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Posts Tagged ‘UQ School of Medicine’

Monday, May 15th, 2017

UQ to provide major boost to regional health

Regional communities and future health professionals studying through The University of Queensland are big winners from a multi-pronged $54.4 million Federal Government initiative.

In Queensland, UQ will lead the establishment of a University Department of Rural Health (UDRH), providing a major boost to education, training and research in rural south Queensland for nurses, midwives and allied health workers.

UQ to provide major boost to regional health

UQ will lead the establishment of a University Department of Rural Health (Photo credit: UQ)

Three new medical training hubs under UQ control will also be established in Central Queensland, Wide Bay and South West Queensland, operating with an aim of retaining doctors in regional areas.

Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences Executive Dean Professor Bruce Abernethy said research indicated students who experienced rural practice were far more likely to return to work rurally once qualified.

“For the local communities, this is part of a long-term strategy to address maldistribution of the health workforce,” Professor Abernethy said.

“Rural and remote regions of Queensland and Australia often face challenges in attracting and retaining qualified health professionals.

“Students on rural placement will discover the diverse range of professional opportunities available in regional areas, thus enhancing the sustainability and viability of rural health care services.”

UQ joined with the University of Southern Queensland and the Hospital and Health Services of Darling Downs and South West in the successful bid to establish the Southern Queensland Rural Health UDRH.

The UDRH will help provide rural experience to student nurses, midwives, physiotherapists, pharmacists, psychologists, social workers, occupational therapists, speech pathologists, dieticians, and exercise physiologists.

Commonwealth funding has also been awarded to provide additional clinical, academic and administration staff at UQ’s three regional medical training hubs:

  • Central Queensland: located at Rockhampton, with sub-units at Gladstone and Emerald
  • Southern Queensland: located at Toowoomba, with sub-units at Charleville in south-west Queensland
  • Wide Bay: located at Bundaberg, with sub units at Hervey Bay and Theodore.

UQ Faculty of Medicine Acting Executive Dean Professor Robyn Ward said the hubs would offer doctors rural opportunities at all stages of their medical training.

“This will facilitate postgraduate training opportunities, including specialties, so doctors can stay in regional communities for training and not have to return to the city,” Professor Ward said.

“The Department of Rural Health and the training hubs will build on the high quality education and training experiences already offered by UQ’s Rural Clinical School.”

Announcing the funding, Assistant Minister for Health Dr David Gillespie said regional and rural health training not only addressed workforce shortages and service expectations, but was also essential to regional economic growth.

UQ Rural Clinical School

UQ Rural Clinical School is funded through the Australian Government’s Rural Clinical Training Support (RCTS) Program to address health workforce shortages in rural and regional Queensland. To achieve this mandate, UQRCS aims to lead and direct the rural health agenda through the highest quality education, training, research and community service.

Now in its second decade of operation, UQRCS is able to demonstrate a positive impact on the medical workforce in the region and elsewhere.  Studies demonstrate that a student who has experienced the Rural Advantage with UQRCS is 2.5 times more likely to work in a rural area when compared with other UQ medical graduates.

About the UQ Medical Program

The UQ Faculty of Medicine conducts a four-year, graduate-entry medical program, the Doctor of Medicine (MD). The faculty is a leading provider of medical education and research in Australia, and with the country’s largest medical degree program, they are the major single contributor to Queensland’s junior medical workforce.

Program: Doctor of Medicine
Location: Brisbane, Queensland
Semester intake: January
Duration: 4 years
Application deadline: Applications are assessed on a rolling admissions (first come, first served) basis. It is recommended that applicants apply as early as possible to increase their chances of timely assessment. This program can fill quickly!

Apply to the UQ Doctor of Medicine!

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Find out more about UQ Medicine. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com, or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Tuesday, March 28th, 2017

UQ medicine flagship research program to deliver health outcomes

Projects tackling key health challenges of antimicrobial use and skin cancer are the first to be funded under a flagship initiative by the University of Queensland Faculty of Medicine.

UQ medicine flagship research program to deliver health outcomes

UQ Centre for Clinical Research

Deputy Executive Dean and Associate Dean of Research, Professor Melissa Brown, said the faculty is committed to progressing worthy world-class research by providing operational support over five years to deliver health outcomes.

“Our Health Outcomes Programs, or HOPs, represent a strategic approach to faculty research, in collaboration with our hospital and health partners,” Professor Brown said.

“These are very specific and targeted programs of research that address an identified health problem and will produce a specific and visible benefit.”

The first project selected will address high rates of infection in critically ill patients by optimising antimicrobial therapy.

The research team will use whole genome sequencing to rapidly determine which bacteria are causing infection so the most suitable drug and dose combination can be given. Once the process is established, the research team will test it in the clinic and determine its benefits to individual patients and the health system.

The project led by Professor Jason Roberts and Professor David Paterson includes researchers from UQ’s Centre for Clinical Research (UQCCR) and School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences (SCMB).

The second program to be supported focuses on harnessing technology to address the problem of high melanoma incidence and mortality.

The research team will recruit high risk participants to test targeted screening using 3D total body photography and mobile teledermoscopy in the context of the Australian health care system.

Results will be used to drive evidence-based changes to clinical practice.

The project will be led by Professor Peter Soyer of UQ’s Diamantina Institute and Professor David Whiteman, QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, and includes collaborators from QUT, QIMR Berghofer and UQ’s Faculty of Medicine and Faculty of Business.

Professor Brown said both teams should be congratulated for working collaboratively to create change and translate research into tangible health outcomes.

“These projects were selected following a competitive application process engaging interstate reviewers in late 2016, and we look forward to seeing them make a difference to health care in the years ahead.”

About the UQ Medical School Program

The UQ School of Medicine conducts a four-year, graduate-entry medical program, the Doctor of Medicine (MD). The School of Medicine is a leading provider of medical education and research in Australia, and with the country’s largest medical degree program, they are the major single contributor to Queensland’s junior medical workforce.

Program: Doctor of Medicine (MD)
Location: Brisbane, Queensland
Semester intake: January
Duration: 4 years
Application deadline: Applications are assessed on a rolling admissions (first come, first served) basis. It is recommended that applicants apply as early as possible to increase their chances of timely assessment. This program can fill quickly!

Apply to the UQ School of Medicine!

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Find out more about studying medicine at UQ. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com, or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Monday, February 6th, 2017

UQ Medicine graduate shares 9 things he wishes he’d been told as a med student

Hailing from Canada, Shaun completed his medical degree at UQ before undertaking his fellowship at the University of Toronto and his residency with University of Calgary. He currently works full time as a Queensland Health registrar within intensive care and in his spare time he works for House Call Doctor— a 100% bulk-billed, after-hours, home GP service operating in Queensland. If you’d like to hear firsthand from a Canadian who is now practicing medicine in Australia, check out Shaun’s advice!

UQ Medicine graduate shares 9 things he wishes he'd been told as a med student

Canadian Shaun Hosein, now practicing in Australia! (Photo credit: UQ)

1. Study medicine for the right reasons.
Medicine is a highly rewarding career that has many opportunities in various sub-specialty fields. However it is a long road, requires intensive study, and at times can seem impossible. It is not a decision to be made lightly, and there are times I wish I could fix that leaky pipe in my kitchen. I chose medicine, because it not only helps people, but I enjoy thinking on my feet and problem solving. Reflecting a bit more, it has also developed my personal ethics and communication skills.

2. For international medicine students, you can’t beat UQ for education and lifestyle.
UQ is constantly improving their medicine course which I feel is important when choosing a university and medical school. When I was applying they were very approachable and efficient throughout the application process.  The case-based learning style made me nervous, but I think it is the best way to learn and study medicine. Brisbane is also an amazing city, it has the best climate of all Australian cities (none of this “four seasons in one day” stuff). Plus the Gold Coast and the Sunshine Coast are about an hour away! Perfect study and lifestyle balance.

3. Studying internationally is incredible, but it can be difficult when you return home.
I have spoken to numerous potential Canadian medical school candidates over the years, and my advice is the same. Studying medicine at UQ was a life-changing event for me, and provided me unique opportunities in an amazing country. I won’t lie—you will find it challenging being away from home, and to be honest, getting back into the Canadian system is difficult. UQ does facilitate opportunities to make this process easier, but it is still a challenge. Be prepared to finish internship training in Australia before considering the road back or please at least obtain and maintain general registration with AHPRA.

4. There are pros and cons to working in different health systems, so consider what’s important to you.
I can only speak in relation to the Canadian and Australian healthcare systems, but in my honest experience you get paid more, will have better shifts and rosters, and overall better work-life balance in Australia.  On the other hand, internship training is structured better in Canada: training is slightly shorter and there are no primary exams, but the programs are very difficult to get accepted into.

5. In medicine, you can have a “typical routine” but you’ll never have a “typical day.”
I currently work for Queensland Health and for House Call Doctor when I have extra time in the evenings, usually on nights off, or weekends. Being a home GP after-hours is very flexible and works well with my schedule. Working with House Call Doctor means I get to visit a wide variety of patients who need urgent after-hours care, treating everything from acute cold and flus to more serious conditions, such as gastro, home accidents or chronic illness. You really never know what kind of patients you’ll treat!

6. Sometimes taking the road less travelled will put you on the right path.
I always wanted to work in primary care, but it was quite difficult to get any experience and determine if it suited me. House Call Doctor has given me this experience but it’s also shown me another side to medical practice. I honestly feel after-hours care is becoming its own sub-specialty of medicine. I enjoy it because it allows me to have a simple chat with patients, to see children or speak with a young mum. It is very rewarding, and not something I could have experienced working in the adult system alone.

7. As a student, it’s easy to get run down from all that studying (and perhaps socialising). When you do get sick there are probably more healthcare options available to you than you think.
House Call Doctor offers 100% bulk-billed home GP visits to anyone with a Medicare or DVA (Department of Veteran’s Affair) Card.  Having a GP visit your home can be particularly useful in acute medical situations that don’t warrant an emergency department response, but can’t wait until normal clinic hours. House Call Doctor visits a wide cross-section of patients, including students living in shared accommodation. International students can also take advantage of the after-hours medical care, rebated if they travelling with BUPA, NIB, Allianz or Medibank insurance. For more information you can visit www.housecalldoctor.com.au, or you can phone the after-hours line on 13 55 66 to book an appointment.

8. Support networks and technology are invaluable for international students.
Having a strong family and supportive Australian peer group is extremely important throughout your medical degree. At the same time, don’t underestimate the impact of technology. Skype, FaceTime, and WhatsApp will ensure you can easily stay in touch with loved ones back home.

9. Your medical degree can take you anywhere and you’re likely to end up somewhere completely different to where you thought you would.
I have worked in numerous medical fields, and I have definitely not taken a straight path. Initially I was very keen on critical care (ICU), but when I worked in Haiti post-earthquake and again in Africa I got a better understanding of health and the need for public health medicine and primary care. I have since completed Canadian postgraduate training in public health medicine, and am now working towards translating my qualification here in Australia. I also have a public health interest in illicit substance abuse and drug use patterns and am completing a fellowship in toxicology. I tell everyone, especially medical students, to never discount the idea of being a GP; I’m still considering it, if I get time.

About the UQ Medical School Program

The UQ Medical School conducts a four-year, graduate-entry medical program, the Doctor of Medicine (MD). The School of Medicine is a leading provider of medical education and research in Australia, and with the country’s largest medical degree program, they are the major single contributor to Queensland’s junior medical workforce.

Program: Doctor of Medicine (MD)
Location: Brisbane, Queensland
Semester intake: January
Duration: 4 years
Application deadline: Applications are assessed on a rolling admissions (first come, first served) basis. It is recommended that applicants apply as early as possible to increase their chances of timely assessment. This program can fill quickly!

Apply to the UQ School of Medicine!

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Find out more about the UQ School of Medicine. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com, or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Friday, December 16th, 2016

UQ Medical School congratulates the Class of 2016

On Dec. 14, more than 450 UQ Medical School students became doctors as they graduated as the Class of 2016. Among them were approximately 43 OzTREKK students!

The cohort included a myriad of remarkable medical practitioners including Rachel Colbran, this year’s valedictorian.

With a GPA of 6.93, Rachel was recognised as an exemplary student who had been decorated with awards such as the UQ Excellence scholarship and published photos in the Medical Journal of Australia.

UQ Medical School congratulates the Class of 2016

There are some OzTREKKers in this pic! (Photo: UQ)

In addition to the class’s valedictorian, you didn’t have to look too far around the room to be inspired, and once such inspiration was graduand John Maunder who has a story from which each of us can take inspiration….

The last time John Maunder graduated from the University of Queensland, it was the same day he become one of the 120,000 new cases of cancer diagnosed in Australia each year.

This time around, he’s qualifying as a doctor and survivor of nodular lymphocyte predominant Hodgkin’s lymphoma, a rare form of blood cancer.

He graduated Tuesday, Dec. 13 at 6 p.m. with a Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery at UQ Centre, St Lucia Campus.

John said it was on the day of his engineering graduation he learned the test results of his biopsy for a lump that surgeons had told him was ‘likely to be nothing.’

“I was at the Regatta Hotel having a beer with my friends and family before the ceremony and I got the call,” John said. “My doctor told me the pathology results from my tests actually showed I had blood cancer and I was to see an oncologist immediately.

“I can’t really explain how I felt after this, I returned to my table where lunch had arrived, told my parents and cried.”

After the initial shock of the news, John had another decision to make upon finding out he had successfully earned a spot in medical school.

“Throughout my engineering degree I was never satisfied that would be my career, I had always toyed with the idea of studying medicine so I ended up sitting the GAMSAT test before I graduated,” John said.

“I didn’t know what to expect, but I got in.

“The thing about medicine is you can’t defer your place for six months and you can’t take on half loads of work, which makes it difficult when you’re facing chemotherapy.”

Not wanting to delay his career any further, John decided to accept his place in the medical course while fighting cancer and undergoing intensive treatments.

“I had intensive chemo for six months, which was also the first semester of my medical studies.

“I’d have chemo every Friday, be wrecked all weekend, then have to front up for class on Monday.”

John’s inspirational commitment means he has now completed his medical degree and has secured a placement at Nambour Hospital on the Sunshine Coast next year.

In addition to full-time study and treatment John has been an active fundraiser for the Leukaemia Foundation, raising more than $100,000 dollars for the charity through events like World’s Greatest Shave.

“I’m so grateful to my friends, family, doctor and the community who helped me over the last few years,” John said.

John is now in remission but requires six-monthly check-ups. He still has some words of wisdom for students going through rough times.

“It’s important to remember if you’re struggling or don’t know what to do, to ask for help.

“There are people around you who know more than you and you should always seek their knowledge whether the issue is big or small, know that it’s okay to talk to someone.”

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Since the beginning of OzTREKK, we’ve had the pleasure and privilege to assist more than 300 students achieve their dreams of studying medicine at UQ.  All of us at OzTREKK offer a hearty congratulations to all of you!

Wondering if studying medicine is for you? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Wednesday, November 23rd, 2016

New Medical Dean at UQ Faculty of Medicine

The UQ Faculty of Medicine has appointed Professor Stuart Carney, from King’s College London in the United Kingdom, to the position of Medical Dean.

Acting Executive Dean Professor Robyn Ward announced the appointment following a comprehensive international search which generated interest from a strong field.

UQ appoints Medical Dean

Professor Stuart Carney (Photo: UQ)

“Professor Carney joins UQ from King’s where he is currently the Dean of Medical Education, overseeing the largest MBBS program in the UK,” Professor Ward said.

“At King’s he has led a major turnaround to transform the student experience and medical program, and before that he was Vice Dean of Education of the newly created University of Exeter Medical School.

“A psychiatrist by training, Professor Carney holds a strong track record in medical education as well as extensive experience as a clinical teacher, examiner and curriculum developer.”

Professor Carney completed his Bachelor of Medicine, Bachelor of Surgery at Edinburgh University and went on to obtain his Master of Public Health in Quantitative Methods at Harvard University.

As Medical Dean at UQ, Professor Carney will be responsible for academic management and will have oversight of all aspects of the program through the Office of Medical Education.

He will also serve as Deputy Executive Dean and work as part of the faculty executive team dedicated to ensuring a world-class comprehensive and integrated medical program.

Professor Carney said he wants to help students to become the best possible doctors they can—safe and effective from day one.

“I want them to be lateral thinkers who are capable of pushing the boundaries to improve patient and population health, and become the medical leaders of today and tomorrow.”

Professor Carney will start in the position in the New Year.

About the UQ Medical School Program

The UQ School of Medicine conducts a four-year, graduate-entry medical program, the Doctor of Medicine (MD). The school is a leading provider of medical education and research in Australia, and with the country’s largest medical degree program, they are the major single contributor to Queensland’s junior medical workforce.

During Phase 1 of their medical degree, students are taught foundation knowledge and skills in preparation for medical practice. During this time, students work in small groups around a planned series of cases to highlight principles and issues in health and disease. Many tutorials take place at UQ’s St Lucia and Herston Campuses.

Phase 2 of the program is taught across 11 academic disciplines with opportunities for students to undertake placements within in Australia and overseas.

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Find out more about the UQ School of Medicine. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com, or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Friday, October 28th, 2016

UQ School of Medicine consultations… and other adventures

I just returned from a mini whirlwind with one of my favorite people in international education: Dr. Jenny Schafer, Director of Student Affairs at the UQ School of Medicine.

Dr. Schafer was recently in Canada for the second of her twice-annual visits and, as is becoming very usual, we all had a blast—students included.

UQ School of Medicine consultations... and other adventures

Dr Schafer about to enjoy… a cricket

First up was a stop in Vancouver where she met with a few dozen students at Simon Fraser University. I can’t lie; I wasn’t there but I have heard that it was a great time and questions needed to be cut off after two solid hours. I think that’s a good sign!

I picked Dr. Schafer up in Toronto where we were hosting the University of Toronto Pre-Med Society for a Q&A about studying medicine abroad. Before that event though, we needed some grub.

Dr. Schafer is a foodie and likes some good eats. In a city with some of the best restaurants, I’m always on the hunt for something a little different. With a surprising 22-degree October evening, I was banking on a patio, so we headed to El Catrin in the Distillery District. Looking for different, nestled among the tacos, charred corn and smoke-infused avocado sauce were… crickets. Like, crickets. How could we not, right? Well, we did, and while they didn’t taste like chicken, I’d argue they didn’t taste like much. Totally worth the few bucks to now know that I don’t necessary need to eat crickets again.

Following dinner—and the Jays’ ultimate demise—the weather took a turn and we got back into the regular October weather we’d expect forcing the switch out of flip flops. Neither of us had the appropriate clothing for the weather.

UQ School of Medicine consultations... and other adventures

OzTREKK Director Jaime Notman and her not-chicken nacho topping

The following evening the UofT Pre-Med Society hosted about 50 students where we to learned more about the UQ School of Medicine, about Dr. Schafer’s field of study, and her suggestions for success. Dr. Iqbal Jaffer (UQ MBBS ’09) joined her for a student-focused Q&A, which was incredible. Currently doing his residency in cardiac surgery at McMaster, Dr. Jaffer had the students peppering him with questions about his experience in Australia, his return to Canada, and his current practice. I should also say he’s currently in the final throes of completing his PhD, which is being defended early in 2017! We had to cull the questions just before 9 p.m. as the cleaning staff was waiting to get home.

I am obviously biased, but it was really great to have such an interactive experience for our future students. Hearing what it’s really like is so invaluable and I’m sure that everyone in attendance felt similarly. We had some students who are leaving in a few short weeks and most in their final (some in their first!) year all eager to understand if this experience is for them. I’m very excited to see their decision!  I’d love to hear if any students found it as interesting as I did!

After UofT it was a quick trip to meet with the Queen’s Medicine team (UQ and Queen’s have a long-standing and exiting partnership if you didn’t know!) where the goodbyes took place and Dr. Schafer headed back to the Brisbane springtime.

Jaime Notman
OzTREKK Director / Operations Manager

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Do you have any questions about your UQ medicine offer? Wondering if studying medicine is for you? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Friday, September 2nd, 2016

UQ Medical School celebrates 80 years of teaching medicine

Generations of doctors have started their medical careers at the University of Queensland, which is celebrating 80 years of medicine in 2016.

UQ celebrates 80 years of teaching medicine

Classes were held in various hastily adapted buildings across the city, until the purpose-built Mayne Medical School at Herston was officially opened in 1939 (Photo credit: UQ)

The UQ Medical School program has graduated more than 13,000 students over the past eight decades, forging an enduring connection to the state’s medical community.

Dean of Medicine Professor Darrell Crawford said the anniversary provided an opportunity to reflect on UQ’s distinguished history of health and medical leadership.

“We are proud to celebrate 80 years of teaching, and to continue to be the leading provider of medical education and research within our state,” Professor Crawford said.

“I am especially proud of the more than 2500 unpaid clinicians—mostly alumni—who return to the university to teach in the medical program and pass on their broad experience to a new generation of learners.”

Established in 1936, the UQ Faculty of Medicine offered Queensland’s first complete medical course. Classes were held in various hastily adapted buildings across the city, until the purpose-built Mayne Medical School at Herston was officially opened in 1939.

The school has grown to become a global medical school, delivering Australia’s largest medical program with nine state-of-the-art clinical schools across Queensland.

“Close links with major hospitals and health services across Queensland ensure students are at the forefront of clinical teaching and practice,” Professor Crawford said.

UQ Medical School’s reach has also extended internationally, with clinical schools located in New Orleans and Brunei, giving medical students an opportunity to be part of a global medical experience.

To celebrate the anniversary, more than 600 guests attended an 80 Years of Medicine Gala Dinner at Brisbane City Hall recently.

The event showcased family connections among alumni, including families with three generations of medical graduates.

UQ celebrates 80 years of teaching medicine

Guests included descendants of the inaugural class and father and son Bert and Peter Klug, graduates of the classes of 1953 and 1978 (Photo credit: UQ)

Guests included descendants of the inaugural class and father and son Bert and Peter Klug, graduates of the classes of 1953 and 1978.

Dr Bert Klug, who is now 94, survived the Holocaust and migrated to Australia in 1948.

“I had always had the ambition to become a doctor but because of war time events my education had been interrupted,” Dr Klug said.

“When we came here I still wanted to be a doctor and I was able to obtain an interview with the Dean of the Medical School who at the time was Professor Meyers.”

Professor Errol Solomon Meyers had been an ardent campaigner for a medical school in Queensland and the ES Meyers Lecture Theatre at the Herston campus is named in his honour.

The 80 Years of Medicine celebrations will continue when the Mayne Medical School Building at Herston opens its doors to the public during Brisbane Open House on Sunday, Oct. 9.

Ten Reasons to Study Medicine at UQ

1. Top 50 in the world for clinical and pre-clinical health and medicine metrics (QS World University Rankings 2016)
2. One of Australia’s leading medical programs
3. World-class scientists, facilities and investment
4. Quality clinical skills training
5. Integrated, problem-based learning approach
6. Early patient contact
7. A wide range of clinical training opportunities with 11 clinical schools
8. 80 per cent of students complete an elective overseas
9. Clinical schools based in USA and Brunei
10. Links to major teaching hospitals and research institutes

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Find out more about the UQ School of Medicine. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com, or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Friday, July 22nd, 2016

UQ appoints new Head of Rural Clinical School

The University of Queensland has appointed Professor Sarah Strasser as Head of Rural Clinical School with the Faculty of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences.

The appointment has been announced by Acting Executive Dean of the Faculty, Professor Robyn Ward.

UQ appoints new Head of Rural Clinical School

Professor Sarah Strasser is the new Head of Rural Clinical School (Photo credit: UQ)

“Professor Strasser is an academic rural general practitioner with significant experience in leading and managing rural clinical programs within Australia and Canada,” Professor Ward said.

She has held several leadership roles and has been instrumental in expanding rural medical schools, including in the Northern Territory for Flinders University.

“Professor Strasser is recognised nationally and internationally for developing successful innovative medical education programs which have improved the rural health workforce.”

Professor Strasser will be responsible for leading the faculty’s Rural Clinical School, developing the rural medical workforce and fostering the faculty’s relationships with the state’s rural and regional hospitals and health services.

“I am delighted to be returning to Australia to take up this important position with The University of Queensland,” Professor Strasser said.

“The UQ Rural Clinical School will have a major teaching and research role in the newly shaped UQ medical programs.

“This is an exciting opportunity for UQ to provide leadership in rural health nationally and internationally.”

The UQ Rural Clinical School aims to address health workforce shortages in rural and regional areas through providing the highest quality education, training, research and community service.

Professor Strasser will commence as Head of School in August.

UQ Rural Clinical School

UQ Rural Clinical School is funded through the Australian Government’s Rural Clinical Training Support (RCTS) Program to address health workforce shortages in rural and regional Queensland. To achieve this mandate, UQRCS aims to lead and direct the rural health agenda through the highest quality education, training, research and community service.

Now in its second decade of operation, UQRCS is able to demonstrate a positive impact on the medical workforce in the region and elsewhere.  Studies demonstrate that a student who has experienced the Rural Advantage with UQRCS is 2.5 times more likely to work in a rural area when compared with other UQ medical graduates.

About the UQ Medical School Program

The UQ Medical School conducts a four-year, graduate-entry medical program, the Doctor of Medicine (MD). The School of Medicine is a leading provider of medical education and research in Australia, and with the country’s largest medical degree program, they are the major single contributor to Queensland’s junior medical workforce.

Program: Doctor of Medicine (MD)
Location: Brisbane, Queensland
Semester intake: January
Duration: 4 years
Application deadline: Applications are assessed on a rolling admissions (first come, first served) basis. It is recommended that applicants apply as early as possible to increase their chances of timely assessment. This program can fill quickly!

Apply to the UQ School of Medicine!

*

Find out more about the UQ School of Medicine. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com, or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Wednesday, July 13th, 2016

UQ MD offers released!

We’ve been busy the last few days: we’ve received a boatload of UQ MD offers! Congratulations!

UQ MD offers released

Study medicine at UQ Medical School

If you’ve received an offer, please note the lapse date on your offer letter. Waiting for your offer? Keep your eyes on your email inbox!

Still wondering if you should apply? UQ MD applications are assessed on a rolling admissions (first come, first served) basis. While it is recommended that applicants apply early to increase their chances of timely assessment, you are still permitted to apply as long as there are spots available!

Students who have completed their MCAT and have met the minimum MCAT requirements, and those who have completed their studies with a minimum 65% cumulative average are encouraged to apply.

Entry Requirements

  • Completed degree (Bachelor, Master, PhD)
  • GPA equivalent to 5.0 on UQ’s 7.0 scale
  • MCAT score (minimum of 8/8/8) or an overall score of 499; or GAMSAT score (minimum of 50 in each section)
  • Compulsory consultative meeting with the UQ School of Medicine

While there are no prerequisites for admission into the Doctor of Medicine program, the University of Queensland’s School of Medicine recommends that students prepare themselves for the MD by undertaking undergraduate, second-year university-level courses in anatomy, physiology and biochemistry. Students with this level of knowledge will more easily transition into the clinical case-based model that forms the foundation of the UQ MD program in Years 1 and 2.

Program: Doctor of Medicine (MD)
Location: Brisbane, Queensland
Semester intake: January 2017
Duration: 4 years
Application deadline: Rolling admissions. Applications close when the program is filled. The sooner you apply the better.

Apply to UQ Medical School!

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If you need assistance regarding how to accept your UQ MD offer, or if you have questions about medical schools in Australia, email Courtney at courtney@oztrekk.com.

Wednesday, May 25th, 2016

Menzies scholarship propels UQ medicine alumnus to Harvard

A prestigious scholarship is helping University of Queensland alumnus Dr Nick Gattas pursue dreams of designing a prototype hi-tech hospital that specialises in chronic illness.

Dr Gattas has been awarded the RG Menzies Scholarship to Harvard, and plans to focus on digital innovation during his Master of Business Administration study there.

UQ School of Medicine

Dr Nick Gattas … planning to combine digital innovation skills with his medical knowledge (Photo credit: UQ)

“Ultimately I hope the combination of digital innovation skills and medical knowledge will allow me to improve the quality, access and cost of healthcare in Australia,” said Dr Gattas, who graduated from UQ in 2013 with a Bachelor of Medicine / Bachelor of Surgery (Honours).

“I hope to use the MBA to enter a leadership role where I can directly change the model of care for patients with chronic disease, with a greater focus on data-enabled prevention, telehealth, and innovative funding.

“One way to do this would be to develop the model of care for a single hospital and then expand it across Australia.”

While at Harvard, Dr Gattas will look at launching a start-up company to address a specific problem, such as delivering specialist diabetes care to patients in remote areas, while developing services that can be scaled up in Australia and abroad.

“The challenge facing all health systems is providing care to an ageing population burdened by chronic disease, in a world where more funding simply is not sustainable,” he said.

“How can we consistently provide high-quality care to those who need it, using the few resources we have available?”

As part of the UQ Medical Leadership Program, Dr Gattas worked on a project with global management and consulting firm McKinsey & Co in Sydney.

After graduating as valedictorian and dux of his year in 2013, he decided he could better influence health systems at a strategic rather than clinical level, and accepted an offer to work at McKinsey.

“Addressing the challenges around an ageing population and chronic disease is my passion in life,” he said.

The RG Menzies Scholarships, valued at $81,860 ($US60,000), are Australia’s leading national awards for postgraduate study in the United States and are jointly awarded by the Harvard Club of Australia, Australian National University and the Menzies Foundation.

Selection panel members said they were impressed by Dr Gattas’s vision for improving systems and using international knowledge not currently maximised in Australia.

About UQ’s Medical Leadership Program

For UQ Medicine students who are also considering leadership roles in their career futures, the UQ School of Medicine has partnered with the UQ Business School to provide an accredited Medical Leadership Program offered exclusively to UQ MD students. Interested applicants may apply at the end of their first year of study of their medical degree.

Key benefits

By participating in this program, students will be able to

  • discover the keys to building strategies to affect continued transformation in the medical profession;
  • develop their personal and professional capabilities in areas such as leadership and management, managing change, thinking strategically, managing people, thinking innovatively, developing teams and an action learning culture, to name just a few areas;
  • explore how they can create a longer-term focus and make a significant impact on their medical outcomes, aligning their professional development around the core capabilities central to the achievement of their professional strategies;
  • formulate practical ideas, models and tools of behaviour, which will help participants advance their own personal and professional development; and obtain a Graduate Certificate in Executive Leadership

If you would like more information about UQ Medical School and the Medical Leadership Program, contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com or call toll free at 1-866-698-7355.