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Posts Tagged ‘vision sciences’

Thursday, May 18th, 2017

University of Melbourne optometry students provide eye care to 3,000 Sri Lankans

Lecturer Dr Kwang Cham and students Anjalee Athukoralage, Victor Liu, Tom Morton and Noni Rupasinghe from the University of Melbourne  Department of Optometry and Vision Sciences conducted eye checks and dispensed glasses to 3,000 low-income earners in Sri Lanka this January.

University of Melbourne optometry students provide eye care to 3,000 Sri Lankans

Melbourne optometry students (Photo: University of Melbourne)

In collaboration with the not-for-profit Global Hand Charity Inc., the team self-funded their trip in order to treat people who had travelled from distant villages and waited in long queues to have their sight checked. The students were able to practice their skills under the supervision of experienced optometrists and make referrals for customised glasses. The new glasses mean that many adults can resume their livelihoods while young people will be aided in their study.

Regina Lau, Medical Coordinator at Global Hand Charity, wrote to the Dean to praise Dr Cham and the students involvement and singled out Senior Optometry Lecturer Christine Nearchou who was instrumental in recruiting the students and organising 1,200 pairs of recycled glasses.

The Department of Optometry and Vision Sciences has backed the program for the past four years by supporting lecturers and students to perform eye care work in the outlying districts of northern Laos and Sri Lanka.

University of Melbourne Doctor of Optometry

The optometry program at the University of Melbourne Optometry School is four years in duration, and consists of a combination of on-campus teaching and clinical placements, with the clinical component commencing in Year 1 and gradually increasing to full time in the final year. Opportunities exist for clinical-related research to be conducted as a required component of the degree.

Program: Doctor of Optometry (OD)
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Semester intake: Late February or early March
Duration: 4 years
Application deadline: October 27, 2017

Entry Requirements

The Melbourne optometry program is available only to those applicants who have successfully completed an undergraduate degree or are in the final year of completing an undergraduate degree.

  1. Have completed an undergraduate degree and prerequisite subjects
  2. Write the OAT
  3. Submit a personal statement

The university may conduct interviews via Skype or teleconference with short-listed candidates.

Apply to the University of Melbourne Optometry School!

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Find out more about the Melbourne optometry program! Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Optometry Schools Admissions Officer Adam Smith at adam@oztrekk.com.

Friday, November 25th, 2016

Melbourne optometry students conduct eye tests for Glasses for Kids

A new program offering free eye tests and glasses at Victorian schools is set to transform the learning environment of children in prep to year three—up to a third of whom may have unidentified vision problems.

Melbourne optometry students conduct eye tests for Glasses for Kids

Melbourne Optometry students will conduct eye tests as part of the Glasses for Kids program (Photo credit: University of Melbourne)

Final-year Melbourne Optometry students will conduct eye tests at more than 100 schools as part of the Glasses for Kids program launched recently by the Victorian Premier Daniel Andrews and Minister for Education James Merlino.

The three-year program is being delivered by the university in partnership with  the not-for-profit group State Schools Relief (SSR), and the Department of Education and Training Victoria.

The new Dean of the Faculty of Medicine Dentistry and Health Sciences, Professor Shitij Kapur, said common problems in this age group included long-sightedness, turned eyes and colour vision problems.

“The importance of both good education and good health to a child’s future cannot be underestimated,” Professor Kapur said.

“Unidentified vision problems often lie at the root of poor educational outcomes for children and our students will be intervening to prevent this.  We are delighted to be working with State Schools’ Relief and the Department of Education and Training to deliver this program. ”

At one school in a trial conducted earlier this year, 330 children were tested and 125 were found to need glasses.

Associate Professor Daryl Guest, the clinical director at University of Melbourne EyeCare, said final-year optometry students were excited to be part of a major public health initiative that would help children and their teachers.

“For many of these kids, simply prescribing glasses has completely transformed their experience of school, improving their concentration and behaviour.

“We need early screening because kids of this age won’t tell you, ‘I can’t see the blackboard.’ They’ll just disengage from learning and fall behind.”

University of Melbourne Optometry School

Optometry is the occupation of measuring eyesight, prescribing corrective lenses, and detecting and managing eye disease. It is a professional allied health discipline based on the optical, visual, and biomedical sciences. An optometrist’s role is to solve their patients’ visual problems.

The Melbourne Optometry degree is a 4-year full-time program that offers intensive training in the clinical discipline of optometry. The course covers the basic and applied optical, visual, and biomedical sciences that underpin optometry, and delivers a comprehensive clinical training that commences in the first year of the study. During the course, students will have the opportunity to undertake a research project, in an area relevant to the discipline, and will be given the opportunity to undertake clinical training at metropolitan, rural and overseas sites as part of their final year of study.

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Would you like more information about the Melbourne Optometry program? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Optometry Schools Admissions Officer Adam Smith at adam@oztrekk.com.

Tuesday, May 31st, 2016

Inside the Melbourne Optometry EyeCare Clinic

The Department of Optometry & Vision Sciences operates the University of Melbourne EyeCare practice, which offers patient care primarily for University of Melbourne staff and students, but is also open to the general public and for specialist referral by other practitioners. The practice is located on Swanston Street, Carlton.

Inside the Melbourne Optometry School EyeCare Clinic

Study optometry at the University of Melbourne

The clinic runs eight consulting rooms, including specialist Pediatric and Keratoconus rooms. The range of consulting room equipment regularly found in private optometric practices is augmented by cutting-edge equipment not normally available. Images, plots and other data from diagnostic equipment is stored digitally. Wireless networked touch-screen notebook computers in each consulting room equipped with Sunix Vision practice management software link to this repository enabling a totally digital practice record system.

The clinic offers the following specialist diagnostic equipment:

  • Optos optomap
  • Cirrus HD-OCT
  • Visucam Pro NM Fundus Camera
  • Atlas 9000 Corneal Topographer
  • Humphrey Field Analyzer II-i
  • Humphrey Matrix Perimeter
  • Nidek Tonoref II Auto Refractor/Keratometer/Tonometer
  • Nidek RT-5100 Auto Refractor Head
  • Designs For Vision Digital Photography Slit Lamp
  • Vistavision Computerised Chart

University of Melbourne Doctor of Optometry

The optometry program at Melbourne Optometry School is four years in duration, and consists of a combination of on-campus teaching and clinical placements, with the clinical component commencing in Year 1 and gradually increasing to full time in the final year. Opportunities exist for clinical-related research to be conducted as a required component of the degree.

Program: Doctor of Optometry (OD)
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Semester intake: Late February or early March
Duration: 4 years
Application deadline: Early round – July 28, 2016; Timely round – September 27, 2016

Entry Requirements

The Melbourne optometry program is available only to those applicants who have successfully completed an undergraduate degree or are in the final year of completing an undergraduate degree.

  1. Have completed an undergraduate degree and prerequisite subjects
  2. Write the OAT
  3. Submit a personal statement

The University of Melbourne may conduct interviews with short-listed candidates. The Department of Optometry and Vision Sciences would conduct interviews with Canadian applicants via Skype or teleconference.

Apply to the Melbourne Optometry School!

*

Find out more about the Melbourne optometry program! Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Optometry Schools Admissions Officer Adam Smith at adam@oztrekk.com.

Friday, April 15th, 2016

University of Melbourne Doctor of Optometry applications

The University of Melbourne Doctor of Optometry is a 4-year full-time program that offers intensive training in the area of optometry. The course covers the basic and applied vision sciences that underpin optometry, and delivers comprehensive clinical training starting in the first year of study. During the course, students will undertake a research project, in an area relevant to the discipline, and will have the opportunity for clinical training at an overseas site as part of the final year of study.

University of Melbourne Optometry School

Study optometry at the University of Melbourne

Admissions Timeline for 2017 Intake

Both application rounds are open to all applicants who have GAMSAT/OAT and who have completed or are completing an undergraduate degree during 2016.

Early Round Applications
Applications close – July 28, 2016

Timely Round Applications
Applications close – September 27, 2016

Applicants not successful in Round 1 will automatically be considered Round 2.

University of Melbourne Doctor of Optometry (OD)

The optometry program at Melbourne Optometry School is four years in duration, and consists of a combination of on-campus teaching and clinical placements, with the clinical component commencing in Year 1 and gradually increasing to full time in the final year. Opportunities exist for clinical-related research to be conducted as a required component of the degree.

Program: Doctor of Optometry (OD)
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Semester intake: Late February or early March
Duration: 4 years

Entry Requirements

The Doctor of Optometry program at the University of Melbourne is available only to those applicants who have successfully completed an undergraduate degree or are in the final year of completing an undergraduate degree.

1. Have completed an undergraduate degree and prerequisite subjects

Successfully completed at least a three-year bachelor’s degree, which includes

  • one university second- or third-year subject in anatomy or cell biology; and
  • two university second- or third-year subjects from one or more relevant biological science disciplines.

2. Write the OAT

Applicants will be required to complete an admissions test, either the Optometry Admission Test (OAT), the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT), or or the Graduate Australian Medical School Admissions Test (GAMSAT). OAT test result is valid for two years.

There is no minimum GPA or GAMSAT/MCAT/OAT requirement to apply for the program; however, as there are limited places available, selection is highly competitive.

Apply to the Melbourne Optometry School!

*

For more information about the University of Melbourne’s Doctor of Optometry program, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Optometry Schools Admissions Officer Adam Smith at adam@oztrekk.com.

Thursday, March 10th, 2016

What is the Optometry Admission Test?

What is the Optometry Admission Test (OAT)?

The OAT is a standardized examination designed to measure general academic ability and comprehension of scientific information. The OAT is sponsored by the Association of Schools and Colleges of Optometry (ASCO) for applicants seeking admission to an optometry program.

University of Melbourne Optometry School

Study optometry at the University of Melbourne

The OAT consists of four tests: Survey of the Natural Sciences (Biology, General Chemistry, and Organic Chemistry), Reading Comprehension, Physics and Quantitative Reasoning.

Do you need to study for the OAT?

Yes, you should definitely study for the OAT, as it will affect your chances of being admitted to the Doctor of Optometry program. When you are preparing to take the OAT, OzTREKK recommends the following:

  • Look for test preparation materials and a sample test. Check out the Association of Schools and Colleges of Optometry (ASCO) website. They also have an OAT User Guide and helpful tips.
  • Study guides are usually available and through book suppliers. Search for “optometry admission test sample” or “optometry admission test preparation.”
  • Do an online search for “optometry admission test.” YouTube has many videos about the OAT.

When should you take the OAT?

At least one year of university education, which should include courses in biology, general chemistry, organic chemistry and physics, is required prior to taking the OAT. Most students, however, elect to complete two or more years of university prior to taking the exam. If you plan to apply to the February/March 2017 intake of the Doctor of Optometry at Melbourne, you should consider writing the OAT as soon as you feel you are ready so that if your results are not as you expected, you have time to rewrite the exam.

When is the OAT examination administered?

The OAT exam is computerized and examinees are allowed to take the OAT an unlimited number of times; however, you must wait at least 90 days between testing dates. Only scores from the four most recent attempts and the total number of attempts will be reported.

You must apply for your test with the OAT Program and receive your electronic notification prior to scheduling your testing appointment with Prometric. Tests are administered year-round at Prometric Test Centers in the United States, its territories including Guam, Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands, and Canada.

Doctor of Optometry at the University of Melbourne

The Doctor of Optometry is four years in duration, and consists of a combination of on-campus teaching and clinical placements, with the clinical component commencing in Year 1 and gradually increasing to full time in the final year. Opportunities exist for clinical-related research to be conducted as a required component of the degree.

Program: Doctor of Optometry (OD)
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Semester intake: Late February or early March
Duration: 4 years
Application deadline: TBA. For the 2016 intake, the early round application deadline was July 30, 2015; the timely application deadline was September 29, 2015.

Apply to the University of Melbourne Optometry School!

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Would you like more information about the University of Melbourne’s Doctor of Optometry program? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Optometry Schools Admissions Officer Adam Smith at 1-866-698-7355 or adam@oztrekk.com.

Wednesday, April 22nd, 2015

Apply to the Melbourne Doctor of Optometry

The University of Melbourne Doctor of Optometry is a 4-year full-time program that offers intensive training in the area of optometry. The course covers the basic and applied vision sciences that underpin optometry, and delivers comprehensive clinical training starting in the first year of study. During the course, students will undertake a research project, in an area relevant to the discipline, and will have the opportunity for clinical training at an overseas site as part of the final year of study.

University of Melbourne Optometry School

Study optometry at the University of Melbourne

Admissions Timeline for 2016 Intake

Applicants with a completed degree and GAMSAT/MCAT are eligible to apply in the Early Round.

Early Round Applications
Applications open – April 30, 2015
Applications close – July 31, 2015

Timely Round Applications
Applications open – April 30, 2015
Applications close – September 30, 2015

University of Melbourne Doctor of Optometry (OD)

The optometry program at Melbourne Optometry School is four years in duration, and consists of a combination of on-campus teaching and clinical placements, with the clinical component commencing in Year 1 and gradually increasing to full time in the final year. Opportunities exist for clinical-related research to be conducted as a required component of the degree.

Program: Doctor of Optometry (OD)
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Semester intake: Late February or early March
Duration: 4 years

Entry Requirements

The Doctor of Optometry program at the University of Melbourne is available only to those applicants who have successfully completed an undergraduate degree or are in the final year of completing an undergraduate degree.

To be considered for admission into this program, a Canadian applicant must comply with the following:

1. Have completed an undergraduate degree and prerequisite subjects

Successfully completed at least a three-year bachelor’s degree, which includes

  • one university second-year or third-year subject in anatomy or cell biology; and
  • two university second-year or third-year subjects from one or more relevant biological science disciplines.

2. Write the OAT

Applicants will be required to complete an admissions test, either the Optometry Admission Test (OAT), the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT), or or the Graduate Australian Medical School Admissions Test (GAMSAT). OAT test result is valid for two years.

3. Submit a personal statement

Applicants must provide a written statement (maximum 500 words) in support of the application explaining your motivation to study optometry.

There is no minimum GPA or GAMSAT/MCAT/OAT requirement to apply for the program; however, as there are limited places available, selection is expected to be highly competitive.

The University of Melbourne may conduct interviews with short-listed candidates. The Department of Optometry and Vision Sciences would conduct interviews with Canadian applicants via Skype or teleconference.

Apply to the Melbourne Optometry School!

*

For more information about the University of Melbourne’s Doctor of Optometry program, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Optometry Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady by emailing rachel@oztrekk.com or calling toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Wednesday, February 4th, 2015

What is the OAT?

If you’re considering applying to optometry school, then you have heard of the Optometry Admission Test (OAT). OzTREKK has gathered a little bit of background information about the OAT from the Association of Schools and Colleges of Optometry (ASCO) website in order to help prepare pre-optometry students.

The University of Melbourne offers the Doctor of Optometry (OD) program, a master’s-level professional-entry degree that creates a new benchmark in 21st century optometric education. It is an internationally recognized qualification and the first of its kind in the southern hemisphere. As part of the entry requirement into the Doctor of Optometry, applicants must take the Optometry Admission Test (OAT).

University of Melbourne Optometry School

Learn more about Melbourne Optometry School

What is the OAT?

The OAT is a standardized examination designed to measure general academic ability and comprehension of scientific information. The OAT is sponsored by the Association of Schools and Colleges of Optometry (ASCO) for applicants seeking admission to an optometry program.

The OAT consists of four tests: Survey of the Natural Sciences (Biology, General Chemistry, and Organic Chemistry), Reading Comprehension, Physics and Quantitative Reasoning.

Do you need to study for the Optometry Admissions Test (OAT)?

Yes, you should definitely study for the OAT, as it will affect your chances of being admitted to the Doctor of Optometry program. When you are preparing to take the OAT, OzTREKK recommends the following:

  • Look for test preparation materials and a sample test. Check out the Association of Schools and Colleges of Optometry (ASCO) website. They also have an OAT User Guide and helpful tips.
  • Study guides are usually available and through book suppliers. Search for “optometry admission test sample” or “optometry admission test preparation””.
  • Do an online search for “optometry admission test”. YouTube has many videos about the OAT.

When should you take the OAT?

At least one year of university education, which should include courses in biology, general chemistry, organic chemistry and physics, is required prior to taking the OAT. Most students, however, elect to complete two or more years of university prior to taking the exam. If you plan to apply to the February/March 2016 intake of the Doctor of Optometry at Melbourne, you should consider writing the OAT as soon as you feel you are ready so that if your results are not as you expected, you have time to rewrite the exam.

When is the OAT examination administered?

The OAT exam is computerized and examinees are allowed to take the OAT an unlimited number of times; however, you must wait at least 90 days between testing dates. Only scores from the four most recent attempts and the total number of attempts will be reported.

You must apply for your test with the OAT Program and receive your electronic notification prior to scheduling your testing appointment with Prometric. Tests are administered year-round at Prometric Test Centers in the United States, its territories including Guam, Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands, and Canada.

University of Melbourne Doctor of Optometry (OD)

The Doctor of Optometry is four years in duration, and consists of a combination of on-campus teaching and clinical placements, with the clinical component commencing in Year 1 and gradually increasing to full time in the final year. Opportunities exist for clinical-related research to be conducted as a required component of the degree.

Program: Doctor of Optometry (OD)
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Semester intake: Late February or early March
Duration: 4 years

Apply to the University of Melbourne Optometry School!

*

Would you like more information about the University of Melbourne’s Doctor of Optometry program? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Optometry Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or 1-866-698-7355. Find out how you can study in Australia!

Tuesday, January 13th, 2015

Melbourne Doctor of Optometry course structure

The University of Melbourne Doctor of Optometry is a 4-year full-time program that offers intensive training in the area of optometry. The course covers the basic and applied vision sciences that underpin optometry, and delivers comprehensive clinical training starting in the first year of study. During the course, students will undertake a research project, in an area relevant to the discipline, and will have the opportunity for clinical training at an overseas site as part of the final year of study.

University of Melbourne Optometry School

University of Melbourne EyeCare

Year 1

Students study the core biological and physical vision sciences within the Integrated Ophthalmic Sciences subject. This subject builds upon prerequisite knowledge in the general biological sciences, helping students to apply general concepts to understand the structure and function of the visual system. Students also commence clinical training, in the Pre-Clinical Optometry subject, and cover the theoretical aspects of clinical ocular examination and refractive management for the first time. The key techniques of the optometric examination are also practiced for the first time.

Year 2

Through the Applied Clinical Training subject students continue to develop clinical investigation skills, and an understanding of the design and function of ocular appliances. Students learn about the mechanisms and manifestations of ocular disease, and start to consider strategies for the diagnosis and management of disease. In the later part of Year 2 students start to see patients in a clinical setting and develop capabilities in ocular appliance prescribing, fitting and dispensing. In conjunction with this applied clinical training, students carry out a research project under the supervision of an optometry and vision sciences academic. This project enhances the knowledge of the vision sciences, emphasises the evidenced-based nature of clinical optometry practice, and prepares students for future postgraduate research work.

Year 3

During the Clinical Optometry Practice subject, the majority of learning experiences are driven by regular patient contact, primarily in the University of Melbourne‘s Clinical Training Facility (University of Melbourne EyeCare), and at a range of local placement sites. Facilitated case-based simulations enhance this clinical experience. The extended semester length ensures that students experience sufficient clinical contacts to provide a solid base for development of patient assessment and management skills . In the third year, students are also introduced to the business and ethical aspects of clinical practice, through both didactic interactions and experiences at University of Melbourne EyeCare.

Year 4

The final year is entirely clinical (Optometry Internship). Students develop advanced experience in all areas of clinical practice, particularly general optometry practice, disease management, contact lenses, paediatrics and low vision management. Rotations through placement sites that include University of Melbourne EyeCare, primary / tertiary eye care sites in city and rural Australia, and international eye care sites will provide a breadth of clinical experience. The extended length of the clinical year offers a level of clinical exposure commensurate with that of the Doctor of Optometry courses offered in North America.

Capstone experience

Compulsory overseas and national internships form the capstone experience for students of the Doctor of Optometry.

These internships, which see students practicing in a variety of environments, will enable them to develop a national and global perspective on optometry, and to experience the similarities and differences in the practice of eye health management throughout the world.

The following is a list of some of the places where students completed their capstone experience in 2013:

  • Illinios College of Optometry, Chcago, USA
  • Department of Ophthalmology, Khoo Teck Puat Hospital, Singapore
  • Department of Ophthalmology, Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore
  • Department of Optometry, The University of Auckland, New Zealand
  • Eye Hospital of Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam
  • School of Optometry, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Canada
  • Tilganga Eye Care Centre, Kathmandu, Nepal
  • State University of New York, New York, USA
  • Phelophepa Health Care Train, South Africa

University of Melbourne Doctor of Optometry (OD)

Program: Doctor of Optometry (OD)
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Semester intake: Late February or early March
Duration: 4 years

Apply to the University of Melbourne Optometry School!

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Find out more about studying optometry in Australia! Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Optometry Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady by emailing rachel@oztrekk.com or calling toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Wednesday, October 15th, 2014

Melbourne Optometry student has his eye on the future

All of us at OzTREKK agree that it takes a certain kind of person to be an OzTREKK student: determined, ambitious, adventurous! Undoubtedly, one of the most challenging yet rewarding courses is the Doctor of Optometry program at the University of Melbourne Optometry School.

Aaron Yu personifies determination, ambition, and adventure. Aaron began his Melbourne optometry studies in February 2011 and is currently finishing his fourth (and last!) year, and somehow finds the time for healthy eating, exercise, student activities, and photography! Here, he offers advice to future students contemplating a career in optometry and a life in the beautiful city of Melbourne!

Sydney Dental School

Aaron Yu, Melbourne Optometry student hard at work!

What pulled you toward optometry?

As a patient, I felt that my local optometrist ran a practice that offered quality eye care. As a student job shadowing local optometrists, I felt the profession made the kind of contributions to the local community that I could support.

When I widened my scope to look at the industry, health care was alluring because it combined the art of dealing with human nature with the science of Western medicine, both of which I firmly believed I had the predispositions to make significant contributions to.

As far as I could tell, optometry was on the frontlines of a collaborative health care system acting as primary eye care professionals. As with any other job, the negatives were going to reveal themselves as I learned more about the profession; however, protecting the sense of sight for individuals throughout their lives resonated strongly with what I found to be important from my own experiences. Projecting that a fulfilling career in optometry would outweigh any disadvantages that could become apparent was a gambit I was very willing to make. So I did—and I haven’t looked back since.

Why did you decide to study optometry in Australia?

The Melbourne Model’s push for transforming optometry from an undergraduate to postgraduate degree will encounter challenges that I felt would mirror the challenges in my own personal and professional development, so I expected immersion in this dynamic environment to be a valuable learning experience. In addition to earning a respected degree, I would have the freedom in my down time to explore a beautiful and vibrant city rich with diversity. Mind. Body. Soul. Everything about this place screamed “Adventure!”—how could I resist?

Sydney Dental School

Sumit Shevade, Mark Dakak, and Aaron Yu

How would you describe your experience in the Melbourne Optometry program?

In the early years, practicing your technical skills to the point where they’re second nature was very central to this program. It trains you to gather clinical data in a practical timeframe so you can focus your efforts on analyzing the information and developing a management plan appropriate for the particular patient in your care.

This program culminates in a fourth year that’s entirely based on clinical experience and requires a certain level of responsibility that I’m not sure I’ve ever had to explore in an academic setting. In a typical day, my colleagues and I are running from clinic to clinic, making sure we catch the right buses on time, eating lunch if we have time, trying to cook/eat healthy meals at home and sticking to a consistent exercise program… then getting the right amount of sleep so we can do it all again the next day!

In this final year, what I’m finding to be the most difficult part of the program is actually figuring out what to do after graduation. I have so many options open to me that, in combination with the lessons I’m learning in this program, there’s no doubt in my mind that I can take full advantage of any course of action I commit to. As sure as I am of the beat of my heart, I know that my time here has made me into a better person and a more reliable member of society.

Sydney Dental School

Eagle’s Nest, Inverloch

What do you do outside of your study/classroom time in Australia?

I’ve been lucky enough to have opportunities to express and further develop my creative talents in photography and videography with Meld Magazine, a local magazine geared towards international students. I’m also actively engaged with the student body and University of Melbourne alumni community through numerous clubs and special initiatives. Other than that, staying healthy by following a balanced diet and consistent exercise regime of cardio and resistance training is something I’m always trying to force myself to make time for.

What do you hope to do following graduation? How do you plan to deal with the accreditation/bridging when (if) you return to Canada?

I’m currently applying for jobs at the moment and plan to work for one or two years in Australia before attempting the bridging program back in Canada, the reasoning being that I want to capitalize on the network I’ve built over the four years to support my real-world learning.

For example, if I need to refer to a specialist, I already have a working knowledge of ones I’ve found to be reliable in the past, as my third and fourth years exposed me to a pool of local specialists when executing management plans for patients. If life as a recent graduate is as intense as I’ve heard (work-life balance, increasing consultation efficiency, etc.), having this advantage will help take a little bit of the edge off during my first years of practice. With all this real-world experience consolidating my clinical skills, when I finally attempt the bridging program, I expect, at least the practical part, to be much easier. As it currently stands, the bridging program is going through some changes as well so this time will allow it to fine-tune its execution before I take part.

What advice would you give to a Canadian considering studying optometry in Australia?

I would recommend all prospective students to job shadow a couple of their local optometrists before arrival; in fact, I would actually recommend this for any student pursuing further education overseas. The benefit of this is twofold: first, you can satisfy entry requirements for any optometry school that requires shadowing experience on top of your written application; and second, you can compare and contrast Canadian and Australian optometry as you receive your education overseas. Knowing the different regulations and legislation in place to govern the way you practice will allow you a clearer understanding of how the law influences the type of optometrist you want to become.

Sydney Dental School

When in Australia, make time for the beach! (Anderson Inlet)

Do you have any advice regarding finding accommodation/getting settled in Melbourne?

There’s a new Tune Hotel that opened up on Swanston Street that’s great for recent arrivals. I haven’t had the need to stay there myself but, as I understand it, the concept is a 5-star hotel experience for minimal pricing (i.e., they charge you a very low price per night but charge you on anything deemed extra such as towels, Wi-Fi, etc.). So at the end of the day you only pay for what you want. Otherwise, you can stay in hostels or try couch-surfing in the interim before you find more permanent housing.

I was actually lucky enough to have an aunt in the area so I researched shared housing options on Gumtree (similar to Craigslist) and connected the landlord with her. Having a liaison was beneficial because it allowed me to have trusted eyes check out the actual locations and relay back to me whether the pictures posted online matched the actual room. With this relationship worked out, I eventually had a place secured before I landed.

It’s not lost on me how wonderful it was of her to help me with this by setting aside time from her busy schedule. If you’re going to do it this way make sure your liaison knows how much you appreciate his or her help and make it easier by

1) only asking them to scout locations that you’re serious about;
2) streamlining the entire process by booking inspection times close together for shared-houses that are also located close together; and
3) doing all inspections in one day only.

Happy hunting!

 

If I want to practice as an optometrist in Canada after completing the Doctor of Optometry (OD) at the University of Melbourne, what do I need to do for registration?

According to the Canadian Association of Optometrists website, international graduates are considered to be those individuals who have obtained their optometric education from a school other than those accredited by the Accreditation Council on Optometric Education.

International graduates may be eligible to obtain a license or certificate of registration to practice in a province or territory in Canada. International graduates are encouraged to contact the optometric regulator in the province or territory in which they are interested to determine if they are eligible for a license or certificate of registration to practice in that jurisdiction. International graduates may be referred by an optometric regulator to the Director of the International Optometric Bridging Program of the University of Waterloo, Ontario,  for an evaluation of their educational and professional credentials and an opinion on their equivalency to those required in a particular jurisdiction.

About the University of Melbourne Doctor of Optometry (OD) Program

The Doctor of Optometry consists of a combination of on-campus teaching and clinical placements, with the clinical component commencing in Year 1 and gradually increasing to full time in the final year. Opportunities exist for clinical-related research to be conducted as a required component of the degree. Early clinical experience is a feature of the Melbourne program. Later years will focus on developing advanced clinical skills with a strong emphasis on evidence-based practice. Broad clinical experience will be achieved by providing an unparalleled range of rural and metropolitan placements and international externship opportunities.

Program: Doctor of Optometry (OD)
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Semester intake: Late February or early March
Duration: 4 years

Apply to the Melbourne Optometry School!

*

Would you like more information about the University of Melbourne’s Doctor of Optometry (OD) program? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Optometry Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at  rachel@oztrekk.com or 1-866-698-7355. Find out how you can study in Australia!

Thursday, April 17th, 2014

Former Melbourne Optometry School professor to head International eye organisation

Eye health expert Professor Hugh Taylor AC, Melbourne Laureate Professor and the Harold Mitchell Chair of Indigenous Eye Health at the University of Melbourne has been named President of the International Council of Ophthalmology (ICO).

He is the first Australian and the first from the southern hemisphere to be appointed to this role. Professor Taylor is recognised worldwide for his leadership in trachoma, advocacy for improved Indigenous eye health and other initiatives to eliminate avoidable vision loss.

He has held numerous leadership positions, including previous vice president for the International Agency for the Prevention of Blindness and has been the ICO Director for Advocacy and is the current ICO Treasurer. Within Australia he was Professor of Ophthalmology at the Melbourne Optometry School for 20 years and established the Centre for Eye Research Australia. He is currently Deputy Chair of the board of Vision 2020 Australia.

Dean of the Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences, Professor Stephen Smith congratulated Professor Taylor on his appointment.

“Professor Taylor brings with him great experience in both clinical and research work. He has been a champion of improved health outcomes for Australian Indigenous communities,” he said.

“His early experience of reviewing Pakistan’s eye care services on behalf of the World Health Organization, led him to take up the challenge of convincing governments to take vision loss seriously and demonstrating why—with limited and competing health dollars—eye care must be made a global priority.”

Professor Taylor’s new role with the ICO comes at the same time as the most recent statistics on blindness were published in a study in the British Journal of Ophthalmology.

Australia has recorded a 21 percent reduction in the prevalence of blindness in the last 20 years, according to The Global Burden of Disease study.

“These figures are encouraging as even though the world’s population increased over this time, the rates of blindness have reduced dramatically so that the actual number of people who are blind has decreased,” said Professor Taylor.

In high-income countries like Australia, the most common cause of blindness changed from cataract in 1990 to macular degeneration in 2010.

While Australia is performing well globally, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders still experience higher rates of blindness due to cataract, uncorrected refractive error, diabetic retinopathy and trachoma.

Professor Taylor warned as most of this is preventable and treatable, we need to continue to improve access to eye care and ensure that Indigenous Australians do not miss out on the essential eye care they need.

“While these figures are encouraging for the general population, the concern is that we are still not making headway with Indigenous Australians, as they continue to miss out on the eye care they need.  More work needs to be done,” urged Professor Taylor.

Professor Taylor took up his two-year appointment with the ICO at the 2014 World Ophthalmology Congress® on April 2 – 6 in Tokyo, Japan.

About the University of Melbourne Doctor of Optometry (OD) Program

The Doctor of Optometry (OD) is four years in duration, and consists of a combination of on-campus teaching and clinical placements, with the clinical component commencing in Year 1 and gradually increasing to full time in the final year. Opportunities exist for clinical-related research to be conducted as a required component of the degree.

Program: Doctor of Optometry (OD)
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Semester intake: Late February or early March
Duration: 4 years

Apply to the Melbourne Optometry School!

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Would you like more information about the University of Melbourne’s Doctor of Optometry (OD) program? Contact OzTREKK’sAustralian Optometry Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at  rachel@oztrekk.com or 1-866-698-7355. Find out how you can study in Australia!