theme. Series one blends comedy with serious academic content.

The first video, “What Are Human Rights?”, discusses basic human rights that many of us would be aware of, but asks what about the right to a healthy environment, marriage equality, or asylum? The video also discusses the limits to these rights.

The second video, “Marriage Equality”, discusses the fact that marriage equality is not yet recognised in international law. It showcases Associate Professor Paula Gerber, who argues that a right of marriage equality should exist as part of the right of non-discrimination.

Director of the Castan Centre Professor Sarah Joseph said the centre uses academic expertise to educate people—politicians and the general public—about human rights.

“As the centre has grown, we’ve become more and more creative in the ways we engage with people, hence our decision to undertake this project,” Professor Joseph said.

“These videos wouldn’t have been possible without the enormous support we’ve received from the Newman’s Own Foundation, the Victoria Law Foundation and the Nordia Foundation, who have all made significant contributions to the project. The pro bono support we’ve received from industry veterans as well as newcomers has also been imperative to the development of these videos. These videos are the result of teamwork and our human rights expertise.”

Castan Centre Manager Marius Smith said the centre had been exploring how to use technology to educate people about human rights for some time.

“We’ve been active on social media since 2009 and we use video extensively, so eventually this project seemed like an obvious next step,” Mr Smith said.

“When we started, we wanted to make something very different to the usual academic content. The videos had to be creative. They had to grab people’s attention, but they also had to answer questions simply and quickly. I hope we’ve succeeded.

“We hope that many people will get to the end of the videos and want to know more, so we’ve created a website with extra resources. There are links to great content for high school students as well as links to academic articles, case law and international treaties. Gradually we will build a library of human rights videos and resources that will be freely available for years to come for people with differing levels of knowledge about human rights law.”

By the end of this project, the aim is to have produced videos on as many internationally recognised human rights as possible. Anyone wishing to contribute to achieving that goal may review further information and consider a donation at the donors and supporters page.

Castan Centre for Human Rights Law

The Castan Centre for Human Rights Law seeks to promote and protect human rights through the generation and dissemination of public scholarship in international and domestic human rights law.

In pursuit of this mission, the Centre brings the work of human rights scholars, practitioners and advocates from a wide range of disciplines together in the Centre’s key activities of research, teaching, public education (lectures, seminars, conferences, speeches, media presentations, etc), applied research, advice work and consultancies.

The centre is named after Ron Castan AM QC (1939–1999), who was a passionate advocate for the recognition and protection of human rights and a distinguished member of the Victorian Bar.

About Monash Law School Juris Doctor

The Monash JD is a graduate law degree designed to teach the knowledge and skills required to practice law. This innovative law degree recognizes the needs of graduates who wish to study law, providing the transferable skills and knowledge only a law degree from one of Australia’s leading universities can provide.

Program: Juris Doctor (JD)
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Duration: 3 years (accelerated option: a minimum of 2.5 years)
Application deadline: Applications are generally assessed on a rolling admissions basis.

Starting semesters for the Monash University JD program:

  • January 2015
  • May 2015
  • August 2015

Apply now to Monash Law School!

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For more information about the Monash JD, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Law Schools Admissions Officer Sarah Bridson at sarah@oztrekk.com or call 1-866-698-7355 (toll free in Canada).

Thursday, September 18th, 2014

Monash Law professor: what should we do about war criminals?

Discussions should to be revived as to how Australia should address the presence of war criminals, according to a legal academic who spent years working on the Slobodan Milosevic trial.

Associate Professor Gideon Boas, now at Monash Law School, was at the time a senior legal officer for the United Nations’ International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia. He spent nine years in The Hague, many of them working on the Milosevic trial.

Monash Law School

Study law at Monash University

His current work encapsulates not only major international forums but also the prosecution of atrocities in an alleged war criminal’s new country of residence. This challenges that country’s willingness and capacity to confront otherwise remote crimes, opening up a range of complex issues that are a focus of Associate Professor Boas’s research.

“I’m interested in these things from a legal angle, which is my baseline training, but also from political, social and cultural perspectives,” he said. “I’m interested in what we prosecute and why, and how that is influenced by a variety of factors.”

As many as 2,000 war criminals from various conflicts are said to be living in the Australian community. Associate Professor Boas said failed attempts to prosecute former Nazi war criminals in the 1980s and 1990s, and the low political capital that this generated, meant governments had become reluctant to engage in debate about how these matters could be tackled.

By comparison, he said, countries such as Canada and the UK had continued to spend money on developing special war crimes units. In 2009, the UK passed retrospective legislation allowing war crimes committed before 2001 to be prosecuted. But the Australian government has so far refused to close similar loopholes in its own legislative framework.

In particular immigrant communities where many people are victims of war crimes, there are varying perspectives on whether sleeping dogs should be allowed to lie, Associate Professor Boas said.

He views such debates as valid in a national discussion about how a country should deal with war criminals.

“But at the moment, the government’s position is that we don’t even want to have that debate because it’s complex and expensive and there’s no political capital in such a conversation,” the Monash Law School associate professor said.

“My research is trying to uncover why this is the case and to make suggestions about what can be done.”

About Monash Law School Juris Doctor

The Monash JD is a graduate law degree designed to teach the knowledge and skills required to practice law. This innovative law degree recognizes the needs of graduates who wish to study law, providing the transferable skills and knowledge only a law degree from one of Australia’s leading universities can provide.

Program: Juris Doctor (JD)
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Duration: 3 years (accelerated option: a minimum of 2.5 years)
Application deadline: Applications are generally assessed on a rolling admissions basis.

Apply now to  the Monash Law School Juris Doctor program!

*

Do you have any questions about the Monash JD? Contact OzTREKK Australian Law School Admissions Officer Sarah Bridson by emailing sarah@oztrekk.com or calling 1-866-698-7355 (toll free in Canada).

Tuesday, August 26th, 2014

Monash Faculty of Law celebrates 50th Anniversary

The Grand Hyatt Melbourne came to life recently as the Monash Faculty of Law celebrated its 50th anniversary with a gala dinner.

There was much joy and exuberance among the 400-plus attendees as those from the first and subsequent decades reacquainted themselves with old classmates and fellow alumni from the faculty.

The MC for the night was ABC broadcaster and Monash University alumnus Jon Faine, whose wit and honesty captivated the ballroom. He shared many Monash memories and also donated to the live auction his Fan of the High Court of Australia T-shirt, which he wore as a law student activist at the 1980 opening of Australia’s High Court building.

Also present for the celebrations were Chief Justice Marilyn Warren AC and Chief Justice Robert French AC, who spoke fondly about their time at Monash. Justice French also shared his interpretation of the history of the Monash Faculty of Law, as he launched Pericleans, Plumbers and Practitioners, the First Fifty Years of the Monash Law School, with authors Fay Woodhouse and Peter Yule.

Monash Law School alumnus Will Fowles conducted the live auction with great humour; the proceeds will fund scholarships for Indigenous students. Among the auction lots were some rare Wolfgang Sievers photographs depicting the early Clayton campus donated by Julian Burnside AO QC; an Aboriginal artwork donated by Michelle Possum Nungurrayi; and some original Chesterfield furniture, donated by the Monash Law Library. Other items auctioned included a lunch with Jon Faine at the Essoign club.

In the spirit of the evening, original law alumnus Mr Jack Hammond donated a cassette and disk recording of the infamous 1976 Campbell McComas hoax lecture, which was attended by many and remembered by all. This last-minute auction inclusion added an extra and unexpected amount to the faculty’s fundraising efforts.

The Dean of the Faculty of Law, Professor Bryan Horrigan, spoke about the development of the Monash Law School to date, and then officially closed the night with a toast. As they left, guests could enjoy slide shows from each of the decades in the foyer, and try to name their old classmates.

About Monash Law School Juris Doctor

The Monash JD is a graduate law degree designed to teach the knowledge and skills required to practice law. This innovative law degree recognizes the needs of graduates who wish to study law, providing the transferable skills and knowledge only a law degree from one of Australia’s leading universities can provide.

Program: Juris Doctor (JD)
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Duration: 3 years (accelerated option: a minimum of 2.5 years)
Application deadline: Applications are generally assessed on a rolling admissions basis.

Starting semesters for the Monash University JD program:

  • January 2015
  • May 2015
  • August 2015

Apply now to Monash Law School!

*

For more information about the Monash JD, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Law Schools Admissions Officer Sarah Bridson at sarah@oztrekk.com or call 1-866-698-7355 (toll free in Canada).

Thursday, May 15th, 2014

Monash Law School releases human rights report card

Real freedom, gender-based violence, terrorism laws, and asylum seekers’ rights are all considered in a report on vital human rights issues in Australia and around the world.

The 2014 Castan Human Rights Report, by Monash University’s Castan Centre for Human Rights Law, highlights the centre’s research and its relevance to some of the most important human rights issues facing society.

Monash University Law School

Study law at Monash University, Melbourne

A key finding of the report is that freedom in Australia is being undermined.

Director of the Castan Centre Professor Sarah Joseph said the recent narrow debate on the “right to be a bigot” had camouflaged the real effects of changes to legislation.

“The ‘bikie laws,’ police move-on powers, copyright laws, and even threats to remove government funding from artists are all reducing society’s freedom,” Professor Joseph said.

Senior Monash University Law School lecturer Dr Heli Askola said that the recent spate of cases of domestic violence shows that the existing laws are not going far enough to protect the most vulnerable in our society.

“Australia’s ‘National Plan to Reduce Violence against Women’ has the potential to create change; however, it must be backed up with sufficient funding and better implementation,” Dr Askola said.

Current terrorism laws in Australia also need closer consideration, according to the Centre’s Dr Patrick Emerton.

“ASIO’s (Australian Security Intelligence Organisation) excessive powers to make ‘predictive judgments’ about potential terrorists—such as ‘adverse assessments’ of bona fide refugees—threaten human rights,” Dr Emerton said. “For this reason ASIO’s powers must be brought into line with human rights norms.”

The report takes up the issue of asylum seekers’ rights.

Dr Azadeh Dastyari has identified at least seven international laws breached by current asylum seeker and refugee policies and practices.

“Contrary to the Australian government’s oft-repeated assertion that it respects asylum seekers’ rights, the current situation doesn’t reflect this,” the Senior Monash Law School lecturer said.

“Asylum seekers cannot have their detention reviewed by the courts. Conditions on Nauru and Manus Island breach the prohibition on cruel or degrading treatment and the detention of children on Nauru breaches Australia’s international obligations to act in the best interests of the child.

“By treating those arriving by boat differently to other asylum seekers, Australia is violating its obligation not to punish refugees for their mode of arrival.”

Dr Dastyari said that in addition to these violations, practices such as push-backs to Indonesia and the removal of legal aid increased the chances that genuine refugees would be returned to harm and were in clear violation of Australia’s non-refoulement obligations.

The inaugural report provides in-depth analysis and commentary on a range of other crucial human rights issues including a better asylum seeker model; Australia’s growing prison crisis; LGBTI rights; foreign aid; business and human rights; human rights in closed environments; and reproductive rights.

About the Castan Centre at Monash Law School

Based at Monash Law School, the Castan Centre strives to create a stronger culture of human rights in Australia. The centre believes that human rights must be respected and protected, allowing people to pursue their lives in freedom and with dignity. Since the Castan Centre’s foundation in 2000, they have worked in six broad areas:
  1. Policy, through engagement with parliaments, direct representations to governments and contributions to public debates on important issues.
  2. Public education, including numerous public event featuring prominent Australian and international human rights figures, and a burgeoning social media presence.
  3. Student programs including international and in-house internship programs, careers guidance and mooting competitions.
  4. Teaching, through the oldest human rights law masters degree in Australia, as well as a thriving undergraduate human rights program.
  5. World-renowned research on many of the most pressing human rights issues.
  6. Human rights training and consultancies aimed at educating Australian and international government officials about human rights.

Monash Law School Juris Doctor (JD) Program

The Monash JD is a graduate law degree designed to teach the knowledge and skills required to practice law. This innovative law degree recognizes the needs of graduates who wish to study law, providing the transferable skills and knowledge only a law degree from one of Australia’s leading universities can provide.

The Monash JD comprises 24 units, taught in a small, seminar-style format that facilitates interactive learning and lively class debate. The program is taught in trimesters at the Monash University Law Chambers (city campus), in the heart of Melbourne’s Central Business District and legal precinct.

Program: Juris Doctor (JD)
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Semester intake: February 2015
Duration: 3 years (accelerated option: a minimum of 2.5 years)
Application deadline: Applications are generally assessed on a rolling admissions basis.

Apply now Monash Law School!

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Would you like more information about Monash Law School and other law schools in Australia? Contact OzTREKK Australian Law Schools Admissions Officer Sarah Bridson at sarah@oztrekk.com or call 1-866-698-7355 (toll free in Canada). Find how OzTREKK helps you to study in Australia and about law programs at Australian universities.

Tuesday, March 11th, 2014

Monash Law team wins silver in Paris

A team of Monash University Law School students and their coaches have won silver at the 9th International Chamber of Commerce (ICC) Mediation Competition in Paris, France.

Monash University Law School

Study at Monash University

This year’s competition, held from February 7 to 12, was the first time that Monash has entered. The four Juris Doctor (JD) students, Tessa Sullivan, Jemima Roe, Joanna Paul, and Julia Larner, accompanied by their two coaches, Naomi Burstyner and Wendy Gaddie, both Monash University Australian Centre for Justice Innovation (ACJI) senior researchers, were selected out of a field of 500 participants from 66 universities and more than 40 countries to participate.

The competition challenged students with complex commercial problems where they applied their skills in negotiation and collaboration to advance their interests and move towards a mutually beneficial settlement with the assistance of a mediator.

Prior to each mediation, the students were also required to prepare a mediation plan outlining their strategy, underlying interests and essentially their goals and objectives to resolving the dispute collaboratively with the opposing team.

Despite the new territory, the team displayed an outstanding performance. After winning preliminary rounds, quarter-finals and a semi-final, their performance at the final was closely watched by more than 350 spectators. The Monash Law School students demonstrated strong mediation advocacy; however, Ludwig-Maximillians University of Munich were the successful team. In an unexpected twist, one of the team from Munich turned out to be an exchange student from Monash University!

Monash officially finished second, winning three trophies, including two special awards, the first for best Mediation Plan and the second for best Advocacy.

Naomi Burstyner, a consultant in negotiation and conflict resolution, said the competition was useful for the students with future mediation skills.

“If you prepare students for mediation in terms of learning a theory and a process, and you give them an opportunity to understand the facts, they feel safe, and they’ll do well. That’s probably one of the most important things they learned at this competition,” Ms Burstyner said.

Co-coach Wendy Gaddie said the international setting provided invaluable experiences.

“The most valuable thing we’ve got out of this competition is being involved on an international scale with some of the most prestigious professionals in our field, and being able to take away valuable words of wisdom from around the world,” Ms Gaddie said.

Director of ACJI, Professor Tania Sourdin, was pleased to sponsor the coaching.

“We have a real interest in mediation, negotiation and dispute resolution in our research and teaching and it is wonderful that our team was able to show on the world stage how useful this learning is in the context of complex problem solving. Our students worked hard and we are so proud of their achievement,” Professor Sourdin said.

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For more information about Monash Law School and its Juris Doctor (JD) program, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Law Schools Admissions Officer Sarah Bridson at sarah@oztrekk.com or call 1-866-698-7355 (toll free in Canada). Contact OzTREKK for more information about studying in Australia and about law programs at Australian universities.

Thursday, February 27th, 2014

Monash Law School academic offers a different perspective on torture

A new book by Monash University Law School academic Dr Ronli Sifris, providing another angle on a feminist understanding of international human rights, will be launched in early March.

Monash University Law School

Study at Monash University

The book, Reproductive Freedom, Torture and International Human Rights: Challenging the Masculinisation of Torture, examines restrictions on reproductive freedom through the lens of the right to be free from torture and other cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment.

Dr Sifris said the book challenges the traditional notions of torture, as it deconstructs the meaning of torture from a feminist perspective.

“There is a myopic view that torture only takes place within the traditional paradigm of interrogation, punishment or intimidation of a detainee,” Dr Sifris said.

“This often prioritizes the experiences of men over those of women, given that the pain and suffering from which women disproportionately suffer occurs in situations outside of the context of these standard definitions, such as in circumstances of intimate partner violence for example.”

“My book focuses on restrictions on reproductive freedom within the framework of the right to be free from torture.”

Dr Sifris is an Associate of the Monash University Castan Centre for Human Rights Law. She received her LLB from Monash University where she was awarded the Supreme Court Prize for graduating first in her class and was the editor of the Monash University Law Review. She completed an LLM in International Legal Studies as a Hauser Scholar at NYU School of Law and a PhD at Monash.

Prior to commencing her PhD she worked as a consultant with the International Centre for Transitional Justice in New York. She is admitted to practice in both Melbourne and New York.

About Monash Law School

The Monash JD is a graduate law degree designed to teach the knowledge and skills required to practice law. This innovative law degree recognizes the needs of graduates who wish to study law, providing the transferable skills and knowledge only a law degree from one of Australia’s leading universities can provide.

Starting semesters for the Monash University JD program:

  • May 2014
  • August 2014
  • January 2015

Apply now to  the Monash Law School Juris Doctor program!

*

For more information about law school entry requirements, application deadlines, tuition fees, scholarships, please visit OzTREKK’s Law Schools in Australia page or contact OzTREKK Australian Law School Admissions Officer Sarah Bridson by emailing sarah@oztrekk.com or calling 1 866-698-7355 (toll free in Canada).

Contact OzTREKK for more information about studying in Australia and about law programs at Australian universities.

Monday, December 16th, 2013

Monash University recognized for its contribution to international education

Monash University’s innovation and international success in the field of education has been recognized at the prestigious Australian Export Awards on Nov. 27, 2013.

Monash University

Study at Monash University in Australia

At a ceremony in Melbourne hosted by Prime Minister Tony Abbott, Monash University was presented with the national Education and Training Award, recognizing an outstanding contribution to international education, as well as exceptional leadership in the field through training services, expertise and curriculum innovation. Monash was singled out for its leadership in innovation in Australia, its international reach and thriving offshore operations.

The award follows recognition at the recent Governor of Victoria Export Awards (GOVEAs) where Monash achieved top honours in the Education and Training Category, progressing it to the national awards.

Pro Vice-Chancellor (Global Engagement) and Pro Vice-Chancellor (Industry Engagement and Commercialisation), Professor Abid Khan, said the national achievement reflected the university’s position as Australia’s most globalized university and a leader in the international education sector.

“It is with much honour that we receive this award. While acknowledging the quality of Australia’s higher education sector, there is a need to have greater impact in-country through a mixture of physical research and education presence and deeper networks,” Professor Khan said.

“Through a bold, determined and innovative global strategy, Monash continues to build on international reach, expand international connections, and extend opportunities for students and staff.

“Beyond our broad multinational education offerings and expansion into new growth markets, our expanding links with international industry and government are crucial to innovation and success, and key to the continued global growth of the university.”

Monash University has six local campuses throughout the state of Victoria, as well as two international campuses—Malaysia and South Africa—and international centres in the People’s Republic of China, Italy and India. A unique alliance with the University of Warwick (UK) sits alongside an array of international collaborations with leading universities and corporations around the world, expanding the university’s global network.

The Australian Export Awards is a national program that recognizes and honours Australian companies engaged in international business who have achieved sustainable growth through innovation and commitment.

About Monash University

As a member of the prestigious Group of 8 universities, Monash offers a wide range of courses that give students access to flexible learning options and innovative course combinations. Monash is dedicated to preparing students for the increasingly competitive job market, and as a result, Monash graduates are highly sought after by employers internationally.

Popular schools at Monash University include

Would you like more information about Monash University and about other Australian universities? Contact OzTREKK at info@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355. Find out how you can study in Australia!