+ OzTrekk Educational Services Home
 
 

Posts Tagged ‘medical program’

Thursday, June 5th, 2014

Melbourne Medical School application deadline is approaching

Have you applied to the prestigious Melbourne Medical School for the 2015 intake? This is just a reminder to all Melbourne MD applicants that the application deadline is June 23, 2014; however, in order for your complete application to be submitted to the university on time, please submit all required documents by 4 p.m. Friday, June 20, 2014.

University of Melbourne Medical School

Study medicine at the University of Melbourne Medical School

Program: Doctor of Medicine (MD)
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Semester intake: February
Duration: 4 years
Application deadline: Application and supporting documents must be at the OzTREKK office by Friday, June 20, 2014 in order to meet the application deadline of June 23, 2014 (Melbourne time).

Entry Requirements for the Melbourne MD Program

To apply to the Melbourne MD, eligible Canadian applicants must have

  • successfully completed an undergraduate degree in any discipline at a recognized university (no minimum GPA required);
  • completed prerequisite second-year university subjects (one each) in anatomy, physiology and biochemistry. Subjects from overseas universities will be considered on a case-by-case basis.
  • completed the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) or the Graduate Australian Medical School Admissions Test (GAMSAT) (no minimum MCAT required); and
  • received an invitation by Melbourne to sit a multi-mini interview (MMI).

Apply to the University of Melbourne Medical School!

*

If you have any questions, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Broghan Dean at any time to assist you with your University of Melbourne Medical School application, or to answer any questions you may have regarding medical school in Australia. Email Broghan at broghan@oztrekk.com or call 1-866-698-7355 (toll free in Canada).

Friday, January 31st, 2014

Monash Medical School application deadline is approaching

Are you considering applying to Monash Medical School for the 2015 intake? The application deadline is fast approaching!

Monash Medical School

Study medicine at Monash University

Application Timelines for the 2015 Intake

Round 1

Last date to undertake MCAT (for graduate-entry MBBS): Jan. 25, 2014

Last date to undertake ISAT (for undergraduate-entry MBBS): Feb. 10, 2014 (due to ISAT closing for site updating)

Application deadline for Round 1: Feb 14, 2014

Interview Dates in Canada: Mar. 17 & 18, 2014 (Toronto); Mar. 20 & 21, 2014 (Vancouver)

Round 2

Last date to undertake MCAT (for graduate-entry MBBS): Sept. 18, 2014

Last date to undertake ISAT (for undergraduate-entry MBBS): Sept. 26, 2014

Application deadline for Round 2: Sept. 26, 2014

Interview Dates in Canada: November 3, 2014 (Vancouver); November 5, 2014 (Toronto)

What’s the Difference Between Graduate- and Undergraduate-entry Medical Programs?

Graduate Entry: Some Australian medical schools offer a graduate-entry medical program where you first have to complete an undergraduate degree, such as a Bachelor of Science, in order to apply to a four-year medical program. Students applying to Monash graduate-entry MBBS must sit the MCAT.

Undergraduate Entry: Rather than having to earn a bachelor degree first, undergraduate-entry medical programs allow students to enter directly from high school. Students applying to Monash undergraduate-entry MBBS must sit the ISAT.

Have you just completed high school? Will you be finishing high school soon? Check out Monash University Medical School’s undergraduate medical program!

Apply to Monash Medical School’s undergraduate-entry medical program!

Have you already completed an undergraduate degree? Then Monash University Medical School’s graduate medical program is for you!

Apply to Monash Medical School’s graduate-entry medical program!

*

Learn more about Monash Medical School and about its application timelines. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Broghan Dean for more information at broghan@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1 866-698-7355. Find out how you can study in Australia!

Friday, January 24th, 2014

JCU professor honoured with Australia Day Ambassador role

James Cook University’s Professor Peter Leggat AM has been named as a 2014 Australia Day Ambassador for Queensland.

JCU Medical School

Study medicine at James Cook University

He is among 47 Queenslanders in the Ambassadors Program, who help to capture the spirit of Australia Day by encouraging communities across Queensland to come together and celebrate Australia’s national day, Jan. 26.

Ambassadors are high-achieving, inspirational Queenslanders from diverse fields and backgrounds, and travel throughout the state to attend local council celebrations on Australia Day.

Professor Leggat, who is based in Townsville, is Head of JCU’s School of Public Health, Tropical Medicine and Rehabilitation Sciences, and Associate Dean for Faculty Affairs, Faculty of Medicine, Health and Molecular Sciences.

This weekend, Professor Leggat will travel to Richmond Shire in Western Queensland—a centre for sheep and cattle farming, but also growing in popularity for tourism as part of the Australia’s acclaimed Dinosaur Trail.

“I was surprised to be asked to be an Ambassador, but did not hesitate to agree,” Professor Leggat said.

“I am looking forward to joining the people of Richmond to celebrate our national day and also to thank them for their contribution to JCU, especially through health placements and workforce development.”

Professor Leggat will spend the Australia Day weekend in Richmond and will be hosted by the Richmond Shire Council.

Professor Leggat said he was initially approached by the Department of Premier and Cabinet in the Queensland Government to participate and they matched him with his host council.

The Australia Day Ambassador Program is now in its 10th year.

Professor Leggat is a highly respected medical educator, who has been teaching medical and other health science students for nearly 30 years.

He helped to establish the popular Australian Postgraduate Travel Medicine course, which has been conducted at James Cook University for more than 20 years, and more recently started JCU’s inaugural expedition and wilderness medicine course.

*

If you have any questions about studying medicine or about JCU Medical School, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Broghan Dean at broghan@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1 866-698-7355.

Find out more about Australian Medical Schools and about how you can study in Australia!

Tuesday, January 7th, 2014

JCU Medical School strengthening Indigenous health care

Creating partnerships to improve the quality of primary health care provided to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders across Northern Australia is the aim of a nationally funded project led by researchers at James Cook University.

JCU Medical School

Study medicine at JCU Medical School

The National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC), which administers grants for health and medical research on behalf of the Australian Government, awarded the project nearly $600,000 in the latest grant round.

Associate Professor Sarah Larkins, from JCU’s School of Medicine and Dentistry, will lead Quality improvement in Aboriginal primary health care: lessons from the best to better the rest from early 2014.

Dr Larkins said improving the quality and consistency of primary health care (PHC) provided to Aboriginal people and Torres Strait Islanders was an essential part of the Federal Government’s Close the Gap program.

“A range of Indigenous PHC centres—both Aboriginal and Islander Community Controlled Health Services and government-provided health services—provide primary health care services for Indigenous people,” she said. “However, the quality of care provided by such services, and the intermediate health outcomes achieved, vary significantly, and the reasons for this are not known.”

Associate Professor Larkins said working in partnership with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peak bodies and government, researchers from JCU, Menzies School of Health Research and the Combined Universities Centre for Remote Health, the project aimed to find out what worked in primary health care services to help improve their performance.

“Working with existing data through the ABCD National Research Partnership, we will identify ‘high-improving’ PHC services over several cycles using Continuous Quality Improvement—or CQI—tools.

“Then we will use multiple case studies with these services that improve dramatically in response to CQI to investigate the factors that support a positive response to CQI processes and how they interact at each site.

“In partnership with participating services, we will then use action research to translate this knowledge through the existing ABCD National Research Partnership Network to services struggling to improve their performance using CQI tools.”

About James Cook University Medical School

James Cook University’s medical school specializes in rural and remote medicine. The JCU program has a unique place among Australian medical schools. The course is undertaken entirely in northern Australia and has an emphasis on tropical medicine, the health of rural and remote communities, and of Aboriginal peoples and Torres Strait Islanders. The JCU medical program is informed by a concern for social justice, innovation and excellence in medical education, research and service.

Medical students at JCU gain early experience in the tropical health care context and benefit from extensive clinical experience and a full course of medical education and training. The program attracts students, staff and clinicians with an ambition to make a difference, whatever their background, specialty or career direction.

James Cook University’s medical school offers a six-year, full-time undergraduate degree in medicine and surgery, the Bachelor of Medicine Bachelor of Surgery (MBBS). This medical program aims to produce graduates of the highest academic standards, who can progress to medical practice and to further studies in medical specialties. As mentioned above, the course places special emphasis on rural and Indigenous health and tropical medicine. If you are interested in global health, and the health people in rural and remote places, JCU medicine may be a great fit for you!

*

Do you have questions about JCU Medical School and its MBBS program? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Officer Broghan Dean at broghan@oztrekk.com or call 1 866-698-7355 (toll free in Canada) for more information about how you can study in Australia!

Monday, November 18th, 2013

UQ co-hosts telehealth conference

Successes and failures in telehealth was on the agenda when world leaders in virtual health care converged on Brisbane for a conference this month.

The University of Queensland’s Centre for Online Health (COH) and the Australasian Telehealth Society (ATHS) hosted the 2013 International Conference on Successes and Failures in Telehealth (SFT-13) on Nov. 11 and 12.

UQ MBBS

The SFT-13 was held in Brisbane Nov. 11 -12, 2013

The conference highlighted innovative approaches and new directions in telehealth research, education and service delivery, said the COH deputy director and scientific chair of the conference, Associate Professor Anthony Smith.

The conference brought together more than 150 delegates to create a forum where people can share their experiences with clinical telehealth services. There were opportunities to share ideas and strategies related to the implementation and uptake of telehealth.

“The conference has attracted an impressive line-up of national and international speakers to present on the future direction of telehealth,” Dr Smith said, adding that the conference offered a trade exhibition and also hosted the ATHS Annual General Meeting, which all delegates were welcome to attend.

Presentations covered telehealth specialties such as mental health, dermatology, pediatric acute care, indigenous health, geriatrics and palliative care.

The telehealth conference also featured two prominent international keynote speakers: Founder and CEO of Canada’s Ontario Telemedicine Network, Dr Ed Brown, who spoke on lessons learned and the future direction for telemedicine; and Dr Shuji Shimizu from Japan’s Kyushu University Hospital, who discussed 10 years of remote medical education experience in the Asia-Pacific region.

Other topics presented included

  • Teledentistry: Opportunities and Challenges;
  • A Telehealth Technician’s Role – Managing a Telehealth Network;
  • Telehealth Service Delivery in a Paediatric Acute Care Setting;
  • Palliative Care Video Consultations at Home: a Cost Effective Approach to Care; and
  • Emergency Telehealth in Queensland: The Next Steps.

About UQ’s Centre for Online Health

The Centre for Online Health (COH) is a part of the UQ School of Medicine within the Faculty of Health Sciences at the University of Queensland. With more than 12 years of experience, the COH is recognized internationally for its role in research, service delivery and education and training in the fields of telemedicine, telehealth and e-Healthcare.

*

Each year, OzTREKK helps Canadian students realize their medical career dreams by helping them through the application and pre-departure process for the UQ Medical School. Our students tell us they love the clinical experience they receive at the UQ Medical School and enjoy the Brisbane lifestyle!

For more information about UQ Medical School and other medical schools in Australia, contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Broghan Dean at broghan@oztrekk.com, or call toll free in Canada at 1 866-698-7355.

 

Thursday, November 14th, 2013

Monash Medical School student shares her experience with OzTREKK

Deciding to study medicine is a big decision, especially when you’ve got your heart set on studying in Australia. What’s even more incredible is when you enter an Australian Medical School as an undergraduate! Undergraduate-entry medical programs are typically five to six years in length, and allow students to enter a medical program directly from high school. Upon the completion of a five-  or six-year year medical degree, students complete a residency in their field of choice/specialization and then become licensed doctors.

Monash University Medical School

Sarah Visakhamoorthy is glad she chose Monash

OzTREKK student Sarah Visakhamoorthy applied to Monash Medical School for the 2013 intake and was delighted when she received an offer. The Waterloo, Ontario high school student began her Australian Medical School journey at the Monash University Clayton campus in February 2013. Sarah has graciously allowed us to bombard her with questions about her studies—even though she’s a busy medical student!

Why did you consider studying medicine in Australia directly after finishing high school? What made you interested in Monash?

I primarily considered studying medicine at an Australian university because certain universities, such as Monash, offered undergraduate medical programs. I knew the level of education I would be receiving in Australia would be world-class and internationally recognized, meaning that my degree would undoubtedly be recognized if I wished to practice in Canada.

I was always keen on studying medicine after high school but doing so after an undergraduate degree in Canada inevitably makes the process quite long (typically a minimum duration of seven years). Thus, the idea of an undergraduate medical program appealed to me as it would allow me to begin working as a physician sooner.

Monash University Medical School

Sarah says Monash medicine is engaging and challenging

Naturally, I was drawn to Monash University’s five-year undergraduate program in this aspect as it is one of the shortest medical programs in Australia; however, this was just a fraction of Monash’s appeal for me. As a member of the M8 Alliance, an international academic network of institutions focused on global health, and The Group of Eight (Go8), Monash University is internationally recognized for its research and teaching excellence, especially in the medical sciences.

How have you found the adjustment in moving from Canada to Australia?

First of all, thanks to Beth and her great team from OzTREKK—my move across the Pacific was made so much easier. From answering the many questions I had to providing me with detailed information packages, OzTREKK equipped me with the essentials.

In terms of adjustment, the many similarities between Canada and Australia made the adjustment to Australia fairly simple for me in terms of culture. Much to my surprise and possibly as a result of cultural similarities, I also didn’t find myself too homesick. Granted, regular Skype sessions with family made the move much easier and allowed me to continue to keep in touch with friends back in Canada.

The staff and students at Monash University were very helpful and living on campus made it extremely easy to socialize with other first years and international students through events hosted by the residence support team.

Monash University Medical School

“I didn’t find myself too homesick”

Despite the minimal culture shock, I still had to adjust to living on my own and making use of public transport much more than I did in Canada which took a while to get used to. The greatest difficulty I faced while learning to live on my own was with time management as this meant that I had to balance cooking and grocery shopping (along with other tasks) with academics and school work.

What is the Monash medical program like so far?

Studying medicine at Monash is fascinating, engaging and challenging. The program strives to immerse students in the clinical environment right from the start by presenting us with the opportunity to apply our knowledge and skills obtained from lectures and tutorials. This is done through short placements throughout the year that provide us with a glimpse of what clinical practice and the hospital environment is like. I find that these placements in conjunction with tutorials that are heavily focused on student discussion and group learning are aspects of the course that are very engaging.

So far I have found the challenges of the program to lie mostly in self-directed learning and keeping up with the quick pace of the program. Nevertheless, staff and senior students of the medical program are always willing to go out of their way to support first years, so don’t be afraid to ask for assistance.

Where do you live and how did you find your accommodation?

Currently I live on campus at Monash as it makes getting to and from class a lot easier. That being said, I have many friends who also live in share houses with other medical students near the university. I was able to find my accommodation through the university as they offered information soon after my acceptance regarding on-campus accommodation options. I was then able to list my room and hall preferences using the residence information on the Monash University website.

About Monash Medical School

The Monash Medical School in Australia offers the Bachelor of Medicine Bachelor of Surgery (MBBS) degree, which first began at the Gippsland Campus in 2008, and is a four-year graduate-entry medical program. The Monash Medical School’s graduate-entry degree emphasizes clinical communication skills and early clinical contact visits to medical practices, community care facilities and hospitals.

The undergraduate-entry medical program at the Monash University Clayton Campus (main campus) is only offered to high school graduates (and for up to two years after) who have not undertaken any other studies at a post-secondary level. The course is 5 years in duration and there is only one intake per year, which is in February.

Have you just completed high school? Will you be finishing high school soon? Check out Monash University Medical School’s undergraduate medical program!

Have you already completed an undergraduate degree? Then Monash University Medical School’s graduate medical program is for you!

*

Are you interested in Monash Medical School? Are you wondering what it’s like to study in Australia? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Broghan Dean at broghan@oztrekk.com or call toll free 1 866-698-7355 for more information.

 

Monday, November 11th, 2013

JCU student’s passion for tropical medicine takes him to Vietnam

Year 2 JCU Medical School student Andrew Samaan is off to Vietnam during the Australia summer holidays to take up a unique placement opportunity at Oxford University’s Tropical Medicine Department. Mr Samaan will join the department’s regular activities, such as ward rounds, tutorials, lab work and academic meetings, under the supervision of Professor Jeremy Farrar. He will produce a literature review on the clinical aspects of typhoid at the end of his placement.

James Cook University Medical School

JCU Med School focuses on tropical medicine

It is the first time a James Cook University student has been accepted for this type of placement with Oxford medical school and Andrew assures us it was no easy feat.

“The selection process was brutal!” Mr Samaan said. “I had to apply two years in advance and compete with students from around the world.”

Mr Samaan was required to produce a written statement, five referees, evidence of suitability for the program and an academic transcript. Luckily, this was no problem for Andrew—he was runner‐up for a university medal at University of New South Wales and was ranked first in his education qualification from the University College London.

Mr Samaan became interested in tropical medicine, specifically typhoid, through his studies in the Master of Public Health and Tropical Medicine.

“Typhoid fever was something I never thought of until I undertook the tropical medicine block this year and became friends with doctors from Burma and Nepal who told me their war stories and made me want to know more about it,” said Mr Samaan.

The keen student has become as familiar with Vietnamese culture as possible and believes he has what it takes to be a successful part of the team.

“In 2011 and 2012, I have been conducting research almost daily with a Vietnamese-trained surgeon and this has instilled a passion for the traditional methods of teaching, the importance of basic sciences and the need to see as many patients as possible.”

Mr Samaan will spend eight weeks from December 2013 overseas.

“I could not pass up the opportunity to test my mettle in Vietnam,” said Mr Samaan. “Being on the wards daily and in the lab with world leaders will improve my clinical skills and basic medical science knowledge beyond what is possible in the same amount of time in other locations.”

This story was originally published in the JCU Medical School’s Taste Of Our Own Medicine publication.

About JCU Medical School

The medical program at James Cook University is highly regarded, producing skilled, work-ready graduates with a strong foundation of scientific and medical knowledge. They value social justice, innovation and excellence. The school is a leader in focus areas of rural and remote health, tropical medicine and the health of Indigenous Australians and it is committed to developing understandings of and workforce appropriate for under-served populations.

The university’s primary aim is to provide high-quality medical education that also reflects its focus on rural, remote, Indigenous and tropical health. For this reason, and to accommodate the increased number of students who are needed for the future, JCU has a program that is geographically distributed across northern Queensland and the Northern Territory.

The JCU Medical School offers the only full medical program in tropical Australia. Established in 2000, the school places a special emphasis on rural, remote and tropical medicine and the health of Aboriginal peoples and Torres Strait Islanders.

The six-year, full-time Bachelor of Medicine Bachelor of Surgery degree is a comprehensive program with integrated instruction in biomedical sciences, professional practice and clinical medicine. Students attend the Townsville campus for the first half of the course with clinical experience from year one. The James Cook University medical precinct is opposite the Townsville Hospital, the largest teaching hospital in regional or tropical Australia. In later years, students have a base at one of the James Cook University clinical schools that include Townsville, Cairns, Mackay or Darwin.

Students undertake rural and remote clinical attachments throughout the course and have opportunities to pursue international interests, in places as diverse as Norway, North Dakota, Papua New Guinea, South America and many others.

*

Do you have questions about tropical medicine, JCU Medical School and about medical programs at Australian universities? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Officer Broghan Dean at broghan@oztrekk.com or call 1 866-698-7355 (toll free in Canada).

 

Monday, November 4th, 2013

UQ Medical School student does his elective in India

Thinking of studying medicine at a medical school in Australia? All of us at OzTREKK love to keep in touch with our former students! They are a great source of information for future OzTREKK students who are considering studying in Australia.

UQ Medical School

You can do your elective in India!

Like before, we’ve kept in touch with countless students long after they’ve arrived in Australia and begun their program. We’ve recently been in contact with a former OzTREKK student who is now studying the Bachelor of Medicine Bachelor of Surgery (MBBS) program at the University of Queensland Medical School—but is now in India for his four-week medical elective! Here, this busy medical school student offers his advice regarding elective placements for anyone considering studying the MBBS at UQ Medical School. Remember: think outside the box!

What made you choose India for your elective?

How it all began? I always wanted to travel to India. As part of UQ School of Medicine‘s first-year curriculum, students must complete a four-week medical elective, basically shadowing a health professional. They really encourage you to go abroad, and India was next on my list of countries to visit. I wanted to combine the two.

UQ Medical School

Don’t forget your passport

How do you find a location for your elective?

The University of Queensland Medical Society (UQMS) has an online database for elective spots posted by students who completed their electives the previous years. The database has useful information such as contacts, testimonials on the quality of medical experience, cultural experience, etc. I picked a highly rated one located in Delhi, contacted the liaison officer, and went from there.

Every elective is different, but the liaison officer asked that I submit a letter of good standing from the Dean of Medicine proving my enrollment. In return, UQ asked that I fill out a few forms such as what I will be doing at the hospital, what is the contact information of the hospital, etc. It was really easy, especially since every year, UQ Medical School students complete an elective at this hospital. Thus everything was in place.

Must you choose only a location on the elective list?

UQ Medical School

Always think outside the box

You do have an opportunity to set up you own elective. One of my peers is going to rural Tanzania in East Africa, and her process was a lot more involved.  Other classmates are travelling together (some up to groups of six) in areas like Peru, and they have someone organizing everything for them. So there’s variety on how you can organize and prepare. After I filled out the forms, I had to wait two weeks, and boom, elective set up! Now onto other important stuff.

What happens next?

Flights. I was lucky to have saved up points from the last bazillion years, so that’s what I booked my flight on. Other students got good deals from STA Travel on campus. Next were vaccinations. The UQ School of Medicine is super strict on this—and they should be. It would suck to come back from elective and have contracted something serious. I went to the clinic on campus that has a doctor knowledgeable in travel medicine, and made sure my vaccinations were up to date. I got a polio booster, and took my two doses of the cholera vaccine. I also made sure there were HIV prophylaxis capabilities at the hospital in Delhi and that they had other medical supplies like gloves, masks, etc. UQ Medical School asked that I do this. I felt a little stupid because this is a big hospital in Delhi and I didn’t want to sound patronizing to the liaison officer. However, my peer who is going to Tanzania has to bring a lot of that stuff with her. I suspect this is precautionary.

UQ SoM

Get your visa

Next was my Indian visa. Every passport holder in the world needs a visa to travel to India, unless of course they are Indian. I was informed that I can travel on a tourist visa (phew!) since I am only a medical “observer.” The process involved internet searching for Indian visas for Canadians in Australia. It took me to the following site http://www.vfs-in-au.net/. I filled out the forms, went to their office near downtown Brisbane with the form, my passport, and a copy of the e-mail I got from the Australian government proving that I had a student visa in Australia. The process takes approximately two weeks. Tip: pay them by debit card (they call that EFTPOS in Australia). I paid via credit card and it was $15 more expensive. Not a big deal, but kind of annoying.

What do you bring with you?

Now packing and pre-departure stuff. I was told that I only needed to bring my white lab coat and stethoscope. I’ve been reading my Lonely Planet, India and Lonely Planet Southeast Asia on a Shoestring (after I am finished my four weeks in Delhi, I’m plan to travel around India and SE Asia for five weeks).  I did not bring any other books, as apparently there is a medical textbook store near the hospital that sells all you could ever want in the medical textbook world for cheap, cheap! As for accommodation during my elective, I am staying at the hospital; it’s around $250 for the four weeks.

Last administrative thing I had to complete was setting up travel insurance. The UQ Medical School has a policy I can travel on covering for my four weeks of elective, but I needed to set something up for my travels afterward.

About the University of Queensland Medical School

The University of Queensland Medical School offers a four-year, graduate-entry medical program, the Bachelor of Medicine Bachelor of Surgery (MBBS).

Designed to produce doctors able to meet the challenges of the new century, the curriculum captures the enthusiasm and maturity of its graduate entrants and help them develop into highly skilled medical graduates capable of entering the wide variety of career options open to them.

*

Questions? Contact OzTREKK Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Broghan Dean at any time to assist you with your University of Queensland Medical School application, or to answer any questions you may have regarding medical school in Australia. Email Broghan at broghan@oztrekk.com, or call toll free in Canada at 1 866-698-7355.

 

Friday, October 25th, 2013

Australia is looking for rural doctors

Did you know that Canadian and New Zealand doctors are now being sought to work in regional and rural Australia? It’s true.

A new agreement will let some Canadian and New Zealand doctors work in Australia without supervision if they have relevant qualifications and rural and remote medical experience. Normally, an overseas-trained doctor would require to undergo one year of supervised work, but this new pathway will eliminate this requirement.

JCU School of Medicine

JCU is the hub of rural and remote medicine

This is a reflection on the need for doctors in Australia with expertise in Aboriginal health.

President of the Australian College of Rural and Remote Medicine (ACRRM)—and JCU Medical School Dean and Head of School—Richard Murray has signed a mutual recognition agreement with the College of Family Physicians of Canada.

“The engagement between rural doctors in Canada and Australia is warm and continues to strengthen,” he said.

The agreement will give its fellowship qualification reciprocal recognition in Canada. According to ACRRM, the draft MoU with Canada proposes that the Primary Qualifications of ACRRM and the College of Family Physicians of Canada (Fellowship and Certification, respectively) be recognized as equivalent qualifications. As a consequence, current holders of a FACRRM would qualify for “all the privileges and responsibilities of Certification with the CFPC.”

Similarly, a CFPC certified practitioner with appropriate rural experience would be entitled to apply for Fellowship of ACRRM.

Professor Murray said that the opportunities this creates for Australian and Canadian practitioners to gain experience in each other’s countries could only benefit the quality and depth of rural medical services.

“Working in unfamiliar environments sharpens people powers of observation and stimulates their curiosity,” says Professor Murray. “Like cultural, business, and sporting exchanges, the exchange of rural generalist-orientated practitioners between Australia and Canada would pay dividends over the long-term.”

About James Cook University Medical School

James Cook University’s medical school specializes in rural and remote medicine. The JCU program has a unique place among Australian medical schools. The course is undertaken entirely in northern Australia and has an emphasis on tropical medicine, the health of rural and remote communities, and of Aboriginal peoples and Torres Strait Islanders. The JCU medical program is informed by a concern for social justice, innovation and excellence in medical education, research and service.

Medical students at JCU gain early experience in the tropical health care context and benefit from extensive clinical experience and a full course of medical education and training. The program attracts students, staff and clinicians with an ambition to make a difference, whatever their background, specialty or career direction.

James Cook University’s medical school offers a six-year, full-time undergraduate degree in medicine and surgery, the Bachelor of Medicine Bachelor of Surgery (MBBS). This medical program aims to produce graduates of the highest academic standards, who can progress to medical practice and to further studies in medical specialties. As mentioned above, the course places special emphasis on rural and Indigenous health and tropical medicine. If you are interested in global health, and the health people in rural and remote places, JCU medicine may be a great fit for you!

*

Do you have questions about JCU Medical School and its MBBS program? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Officer Broghan Dean at broghan@oztrekk.com or call 1 866-698-7355 (toll free in Canada) for more information about how you can study in Australia!

 

Wednesday, October 23rd, 2013

UQ Medical School announces new appointments

The UQ Medical School is a leading provider of medical education and research in Queensland, with the country’s largest medical degree program.

Designed to produce doctors who are able to meet today’s medical challenges, the MBBS curriculum at UQ Medical School has been planned to capture the enthusiasm of their students and help them develop into highly skilled medical graduates capable of entering the wide variety of career options open to them.

University of Queensland Medical School

Learn more studying medicine at UQ

Recently, the UQ Medical School formally announced three new appointments:

Professor Peter Soyer: Acting Head, South-West Cluster and Acting Head, PA-Southside Clinical School

Professor Peter Soyer has commenced duties as Acting Head, South-West Cluster and Acting Head, PA-Southside Clinical School. Peter is an outstanding academic clinician. He is currently the Director of the Department of Dermatology, Princess Alexandra Hospital, and Chair, Dermatology Research Centre, School of Medicine. Peter has an impressive research record with specific interests in melanoma and teledermatology. In addition he has substantial managerial experience in the hospital and academic environment which will advance the School of Medicine and particularly the South-West Cluster.

Associate Professor Stephen Brierley: Head, Ipswich Clinical School

Associate Professor Stephen Brierley has formally been appointed to the position of Head, Ipswich Clinical School. Stephen is a Fellow of the Australasian College of Emergency Medicine, as well as the Australian College of Rural and Remote Medicine. He holds a Master of Health Administration. Stephen has extensive clinical experience in accident and emergency medicine, as well as hospital administration. These skills will be invaluable to the School of Medicine as it seeks closer engagement with its partners in medical education.

Dr Helen Benham: Acting Deputy Head, PA-Southside Clinical School

Dr Helen Benham has been appointed as Acting Deputy Head, PA-Southside Clinical School. Helen is an impressive and emerging academic clinician. The School is delighted to invest in a young academic with such enormous potential. Helen has extensive experience already in clinical teaching and she brings outstanding communication and organization skills to the role.

Entry Requirements for the UQ Medical Program

Offers will be made to eligible applicants on a “rolling admissions,” first-come, first-served basis.

  • Completed degree (bachelor, master, PhD)
  • GPA equivalent to 5.0 on UQ’s 7.0 scale
  • MCAT score (minimum 8/8/8 or 8/8/M/8) or GAMSAT score (minimum of 50 in each section)
  • Compulsory consultative meeting with the UQ Medical School

Applications are still open for the 2014 intake!

Apply now to the UQ Medical School!

*

Find out more about the UQ Medical School and other medical schools in Australia. Email OzTREKKs Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Broghan Dean at broghan@oztrekk.com, or call toll free in Canada at 1 866-698-7355.