+ OzTrekk Educational Services Home
 
 

Posts Tagged ‘Melbourne MD’

Thursday, February 21st, 2019

OzTREKK Ambassadors: Being mentally prepared for your move to Australia

Welcome to the very first OzTREKK Ambassador blog!

At OzTREKK, we are proud to assist you throughout your entire journey—from your very first questions to predeparture to greeting you in Australia for our on-campus In-Australia Meet-ups.

Because we’ve been doing this since 2002, we know there can be bumps along the way. The key to traversing the bumps and hairpin turns is to have a positive attitude and to know you have a support system (and when to seek help if you need it!). In fact, all our Australian universities have international student support services available to help you with any issue, especially when you may feel overwhelmed and homesick.

University of Melbourne MD student

Follow Josh on Instagram!

Meet OzTREKK student ambassador Josh Walt, a Melbourne MD student who has agreed to document his Australian journey—including some of the stuff other people may forget about—like how to adjust to life in Australia and how to make sure you have a support system in place.

Take it away, Josh!

The Overwhelming Beginning and The Importance of Coping Mechanisms for Mental Health

I would be lying to you if I said that moving across the world didn’t come with its challenges.

After landing, it took over two weeks to find a place in a location somewhat close to campus and another week to settle in comfortably. Maybe my roommate and I were some of the unlucky few, but on move-in day we were shocked to see the apartment that was “professionally cleaned” still had Oreos under the mattress, dark brown stains on them, gum between the couch cushions and multiple miscellaneous sticky and greasy substances all over the cutlery, plates and other furniture. Setting up our WiFi took two weeks longer than the company had guaranteed. It’s a good thing phone plans here provide you with 40GB of data a month!

Although, after going to the Victoria night market, the Royal Botanical Gardens, the storage units on Brighton Beach etc., it is safe to say it was all worth it!

First Day of Orientation

To add to the stress of moving across the world, the first thing that was said in orientation was that the MD program at The University of Melbourne was one of the hardest and most demanding courses offered. The school’s academic mentors, counselling and psychological services then followed this speech by stating more than 50% of the students who see them seek support for mental health issues. A larger portion of these students have never experienced mental health problems before. Leading to why I am reaching out to all you prospective students today…

The Most Successful Students

My point is not to scare anyone off, only to share that it was a difficult move. I want to emphasize the importance of coping mechanisms for mental health. Especially as an international student, you have the pressure of school and the added stress of moving across the world without a social network.

These counsellors went on to say the most successful students are the ones who make time for their music, sports, social life, travel etc., because it is so important for your mental health as a student in a challenging professional program. Fortunately, there are a variety of ways to manage stress that will help you succeed and attain your dream degree—the reason you headed to Australia in the first place!

I know it’s a long time away, but I know once I finish and get that medical degree all the stress and hard work will be worth it!

Excited for the next chapter!

Josh
@mddownunder

Tuesday, April 25th, 2017

University of Melbourne students run Teddy Bear hospital

Recently, more than 1,200 medicine, nursing, dentistry, physiotherapy, audiology, biomedical, science, speech pathology and social work students from the University of Melbourne ran a Teddy Bear Hospital (TBH) to raise funds for the Royal Children’s Hospital Good Friday appeal.

University of Melbourne students run Teddy Bear hospital

University of Melbourne students run Teddy Bear hospital

Students aimed to reduce children’s fears associated with medical environments, procedures and professionals by familiarising them with health care in a fun, relaxed and interactive manner.

These interactions give future young doctors and health care professionals an excellent opportunity to further develop the specific communication and engagement skills required to successfully interact with children.

The students offered Teddy medical consultations to more than 5,000 children, making TBH the largest student volunteer event run by the University of Melbourne.

Professor Cheryl Jones, Stevenson Chair of Paediatrics and Head of the Department of Paediatrics in the Melbourne Medical School said students learn so much more when working as a team.

“The Teddy Professors from the university’s Department of Paediatrics who oversee this student-led program, are amazed at the passion and creativity of the students as they work together to create the toy machines and instruments for the day, and plan and execute this major event,” she said. “Apart from the fun and fundraising, our students learn more about each other’s multidisciplinary roles and provide practical advice to children and families about how to keep healthy and reduce children’s anxiety about medical environments, procedures and professionals.

“We are very proud to watch this group of students as they are our future health leaders of tomorrow,” Professor Jones said.

Children are asked to bring in a “sick” teddy bear or other toy for treatment at the “hospital.” There are many stations, including teddy triage, teddy doctor consultation, radiology, surgery, and anatomy. There are dedicated student volunteers to design and build the activities and equipment that are used inside the hospital.

Medical student coordinator Elliott Cope believes taking part in the TBH has improved his communication skills, leadership and confidence in interacting with children.

“One of the most memorable interactions was with a four-year-old boy who bought in his dragon teddy bear. The complaint: his dragon had stopped breathing fire,” he said.

Not having much experience with dragon medicine, Elliott was a little stumped, but after a look in the dragon’s throat and a feel of the neck, he diagnosed a dragon cold. After a good night’s sleep and lots of rest, the dragon was back to breathing fire and feeling much better.

University of Melbourne Doctor of Medicine

Program: Doctor of Medicine (MD)
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Semester intake: February
Duration: 4 years
Application deadline: June 22, 2017

The Melbourne MD is a four-year, graduate-entry medical program that builds on the university’s reputation for excellence in teaching and research. It enables students to become outstanding medical practitioners who will excel as world-class leaders in their chosen field.

Apply to the University of Melbourne Medical School!

*

Questions about Melbourne Medical School? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Wednesday, February 15th, 2017

University of Melbourne joins Epilepsy Centre Without Walls in $28m global research push

People with epilepsy acquired following brain trauma are the focus of a new $28 million global push for a long-awaited research breakthrough to develop treatments that for the first time could prevent or mitigate this disabling and potentially life-threatening condition. The University of Melbourne, in partnership with the Royal Melbourne Hospital, is the only Australian institution to take part in the project, funded by one of the largest grants to date awarded by the US National Institutes of Health (NIH) for research into the elusive condition.

Melbourne joins Epilepsy Centre Without Walls in $28m global research push

People with epilepsy acquired following brain trauma are the focus of a new $28 million global push (Photo: University of Melbourne)

Some 250,000 Australians suffer from epilepsy, the causes of which range from tumours to infections, genetics, hemorrhages or stroke, in addition to brain trauma.

Principal Investigator neurologist Terry O’Brien said epilepsy caused by traumatic brain injury, the major cause of epilepsy in people aged 15–24, is harder to predict and control than many other forms of epilepsy.

“Up to 20 per cent of people who’ve had a traumatic brain injury will develop epilepsy, yet researchers know very little about why, and have no way to prevent or mitigate it,” Professor O’Brien said.

“It’s the nasty sting in the tail for people who’ve got through a difficult rehabilitation, only to be hit by their first seizure just when they think they’re on the mend—anywhere from six months to two years after they were first injured.

“More than a third of these patients’ seizures can’t be controlled by drugs.”

Professor O’Brien—who is the James Stewart Chair of Medicine and Head of the Department of Medicine (Royal Melbourne Hospital) at The University of Melbourne—said the key to Melbourne’s appeal to be invited to be part of this international research collaboration was its location in the Parkville Precinct.

“Being in the Parkville Precinct will enable clinicians and researchers from disciplines such as neuroscience, electrophysiology, imaging, bioinformatics and molecular biology to work very closely together, at the Melbourne Brain Centre and the Royal Melbourne Trauma Centre and ICU.”

The project, one of three NIH Epilepsy Centres without Walls, will be led by researchers at five institutions—the University of Melbourne, the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, the Keck School of Medicine at the University of Southern California, and the University of Eastern Finland.

About Melbourne Medical School

The Melbourne Medical School is part of the Faculty of Medicine Dentistry and Health Sciences. It is the oldest medical school in Australia and internationally renowned for global leadership in teaching and training, health research, policy and practice. The school encompasses all major fields of medicine and rural health.

Renowned for global leadership in health research, policy and practice, the University of Melbourne educates more health professionals than any other university in Australia.

Program: Doctor of Medicine (MD)
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Semester intake: February
Duration: 4 years
Application deadline: TBA. For the 2017 intake, the deadline was June 23, 2016.

The Melbourne MD is a four-year, graduate-entry medical program that builds on the University of Melbourne’s reputation for excellence in teaching and research. It enables students to become outstanding medical practitioners who will excel as world-class leaders in their chosen field.

Apply to the University of Melbourne Medical School!

*

Want more information about Melbourne Medical School?  Please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com.

Monday, June 13th, 2016

Melbourne MD application deadline in two weeks

Have you finished your Melbourne Medical School application for the 2017 intake? This is just a reminder to all Melbourne MD candidates that the application deadline is June 23, 2016!

University of Melbourne Medical School

Study medicine at the University of Melbourne Medical School

Program: Doctor of Medicine (MD)
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Semester intake: February
Duration: 4 years
Application deadline: June 23, 2016

Entry requirements

To apply to the Melbourne MD, eligible Canadian applicants must have

  • successfully completed an undergraduate degree in any discipline at a recognized university;
  • completed prerequisite second-year university subjects (one each) in anatomy, physiology and biochemistry. Subjects from overseas universities will be considered on a case-by-case basis; and
  • completed the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) or the Graduate Australian Medical School Admission Test (GAMSAT).

The selection of eligible international applicants is based on the following:

  • Academic record: grade point average (GPA) from a completed three-year (or more) university degree in any discipline (with prerequisites met and studies completed within the last 10 years)
  • Test results in an aptitude test, MCAT or GAMSAT: MCAT test results from January 2014 to May 2016 (inclusive) will be accepted for those applying for the 2017 intake. Applicants sitting the MCAT test more than once within this date range may choose which set of scores to include with their application
  • Structured multi-mini interview (MMI)

Apply to the University of Melbourne Medical School!

*

Find out more about studying the Melbourne MD. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com.

Thursday, May 19th, 2016

University of Melbourne appoints new Dean of Medicine

Professor Shitij Kapur was recently named the next Dean of the Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences and Assistant Vice-Chancellor (Health) at the University of Melbourne.

Currently Executive Dean of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, and Assistant Principal (Academic Performance) at King’s College London, Professor Kapur will take up the role in October.

Acting Vice-Chancellor & Provost, Professor Margaret Sheil said the university was looking forward to welcoming Professor Kapur to Melbourne.

University of Melbourne Medical School

Professor Shitij Kapur will take up the role of Dean in October (Photo credit: University of Melbourne)

“During his nine years in London Professor Kapur has led the highly successful Institute of Psychiatry, overseen the expansion of the Institute to incorporate Neurosciences and coordinated the response to the Research Excellence Framework for health and medical sciences across King’s,” said Professor Sheil.

“Over this period he has overseen a major expansion in the education portfolio of the Institute, has been a champion for equality and diversity initiatives, and in his recent role as Assistant Principal (Academic Performance), has been responsible for developing faculty development initiatives.

“His appointment follows an extensive national and international search and was the unanimous choice of our selection committee from an outstanding field of candidates.”

Professor Kapur said he was looking forward to taking up the position. “I am delighted to be offered this opportunity and thank the university for inviting me to join its academic community.

“As I have come to know the university, I have been most impressed with the breadth of academic excellence at the faculty, the brilliance of its students and its commitment to education, as well as the strength of its partnerships with world-class medical research institutes and hospitals.”

“I have been lucky to work in some world-leading centres of medicine and the University of Melbourne stands out in its scope, scale and potential. It will be a privilege to serve as the Dean and work with the so many talented colleagues and students to realize the next stage of the Faculty’s success.”

Professor Sheil concluded, “Professor Mark Hargreaves will continue as Dean of the Faculty until Professor Kapur commences his appointment.  We are indebted to Prof Hargreaves for his outstanding leadership in recent months and we are grateful he will remain at the helm in the interim.”

University of Melbourne Doctor of Medicine

Program: Doctor of Medicine (MD)
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Semester intake: February
Duration: 4 years
Application deadline: June 23, 2016

The Melbourne MD is a four-year, graduate-entry medical program that builds on the University of Melbourne’s reputation for excellence in teaching and research. It enables students to become outstanding medical practitioners who will excel as world-class leaders in their chosen field.

Apply to the University of Melbourne Medical School!

*

Questions about Melbourne Medical School? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Wednesday, March 30th, 2016

Melbourne MD application timeline announced

Melbourne MD application timeline for 2017 Intake

University of Melbourne MD

Apply to Melbourne Medical School

  • Application deadline: June 23, 2016
  • Last date to sit MCAT for 2017 intake: June 2, 2016
  • Last date to submit MCAT results: July 16, 2016
  • Interview offers released: August 15, 2016
  • Deadline to accept interview (online acceptance): August 20, 2016
  • Interviews (via Skype): August 29 – September 2, 2016
  • Applicants not shortlisted for interview notified: September 12 – 16, 2016
  • Offers of admission begin to be issued: October 21, 2016
  • Deadline to accept offer or submit deferral request: November 5, 2016
  • Deadline to meet any conditions of offer: November 11, 2016
  • Enrollment deadline for non-conditional offered applicants: December 16, 2016
  • Enrollment deadline for conditional offered applicants: January 12, 2017
  • First day of class: TBA

About the Melbourne Doctor of Medicine Program

The Melbourne MD is a four-year, graduate-entry medical program that builds on the University of Melbourne’s reputation for excellence in teaching and research. It enables students to become outstanding medical practitioners who will excel as world-class leaders in their chosen field.

Program: Doctor of Medicine (MD)
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Semester intake: February
Duration: 4 years
Application deadline: June 23, 2016

Entry Requirements for the Melbourne MD Program

To apply to the Melbourne MD, eligible Canadian applicants must have

  • successfully completed an undergraduate degree in any discipline at a recognized university;
  • completed prerequisite second-year university subjects (one each) in anatomy, physiology and biochemistry. Subjects from overseas universities will be considered on a case-by-case basis; and
  • completed the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) or the Graduate Australian Medical School Admission Test (GAMSAT).

The selection of eligible international applicants is based on the following:

  • Academic record: grade point average (GPA) from a completed three-year (or more) university degree in any discipline (with prerequisites met and studies completed within the last 10 years)
  • Test results in an aptitude test, MCAT or GAMSAT: MCAT test results from January 2014 to May 2016 (inclusive) will be accepted for those applying for the 2017 intake. Applicants sitting the MCAT test more than once within this date range may choose which set of scores to include with their application
  • Structured multi-mini interview (MMI)

Apply to Melbourne Medical School!

*

Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Courtney Frank for more information about how to apply to the Melbourne MD program. Email Courtney at courtney@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-986-7355.

Tuesday, January 26th, 2016

Jaime’s adventures in Oz: Melbourne

Hi, everyone!

I have heard it’s crazy busy in the office but that you’re all staying afloat! I hope you’re doing well, though, and are able to share a little in the excitement of the 2016’ers!

Anyway, I wanted to provide a little update on the last few days for you. I kind of imagined that I was going to be able to write detailed emails about each day but a few days I’ve been absolutely pooped and just basically do emails and give up. In exciting news, though, I am sleeping like an absolute champion. I think I am probably awake for 90 seconds before I’m out. Then I wake up around 5:30 (which is pretty usual for me) feeling just grand. And, Julie knows very well that does not happen back at home. I’ve become a terrible sleeper. In any case….

So, where did I leave off?

Well, late Monday I arrived in Melbourne and basically went to bed (I think I got in around 11 p.m.). I woke up and wanted to drive around to make myself more comfy with the whole signal thing before I have a group of students staring at me. The first place I drove was to the Apple Store where the “Geniuses” happily swapped my iPhone with apologies and away I went. By “away I went” I really mean “I put my name in a queue and then waiting for TWO AND A HALF HOURS to get the text to return to the store. I did also get a bank account, too, which was quite painless. I pick up my card when I’m back in Melbourne in a couple of weeks. Then I drove around the CBD, kind of orienting myself. I think it’s because I love Melbourne so much that I find it pretty easy (also the fact that the town is a giant grid) and it didn’t take too long to become pretty comfortable with the suburbs and where I was.

University of Melbourne Dental School

OzTREKKers enjoying the classic OzTREKK Welcome meal!

Wednesday was the first “big” group. Nearly all of our Melbourne Dental School students seemed to be there (I didn’t get to do the sign-in sheet because staff thought they were garbage and pitched them while I wasn’t looking!). We also had four med students from last year; they were great! Even though the programs were not the same, the conversation flowed as people grilled them about Melbourne tips and tricks. It was great to see the Melbourne DPT students (there were about six there, I think), too. After breakfast we got a campus tour from two absolutely adorable Aussie students. The funniest part was when one of them was explaining what’s in the student centre. He mentions that you can get your hair cut for cheap in there. The irony is, I swear, that his haircut was nearly identical to this: http://images.dailystar.co.uk/dynamic/1/photos/913000/1913.jpg. I loved it!

I spoke with a few students who were glad to be able to get a card of an actual person (Aileen) and to speak with previous students so that was good. If schedules align next year, I’d love some DDS students. Because their program starts in a few weeks, the students I checked with weren’t in country yet. Aileen was really happy to see students that she had spoken with earlier. She invited them to come by her office for tea any time they wanted.

Oh, I also had Suzanne from Semester in Australia with me at this stop to help me navigate and offer assistance on housing. Most students had housing by this point but she was a great tour guide, giving everyone really great tips about things like a great library that’s nearly always free and has a great coffee shop at the top of a building with some the best views in Melbourne (which I noted!). Plus, it probably saved me from getting a ticket for phoning and driving. 🙂 She was also really great for those students who didn’t have places and were asking about certain buildings.

We shuttled people back and forth to IKEA and Kmart for the rest of the day, and did a few other stops to pick up other random items and that was about it. Pretty simple! Everyone was really great and everyone seemed in good spirits. It didn’t seem (to me at least) that anyone was concerned with anything. So, hats off to Sarah and Adam for that! We probably wrapped up around 7 p.m., give or take. All the dentistry students were going to Lygon Street for dinner together so they were excited and really buzzing. Oh, and one of the trips to IKEA I had a pretty full group in the car and I turned on the windshield wipers instead of the turn signal and they died. It started as a little rumbling and ended in full-on hysterics. It was so funny! It’s been a long time since I’ve been at the root of such mockery and it was quite amusing. I’m sure my face was red as I surely tried to play it cool.

Wednesday: no one needed the van so I took it back around noon. I emailed the Melbourne MD students and waited to hear if anyone needed it; everyone seemed to have their stuff, which was good (and DDS started that day). After taking back the van, I wandered over to the Australian Open (by wandered I mean that I looked at my watch and thought “I’m not in a rush; I’ll walk.” After an hour, I had visions of Adam’s walk home from Tullamarine and decided to hop on a tram). I just got a grounds ticket, which gets me access to all matches except for the ones in the big arenas. I don’t know anything about tennis so I just went over to a big venue that didn’t have a line. I watched some girls (a girl in pink and a girl in yellow) play tennis. I didn’t think they were that good. Their serves didn’t look strong (they were around 150 kph) and I kind of thought I could do that. So I left. Plus my flip flops were sticking to the floor and I was really concerned that they were going to break and that I’d have to walk around without shoes.

University of Melbourne Physiotherapy School

OzTREKK students getting a tour from a current Melbourne student during orientation

So… then I wandered over to the Raonic match and literally happened to walk into an entry without a line. It was actually weird. I asked the lady “Like, can I go?” because all other gates had huge lines. It’s a one-in-one-out kind of deal. So I walk in and I see some seats. In the front row. Beside the Canadians with a flag draped over the railing. For reals. So I sat down with two guys from Vancouver and another guy with a Canadian tie but who spoke with a pretty good Aussie accent. I assumed he skied in Whistler. My new neighbour warned me, “We’re on TV back home so don’t pick your nose.” He kept getting calls and texts from friends in Vancouver saying that they saw him on TV. It was amazing! First of all, Milos’ serves were regularly over 220 kph. You could feel them, you know? It was pretty impressive. The game was quite long and I felt like they really earned every point. Milos won and was a fan favourite as he threw out all his gear into the audience—like sweat bands and arm covers. After four hours in the sweltering sun, you could not pay me to take them. The crowd loved it, though. I also found it comical that he teased the audience with each of his rackets (like he was going to toss them). They also loved it. I was on to his little tricks by racket #2. I think he used about four or five rackets through the game.

Now. The sun. So it’s pretty intense. When I started my walk from Thrifty it was cold and I was questioning my clothing attire (shorts and tee). By midway through the Raonic game, I was furiously applying and re-applying sunscreen. I felt that my skin was going to bake right off. I kept having to remind myself that the sunscreen will protect me (rather, hope that it would protect me). I was really questioning buying Life brand. At that moment, I wanted the expensive brand-name stuff. Immediately after the game, I found some shade and just sat. And re-applied (again). Classic Melbourne weather: four seasons in one day! I woke up today and was pleasantly surprised to see no burns. I was really terrified that I’d show up in Sydney like, well, a Canadian who just arrived in Australia.

Thankfully, I’m still as pasty-white as I was, but a week ago.

Phew. I write a lot.

*

Stay tuned for Jaime’s next blog: Sydney!

Tuesday, September 29th, 2015

Melbourne MD Application timeline for 2016 intake

Waiting patiently for the outcome of your Melbourne Medical School application? It won’t be long now!

University of Melbourne Medical School

Study medicine at the University of Melbourne

Application Timeline for 2016 Intake

  • Offers of admission begin to be issued: October 20, 2015
  • Deadline to accept offer of admission and pay deposit: November 4, 2015
  • Deadline to meet any conditions of offer: November 11, 2015
  • Unsuccessful applicants advised of outcome: November 13 – 16, 2015
  • Enrollment deadline: January 14, 2016
  • First day of class: February 1, 2016

Program: Doctor of Medicine (MD)
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Semester intake: February
Duration: 4 years

The Melbourne MD is a four-year, graduate-entry medical program that builds on the University of Melbourne’s reputation for excellence in teaching and research. It enables students to become outstanding medical practitioners who will excel as world-class leaders in their chosen field.

*

Questions about Melbourne Medical School? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Sarah Bridson at sarah@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Thursday, May 21st, 2015

Melbourne MD application timeline

Have you applied to Melbourne Medical School for the 2016 intake? Don’t forget to check out the application timeline!

University of Melbourne Medical School

Study medicine at Melbourne Medical School

Application Timeline for 2016 Intake

  • Application deadline: June 22, 2015 (Melbourne time). NOTE: All Melbourne MD application documents must be at the OzTREKK office by Friday, June 19, 2015 in order for your complete Melbourne Medical School application to be submitted on time.
  • Last date to sit MCAT for 2015 intake: May 22, 2015
  • Last date to submit MCAT results: July 6, 2015
  • Interview offers released: August 3, 2015
  • Deadline to accept interview (online acceptance): August 9, 2015
  • Interviews (via Skype): August 17 – 21, 2015
  • Applicants not shortlisted for interview notified: September 15 – 16, 2015
  • Offers of admission begin to be issued: October 20, 2015
  • Deadline to accept offer of admission and pay deposit: November 4, 2015
  • Deadline to meet any conditions of offer: November 11, 2015
  • Unsuccessful applicants advised of outcome: November 13 – 16, 2015
  • Enrollment deadline: January 14, 2016
  • First day of class: February 1, 2016

About the Melbourne Doctor of Medicine Program

Program: Doctor of Medicine (MD)
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Semester intake: February
Duration: 4 years
Application deadline: Friday, June 19, 2015

The Melbourne MD is a four-year, graduate-entry medical program that builds on the University of Melbourne’s reputation for excellence in teaching and research. It enables students to become outstanding medical practitioners who will excel as world-class leaders in their chosen field.

Entry Requirements for the Melbourne MD Program

To apply to the Melbourne MD, eligible Canadian applicants must have

  • successfully completed an undergraduate degree in any discipline at a recognized university;
  • completed prerequisite second-year university subjects (one each) in anatomy, physiology and biochemistry. Subjects from overseas universities will be considered on a case-by-case basis.
  • completed the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) or the Graduate Australian Medical School Admission Test (GAMSAT); and
  • received an invitation by the University of Melbourne to sit a multi-mini interview (MMI).

The selection of eligible international applicants, including Canadians, will be based on the following:

  • Academic record: grade point average (GPA) from a completed three-year (or more) university degree in any discipline (with prerequisites met and studies completed within the last 10 years)
  • Test results in an aptitude test, MCAT or GAMSAT: MCAT test results from January 2013 to May 2015 (inclusive) will be accepted for those applying for the 2016 intake. Applicants sitting the MCAT test more than once within this date range may choose which set of scores to include with their application
  • Structured multi-mini interview (MMI)

Apply to Melbourne Medical School!

*

Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Sarah Bridson for more information about how to apply to Melbourne Medical School. Email Sarah at sarah@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Tuesday, May 12th, 2015

University of Melbourne welcomes $2m for proton beam therapy development

The University of Melbourne has welcomed a $2-million investment by the State government in the budget to help plan and develop a National Centre for Proton Beam Therapy (PBT) as part of the Victorian Comprehensive Cancer Centre (VCCC).

The project will be undertaken in conjunction with the university and the Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre.

University of Melbourne Medical School

Learn more about Melbourne Medical School

Proton beam therapy is a cancer treatment that offers significant benefits to patients, particularly children, as it causes less side effects than other forms of radiation treatment and results in less damage to the healthy tissue surrounding a tumour.

There are presently no proton therapy facilities in Australia or South East Asia, and approximately 50 PBT centres globally. The presence of a facility in Victoria will not only benefit Victorians but also offer opportunities for research into cancer therapies and training of clinicians.

Acting Vice-Chancellor Professor Margaret Sheil said the project is a great initiative for Victoria.  “This Centre will draw on the existing strengths of the Melbourne biomedical precinct, and the expertise located at the university’s Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences and the Faculty of Science.

“The university welcomes the opportunity to be part of this project, that builds on our already strong record in cancer research and medical training, and will help ensure Victoria continues to lead the way in developing advanced treatments in the fight against cancer.”

The Centre will bring together experts in research and cancer treatment from both the University of Melbourne and the Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre.  The $2-million commitment will allow work to begin on developing a business case for the Centre and determine the most appropriate location and machine.

Dean of the Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences Professor Stephen Smith said, “This announcement is an excellent recognition of the work that needs to be done in this area.”

“As a member of the VCCC we’re looking forward to working with our partners on further developing improved clinical treatments for patients.”

About the Melbourne Doctor of Medicine Program

Program: Doctor of Medicine (MD)
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Semester intake: February
Duration: 4 years
Application deadline: June 22, 2015 (Melbourne time).  NOTE: All Melbourne MD application documents must be received by Friday, June 19, 2015 in order for your complete application to be submitted on time.

The Melbourne MD is a four-year, graduate-entry medical program that builds on the university’s reputation for excellence in teaching and research. It enables students to become outstanding medical practitioners who will excel as world-class leaders in their chosen field.

Entry Requirements for the Melbourne MD Program

To apply to the Melbourne MD, eligible Canadian applicants must have

  • successfully completed an undergraduate degree in any discipline at a recognized university;
  • completed prerequisite second-year university subjects (one each) in anatomy, physiology and biochemistry. Subjects from overseas universities will be considered on a case-by-case basis.
  • completed the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) or the Graduate Australian Medical School Admission Test (GAMSAT); and
  • received an invitation by the University of Melbourne to sit a multi-mini interview (MMI).

The selection of eligible international applicants, including Canadians, will be based on the following:

  • Academic record: grade point average (GPA) from a completed three-year (or more) university degree in any discipline (with prerequisites met and studies completed within the last 10 years)
  • Test results in an aptitude test, MCAT or GAMSAT: MCAT test results from January 2013 to May 2015 (inclusive) will be accepted for those applying for the 2016 intake. Applicants sitting the MCAT test more than once within this date range may choose which set of scores to include with their application
  • Structured multi-mini interview (MMI)

Apply to Melbourne Medical School!

*

Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Sarah Bridson for more information about how to apply to Melbourne Medical School. Email Sarah at sarah@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.