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Posts Tagged ‘UQ School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences’

Wednesday, October 11th, 2017

UQ sports science consistently ranked among best in world

The UQ School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences has ranked among the best in the world for sport science for the second year in a row.

The school ranked 5th globally and 2nd in Australia in the ShanghaiRanking’s Global Ranking of Sport Science Schools and Departments 2017.

UQ sports science consistently ranked among best in world

UQ sports science—an interdisciplinary approach to research (Photo: UQ)

The ranking assessed key areas of research performance, including the number of papers published in top sport science journals and the number of citations of articles.

Head of the School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences Professor Andrew Cresswell said the accolade was a reflection of the University of Queensland’s dedication to being an international leader in exercise and sport science research and education.

“We take an interdisciplinary approach to research which is critical to allow effective translation of knowledge into practice,” Professor Cresswell said.

“Our research is diverse and focuses on addressing multi-dimensional questions related to how and why humans move and obtain nutrition.

“We focus on areas critical to health and disease prevention across the lifespan—including exercise, physical activity and health, dietetics and nutrition, sensorimotor neuroscience, sport, physical and health education.”

Professor Cresswell said the school’s performance was led by outstanding teaching and research staff, and work being undertaken in the research centres.

“Our strong commitment to excellence in teaching and research is paramount to our success, and permeates everything we do,” Professor Cresswell said.

“We aspire to be at the forefront of learning and strive to ensure students meet the needs of the sport science industry, are job-ready, and equipped with the skills and knowledge to succeed in their chosen careers.

“To be rated among the very best in the world is a huge accolade.”

UQ Bachelor of Exercise and Sports Sciences (Honours)

Studying the UQ sport science program will ignite your interest in the complexities of maintaining an active, healthy human body and allow you to make an essential contribution to well-being, rehabilitation and performance. This program focuses on understanding how to enhance human performance, how the body responds to exercise and physical activity, and how to conduct research which could help build healthier communities and stronger athletes.

Career opportunities are varied and may include prescribing and delivering exercise and physical activity programs in the fitness industry, developing strength and conditioning programs to assist elite athletes and sporting teams, delivering workplace health promotion and executive health management programs, or conducting diagnostic measurements (cardiac, sleep, respiratory or neurophysiology) in hospitals or other clinical services.

Program: Bachelor of Exercise and Sports Sciences (Honours)
Location: Brisbane, Queensland
Semester intake: February
Program duration: 4 years
Application deadline: November 29, 2017

Apply to the University of Queensland!

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Would you like more information about studying UQ sports science? Please contact OzTREKK Australian Health Sciences Admissions Heather Brown at heather@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Tuesday, February 14th, 2017

UQ sport science ranks in global top 5

The UQ School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences has ranked 4th and 5th in the world for sport science in two highly respected global rankings systems.

This January, UQ placed 4th in CEOWORLD Magazine’s World’s Top Universities for Sport Science In 2016.

UQ sport science ranks in global top 5

UQ School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences has ranked 4th and 5th in the world for sport science! (Photo: UQ)

Head of School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences Professor Andrew Cresswell said the accolade was a reflection of UQ’s dedication to being a world-leader in sport and exercise science education and research.

“Our strong commitment to excellence in teaching and research is paramount to our success, and permeates everything we do,” Professor Cresswell said.

“We aspire to be at the forefront of learning and strive to ensure students meet the needs of the sport science industry, are job-ready, and equipped with the skills and knowledge to succeed in their chosen careers.”

The ranking is based on six key indicators of quality, including academic reputation, admission eligibility, job placement rate, recruiter feedback, specialisation, and global reputation and influence.

It comes one month after UQ ranked 5th in the ShanghaiRanking’s Global Ranking of Sport Science Schools and Departments 2016.

The ShanghaiRanking assessed key areas of research performance, including the number of papers published in top sport science journals and the number of citations of articles.

Professor Cresswell said the school’s performance was led by outstanding teaching and research staff, and work being undertaken in the research centres.

“To be rated among the very best in the world by two highly respected ranking systems, and to score higher than many larger universities with celebrated kinesiology and human movement departments, is a huge accolade,” Professor Cresswell said.

Why study the UQ Bachelor of Exercise and Sports Sciences (Honours)?

This program will ignite your interest in the complexities of maintaining an active, healthy human body and allow you to make an essential contribution to well-being, rehabilitation and performance. This program focuses on understanding how to enhance human performance, how the body responds to exercise and physical activity, and how to conduct research which could help build healthier communities and stronger athletes.

Career opportunities are varied and may include prescribing and delivering exercise and physical activity programs in the fitness industry, developing strength and conditioning programs to assist elite athletes and sporting teams, delivering workplace health promotion and executive health management programs, or conducting diagnostic measurements (cardiac, sleep, respiratory or neurophysiology) in hospitals or other clinical services.

Program: Bachelor of Exercise and Sports Sciences (Honours)
Location: Brisbane, Queensland
Semester intake: February
Program duration: 4 years
Application deadline: November 29, 2017

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Learn more about studying UQ sports science! Contact OzTREKK Australian Health Sciences Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston: shannon@oztrekk.com or 1-866-698-7355.

Monday, February 8th, 2016

UQ exercise physiology graduate helping seniors stay independent

UQ exercise physiology graduate Renee Weller may have just started her career, but she’s already making big changes to the lives of elderly clients.

Ms Weller, of Kallangur in Brisbane, developed and delivered a group exercise class to help senior citizens improve their strength, mobility, fitness and balance.

UQ exercise physiology

Renee Weller runs a fitball class (Photo credit: University of Queensland)

“We work a lot with senior citizens and as a result I am extremely passionate about helping my clients maintain their level of independence,” she said.

“Through specific exercises, I aim to improve their function which will assist with tasks at home and allow them to continue activities they enjoy.”

Exercise and Sports Science Australia (ESSA) has recognised Ms Weller’s early career contributions to exercise physiology, naming her the national Accredited Exercise Physiology Graduate of the Year.

The award recognises young exercise physiology graduates for their work in and commitment to improving health through the delivery of exceptional or innovative exercise physiology programs or activities.

“I really enjoy working with people to help improve their health and lifestyle and the variety of work that is involved in that,” Ms Weller said.

“Within my job, no two people are the same. My exercise prescription is constantly challenged as I am always meeting new people with different circumstances and goals for their health.”

Ms Weller graduated from the University of Queensland with first-class honours, completing her major university practicum placement at Healthy Connections Exercise Clinic where she was then offered a permanent role.

She will be presented the award in April at the ESSA Conference in Melbourne.

The Healthy Connections Exercise Clinic in Brisbane has a strong partnership with the UQ School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences, and 10 of their 12 accredited exercise physiologists are UQ graduates.

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Wondering about health science programs at the University of Queensland? Contact OzTREKK Australian Health Sciences Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com.

Thursday, November 26th, 2015

Do you need protein supplements to get ripped?

Many people spend hours in the gym every week and fill up on protein supplements in the quest for a ripped physique, but could all that hard work and money spent on sweet tasting powder be in vain?

According to a University of Queensland physiology and nutrition expert, expensive supplements may be nothing more than a waste of money.

UQ Health Sciences

Do you need protein supplements to get ripped? (Photo credit: UQ)

UQ School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences researcher Dr David Jenkins argues that more protein doesn’t necessarily mean more muscle.

“Because muscles are made of protein, there’s a misconception that if you eat more protein you get more muscle,” Dr Jenkins said.

“In principle this is true, but there are two considerations that override this.

“Provided you eat a healthy and balanced diet, you consume far more protein than you actually need.

“Any extra protein we consume is probably not going to have any additional effect.”

Dr Jenkins said timing meals around workouts was important for muscle growth.

“Having 20 grams of high-quality protein that includes leucine and the other essential amino acids immediately before or after exercise will promote muscle growth and repair.”

He said whey protein, marketed as being the best work out supplement, tended to have higher amount of leucine and the other essential amino acids.

“However there is no long-term evidence that expensive supplements from the shop are any better than just drinking flavoured milk,” Dr Jenkins said.

“Provided a food source has the essential amino acids and the timing of intake is carefully considered, this will provide the right environment for muscle growth.”

About the UQ School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences

The UQ School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences offers a range of high-quality undergraduate, postgraduate and research programs in the interdisciplinary areas of human movement and nutrition, which includes, but is not limited to, clinical exercise physiology, exercise science, health sport and physical education, dietetics and coaching.

The school provides world-leading staff and state-of-the-art facilities which provide students with a world-class education.

The university takes an interdisciplinary approach to research, which is critical to allow effective translation of research outcomes for policy and practice.

The school’s research is diverse and focuses on addressing multi-dimensional questions related to how and why humans move and obtain nutrition. Areas of focus include critical to health and disease prevention across the lifespan including exercise, physical activity and health, dietetics and nutrition, sensorimotor neuroscience, sport, physical and health education.

View this story on Science Over Coffee

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Would you like more information about health science programs at the University of Queensland? Contact OzTREKK Australian Health Sciences Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com.

Monday, August 10th, 2015

V8 Supercar drivers chase accelerated results

The quest to find even the slightest advantage has led V8 Supercars team Brad Jones Racing to the University of Queensland.

UQ Health Sciences

Brad Jones Racing drivers Dale Wood, Jason Bright and Fabian Coulthard (Photo credit: University of Queensland)

Ahead of the Ipswich 400 at Queensland Raceway, the drivers rolled up for physical testing with UQ School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences PhD candidate Justin Holland.

Fabian Coulthard, Jason Bright and Dale Wood spent time on a computerised simulator and had their strength, cardiovascular output, blood and body composition analysed.

“In this sport you are looking for any little edge you can get,” 500-race veteran Jason Bright said.

“The difference between fifth and fifteenth in V8 Supercars is 0.2 of a second over a lap.

“We’re constantly making tiny adjustments to our vehicles to shave the smallest margins off, so it makes sense we look at the drivers to see where we can do better.”

University of Queensland researcher Mr Holland, who also works with the Ipswich Jets rugby league team, said he believed improved fitness could contribute to better lap times.

The drivers reported using a variety of training methods to keeping fit, from boxing to swimming, running and cycling.

Mr Bright said race temperature inside a vehicle could reach 60 degrees Celsius and—with drivers wearing a helmet, gloves, balaclava and fire-retardant clothing—the ability to stave off fatigue was critical.

This season Mr Coulthard is positioned third in the rankings, with Mr Bright 13th and Mr Wood 20th.

“When I did my undergraduate at UQ it was always a passion and a dream to be working in the motorsports industry,” Mr Holland said.

“To have them come along today was an absolute godsend and I’m very grateful to Brad Jones Racing for making it happen.”

Mr Holland said UQ researchers had completed more than 220 laps of Bathurst’s famous Mount Panorama course on the driving simulator in preparation for the visit by Brad Jones Racing.

The best time posted by an academic was a respectable 2 minutes and 10 seconds, not far adrift of the 2:7.4 set last year on the actual track by V8 Supercars driver Chaz Mostert.

Mr Holland will continue to work with Brad Jones Racing in coming months, specifically in relation to testing driver hydration.

About the UQ School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences

The UQ School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences offers a range of high-quality undergraduate, postgraduate and research programs in the interdisciplinary areas of human movement and nutrition, which includes, but is not limited to, clinical exercise physiology, exercise science, health sport and physical education, dietetics and coaching.

The school provides world-leading staff and state-of-the-art facilities which provide students with a world-class education.

The university takes an interdisciplinary approach to research, which is critical to allow effective translation of research outcomes for policy and practice.

The school’s research is diverse and focuses on addressing multi-dimensional questions related to how and why humans move and obtain nutrition. Areas of focus include critical to health and disease prevention across the lifespan including exercise, physical activity and health, dietetics and nutrition, sensorimotor neuroscience, sport, physical and health education.

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Wondering about health science programs at the University of Queensland? Contact OzTREKK Australian Health Sciences Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or call 1-866-698-7355. Find out how you can study in Australia!