+ OzTrekk Educational Services Home
 
 

Posts Tagged ‘electrical engineering’

Tuesday, June 16th, 2015

Global interest in JCU’s revolutionary IT course

Global tech experts are looking to Cairns, with strong international interest in JCU’s revolutionary new engineering course, the Internet of Things.

JCU is the first Australian university to establish a new program in “Electronic Systems and the Internet of Things (IoT)”, as part of its Bachelor of Engineering. It’s believed that James Cook University is only the second university in the world to offer such a course.

JCU IT School

Study IT and engineering at JCU  (image credit: JCU)

The Internet of Things is expected to lead to the next revolution in computer technology. It will allow everyday objects to have network connectivity, allowing them to send and receive data, creating radical shifts in the way we apply technologies in our daily lives.

More than 50 people from 14 countries have applied for two senior academic positions with the course at JCU’s Cairns campus.

Applications have been received from countries as diverse as the United States, Saudi Arabia, Singapore, Norway, Malaysia and Portugal.

The Dean of the College of Science, Technology and Engineering, Professor Paul Dirks said he’s delighted by the strong interest in the course.

“It confirms the global significance of the Internet of Things and vindicates JCU’s decision to establish such an innovative course.”

“The Internet of Things will create the conditions for a new industrial revolution over the next decade, and JCU is leading the charge on educating the next generation of computer engineers,” Prof Dirks said.

The four-year degree will be offered at JCU’s Cairns campus from 2016. It will combine the study of electrical engineering, wireless communication, software engineering and industrial design.

There will be an emphasis on sensor devices, internet technologies, data mining and cloud computing.

It’s the first time a full engineering degree has been offered at the Cairns campus.

James Cook University will work with industry partners, linking advancements in the Internet of Things to entrepreneurial opportunities. New commercial opportunities focused on the potential of northern Australia and the tropical world will be a special focus.

*

Learn more about JCU Engineering School. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Engineering Schools Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Wednesday, May 20th, 2015

Monash Engineering’s chipless tracker could transform barcode industry

Barcodes on packaged goods could soon be a thing of the past with the rapid expansion of chipless tags, and Monash University researchers are at the forefront of developing this technology.

Monash University Engineering School

Barcodes on packaged goods could soon be a thing of the past

A research team lead by Dr Nemai Karmakar, from the Department of Electrical and Computer Systems Engineering, have long been developing chipless radio frequency identification (RFID) tags that can be printed directly onto products and packaging—including postal items, drugs and books—making it cheaper, smaller and faster than any other tracking system on the market.

Now, the team have developed fully printable tags for metals and liquids including water bottles and soft-drinks cans. Until now, this hasn’t been possible because the metal and liquids interfere with the technology. The tag can be printed with an inkjet printer and can be read when they are attached to reflective surfaces such as metal cans and water bottles.

Dr Karmakar said the team was believed to be the first to develop fully printable chipless RFID tags on paper and plastics, and the technology could revolutionise the multi-billion-dollar RFID market.

“The fact that chipless tags be printed directly onto products and packaging means they are far more reliable, smaller and cost effective than any other barcoding system,” Dr Karmakar said.

“The new chipless RFID technology is a high data capacity mm-wave barcode system that operates at 60 GHz mm-wave signal. This means it is much smaller than any other commercially available chipless RFID tags; however, it can still contain a high amount of data and information.

“The main challenge that we have overcome is to transfer the technology to paper and plastic while retaining the required printing resolution. Uniquely, the 60 GHz mm-wave tag can handle printing errors and surface variations. It’s very promising indeed in its ability to revolutionise the multi-billion-dollar RFID market.”

Dr Karmakar said the chipless RFID tag could also be used in temperature above 80 degrees and cryogenic temperatures.

“Another application could be biomedical samples stored at cryogenic temperatures,” Dr Karmakar said.

The researchers, based in the Monash Microwave, Antenna, RFID and Sensor Laboratory (MMARS) recently received a US$90,000 grant over three years from Xerox to further develop the cutting edge 60 GHz Chipless RFID.

The research has been supported by the Australian Research Council (ARC) Discovery and Linkage Projects.

Monash University Department of Electrical and Computer Systems Engineering

The Department of Electrical and Computer Systems Engineering (ECSE) is an extremely diverse department specialising in telecommunications, RFID, biomedical engineering, robotics, sensing, vision, systems-on-a-chip and smart energy systems. These applications are based on fundamental research in electronics, photonics, signal processing, communications theory, artificial intelligence, real-time software, optimization, electromagnetics and numerical modeling.

The ECSE program at Monash University equips students with the skills necessary to succeed in this rapidly changing industry, with graduates going on to make an impact in many areas. The department is at the centre of ECSE research, with Monash researchers working on innovative projects including bionic vision, augmented reality, medical diagnostics, optical communications, wireless communications, sensor systems and high-voltage engineering. This research is creating and supporting high-tech industry.

*

Would you like to learn more about engineering programs at Monash University? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Engineering Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com, or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Tuesday, October 21st, 2014

Monash Computer Systems Engineering duo win international accolade for wearable computer

Monash University researchers have scooped an award at an international symposium on wearable computers.

A Monash PhD student Titus Tang and his supervisor Dr Wai Ho Li, from Monash Vision Group and the Department of Electrical and Computer Systems Engineering won the Best Paper Award at the 18th International Symposium on Wearable Computers in Seattle, a major conference for specialists in the field.

Monash Computer Systems Engineering

Study engineering at Monash University

Titus presented the research on the EyeWear prototype which assists vision impaired users by translating 3D visual information into 3D audio cues, to more than 700 delegates.

After the win, Titus was invited to visit Microsoft’s research campus in Seattle as well as a Ubiquitous Computing Research Lab at the University of Washington sponsored by Belkin and other industry partners.

Titus said giving the presentation was a nerve-wracking experience because it was the first time he showcased the work to fellow researchers working in the field of wearable computers.

“We knew our paper had been nominated for an award before the conference and we were also told that the best paper award would be judged not just by the paper itself, but also by the quality of the podium presentation. This certainly added to the pressure I felt on the day,” Titus said.

“But it feels great that our work is being recognised by the research community. The award has certainly boosted confidence in my own research.”

The assistive system, which Computer Systems Engineering student Titus developed over the last three years with the help of his supervisor Dr Li, uses a wearable 3D camera and fast computer vision to detect objects in the environment. The 3D location of detected objects is then conveyed to the user in real time using 3D audio much like virtual objects in video games.

Whereas previous electronic aids have been used for navigational tasks, the Monash system is the first to detect and sonify nearby objects. In tests, the aid provided volunteers who were blindfolded, with enough accuracy to reach out and grasp an object by hand.

Titus’ supervisor Dr Wai Ho Li said that there was tough competition for the award.

“Just getting the research accepted was no mean feat as the symposium only accepts ten per cent of submissions as full papers. Despite the tough competition, the research won the best paper award,” Dr Li said.

“The fact that we won speaks volumes about the quality of the work. Titus did a great job presenting our work to some of the world’s leading experts on wearable computers, including researchers from Google and Microsoft. In an ocean of research focused on mobile devices with visual touchscreens, our work on an accessible audio-only interface stood out amongst the crowd.”

The assistive system was designed after discussions with Vision Australia and vision-impaired people, which revealed that traditional aids like the white cane and guide dogs have limitations—one of which is finding an object without touching it. The Monash University system is a first step in addressing these deficiencies, with user trials on vision-impaired volunteers currently underway.

Titus said the work was challenging because it was dependent on volunteers to assist with the trials.

“I have personally collected about 1,500 data points from my user trials. Each trial is labour intensive and it is a challenge to recruit volunteers and then getting everybody’s schedule right,” he said.

“But what’s significant is that all the volunteers I have worked with have been extremely helpful and enthusiastic about the project.”

The research was carried out within Monash Vision Group, who are developing a bionic eye that interfaces directly with the human brain. The knowledge gained about 3D sensors, wearable computers, computer vision and 3D audio has the potential to greatly improve the efficacy of the Monash Vision Group device and other visual prostheses.

Monash University Department of Electrical and Computer Systems Engineering

The Department of Electrical and Computer Systems Engineering (ECSE) is an extremely diverse department specialising in telecommunications, RFID, biomedical engineering, robotics, sensing, vision, systems-on-a-chip and smart energy systems. These applications are based on fundamental research in electronics, photonics, signal processing, communications theory, artificial intelligence, real-time software, optimization, electromagnetics and numerical modeling.

The ECSE program at Monash University equips students with the skills necessary to succeed in this rapidly changing industry, with graduates going on to make an impact in many areas. The department is at the centre of ECSE research, with Monash researchers working on innovative projects including bionic vision, augmented reality, medical diagnostics, optical communications, wireless communications, sensor systems and high-voltage engineering. This research is creating and supporting high-tech industry.

*

Would you like to learn more about engineering programs at Monash University? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Engineering Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com, or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355. Find out how you can study in Australia!

Tuesday, September 30th, 2014

Monash Engineering PhD student wins Three Minute Thesis finals

PhD student Tridib Saha has emerged the victor of the Monash University Three Minute Thesis finals.

After taking part in numerous heats and faculty finals, the student, from Monash University Malaysia and the Faculty of Engineering, wowed judges at the Monash finals Sept. 19, with the summary of his work on the possibilities of harvesting electrical energy from vibrations.

Monash Engineering School

Study at Monash School of Engineering

After defeating over 200 fellow Monash PhD students, Mr Saha will now compete against 30 other PhD students from universities across Australia, New Zealand and the South Pacific in the transnational Three Minute Thesis (3MT®) finals at the University of Western Australia on Monday, Nov. 3, 2014.

Mr Saha who started his PhD in Engineering in December 2012, after graduating from a Bachelor of Engineering (with Honors) in the field of Electrical and Computer Systems Engineering, decided to take part after encouragement from his supervisor, Dr Ramakrishnan from the Monash School of Engineering.

“Research can be very one-dimensional and I’m always looking for new things to do to keep myself occupied. All it needed was a bit of convincing from my supervisor, and the next thing I know, I’m representing my faculty for the campus rounds,” Mr Saha said.

“I’m usually good with people and I tend to talk a lot, so I wasn’t really scared of the public speaking part. The biggest challenge was condensing and simplifying my work in a way that everyone would understand.”

Guest judges were Dr Graham Phillips from ABC TV’s Catalyst program, Monash Vice-Provost (Research), Professor Pauline Nestor and CEO of PACIA, Ms Samantha Read. Associate Professor JaneMaree Maher, School of Social Sciences convened as the Master of Ceremonies.

The panel of judges declared Mr Saha the winner based on his ability to creatively convey his research to a general audience, leaving them wanting to hear more.

Vice-Provost (Graduate Education), Professor Zlatko Skrbis, said the Three Minute Thesis competition represents a unique challenge for graduate research students.

“One of the key characteristics for any researcher is to make an impact by conveying the importance of their work to the general public. This competition is a great opportunity to develop those skills,” he said.

“The entries this year were of an incredibly high standard. Mr Saha’s presentation stood out because he used a winning combination of humour with a clear, expressive style to effectively convey his research to non-specialist audience.

“On behalf of everyone at Monash, I wish Mr Saha the very best of luck at the finals,” Professor Skrbis said.

Mr Saha said he was truly honoured to have the opportunity to represent Monash University at a national level.

“It is a huge step going from representing a campus to representing the whole university. I can’t wait to meet my competition and see where I stand among all the trans-national universities,” he said.

Mr Saha’s prize from the Monash University final is $2,000 and an all-expenses-paid trip to the transnational final, where he now has a chance of winning a research and travel grant.

Monash Electrical and Computer Systems Engineering

The Department of Electrical and Computer Systems Engineering (ECSE) is an extremely diverse department specialising in telecommunications, RFID, biomedical engineering, robotics, sensing, vision, systems-on-a-chip and smart energy systems. These applications are based on fundamental research in electronics, photonics, signal processing, communications theory, artificial intelligence, real-time software, optimization, electromagnetics and numerical modeling.

The ECSE program at the Monash School of Engineering equips students with the skills necessary to succeed in this rapidly changing industry. The department is at the centre of ECSE research, with researchers working on innovative projects including bionic vision, augmented reality, medical diagnostics, optical communications, wireless communications, sensor systems and high-voltage engineering. This research is creating and supporting high-tech industry.

*

Would you like more information about engineering at Monash University? Email OzTREKK’s Australian Engineering Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com, or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355. Find out how you can study in Australia!

Wednesday, September 24th, 2014

UQ celebrates rising stars at Women in Technology awards

Two University of Queensland early-career researchers have been recognised by their peers for their promising medical and technology research at the 17th annual Women in Technology (WiT) awards ceremony.

Dr Irina Vetter, from UQ’s Institute for Molecular Bioscience (IMB) and UQ School of Pharmacy, won the WiT Rising Star Award for her research to understand the causes of pain and develop new treatments for the one in five Australians living with chronic pain.

UQ School of Pharmacy

Study pharmacy at the UQ Pharmacy School

“Pain is something we have all experienced, and usually we expect this pain will go away—but this isn’t the case for those living with chronic pain,” she said.

“Chronic pain also has a huge impact on the community, and together with my colleagues in IMB’s Centre for Pain Research, we are working to put it on the national health agenda,” she said.

Dr Helen Huang, from the UQ School of Information Technology and Electrical Engineering, won the WiT Infotech Research Award for her contribution in the field of big data management and analysis.

“With the rapid population growth of social websites, we are now having vast amounts of social media data that can be used for analysing and predicting real-world events,” Dr Huang said.

“The predictions provide an opportunity of timely response to emergencies such as disease outbreaks and natural disasters, as well as prevention of crime, security breaches and the like.

“This award is a fantastic recognition of my work and such a wonderful encouragement that my work is important for our future society.”

The award winners each received a $1000 prize to support their research.

WiT is one of Queensland’s most respected and active technology industry associations and a peak body for women in the technology and life sciences sectors in Queensland.

About the Bachelor of Pharmacy at the UQ School of Pharmacy

The University of Queensland Bachelor of Pharmacy program prepares graduates for the contemporary role of the pharmacist in society, ensuring that patients optimize medication usage. Initial courses on chemical, physical and biological studies lead to professional specialties in later years. Practical and clinical science studies begin in first year, providing students with a strong background in professional practice.

Program: Bachelor of Pharmacy (Honours)
Location: Brisbane, Queensland
Semester intake: February
Duration: 4 years
Application deadline: November 15, 2014

*

About the UQ School of Information Technology and Electrical Engineering

Located within the Faculty of Engineering, Architecture and Information Technology, the School of ITEE is at the forefront of research, teaching and learning across the Information & Communications Technology (ICT) and Engineering disciplines.

The School of ITEE offers a multifaceted suite of teaching programs, at both the undergraduate and postgraduate level, in Information Technology, Engineering Hardware, Software and Information Management, Human-Computer Interaction and Multimedia Design.

Would you like more information about the Bachelor of Pharmacy and IT and engineering programs available at the University of Queensland? Contact OzTREKK’s Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Tuesday, April 30th, 2013

Sydney IT engineer commended

An academic paper by a University of Sydney information technologies engineer has been recognized by his international peers as one of the most influential contributions to reconfigurable computing in the past two decades.

University of Sydney Associate Professor Philip Leong from the School of Electrical and Information Engineering has been commended for his work on reconfigurable computing at a computing machines symposium in the USA.

Professor Leong says the concept of reconfigurable computing has existed since the 1960s, when it was proposed that a computer was made of a standard processor and an array of reconfigurable hardware.

Reconfigurable computing is the application of field programmable gate array (FPGA) devices to computational problems, he states.

Reconfigurable computing can be used to accelerate computationally intensive applications such as those found in signal processing, cryptography and computational finance. Although reconfigurable computing offered enormous computational resources, they caused a bottleneck between the FPGA and the host computer, says Professor Leong.

His landmark paper published in 2001 and titled Pilchard – a reconfigurable computing platform with memory slot interface overcame this problem.

“We utilized the memory interface rather than the standard PCI interface. This provided an easy-to-use, low-cost and high-performance platform for reconfigurable computing,” says Professor Leong.

The keen fisherman named his device “Pilchard” because it was designed to be a small, expensive and plentiful resource like the fish.

The 21st International Symposium on Field-Programmable Custom Computing Machines (FCCM) in California has identified the 25 most significant papers from its first 20 years.

The papers capture pioneering work that has clarified the landscape, provided key tools, opened areas of research, resolved serious problems, illuminated difficult issues, and illustrated innovative ways to use FPGAs and other reconfigurable computing devices.

Since the publication of his groundbreaking research, Professor Leong’s work has focused on the development of novel hardware and software solutions to problems that range from derivative pricing and hedging of foreign exchange risk to the treatment of cardiac disorders.

He says much of his work involves developing solutions to problems constrained by processing speed or power consumption.

Nowadays he often uses field-programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) as his “canvas,” as they enable the development of problem-specific architectures that are orders of magnitude more efficient than microprocessor-based solutions.

“Among the applications I’ve pioneered have been FPGA-based financial derivative pricing systems. A number of banks have since developed their own implementations based on these systems, and have found that they offer much lower power consumption than competing technologies.

“The overall goal of my research is to benefit society through improved high-performance custom hardware and parallel software.”

About the Sydney School of Electrical and Information Engineering

With rapid transformation occurring across industries and a greater emphasis on green technologies, electrical engineering are set to play a vital role in building our future society.

The School of Electrical and Information Engineering offers an exciting range of electrical engineering programs. They provide the scientific, mathematical and engineering foundations required to design systems across diverse areas like satellite communications, high-performance computing, telecommunications, signal processing, energy generation and biomedical engineering.

The research activities, in all major areas of electrical engineering, attract funding from nationally competitive grant sources including significant funding from the Australian Research Council, and the school’s links with industry have been strengthened by funding from national and international companies where Sydney graduates are highly appreciated for their expertise, creativity and leadership.

Power engineers build renewable sources of energy and integrate them into smart grids, thus reducing gas emissions and preserving the environment.

Telecommunication engineers build telecommunication networks, such as the proposed National Broadband Network in Australia, capable of delivering advanced web, entertainment and health services to homes.

Biomedical engineers build medical electronic products and systems, including hearing aids, bionic eyes and automated software to help doctors diagnose diseases.

Computer engineers design, build and test intelligent machines, such as iPads, mobile phones, smart cars and homes. They integrate sensors and intelligent devices into global and interactive networks for monitoring environment, traffic and industrial processes.

Software engineers design software and information technologies for cost-effective and energy-efficient organizations, social networking and instant messaging.

*

Find out more about studying information technology and engineering at the University of Sydney.

Contact OzTREKK for more information about IT programs and engineering programs offered at Australian universities.

Email OzTREKK Australian IT Engineering Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1 866-698-7355 to find out how you can study in Australia.