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Posts Tagged ‘Bachelor of Veterinary Biology/Doctor of Veterinary Medicine’

Thursday, December 12th, 2013

Sydney Veterinary Science researcher encouraged by first Blue Mountains koala sighting in 70 years

A koala has been seen crossing the Great Western Highway near Wentworth Falls, the first record of koalas in the upper Blue Mountains since the 1940s.

Sydney Veterinary School

Koalas are listed as “vulnerable to extinction”

The sighting is encouraging news for Dr Kellie Leigh, from the Sydney Veterinary School, who is currently mapping koalas in and around the Blue Mountains.

“If you asked a local this time last year they might have told you there were no longer any koalas in the Blue Mountains; however, during the recent bushfires koalas have appeared on the edges of urban areas, including three koalas coming out of the bush to sit in buckets of water near the Springwood fire,” said Dr Leigh.

The Sydney Veterinary School researcher explained that the fires have forced koalas to move out of their normal home ranges and habitats, and this movement is taking them into developed areas where they are being seen by people. Unfortunately, koalas are vulnerable to both fire and heat so the bushfires and extreme weather are likely to have had an impact on them. What’s exciting about it is that it was uncertain whether or not koalas still existed in many of these areas.

Although koalas are not normally seen on the high altitude ridgelines in the Blue Mountains, they used to be abundant in the valleys either side. There are historical records advertising koala hunting opportunities in the Megalong Valley, back in the days of the koala fur trade. Since then koala numbers have dropped dramatically.

Dr Leigh says it’s critical to find what is left of koalas after such a massive drop in numbers. “Many Sydneysiders don’t realize we still have koala populations around, in areas such as Campbelltown, and west right through to Bathurst. Even more people are not aware that koalas in New South Wales are now federally listed as vulnerable to extinction. Koalas are picky eaters and adapt to their local habitats, so if we’re going to hang on to this iconic species we need to find and conserve all the surviving koala populations.”

The recent Great Koala Count run by the National Parks Association of NSW has shown the power of citizen science for finding koalas, with 900 koalas reported throughout NSW and beyond; however, the next step of assessing low density populations in rugged terrain is more challenging.

The information being collected is part of a larger national scale koala study led by the University of Sydney together with researchers from James Cook University and San Diego Zoo Global. The project is using new technology whole-genome DNA to prioritize koala populations for conservation management, right across the species range.

Dr Kellie Leigh is also director of Science for Wildlife Inc, a research partner with the University of Sydney that will undertake the regional koala mapping using innovative research methods such as a koala detection dog. The resulting data will be used in the university’s genome research.

Koalas in the Blue Mountains are thought to be particularly important for conservation of the species due high levels of genetic diversity, and the large World Heritage Area might be an important habitat refuge for other populations under pressure from climate change. There is also a need to understand more about the impacts of bushfires on koalas in different habitats, which is even more urgent since the Blue Mountains bushfires.

About the Sydney Veterinary School’s  Bachelor of Veterinary Biology/Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (BVetBiol/DVM) program

Program title: Bachelor of Veterinary Biology/Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (BVetBiol/DVM)
Location: Sydney, New South Wales
Semester intake: March
Program duration: 6 years
Find out more about the the University of Sydney’s new veterinary science program. Check out our blog “New Sydney Doctor of Veterinary Medicine program for 2015.”

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Learn more about the Sydney Veterinary School and about Australian Veterinary Schools.

Do you have questions about Sydney Veterinary School and about studying veterinary programs at Australian universities? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Veterinary Schools Officer Rachel Brady by emailing rachel@oztrekk.com or by calling 1 866-698-7355 (toll free in Canada).

Monday, November 4th, 2013

University of Sydney Veterinary Science Alumni Awards

Equine specialist David Hutchins, television’s Dr Harry, wildlife conservationist Russell Dickens, and global health pioneer Charles Mackenzie were this year’s recipients of the Faculty of Veterinary Sciences Alumni Awards.

The Alumni Awards recognize outstanding achievements made to the community and the veterinary profession.

Sydney Veterinary School

Learn more about the University of  Sydney Veterinary School

Associate Professor Hutchins, who graduated with a Bachelor of Veterinary Science (BVSc) in 1947, was honoured with the Alumni Award for Special Achievement.

One of the pre-eminent veterinarians of his generation, Professor Hutchins’s 65-year career has seen him pioneer equine surgery techniques and evidence-based approaches to equine medicine. He helped plan and launch the University of Sydney‘s veterinary teaching hospital and has taught and mentored more than 3,000 students.

The internationally acclaimed researcher was also responsible for breakthroughs ranging from equine colic to peritonitis, to the use of flotation tanks. His findings have appeared in almost 100 articles and scholarly presentations.

Still active in retirement, Professor Hutchins is an official veterinarian at Sydney meetings for Racing NSW and is renowned throughout the horse racing industry for his expertise in the diagnosis and treatment of thoroughbreds.

He was made an Honorary Fellow of the Australian College of Veterinary Science (Medicine and Surgery) in 1997 and was awarded a Medal of the Order of Australia in 2000.

The Alumni Award for Community Achievement went to someone readily recognized by many Australians—Dr Harry! Dr Harold Cooper was recognized for his efforts to increase public understanding of pet care and animal welfare in his role as the nation’s best known television vet. He has said that one of his main aims is to teach children a love, understanding and respect for animals that they will carry through to adult life.

After graduating with a Bachelor of Veterinary Science in 1966, Dr Harry practiced as a veterinarian in both Sydney and the UK where, in his late twenties, he became a regular guest on a morning talk show.

Returning to Australia he joined Don Burke on radio before launching his television career on the high rating show Burke’s Backyard. He then presented his own series Talk to the Animals and Harry’s Practice. Dr Harry continues to appear on Better Homes and Gardens, winner of 10 Silver Logies for Australia’s most popular lifestyle program.

Dr Cooper’s reputation as a caring and skilled veterinarian has greatly enhanced the credibility of the entire profession.

For his landmark efforts to protect Australian wildlife, and his 50 years of service to the people of western Sydney, Dr Russell Dickens received the Alumni Award for Community Achievement.

Described as the father of koala medicine, Dr Dickens graduated in 1954 with a BVSc before being awarded a Master of Veterinary Science in 1975. In the 1970s he was one of the first to study diseases of the koala systematically and provide advice on their clinical management. His pioneering research is the basis for today’s expanding discipline of wildlife medicine.

Dr Dickens has also served the pet owners, farmers and wildlife carers of the Blacktown area as a veterinarian and an independent member on the local council for the past 33 years. A vocal advocate for responsible pet ownership, he recently helped Blacktown City Council improve the control and treatment of stray animals and collaborated with the University of Sydney Veterinary School to secure their participation in the council’s desexing program.

His dedication to the welfare of animals, especially the koala, was recognized with a Medal of the Order of Australia in 1992.

Veterinary pathologist Professor Charles Mackenzie was presented with the Alumni Award for International Achievement for his exceptional contribution to global health. His efforts to combat crippling disease caused by parasitic worms in equatorial areas is changing the lives of millions of people. Professor Mackenzie, who was awarded a doctorate in 1975 following a BSc in 1969 and Bachelor of Veterinary Science in 1972, today leads Michigan State University’s participation in the Global Alliance for the Elimination of Lymphatic Filariasis which aims treat three billion people worldwide with anti-parasitic drugs.

He has made a lasting impact across a range of research areas including immunopathology, tropical pathology and parasitology.

In 2012 Professor Mackenzie received the Order of Australia for distinguished service to veterinary pathology and to medical science through his significant contributions to disease eradication as well as a researcher and educator.

Professor Rosanne Taylor, Dean of the Faculty of Veterinary Sciences welcomed the Alumni Award recipients and guests at a reception at the University of Sydney on September 13. Emeritus Professor Paul Canfield and Dr Garth McGilvray AM congratulated and presented the winners with their awards.

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About the Sydney Veterinary School’s  Bachelor of Veterinary Biology/Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (BVetBiol/DVM) program

Program title: Bachelor of Veterinary Biology/Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (BVetBiol/DVM)
Location: Sydney, New South Wales
Semester intake: March
Program duration: 6 years
Application deadline: TBA

Apply to Sydney Veterinary School!

Find out more about the the University of Sydney’s new veterinary science program. Check out our blog “New Sydney Doctor of Veterinary Medicine program for 2015.”

*

Learn more about the Sydney Veterinary School and about Australian Veterinary Schools.

Do you have questions about Sydney Veterinary School and about studying veterinary programs at Australian universities? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Veterinary Schools Officer Rachel Brady by emailing rachel@oztrekk.com or by calling 1 866-698-7355 (toll free in Canada).

Monday, October 28th, 2013

University of Sydney Veterinary School attends Paws in the Park

On October 20, a team of University of Sydney Veterinary School staff and students took to the great outdoors to promote the University of Sydney‘s veterinary services at the annual “Paws in the Park” event. Run by the Camden Council, the event provides several benefits to the local population, including free health checks to hundreds of dogs and advice to their owners about responsible pet ownership. The event also provides a great opportunity for University of Sydney Veterinary School students to practice their communication and examination skills, and promote the veterinary school’s Small Animal Unit.

University of Sydney Veterinary School

University of Sydney’s beautiful campus

The event began with either a 3 km or 5 km dog walk around the venue, the Camden Bicentennial Equestrian Park. Other events included

  • entertainment;
  • animal-related stalls;
  • animal rescue groups;
  • demonstrations;
  • obedience classes;
  • free vet checks;
  • micro-chipping and desexing vouchers;
  • pet registration;
  • best-dressed dog, best trick, look-a-like competitions and more; and a
  • flyball dog competition.

After the dog walk, veterinarians from the University of Sydney Veterinary School Small Animal Unit along with a team of veterinary students in the final year of their degree provided free physical examinations to the hundreds of dogs in attendance.

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Are you interested in studying veterinary medicine at the Sydney Veterinary School? Find out more about the University of Sydney’s new combined degree program, the Bachelor of Veterinary Biology/Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (BVetBiol/DVM) for the 2014 intake, and the proposed 4-year Doctor of Veterinary Medicine program for the 2015 intake.

If you’d like more information about Australian Veterinary Schools, and would like veterinary school updates emailed to you, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Veterinary Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or by calling toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Wednesday, August 21st, 2013

University of Sydney Veterinary School professor talks about the role of the horse whip in racing

It’s been a bone of contention for many, many years: should whipping be permitted in horse racing? Many animal welfare activists claim it is cruel and unnecessary. The British Racing Authority states “The whip should be used for safety, correction and encouragement only.” For many jockeys, trainers, and racing officials, there is a great distinction between “use” and “abuse” of the whip jockeys carry. Who hasn’t seen the close-up images of jockeys and horses dueling for position on the home stretch at Churchill Downs? Whips are flashed beside the horses’ faces and brought sharply against their hindquarters. Sometimes it works, and sometimes it doesn’t.

Sydney Veterinary School

Learn more about Sydney Veterinary School

Veterinarian and University of Sydney Professor Paul McGreevy’s talk on the use of the whip in horse racing caused a stir in the horse racing world.

The Sydney Veterinary School professor’s talk traced the history of animal welfare in his address at the University of Sydney, particularly in relation to horses. His major focus pinpoints the use of the whip in horse racing to make “tired horses run faster.”

While the University of Sydney Veterinary School professor praised the agility and skill of the jockeys and the magnificence of the racing thoroughbred, it is his belief that horses can still perform brilliantly—and win—without being whipped. Check out Prof. McGreevy’s full talk here.

About Prof Paul McGreevy

RCVS Recognized Specialist in Veterinary Behavioural Medicine with the Faculty of Veterinary Science at the University of Sydney, and his research focuses on equitation science, epidemiological studies, ethopathies in companion and exotic species, and learning theory as applied to animal training and behaviour modification. Prof McGreevy also studies urban animal management and the use of IT in teaching.

At the University of Sydney Veterinary School, he lectures in Animal Husbandry to first year BVSc students, and Animal Behaviour and Welfare Science to third year BVSc and Animal & Veterinary Bioscience students.

The Sydney Veterinary School professor also co-wrote Carrots and Sticks: Principles of Animal Training, a book that brings behavioural science to life, explaining animal training techniques in the language of learning theory.

About the Sydney Veterinary School’s  Bachelor of Veterinary Biology/Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (BVetBiol/DVM) program

Program title: Bachelor of Veterinary Biology/Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (BVetBiol/DVM)
Location: Sydney, New South Wales
Semester intake: March
Program duration: 6 years
Application deadline: TBC

Apply to Sydney Veterinary School!

Find out more about the the University of Sydney‘s new veterinary science program. Check out our blog “New Sydney Doctor of Veterinary Medicine program for 2015.”

*

Learn more about the Sydney Veterinary School and about Australian Veterinary Schools.

Do you have questions about Sydney Veterinary School and about studying veterinary programs at Australian universities? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Veterinary Schools Officer Rachel Brady by emailing rachel@oztrekk.com or by calling 1 866-698-7355 (toll free in Canada).

 

Monday, August 12th, 2013

Sydney Veterinary School finds new species of fungus

A new species of fungus that causes life-threatening infections in humans and cats has been discovered by a University of Sydney researcher.

“This all originated from spotting an unusual fungal infection in three cats I was seeing at the university’s cat treatment centre in 2006,” said Dr Vanessa Barrs,  a Senior Lecturer from the Sydney Veterinary School, whose findings have just been published in PLOS One (Public Library of Science, an international, peer-reviewed, open-access, online publication).

Sydney Veterinary School

Learn more about Sydney Veterinary School

“These cats presented with a tumour-like growth in one of their eye sockets, that had spread there from the nasal cavity. The fungal spores are inhaled and in susceptible cats they establish a life-threatening infection that is very difficult to treat.”

Six years of investigation followed, including working with some of the world’s leading fungal experts at the CBS-KNAW fungal biodiversity centre in The Netherlands.

“Finally I was able to confirm this as a completely new species, Aspergillus felis, which can cause virulent disease in humans and cats by infecting their respiratory tract. We were able to demonstrate that this was a new species of fungus on a molecular and reproductive level and in terms of its form. This new species of fungus can reproduce both asexually and sexually—and we discovered both phases of the fungus.”

Since the first sighting of the new species, more than 20 sick domestic cats from around Australia and one cat from the United Kingdom have been diagnosed with the fungus.

The fungus appears to infect otherwise healthy cats but in the two humans identified it attacked an already highly compromised immune system.

The disease is not passed between humans and cats but its study in cats will not only help their treatment but provide a good model for the study of the disease in people. There is only a 15 per cent survival rate of cats with the disease and it has so far proved fatal in humans. To date only one case has been identified in a dog.

“We are right at the start of recognizing the diseases caused by this fungus in animals and humans. The number of cases may be increasing in frequency or it may just be we are getting better at recognizing them,” the Sydney Veterinary School Senior Lecturer stated.

“Fungi like Aspergillus felis can be easily misidentified as the closely related fungus Aspergillus fumigatus, which is a well-studied cause of disease in humans. However, A. felis is intrinsically more resistant to antifungal drugs than A. fumigatus and this has important implications for therapy and prognosis.”

The next step for Dr Barrs and her Sydney Veterinary School team is studying fungi in culture collections throughout Australia to determine the prevalence of A. felis infections in people with previously diagnosed aspergillosis. They will collaborate with researchers at the Westmead Millenium Institute for Medical Research.

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Are you interested in studying veterinary medicine at the Sydney Veterinary School? Find out more about the University of Sydney Faculty of Veterinary Science‘s new combined degree program, the Bachelor of Veterinary Biology/Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (BVetBiol/DVM) for the 2014 intake, and the proposed 4-year Doctor of Veterinary Medicine program for the 2015 intake.

If you’d like more information about Australian Veterinary Schools, and would like veterinary school updates emailed to you, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Veterinary Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or by calling toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Tuesday, June 18th, 2013

New Sydney Doctor of Veterinary Medicine program for 2015

Each year, OzTREKK assists a number of Canadians who want to study in Australia to become a vet. Most of our students who wish to study veterinary medicine in Australia already have an undergraduate degree, and they are seeking a graduate-entry option, which is usually a Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM) program.

In Australia, universities offer options in veterinary medicine for students who already have an undergraduate degree and for those who have just graduated from high school. Bachelor of Veterinary Science programs in Australia welcome students who have just completed high school and they also welcome those who have already undertaken university studies. These Bachelor of Veterinary Science programs are five years in length. Four-year Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM) programs in Australia require their students to have already completed an undergraduate degree, and many OzTREKK students have completed a DVM program in Australia.

The University of Sydney has offered a five-year, Bachelor of Veterinary Science in past years. Sydney is now transitioning its vet program from a Bachelor of Veterinary Science to a Doctor of Veterinary Medicine program. In 2013, Sydney offered its last Bachelor of Veterinary Science intake. In 2015, it is planned that the faculty will offer a four-year, graduate-entry Doctor of Veterinary Medicine degree.

As this transition takes place, the University of Sydney Faculty of Veterinary Science has introduced a new combined degree program, the Bachelor of Veterinary Biology/Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (BVetBiol/DVM) for the 2014 intake. This new 6-year program allows students to enter into the veterinary program directly from high school. As it encompasses the biological sciences aspect of studies prior to the DVM portion, it is perfectly designed for recently graduated high school students who are high achieving and ready to become knowledgeable and successful veterinarians.

Also being discussed within the Faculty of Veterinary Science at the university is the implementation of a 4-year Doctor of Veterinary Medicine program for the 2015 intake. Dr Peter White of the University of Sydney Faculty of Veterinary Science has stated that while options for entry requirements (e.g., GPA only or combination of other factors) are currently being finalized by the faculty, it is likely that the applications for this program will be open in 2014. This DVM program will be a stand-alone, graduate-entry degree, aimed at students who have already attained a bachelor degree and who are accustomed to the challenge of university studies.

If you are a high school student interested in studying veterinary science, the Bachelor of Veterinary Biology/Doctor of Veterinary Medicine may be right for you; however, if you currently hold a bachelor degree, or will have acquired your bachelor degree in 2014, you may be interested in the new Doctor of Veterinary Medicine program for the 2015 intake.

OzTREKK will post information regarding the new DVM program as soon as it is received from the University of Sydney Veterinary School.

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If you’d like more information about Australian Veterinary Schools, and would like veterinary school updates emailed to you, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Veterinary Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or by calling toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

 

Tuesday, May 28th, 2013

Sydney Veterinary School introduces new veterinary program

The Faculty of Veterinary Science at the University of Sydney opened its doors on March 22, 1910. Since then, the Sydney Veterinary School has developed outstanding research and clinical facilities, and strong reciprocal links with academic peers around the world.

The veterinary school is recognized internationally as a leading provider of education and a key contributor to the world’s best practice in the care and welfare of animals. The university’s strong global connections ensure that approximately 20 percent of their veterinary student intakes each year are international students.

New Veterinary Program for 2014

The Faculty of Veterinary Science at the University of Sydney has introduced a new combined degree program, the Bachelor of Veterinary Biology/Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (BVetBiol/DVM). This exciting, innovative course produces graduates with the knowledge as well as the practical, personal, professional and generic skills to enable them to pursue many career options as veterinary scientists participating in the care and welfare of animals.

The BVetBiol/DVM is six years’ duration and graduates are immediately eligible for registration with Veterinary Surgeons’ Boards in each state. The course is also recognized internationally by the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons (UK) and is accredited by the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA).

Students in first, second and third years are given a sound grounding in the basic biomedical sciences relevant to veterinary science. Examples of clinical cases and actual problems in veterinary practice are used to promote integrated learning in many subject areas.

In the fourth, fifth and sixth years, emphasis shifts to applying this knowledge in clinical settings. The University of Sydney’s BVetBiol/DVM program incorporates a lecture-free year in which students are assigned as “interns” in university and commercial partner practices.

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Although complete information regarding this new veterinary program has not yet been released, OzTREKK will post information as soon as it becomes available.

If you’d like more information about Australian Veterinary Schools, and would like veterinary school updates emailed to you, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Veterinary Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or by calling toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.