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Posts Tagged ‘Monash Law School’

Friday, October 27th, 2017

Meet Molly, your new Australian law schools admissions officer!

As many of you know, OzTREKK’s Australian Law Schools Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston is taking a break to welcome the arrival of her little one! But we won’t leave you hanging!

Meet Molly, your new Australian law schools admissions officer!

OzTREKK Australian Law Schools Admissions Officer Molly Mahon

All of us at OzTREKK are pleased to welcome back Molly Mahon, who was away this year on maternity leave. Molly originally joined the OzTREKK team in 2012, so she has lots of experience working with student files, and she understands the ins and outs of studying in Australia.

Molly looks forward to working with you and assisting you with your law school applications, but mostly she is happy to help you get to Australia to follow your dreams!

Are you interested in studying law at an Australian university?

As a Canadian seeking to become qualified to practice law, you have a range of study options abroad. As Commonwealth nations, the Australian and Canadian systems are based on English common law, and Australian law schools provide a solid foundation for students planning to practice law in Canada (with the exception of Quebec). OzTREKK’s aim is to assist you in choosing the best Australian law school for you. Do you have questions about admissions, program structures, accreditation, practicing in Canada? OzTREKK has answers!

Which law programs do OzTREKK Australian Law Schools offer?

Australian Law Schools offer either a graduate-entry LLB or JD and most offer an undergraduate-entry LLB:

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Would you like more information about law degrees offered in Australia? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Law Schools Admissions Officer Molly Mahon at molly@oztrekk.com!

Wednesday, August 3rd, 2016

Could the next Olympics violate human rights?

On August 5, 2016, Rio will become the first South American city to host the Summer Olympics. Along with the usual fanfare, there are also human rights concerns over the ongoing outbreak of the mosquito-borne Zika virus and its potential impact on athletes and visitors. So much so that dozens of athletes from all over the world have decided to forego the event.

Few sports fans would associate their favourite competition with international human rights law, but according to one legal academic there are some surprising connections at play.

Monash Law School Professor Sarah Joseph, who will deliver the 2016 Michael Wincop Memorial Lecture in August, said sporting’s biggest event—the Olympics—has been embroiled in human rights controversy.

Could the next Olympics violate human rights?

Are we ready for the consequences of going ahead with the Rio Olympic games? (Photo: Griffith University)

The public lecture is being hosted by Griffith Law School’s Law Futures Centre.

Professor Joseph argues that holding the Olympic games in Rio de Janeiro, when there are serious health concerns about the Zika virus, could potentially violate human rights.

“It is highly unlikely that the [Rio Olympics] will be cancelled, despite the fact that it will inevitably spread Zika worldwide. Will this decision result in major threats to the enjoyment of the right to health?” she said.

Major sporting events like the FIFA World Cup and the Olympics can also lead to other human rights abuses, like the forced eviction of citizens to make way for the stadiums and facilities that need to be built.

Professor Joseph said while responsibility for evicting people falls to the host government, do sporting bodies like the International Olympic Committee and FIFA owe any human rights obligations to the people affected?

“Should events be awarded to countries with terrible human rights records, such as Russia, especially if preparation for the event might lead to abuses, such as deaths during stadium construction in Qatar?” she said.

Professor Joseph said that human rights issues could also arise at the individual level, where the labour rights of athletes are often severely constrained by administrative processes.

“Why is a young AFL draftee not able to play for the club of his choice, but can only play for the club that picks him? Why can they only move to the club of their choice after ten years of playing for the same club?” she said.

What’s most troubling is the way in which some sporting bodies and clubs disregard the health rights of their players. Professor Joseph said the Essendon Football Club doping scandal reveals how the club failed in its duty of care.

“They have been fined for OHS (occupational health and safety) breaches, but the affected players still do not know what they were injected with by their own employer,” she said.

Professor Joseph says that human rights obligations are also at stake in the many football codes that carry the risk of long-term brain damage due to multiple concussions.

Time magazine recently reported that over forty percent of NFL players in the US might have brain injuries. What did the NFL know about the dangers of its product for its employees and when?” she said.

While it may not seem it at first, the sporting arena is rife with human rights issues and obligations that are yet to be determined.

The public lecture that will explore these issues is hosted by the Law Futures Centre and is held annually to honour the scholarship and contributions of the late Professor Michael Whincop.

International Human Rights Law

International Human Rights Law at Griffith Law School is designed to expose students to the laws which deal with the protection of individuals and groups against violations by governments of certain internationally guaranteed rights. Students will gain a greater understanding of some of the theoretical, political and socio-economic issues associated with human rights awareness, advocacy and litigation. This course focuses on the structures and processes through which international human rights norms are established and transformed into rights. Students will gain insight into the relationship of international human rights norms to the Australian national legal system and the specific techniques for the implementation of human rights in domestic and international law.

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Find out more about studying at Griffith Law School! Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Law Schools Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com.

Wednesday, May 18th, 2016

Monash Law School launches major study into legal responses to domestic violence deaths

Monash Law School and the Domestic Violence Resource Centre Victoria (DVRCV) have launched a major report into intimate partner killings in Victoria.

Out of character? Legal Responses to Intimate Partner Homicides is the first comprehensive study of the impact of legal reforms introduced in Victoria between 2005 and 2014.

Monash Law School launches major study into legal responses to domestic violence deaths

Study law at Monash University

The report was launched by former Supreme Court Justice The Hon. Philip Cummins at the Monash Law Chambers in Melbourne’s CBD.

The report finds that despite legal reforms the gender of the perpetrators of intimate partner homicides still plays a significant role in the outcome of trials.

The authors of the report include Associate Professor Bronwyn Naylor from Monash Law School, Dr Danielle Tyson from Monash School of Social Sciences and Dr Debbie Kirkwood and Mandy McKenzie from DVRCV.

The researchers examined risk factors and legal responses to 51 homicides committed by men and 13 homicides by women against their intimate partner over a 10-year period between 2005 and 2014.

The report finds a history of family violence and relationship separation were key factors in these deaths.

“Our research has shown that men are still able to ‘explain’ their killing of an intimate partner as a ‘one off’ awful event,” says Dr Naylor. “This occurs even where there is plenty of evidence that they were violent and/or coercive to their partner over long periods of time before the killing.”

Dr Naylor says reforms to Victorian law between 2005 and 2014 have had minimal impact on the practical operation of the law in court.

The report finds that the abolition of the partial defence of defensive homicide in 2014 will disadvantage women who kill their abusive partners.

“Women charged with killing their violent partner can still have difficulty proving that they were acting in self defence, and law reforms that were aimed to make this a clearer defence in appropriate cases have not necessarily made a significant difference,” says Dr Naylor.

“We need to go back to look at our recent reforms and see why some aren’t being used and whether other reforms should be revised.”

Monash Law School

Monash Law School is one of the largest and most prestigious law schools in Australia, providing legal education and training to more than 3,000 undergraduate and postgraduate students. Monash offers a Juris Doctor program and a number of postgraduate legal degrees, including a Doctor of Judicial Sciences, Doctor of Laws, Master of Laws by Research, and several postgraduate master by coursework programs.

The Faculty of Law at Monash University has one of the largest law libraries in Australia. It also has a moot court designed as a real courtroom for practicing trial work.

Monash Law School offers high-quality teaching by leading academics and practitioners, who are experts in the teaching of law and legal practice. Additionally, the JD program offers an interactive learning environment, small class sizes and innovative teaching.

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Learn more about Monash Law School and the Juris Doctor program. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Law Schools Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com or call 1-866-698-7355.

Tuesday, May 17th, 2016

Celebrating National Law Week in Australia

National Law Week in Australia takes place throughout Australia in May each year. This year, it runs from May 16 – 20. Law Week provides Australians (and visitors) to get a closer look at how law and justice works in each Australian state. A range of exciting and interactive activities are being held around Australia celebrate Law Week, including courthouse tours, mock trials and student competitions.

Australian Law Schools in Australia

Bond University Law School Moot Court

Law Week events in Australia are organized individually or by a group of organizations collaborating to share ideas and resources. Some examples of organizations who participate in and support Law Week include the Courts Administration Authority, law firms, Australian police departments, municipal libraries, community legal centres, legal aid, and the Attorney General’s Department. Usually, Law Week‘s major highlight is Courts Open Day, which provides a chance to explore the rich heritage of the courts. Tours, mock trials, sentencing exercises and meet-the-judge sessions give visitors an insight into court operations and personalities.

Law Week events are aimed at the whole community. These events provide opportunities for people from all walks of life to gain new perspectives on legal and justice issues. These events will be of interest to those who work in legal and justice agencies and students, especially students studying at Australian Law Schools.

What is the difference between the LLB and the JD?

The Bachelor of Laws and the Juris Doctor are both professionally recognized degrees. Both LLB and JD programs educate students to practice law and allow them to apply for registration in Canada. The main difference is that the LLB is offered at the undergraduate level, and the JD is offered at the postgraduate level. Bachelor of Laws students can study the program directly from high school or after having completed post-secondary studies, while the JD or graduate-entry LLB requires a completed bachelor degree for admission.

At some Australian Law Schools, JD programs are fast-tracked, so that you can complete them in two calendar years, as opposed to a three-year, graduate-entry LLB. Entry requirements for JD programs can be more competitive, especially as they become more popular with North American students. At universities where both a Juris Doctor and a Bachelor of Laws are offered, students who have already completed an undergraduate degree normally apply for the postgraduate professional qualification (JD).

Which law programs do OzTREKK Australian Law Schools offer?

Australian Law Schools offer either a graduate-entry LLB or JD and most offer an undergraduate-entry LLB:

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Would you like more information about law schools in Australia? Contact OzTREKK Australian Law Schools Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Wednesday, December 2nd, 2015

Monash Law students participate in mooting competition

Monash Law School recently sent a team of three students to London to compete in the Global Round of the Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) International Arbitration Mooting Competition, hosted by Kings College.

Congratulations goes out to the team consisting of Michael Smyth, Anthony Hajiantoniou, Lynette Lee and Dr Emmanuel Laryea (coach). The students performed extremely well and came seventh for memorials and oral rounds. Individual rankings for the two oral presenters (Michael Smyth and Anthony Hajiantoniou) were ranked twentieth and twenty-fourth respectively and the team’s written submission (memorial) for the Claimant won third place and will be published in the Transnational Dispute Management Journal.

In preparation for the competition, the Monash Law students visited law firms in Paris and London and the International Chamber of Commerce (ICC) for mooting practice, discussions about the law and exposure to investment arbitration practice and institutions. They visited Lazareef Le Bars, for an insightful practice moot and general discussions about practice in the area investment arbitration.

Linklaters, London hosted a lunch with Monash law alumni Jack Naughton and Alex Fawke who kindly gave up their time to provide a practice moot and insights into practice.

The students agree that the experiences from participating in the mooting program and competition are invaluable. The core skills, engagement with firms and international networking are unique opportunities which arise from national and international mooting competitions.

Monash Law School Juris Doctor program

The Monash JD is a graduate law degree designed to teach the knowledge and skills required to practice law. This innovative law degree recognizes the needs of graduates who wish to study law, providing the transferable skills and knowledge only a law degree from one of Australia’s leading universities can provide.

Program: Juris Doctor (JD)
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Semester intakes: January, May, August
Duration: 3 years (accelerated option: a minimum of 2.5 years)
Application deadline: Applications are generally assessed on a rolling admissions basis.

Apply now to  the Monash Law School Juris Doctor program!

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Do you have any questions about Monash Law School and the Juris Doctor program? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Law School Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston by emailing shannon@oztrekk.com or calling (toll free in Canada) 1-866-698-7355.

Wednesday, May 13th, 2015

Monash Warwick Collaborative International Moot

The Monash Warwick Collaborative International Moot has brought together law students from Monash University and the University of Warwick for a second year to battle out points of law.

Supported by the Monash Warwick Alliance, the moot was held in Melbourne and saw two teams of three students go head-to-head to argue points of Victorian contract law including a dispute about a tutoring agreement and a sale of a property, complicated with an injury and compensation claim.

Monash Law School

2015 Monash and Warwick law moot teams meet in Melbourne

Two preliminary moots were held at the College of Law with the Grand Final held at the Federal Court in Melbourne.

Teams included students from both universities and gave all involved valuable domestic and international law experience and skills, including working with a teammate from a different jurisdiction.

Jemima Roe, President of the Monash Law Students’ Society said the moot gave participants a range of domestic and international law experience.

“It offers all of the learning opportunities of a domestic moot including applying the legal theory learnt in class in a real-world context and practical skills in research, advocacy and teamwork, but also international legal skills and experience, court etiquette and the mooting practices of a foreign system,” she said.

The first Monash-Warwick Collaborative International Moot was held in the UK in early 2014 with three Monash students heading to Warwick. This year Monash hosted, with three Warwick students flying to Melbourne for the event.

According to Megan McMellon, President, Warwick Law Society, the moots were a success with positive feedback received from participants, spectators and judges.

“Participants loved the moot and enjoyed the opportunity to learn about another country’s laws.”

“We received very positive feedback from participants, spectators and judges who have been impressed by the high quality of mooting and commended the teams’ advocacy and teamwork in particular,” Megan said.

Jemima said that the opportunity had given the students a valuable, early career networking opportunity.

“The experience allows students to establish a global network of relationships that will continue to benefit them well into the future,” she said.

Formed in early 2012, the Monash Warwick Alliance represents an innovation in higher education and research and aims to accelerate the exchange of people, ideas and information between Monash University and the University of Warwick.

Monash Law School Juris Doctor program

The Monash JD is a graduate law degree designed to teach the knowledge and skills required to practice law. This innovative law degree recognizes the needs of graduates who wish to study law, providing the transferable skills and knowledge only a law degree from one of Australia’s leading universities can provide.

Program: Juris Doctor (JD)
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Semester intakes: January, May, August
Duration: 3 years (accelerated option: a minimum of 2.5 years)
Application deadline: Applications are generally assessed on a rolling admissions basis.

Apply now to  the Monash Law School Juris Doctor program!

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Do you have any questions about Monash Law School and the Juris Doctor program? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Law School Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston by emailing shannon@oztrekk.com or calling 1-866-698-7355 (toll free in Canada).

Monday, May 11th, 2015

National Law Week in Australia

National Law Week in Australia takes place throughout Australia in May each year. This year, it runs from May 11 – 15. Law Week provides Australians (and visitors) to get a closer look at how law and justice works in each Australian state. A range of exciting and interactive activities are being held around Australia celebrate Law Week, including courthouse tours, mock trials and student competitions.

Australian Law Schools

University of Melbourne Law School

Law Week events in Australia are organized individually or by a group of organizations collaborating to share ideas and resources. Some examples of organizations who participate in and support Law Week include the Courts Administration Authority, law firms, Australian police departments, municipal libraries, community legal centres, legal aid, and the Attorney General’s Department. Usually, Law Week‘s major highlight is Courts Open Day, which provides a chance to explore the rich heritage of the courts. Tours, mock trials, sentencing exercises and meet-the-judge sessions give visitors an insight into court operations and personalities.

Law Week events are aimed at the whole community. These events provide opportunities for people from all walks of life to gain new perspectives on legal and justice issues. These events will be of interest to those who work in legal and justice agencies and students, especially students studying at Australian Law Schools.

Australian Law Schools are a popular option for Canadian students wishing to attain qualifications to practice law.

But how do you know which degree to take—the LLB or the JD? It’s a question we receive a lot here at the OzTREKK office. Just what is the difference between the Bachelor of Laws and the Juris Doctor? Although we’ve covered the topic before, with so many new applicants, we felt it was important to have another look and answer some other common questions we receive.

What is the difference between the LLB and the JD?

The Bachelor of Laws and the Juris Doctor are both professionally recognized degrees. Both LLB and JD programs educate students to practice law and allow them to apply for registration in Canada. The main difference is that the LLB is offered at the undergraduate level, and the JD is offered at the postgraduate level. LLB students can study the program directly from high school or after having completed post-secondary studies, while the JD or graduate-entry LLB requires a completed bachelor degree for admission.

At some Australian Law Schools, JD programs are fast-tracked, so that you can complete them in two calendar years, as opposed to a three-year, graduate-entry LLB. Entry requirements for JD programs can be more competitive, especially as they become more popular with North American students. At universities where both a Juris Doctor and a Bachelor of Laws are offered, students who have already completed an undergraduate degree normally apply for the postgraduate professional qualification (JD).

After I graduate, what do I have to do in order to be eligible to practice law in Canada?

An assessment based on your academic and professional profile is done before you may apply for admission to a law society in a Canadian common law jurisdiction. Once a file is assessed by the National Committee on Accreditation (NCA), you may be asked to complete one or more exams and/or attend and complete specific law school courses within a prescribed time frame. Upon successful completion of these requirements, the NCA issues a Certificate of Qualification. The certificate will state that you have education and training equivalent to that of a graduate from a Canadian law school.

How can I take the examinations in Canadian law?

There are two ways of taking these examinations if they have not been taken as part of an Australian Law School degree. Once an assessment is complete, you may either complete assigned subjects with NCA “challenge exams” or complete assigned subjects at law school.

The more popular route for Canadians is the challenge exams.

NCA assessments focus on the competence of applicants in core common law subjects, including four Canadian subjects which are mandatory for all applicants:

  • Principles of Canadian Administrative Law
  • Canadian Constitutional Law
  • Canadian Criminal Law and Procedure
  • Foundations of Canadian Law

A syllabus and sample exam are available for each subject.

How much difference is there between Australian and Canadian law?

The principles and methodology of Australian and Canadian law are similar. The details of statutory provisions and case-law obviously differ, but an Australian law degree provides a good basis for taking examinations in Canadian law and for legal practice in Canada.

Will I be able to practice law in Australia?

These are two separate issues: qualification as an Australian lawyer and possession of a visa entitling you to work in Australia. Admission to the legal profession in Australia requires—depending on the state—the completion of either articles or a six-month Practical Legal Training program. Australian immigration operates on a “points” system for working visas. Some points are awarded for having an Australian degree, but additional points are required. Some of OzTREKK’s Australian Law School graduates have qualified and are working in Australia. For further information, you should contact the Australian Government Department of Immigration and Border Protection or an Australian consulate in Canada.

Which law programs do OzTREKK Australian Law Schools offer?

OzTREKK’s Australian Law Schools offer either a graduate-entry LLB or JD. Click on the links below to find out more about the university’s law program.

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For information about about law programs at Australian universities, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Law Schools Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com or call (toll free in Canada) at 1-866-698-7355.

Friday, May 8th, 2015

Monash Law School

The Monash University Law School is one of the largest and most prestigious law schools in Australia, providing legal education and training to more than 3,000 undergraduate and postgraduate students. Monash Law School offers a Juris Doctor program and a number of postgraduate legal degrees, including a Doctor of Judicial Sciences, Doctor of Laws, Master of Laws by Research, and several postgraduate master by coursework programs.

Monash Law School

Study law at Monash University

Monash Law School Juris Doctor (JD) Program

The Monash JD comprises 24 units, taught in a small, seminar-style format that facilitates interactive learning and lively class debate. The program is taught in trimesters at the Monash University Law Chambers (city campus), in the heart of Melbourne’s Central Business District and legal precinct.

Program: Juris Doctor (JD)
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Semester intakes: January, May and August
Duration: 3 years (accelerated option: a minimum of 2.5 years)
Application deadline: Applications are generally assessed on a rolling admissions basis.

Entry Requirements for the Monash Law School JD Program

  • Monash JD applicants must have completed an undergraduate degree in any discipline.
  • Applicants with a minimum, cumulative average of 75% above in their university studies, as well as work/life experience, will be considered for admission. Please note that each applicant’s average is calculated over all years of university study. Monash does not require the LSAT for entry in the program.
  • Work experience is not required for admission.
  • It is also recommended that students submit a resume and/or a personal statement along with their application.
  • Interviews may be conducted if a candidate meets the academic requirements. If an interview is required, it will be held via teleconferencing by the JD assessment team.
  • Students who have not yet completed an undergraduate degree may apply, as long as they will have graduated prior to commencing the Monash JD program.

Apply now to  the Monash Law School Juris Doctor program!

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Do you have questions about how to apply to Monash Law School? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Law Schools Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355. Find out how you can study in Australia!

Thursday, April 30th, 2015

Monash Law students excel at Oxford Moot

The Monash Law School student mooting team has made their mark on the international stage, claiming a variety of awards at the 2015 Oxford International Intellectual Property Law Moot in England last month.

Competing at the moot for the first time, the Monash Law team gave a memorable performance reaching the competition Grand Final, along with the National University of Bangalore (India).

Monash University Law School

Study law at Monash University, Melbourne

On the way to the final, the three-strong team became competition favourites as they triumphed over highly regarded institutions such as the University of Cambridge and King’s College London.

Universities from around the world descended on Oxford for the 13th edition of the competition, including teams from universities in United Kingdom, USA, India, Singapore, Canada and Germany.

All three Monash Law students excelled over the three days of competition, with James Beavis winning best speaker and Tim Rankin named second-best speaker.

In a high-quality final it was the National University of Bangalore who would emerge victorious, but it was Monash’s own Gisela Nip who many considered the standout speaker.

Monash Law School academics Professor Mark Davison, Dr Rebecca Giblin and Dr Patrick Emerton all assisted the team to prepare for the annual event.

Monash Law School Juris Doctor program

The Monash JD is a graduate law degree designed to teach the knowledge and skills required to practice law. This innovative law degree recognizes the needs of graduates who wish to study law, providing the transferable skills and knowledge only a law degree from one of Australia’s leading universities can provide.

Program: Juris Doctor (JD)
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Semester intakes: January, May, August
Duration: 3 years (accelerated option: a minimum of 2.5 years)
Application deadline: Applications are generally assessed on a rolling admissions basis.

Apply now to  the Monash Law School Juris Doctor program!

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Do you have any questions about Monash Law School and the Juris Doctor program? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Law School Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston by emailing shannon@oztrekk.com or calling 1-866-698-7355 (toll free in Canada).

Thursday, March 26th, 2015

Monash Law team wins international mediation award

A team from the Monash Faculty of Law has won the award for Best Mediation Plan at the International Chamber of Commerce (ICC) Mediation Competition, held in Paris last month.

The team, consisting of Belinda Anderson (undergraduate student) and Alyson Gale (JD student), and coaches Anne Sutherland-Kelly and Naomi Burstyner from the Faculty of Law, claimed the prestigious award ahead of a field of 500 participants from 67 universities and more than 40 countries.

Monash University Law School

Learn more about studying law at Monash Law School

From the Australian Centre for Justice Innovation (ACJI), the two coaches brought significant expertise to the team, with Ms Sutherland-Kelly an experienced commercial and human rights mediator, teacher and senior fellow at ACJI, while Ms Burstyner is a mediator, negotiation skills teacher and senior researcher at ACJI.

The competition consisted of four preliminary and four final rounds of commercial mediations, where students were expected to apply their skills and knowledge of negotiation and collaborative practice, to advance their interests and move forward toward resolution. The students were also required to prepare and submit a mediation plan outlining their strategy, underlying interests and objectives in relation to resolution of the dispute.

The team put in a fantastic performance. Belinda and Alyson worked seamlessly together as client and counsel throughout the rounds and it was clear the team, for the second year running, were considered to be in the top tier of competitors, after the team achieved second place in 2014.

Ms Burstyner believes the competition helps students with essential skills required of the modern lawyer.

“We could see when they had mastered a framework for negotiating, they felt secure about their ability to work within the process. The facts provided by the ICC are complex and intricate, so it was essential for the students to have internalised the facts and figures as well. Once this ‘absorption’ of the facts was combined with a real command of the negotiation process, the students achieved a sense of flow in the negotiation.” Ms Burstyner said.

Ms Sutherland-Kelly said the competition solidifies the quality of students at Monash Law School.

“The ICC competition tests our students abilities at the highest levels of international commercial practice. Participation in this prestigious competition has again demonstrated Monash’s international standing as a leader in the ADR field, and that ACJI students are globally competitive,” Ms Sutherland-Kelly said.

Director of ACJI, Professor Tania Sourdin, was pleased to sponsor the coaching.

“Mediation and arbitration subjects, and competitions really support student development. We are proud and delighted with the team effort,” Professor Sourdin said.

The team were supported by Lander & Rogers Lawyers (a Melbourne law firm with offices in Melbourne, Sydney and Brisbane) and assisted by three ‘honorary’ coaches (Peter Singer, Myles Watson and Shawn Whelan), who gave selflessly of their time and expertise.

About Monash Law School Juris Doctor

The Monash JD is a graduate law degree designed to teach the knowledge and skills required to practice law. This innovative law degree recognizes the needs of graduates who wish to study law, providing the transferable skills and knowledge only a law degree from one of Australia’s leading universities can provide.

Program: Juris Doctor (JD)
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Semester intakes: January, May, August
Duration: 3 years (accelerated option: a minimum of 2.5 years)
Application deadline: Applications are generally assessed on a rolling admissions basis.

Admissions Criteria/Entry Requirements for Canadians

  • Applicants must have completed an undergraduate degree in any discipline.
  • Applicants with a minimum, cumulative average of 75 percent and above in their university studies, as well as work/life experience, will be considered for admission.

Please note that each applicant’s average is calculated over all years of university study. Monash University does not require the LSAT for entry in the Monash JD program.

Apply now to  the Monash Law School Juris Doctor program!

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Do you have any questions about the Monash JD? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Law Schools Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston by emailing shannon@oztrekk.com or calling 1-866-698-7355 (toll free in Canada).