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Posts Tagged ‘Veterinary Medicine’

Wednesday, January 3rd, 2018

Distinguished academic appointed Head of UQ Veterinary Science

The UQ School of Veterinary Science has received some great news lately.

Currently ranked number 1 in Australia*, the school has just announced an internationally renowned veterinary academic and a leader in the University of Queensland’s One Health initiative has been appointed to head of UQ School of Veterinary Science. Following a competitive international selection process, Executive Dean of UQ’s Faculty of Science Professor Melissa Brown announced Professor Nigel Perkins as the new Head of School.

UQ veterinary science

Prof Perkins is the new Head of UQ School of Veterinary Science (Photo: UQ)

Professor Perkins said he looked forward to working with his colleagues to build on the school’s current international standing in the prestigious Academic Ranking of World Universities.

“I would like to maintain the school’s record as the preferred choice for the very best students and staff from Australia and across the world,” Prof Perkins said.

Originally from southwest Queensland, Professor Perkins completed his veterinary science degree at UQ in 1984, earning first-class honours and a University Medal. This was followed by a Master of Science at The Ohio State University and a PhD in veterinary epidemiology at Massey University, New Zealand.

He has practiced as a veterinarian in Queensland, New South Wales and Victoria and has worked as a veterinary academic clinician at university veterinary schools in the USA, New Zealand and Australia.

Professor Perkins has held leadership roles including as Group Leader of the EpiCentre, an internationally acclaimed epidemiology research and consultancy centre within the Institute of Veterinary, Animal and Biomedical Science, Massey University, New Zealand.

He was research program manager for the Horse R&D Program within the Rural Industries Research and Development Corporation (now AgriFutures Australia); and surveillance program coordinator for the Australian Biosecurity Co-operative Research Centre.

Professor Perkins was Chief Examiner of the Australian and New Zealand College of Veterinary Scientists and Director of AusVet Animal Health Services, a private Australian epidemiology consulting company operating in many countries around the world.

“The school has great facilities and caseloads and fantastic students and staff,” Prof Perkins said. “My predecessors, acting head Associate Professor Jenny Seddon and former head Professor Glen Coleman have left the school in great shape and I look forward to continuing this success.”

*Academic Ranking of World Universities (ARWU) 2017

Why study veterinary science at UQ?

The UQ veterinary science program is one of the most sought after in Australia, attracting the very best students and producing veterinarians that are in high demand. The UQ Bachelor of Veterinary Science provides the broadest base in the biological sciences of any undergraduate course and provides a very wide range of career options as well as its professional qualifications, enabling graduates to practice veterinary medicine and surgery.

Practice in Canada
The University of Queensland’s Bachelor of Veterinary Science program was accredited by the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) in 2012. This means that graduates are considered in the same category as graduates from North American vet schools when undertaking licensing examinations in North America. Graduates are eligible to sit the North American Veterinary Licensing Examination along with graduates from accredited veterinary colleges in the United States and Canada.

Program: Bachelor of Veterinary Science (Honours)
Location: Gatton, Queensland
Semester intake: February each year
Duration: 5 years
Application deadline: UQ Veterinary School has a general application deadline of November 29; however, late applications may be accepted. It is strongly recommended that students apply a minimum of three months prior to the program’s start date.

Apply to UQ Veterinary School!

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Do you have any questions about the UQ veterinary science program? Please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Veterinary Schools Officer Meghan Strank at meghan@oztrekk.com. We’re here to help!

Wednesday, July 19th, 2017

UQ Veterinary School earns top marks in global ranking system

The University of Queensland has been ranked the best in Australia for veterinary sciences by a major international rankings system.

UQ Vet School earns top marks in global ranking system

Study at UQ Vet School (Photo credit: UQ)

Acting Head of the UQ School of Veterinary Science Associate Professor Jenny Seddon welcomed the latest school accolade in the ShanghaiRanking Global Ranking of Academic Subjects for 2017.

“The school has a sustained record of excellence in research and teaching across the veterinary disciplines since our first student intake 81 years ago,” she said.

“In addition to providing world-class veterinary education, our diverse group of academic and clinical staff contribute to animal science, health and welfare through innovative, practical research, advanced veterinary services and successful industry partnerships.”

Associate Professor Seddon said as well as being the top-ranked Australian university in veterinary sciences, The University of Queensland was also ranked globally in the world’s top 25 for veterinary sciences—at ranking 24—in the prestigious subject rankings.

She said prospective students could be confident in the quality of their programs, with the five-year Bachelor of Veterinary Science degree being globally accredited by three major accrediting bodies in Australia/NZ (AVBC), UK (RCVS) and North America (AVMA).

UQ is also a leader both nationally and internationally in the emerging profession of veterinary technology, offering a three-year Bachelor of Veterinary Technology degree which combines theory, practical instruction and hands-on experience.

With more than $140 million invested in purpose-built teaching and research facilities at UQ’s Gatton campus, students and research staff access an integrated site for animal production, health and welfare teaching and research activities set on 1,000 hectares of rural land.

UQ Veterinary School

Since its first intake of students in 1936, the UQ Veterinary School has been recognized for a sustained record of excellence in teaching and learning across the veterinary disciplines and the quality of its research. The vet program at the University of Queensland is one of the most sought after in Australia, attracting the very best students and producing veterinarians that are in high demand, both domestically and internationally. The Bachelor of Veterinary Science (Honours) provides the broadest base in the biological sciences of any undergraduate course and provides a very wide range of career options as well as its professional qualifications, enabling graduates to practice veterinary medicine and surgery.

Program: Bachelor of Veterinary Science (Honours)
Location: Gatton, Queensland
Semester intake: February
Duration: 5 years
Application deadline: General application deadline of November 29; however, late applications may be accepted. Candidates are encouraged to apply as early as possible.

Apply to UQ Veterinary School!

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Discover more about studying at UQ Veterinary School! Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Veterinary Schools Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com.

Wednesday, May 24th, 2017

New gift helps treat pets at UQ School of Veterinary Science

A donation of state-of-the-art equipment to UQ VETS Small Animal Hospital has empowered the university’s staff and students, while also improving the outcomes of the animals they treat.

A dog named Sparkie was the first patient to benefit from a generous donation by alumna Hilary Huey (Diploma in Physical Education ’70) that funded the purchase of diagnostic equipment.

New gift helps treat pets at UQ Veterinary School

UQ VETS Small Animal Hospital has received a generous donation (Photo credit: UQ)

Dr Donna Spowart from UQ VETS said the equipment used to treat Sparkie had also provided many additional benefits for students, and pets treated at UQ.

“The digital otoscope allowed us to get good visualisation of what was going on in the ear canal so that we could develop an appropriate treatment plan. Using the equipment meant we could share these pictures with the owner to explain the pet’s condition,” said Dr Spowart.

“It also allowed our students to practice visualising ear structures which is something that is otherwise difficult to teach.”

UQ veterinary science students can watch the clinician position the scope, while also viewing the procedure on the big screen. This content can then be uploaded to online teaching platforms, which allows students to study the material.

From a teaching and learning perspective, this equipment achieves many things with the ability to teach multiple students at the same time without them needing to be physically present.

Ms Huey said she was pleased the equipment had an immediate impact on the learning outcomes of students and the treatment outcomes of the animals cared for by UQ VETS Small Animal Hospital.

“This donation has achieved several benefits; UQ has the advantage of having the latest equipment available and it allows for a more productive teaching and learning experience by both staff and students,” she said.

“Having been trained to use such an item, veterinary students might also be inclined to buy it when setting up their own practice.”

The equipment purchased through Ms Huey’s generosity has made it possible to not only diagnose the condition of Sparkie, but will have wider implications for other animals treated at UQ VETS Small Animal Hospital.

“Most importantly, equipment of the highest standard should allow for more effective treatment and management of the animal’s condition, thus facilitating the maximum chance of the creature’s recovery. To me, this is a win-win situation,” said Ms Huey.

The Webb-Jenkins Veterinary Science Endowment Fund, established with a gift from Hilary Huey, provides funds for the Webb-Jenkins Veterinary Travel Scholarships which supports students who undertake practical placements in rural areas, and also small items of equipment.

Studying veterinary science at the University of Queensland

Are you interested in veterinary science? Since its first intake of students in 1936, UQ’s School of Veterinary Science has been recognized for a sustained record of excellence in teaching and learning across the veterinary disciplines and the quality of its research. The school is based at a purpose-built site with first-rate facilities for teaching and research and access to horses, cattle, pigs and poultry.

Program: Bachelor of Veterinary Science (Honours)
Location: Gatton, Queensland
Semester intake: February
Duration: 5 years
Application deadline: General application deadline of November 30; however, late applications may be accepted. Candidates are encouraged to apply a minimum of three months prior to the program’s start date.

The UQ School of Veterinary Science has full accreditation with the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA), and with both the Australasian Veterinary Boards Council and the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons in the UK, enabling UQ graduates to also practice in North America, Australia, New Zealand, UK, Hong Kong and most of Asia.

Apply to UQ Veterinary School!

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Discover more about studying at the UQ School of Veterinary Science ! Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Veterinary Schools Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com for more information.

Tuesday, March 21st, 2017

UQ School of Veterinary Science supports international students

Moving to a new country can be daunting. So can starting at a new university, and doing both at once can be a real challenge! The UQ School of Veterinary Science helps international students make a smooth and successful transition to life and studying on Gatton Campus.

UQ vet science supports international students

UQ School of Veterinary Science supports its international students! (Photo: UQ)

International student representatives

In each year of the Bachelor of Veterinary Science (Hons) program, two international year representatives are elected. They provide a collective voice for international students in a single year and are the first contact for international student issues. The international year representatives also discuss international student issues with the veterinary school international student mentor, organise international students’ events and provide mentoring services to international students.

Email addresses for international year representatives will also be provided to international students of each year.

International student representatives

  • communicate any international students issues directly with the international student mentor;
  • develop and maintain an international student Facebook page;
  • help organise events;
  • are involved in the international student peer-support/mentoring.

Peer support for international students

An international (peer) mentor is a current student who volunteers their time to help new students settle into life in Gatton and study at the UQ School of Veterinary Science.  All new students have to make adjustments to be successful at university.  Mentors provide peer support and thus a student’s perspective of university life by sharing their experiences, challenges and insights.  The international student mentors are a mix of local and international students working together to assist new students from the time they arrive in Australia, attend orientation and throughout the semester.

Academic mentor for international students

Dr Joerg Henning is the International Student Mentor at the School of Veterinary Science. He liaises directly with international students and international student representatives and provides support, guidance and advice on any issues that might be important for international students.

UQ Bachelor of Veterinary Science Honours

The vet program at the University of Queensland is one of the most sought after in Australia, attracting the very best students and producing veterinarians that are in high demand, both domestically and internationally. The university’s Bachelor of Veterinary Science provides the broadest base in the biological sciences of any undergraduate course and provides a very wide range of career options as well as its professional qualifications, enabling graduates to practice veterinary medicine and surgery.

Program: Bachelor of Veterinary Science (Honours)
Location: Gatton, Queensland
Semester intake: February
Duration: 5 years
Application deadline: UQ Veterinary School has a general application deadline of November 30; however, late applications may be accepted. It is strongly recommended that students apply a minimum of three months prior to the program’s start date.

Apply to UQ Veterinary School!

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If you have any questions about UQ Veterinary School, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Veterinary Schools Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com or at 1-866-698-7355.

Monday, February 27th, 2017

Why choose to study veterinary science at the University of Queensland?

The UQ School of Veterinary Science is located on the Gatton campus of the University of Queensland. This campus represents Queensland’s premier hub for animal and agricultural training and is 100 km west of Brisbane, Queensland’s capital city and a major national and international transport hub.

Why choose to study veterinary science at the University of Queensland?

UQ Vet Centre at the Gatton campus

The veterinary teaching facilities on the Gatton Campus were built in 2010 and are among the best in the southern hemisphere. The University of Queensland Gatton campus provides access to all animal species and clinics and teaching facilities are located at the one site, so there is no need to switch between campuses!

Approximately 24% of students in each year of the program are international students, hailing from a diverse range of home countries, including Canada. Modern veterinary practice must have a global perspective, and the  Bachelor of Veterinary Science (Hons) curriculum has been designed to offer internationally aligned content and methods of teaching, preparing students for professional roles in whichever region they choose.

UQ and the School of Veterinary Science demonstrate their excellence in a number of ways, not least being highly ranked on global tertiary education quality indicators. The latest QS Global Employability Ranking placed UQ within the top 5 universities in Australia, and within the top 60 internationally, with respect to employability of its graduates.

The school has full accreditation with the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA), and with both the Australasian Veterinary Boards Council and the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons in the UK, enabling UQ graduates to also practice in North America, Australia, New Zealand, UK, Hong Kong and most of Asia.

Studying veterinary science at the University of Queensland

Since its first intake of students in 1936, the UQ School of Veterinary Science has been recognized for a sustained record of excellence in teaching and learning across the veterinary disciplines and the quality of its research. The school is based at a purpose-built site with first-rate facilities for teaching and research and access to horses, cattle, pigs and poultry.

Program: Bachelor of Veterinary Science (Honours)
Location: Gatton, Queensland
Semester intake: February
Duration: 5 years
Application deadline: General application deadline of November 30; however, late applications may be accepted. It is strongly recommended that students apply a minimum of three months prior to the program’s start date.

Apply to UQ Veterinary School!

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Discover more about studying at UQ Veterinary School! Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Veterinary Schools Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com.

Tuesday, December 13th, 2016

Generous donation supports recovery of UQ veterinary hospital patients

Sailor the Great Dane was the first patient to benefit from a generous donation to the University of Queensland Veterinary Medical Centre for the purchase of a portable patient monitor.

Generous donation supports recovery of UQ veterinary hospital patients

The monitor enabled the close observation of Sailor’s vital signs while moving him to and from receiving CT Scans (Photo credit: UQ)

The monitor enabled the close observation of Sailor’s vital signs while moving him to and from receiving CT Scans.

Sailor was suspected of having lesions in the cervical area of the spine, and this condition would have predisposed him to a drop in heart rate or respiratory arrest. The portable patient monitor enabled the staff to easily check for these complications if they occurred.

Head of UQ School of Veterinary Science Professor Glen Coleman said the donation enhances patient care and was very appreciated by the staff and veterinary students who benefit from hands-on exposure to the monitor during their anaesthesia rotations.

The UQ Veterinary Medical Centre opened in August 2010 and hosts the latest in veterinary medical and surgical diagnostic and treatment options which underlie the School of Veterinary Science’s commitment to providing high-quality, compassionate care to meet the needs of the patient, client and referring veterinarian while providing quality learning experiences for clinical veterinary students.

Bachelor of Veterinary Science at the University of Queensland

The vet program at the UQ Veterinary School is one of the most sought after in Australia, attracting the very best students and producing veterinarians that are in high demand, both domestically and internationally. The university’s Bachelor of Veterinary Science provides the broadest base in the biological sciences of any undergraduate course and provides a very wide range of career options as well as its professional qualifications, enabling graduates to practice veterinary medicine and surgery.

Program: Bachelor of Veterinary Science
Location: Gatton, Queensland
Semester intake: February
Program duration: 5 years

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Would you like more information about UQ Veterinary School? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Veterinary Schools Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com or call 1-866-698-7355 (toll free in Canada).

Monday, November 21st, 2016

A prickly patient for UQ Veterinary School

Sticking his best beak forward was not a wise idea for George the echidna, who recently ended up with a fractured beak near the town of St George, Queensland.

But thanks to a kind rescuer and the staff at the UQ Vets Small Animal Hospital at the UQ Veterinary School, George has made a full recovery and is ready to defend his territory.

A prickly patient for UQ Veterinary School

George the echidna (Photo credit: UQ)

Veterinary nurse Rebecca de Gier said a good Samaritan had found George rolled up in a ball by the roadside and looking poorly.

“Luckily for George, the gentleman had the presence of mind, commitment, passion and kindness to animals to drive five hours to bring him to us for a check up,” Ms de Gier said.

“George was X-rayed and provided with pain relief, and had a fracture in his beak stabilised.”

George received world-class attention from the hospital’s avian and exotics team, including Associate Professor Dr Bob Doneley, veterinary intern Dr Zoe Anastassiadis and Ms de Gier.

“Vehicle accidents are the number one cause of damage to echidna beaks that we see,” Dr Doneley said.

“It’s a problem because echidnas need their beaks to eat.

“They have a fifteen-centemetre-long tongue which is housed in the beak, which is about seven centimetres long. They roll out the sticky tongue to catch their food.”

As with most wildlife patients, staff minimised human contact and kept George in a separate wildlife enclosure, where he was fed his favourite termites to help him in his recovery.

“He is doing well now, which was great news for his rescuer who rang every day to check on his progress,” Ms de Gier said.

“All in all, he’s travelled about 40 hours to look after him.

“This gentleman collected George from UQ at the start of Be Kind to Animals Week, and returned him to the area he was found, which is the best possible outcome.

“George can now look after his lady echidnas and keep the other males at bay.”

UQ Veterinary School receives no government funding for wildlife care, relying on community support through the Wildlife Emergency Care Fund.

“We are always grateful for donations to care for our native animals,” Dr Doneley said.

UQ Bachelor of Veterinary Science Honours

Are you passionate about animals of all shapes and sizes? Consider studying veterinary science!

The vet program at the University of Queensland is one of the most sought after in Australia, attracting the very best students and producing veterinarians that are in high demand, both domestically and internationally. The university’s Bachelor of Veterinary Science provides the broadest base in the biological sciences of any undergraduate course and provides a very wide range of career options as well as its professional qualifications, enabling graduates to practice veterinary medicine and surgery.

Program: Bachelor of Veterinary Science (Honours)
Location: Gatton, Queensland
Semester intake: February
Duration: 5 years
Application deadline: UQ Veterinary School has a general application deadline of November 30; however, late applications may be accepted. It is strongly recommended that students apply a minimum of three months prior to the program’s start date.

Apply to UQ Veterinary School!

*

If you have any questions about UQ Veterinary School, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Veterinary Schools Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com or at 1-866-698-7355.

Wednesday, September 21st, 2016

UQ Vet focuses on one health—for all creatures great and small

As the gatekeepers of the interface between humans and animals, veterinarians have many roles.

While the local “pet vet,” who vaccinates and treats beloved “Fido” may be the most recognisable, veterinary practice in Australia and Canada encompasses much more diverse fields, including small and large animal practice, emergency medicine, animal production, public health and disease control, quarantine and biosecurity, research and education, pharmaceuticals and commercialisation, animal welfare and therapeutic treatments, and wildlife conservation.

UQ One Health—for all creatures great and small

We are all connected: Fido’s health can affect yours! (Photo credit: UQ)

Over the last decade, the veterinary profession has progressively shifted its focus to a more holistic and integrated approach, which links animal, human and ecosystem health to promote all components through interdisciplinary cooperation.

Concepts of One Health have gathered momentum from an initial focus on understanding and controlling significant recent emerging infectious diseases (EIDs) such as Ebola, avian influenza, and Hendra viruses.

Many recent EIDs originate in animal populations and pose threats to human and environmental health. Veterinarians are playing vital roles in collaborative teams to combat these diseases.

The scope of One Health activities is now extending to embrace broader issues that span animal, human and environmental health, such as sustainable food systems, climate change, biodiversity, animal welfare and many others. A truly integrated approach requires multidisciplinary expertise, including sociological, agricultural, ecological and non-technical knowledge and skills.

An example of such an approach being used to combat recent challenges is the work UQ School of Veterinary Science epidemiologist Dr Ricardo Soares Magalhaes has been conducting, which informs disease control policy by better understanding the link between geographical distribution of animal and human infections and their associated morbidity.

One of his recent projects has involved studying avian influenza—better known as bird flu—and rabies with the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, the China Animal Health Epidemiology Centre and the China Centres for Disease Control.

Dr Magalhaes is also currently using Big Data to map and develop rapid responses for the West African Ebola virus, with important applications to other emerging infections such as the South American Zika virus.

Researchers from the UQ Veterinary School are also investigating the prevalence and molecular epidemiology of antimicrobial drug resistance in pathogens and commensal organisms in food producing and companion animals in Australia and overseas (in Vietnam and the Philippines). Beyond their human health impact, antimicrobial-resistant bacteria threaten the health and welfare of animals and people’s food security and livelihoods.

This research has already improved veterinary teaching methods.

Students in developing countries are now taught improved antimicrobial awareness and mitigation, and have increased awareness of usage of antimicrobial agents (such as antibiotics) and resistance in the pig industry and in avian species.

Studying veterinary science at the University of Queensland

Are you interested in veterinary science? Since its first intake of students in 1936, UQ’s School of Veterinary Science has been recognized for a sustained record of excellence in teaching and learning across the veterinary disciplines and the quality of its research.

The school is based at a purpose-built site with first-rate facilities for teaching and research and access to horses, cattle, pigs and poultry.

Program: Bachelor of Veterinary Science (Honours)
Location: Gatton, Queensland
Semester intake: February
Duration: 5 years
Application deadline: General application deadline of November 30; however, late applications may be accepted. It is strongly recommended that students apply a minimum of three months prior to the program’s start date.

The UQ School of Veterinary Science has full accreditation with the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA), and with both the Australasian Veterinary Boards Council and the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons in the UK, enabling UQ graduates to also practice in North America, Australia, New Zealand, UK, Hong Kong and most of Asia.

Apply to UQ Veterinary School!

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Discover more about studying at UQ Veterinary School! Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Veterinary Schools Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com.

Thursday, August 25th, 2016

Creating change: UQ Vet School sets up students for success

Did you know that the UQ School of Veterinary Science is ranked #3 in Australia according to the QS World University Rankings by Subject 2016?

Creating change: UQ Vet School sets up students for success

Study veterinary science at UQ!

This ranking places UQ among the world’s best veterinary schools and near the very top of Australia’s best!

UQ Vet is determined to have their students succeed, and encourage the idea that lifelong learning really is the key to being a successful veterinarian in today’s world.

To keep up in an ever-changing industry environment, veterinary education increasingly focuses on self-sufficiency.

UQ Veterinary School’s Professor Paul Mills has worked across many sectors of the industry in the last three decades, including government, emergency medicine, and education, and knows firsthand that students need more than just scientific or practical skills to succeed.

“Setting up our students for success means teaching them not only the vital skills they need to hit the ground running from day one, but also how to learn for themselves so they can continue to develop as veterinarians, but also more broadly as scientists, for their whole careers,” says Professor Mills.

We are trying to make sure they’ve got that ability to change, to think for themselves, to work for whatever job they can do, so they are not pigeon-holed. – Professor Paul Mills

Part of this process involves regular training throughout the five-year Bachelor of Veterinary Science program in skills that are vital to success after graduation.

“From the beginning of their degree, students must participate in activities that prepare them for day-to-day life as a practitioner,” says Professor Malcolm Jones, a parasitologist who works closely with students in the veterinary science program, and has visited Canada to deliver informative information sessions to future UQ vet students.

“This includes a boot camp called Vets for Life at the beginning of their degree that establishes their expectations and provides them with support mechanisms for their studies.

“Later in their coursework, they conduct mock interviews to prepare them for dealing with difficult clients; take courses that develop their business-management, client-management and people skills; and learn techniques to help them manage their feelings and actions in a high-stress environment.

“We are really keen to support our students’ development as resilient, critical thinkers.”

Student Sarah Babington is completing a Bachelor of Veterinary Science and says UQ has prepared her well for a career after graduation.

“Studying veterinary science at UQ has not only taught me the importance of practical skills, such as client communication and business management, but also the essential role veterinarians play in today’s world of human public health on an international scale.”

To learn more about the Vets for Life program, visit veterinary-science.uq.edu.au/student-life

Bachelor of Veterinary Science Honours at UQ

The vet program at the UQ Veterinary School is one of the most sought after in Australia, attracting the very best students and producing veterinarians that are in high demand, both domestically and internationally. The university’s Bachelor of Veterinary Science provides the broadest base in the biological sciences of any undergraduate course and provides a very wide range of career options as well as its professional qualifications, enabling graduates to practice veterinary medicine and surgery.

Program: Bachelor of Veterinary Science (Honours)
Location: Gatton, Queensland
Semester intake: February
Duration: 5 years
Application deadline: UQ Veterinary School has a general application deadline of November 30; however, late applications may be accepted. Candidates are encouraged to apply a minimum of three months prior to the program’s start date.

Apply to the UQ School of Veterinary Science!

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Discover what it’s like to study at UQ Veterinary School! Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Veterinary Schools Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com or 1-866-698-7355.

Wednesday, July 20th, 2016

Sydney Faculty of Veterinary Science experts help Indira the tiger

A team of experts at the University of Sydney Veterinary Teaching Hospital were recently visited by “Indira” the famous tiger to prepare for an operation to arrest her deteriorating eyesight.

“Indira,” who has appeared in numerous movies and TV series such as George of the Jungle and Anaconda, is in the care of Zambi Wildlife Retreat, which among other things provides a home for retired animals from the entertainment industry.

Anaesthesia specialist Dr Alastair Mair and radiologist Dr Mariano Makara at the University of Sydney’s veterinary teaching hospital collaborated with Taronga Zoo chief veterinarian Dr Larry Vogelnest and affiliate veterinary ophthalmologist Dr Cameron Whittaker to anaesthetise the tiger. Diagnostic imaging work including ultrasound, MRI and computerised tomographic CT/CAT scan took longer than exptected, so Indira will return for surgery in a few weeks’ time.

The hospital’s veterinary director, Professor Vanessa Barrs from the Sydney Faculty of Veterinary Science, said the multi-specialist team ensured the exotic animal received the best possible treatment.

“This is the first time in more than a decade that we have had a tiger in our facility,” Professor Barrs said.

Zambi director Donna Wilson said the 15-year-old Bengal tiger had been born at the Bullen’s Animal World facility and as a cub underwent cataract surgery with good results.

“Indira is a very quiet, happy girl who is exceptionally well behaved and easy to handle, but unfortunately her eyesight has deteriorated over the years to the point that she now walks into objects, falls into open ditches and at times has trouble finding her food,” Ms Wilson said.

Veterinary Science

The Sydney DVM aims to produce career ready graduates with excellent fundamental knowledge and skills in managing animal health and disease; and in protecting and advancing animal, human and environmental health and welfare locally and globally.

The program encourages enrolment of students from diverse backgrounds and aims to help them achieve their goals to become veterinary medical professionals in the global community. Teaching is research-driven to ensure students learn from the latest developments and advances in evidence-based practice, veterinary science research, animal behaviour and welfare science and veterinary public health.

Program: Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM)
Location: Sydney, New South Wales
Semester intake: March
Program duration: 4 years
Application deadline: September 14, 2016

Apply to the Sydney Veterinary School!

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Wildlife Health

The Master of Wildlife Health and Population Management is an innovative program offered by the University of Sydney that provides holistic training in wildlife population management. Students will be taught by experts from academia, industry, and government in one of the most beautiful and ecologically diverse settings in the world yet will only be a short distance from the cosmopolitan and vibrant city of Sydney.

Program: Master of Wildlife Health and Population Management
Location: Sydney, New South Wales
Semester intake: March and July
Duration: 1 year
Application deadline: January 31 for the March intake; June 30 for the July intake. Applicants are strongly encouraged to apply as early as possible, as offers are made on a rolling basis and places are limited.

Apply to the University of Sydney!

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Discover more about studying wildlife health or veterinary science! Please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Veterinary Schools Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.