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Posts Tagged ‘UQ Rural Clinical School’

Monday, May 15th, 2017

UQ to provide major boost to regional health

Regional communities and future health professionals studying through The University of Queensland are big winners from a multi-pronged $54.4 million Federal Government initiative.

In Queensland, UQ will lead the establishment of a University Department of Rural Health (UDRH), providing a major boost to education, training and research in rural south Queensland for nurses, midwives and allied health workers.

UQ to provide major boost to regional health

UQ will lead the establishment of a University Department of Rural Health (Photo credit: UQ)

Three new medical training hubs under UQ control will also be established in Central Queensland, Wide Bay and South West Queensland, operating with an aim of retaining doctors in regional areas.

Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences Executive Dean Professor Bruce Abernethy said research indicated students who experienced rural practice were far more likely to return to work rurally once qualified.

“For the local communities, this is part of a long-term strategy to address maldistribution of the health workforce,” Professor Abernethy said.

“Rural and remote regions of Queensland and Australia often face challenges in attracting and retaining qualified health professionals.

“Students on rural placement will discover the diverse range of professional opportunities available in regional areas, thus enhancing the sustainability and viability of rural health care services.”

UQ joined with the University of Southern Queensland and the Hospital and Health Services of Darling Downs and South West in the successful bid to establish the Southern Queensland Rural Health UDRH.

The UDRH will help provide rural experience to student nurses, midwives, physiotherapists, pharmacists, psychologists, social workers, occupational therapists, speech pathologists, dieticians, and exercise physiologists.

Commonwealth funding has also been awarded to provide additional clinical, academic and administration staff at UQ’s three regional medical training hubs:

  • Central Queensland: located at Rockhampton, with sub-units at Gladstone and Emerald
  • Southern Queensland: located at Toowoomba, with sub-units at Charleville in south-west Queensland
  • Wide Bay: located at Bundaberg, with sub units at Hervey Bay and Theodore.

UQ Faculty of Medicine Acting Executive Dean Professor Robyn Ward said the hubs would offer doctors rural opportunities at all stages of their medical training.

“This will facilitate postgraduate training opportunities, including specialties, so doctors can stay in regional communities for training and not have to return to the city,” Professor Ward said.

“The Department of Rural Health and the training hubs will build on the high quality education and training experiences already offered by UQ’s Rural Clinical School.”

Announcing the funding, Assistant Minister for Health Dr David Gillespie said regional and rural health training not only addressed workforce shortages and service expectations, but was also essential to regional economic growth.

UQ Rural Clinical School

UQ Rural Clinical School is funded through the Australian Government’s Rural Clinical Training Support (RCTS) Program to address health workforce shortages in rural and regional Queensland. To achieve this mandate, UQRCS aims to lead and direct the rural health agenda through the highest quality education, training, research and community service.

Now in its second decade of operation, UQRCS is able to demonstrate a positive impact on the medical workforce in the region and elsewhere.  Studies demonstrate that a student who has experienced the Rural Advantage with UQRCS is 2.5 times more likely to work in a rural area when compared with other UQ medical graduates.

About the UQ Medical Program

The UQ Faculty of Medicine conducts a four-year, graduate-entry medical program, the Doctor of Medicine (MD). The faculty is a leading provider of medical education and research in Australia, and with the country’s largest medical degree program, they are the major single contributor to Queensland’s junior medical workforce.

Program: Doctor of Medicine
Location: Brisbane, Queensland
Semester intake: January
Duration: 4 years
Application deadline: Applications are assessed on a rolling admissions (first come, first served) basis. It is recommended that applicants apply as early as possible to increase their chances of timely assessment. This program can fill quickly!

Apply to the UQ Doctor of Medicine!

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Find out more about UQ Medicine. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com, or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Friday, July 22nd, 2016

UQ appoints new Head of Rural Clinical School

The University of Queensland has appointed Professor Sarah Strasser as Head of Rural Clinical School with the Faculty of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences.

The appointment has been announced by Acting Executive Dean of the Faculty, Professor Robyn Ward.

UQ appoints new Head of Rural Clinical School

Professor Sarah Strasser is the new Head of Rural Clinical School (Photo credit: UQ)

“Professor Strasser is an academic rural general practitioner with significant experience in leading and managing rural clinical programs within Australia and Canada,” Professor Ward said.

She has held several leadership roles and has been instrumental in expanding rural medical schools, including in the Northern Territory for Flinders University.

“Professor Strasser is recognised nationally and internationally for developing successful innovative medical education programs which have improved the rural health workforce.”

Professor Strasser will be responsible for leading the faculty’s Rural Clinical School, developing the rural medical workforce and fostering the faculty’s relationships with the state’s rural and regional hospitals and health services.

“I am delighted to be returning to Australia to take up this important position with The University of Queensland,” Professor Strasser said.

“The UQ Rural Clinical School will have a major teaching and research role in the newly shaped UQ medical programs.

“This is an exciting opportunity for UQ to provide leadership in rural health nationally and internationally.”

The UQ Rural Clinical School aims to address health workforce shortages in rural and regional areas through providing the highest quality education, training, research and community service.

Professor Strasser will commence as Head of School in August.

UQ Rural Clinical School

UQ Rural Clinical School is funded through the Australian Government’s Rural Clinical Training Support (RCTS) Program to address health workforce shortages in rural and regional Queensland. To achieve this mandate, UQRCS aims to lead and direct the rural health agenda through the highest quality education, training, research and community service.

Now in its second decade of operation, UQRCS is able to demonstrate a positive impact on the medical workforce in the region and elsewhere.  Studies demonstrate that a student who has experienced the Rural Advantage with UQRCS is 2.5 times more likely to work in a rural area when compared with other UQ medical graduates.

About the UQ Medical School Program

The UQ Medical School conducts a four-year, graduate-entry medical program, the Doctor of Medicine (MD). The School of Medicine is a leading provider of medical education and research in Australia, and with the country’s largest medical degree program, they are the major single contributor to Queensland’s junior medical workforce.

Program: Doctor of Medicine (MD)
Location: Brisbane, Queensland
Semester intake: January
Duration: 4 years
Application deadline: Applications are assessed on a rolling admissions (first come, first served) basis. It is recommended that applicants apply as early as possible to increase their chances of timely assessment. This program can fill quickly!

Apply to the UQ School of Medicine!

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Find out more about the UQ School of Medicine. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com, or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Friday, November 13th, 2015

New facilities steer UQ medical grads to rural practice

The University of Queensland has opened medical training centres at Bundaberg and Hervey Bay to boost the stream of ‘home-grown’ doctors to rural communities.

The UQ Rural Clinical School (UQRCS) officially opened the $2.4-million UQ Health Sciences Learning and Discovery Centre at Bundaberg and the $1.9-million centre at Hervey Bay, both featuring state-of-the-art interactive clinical simulation facilities.

 UQ medical school

Caption (back, from left): Professor Nicholas Fisk, Mr Stephen Bennett MP, Dr Vanessa Greig, Mr Keith Pitt MP, (front, from left) Councillor Mal Forman, Professor Peter Høj, Ms Leanne Donaldson MP, Mr John Story AO, Professor Darrell Crawford Associate Professor Riitta Partanen (Photo credit: UQ)

UQ Vice-Chancellor and President Professor Peter Høj said the centres were part of a wider commitment the university had made to invest across its rural academic sites.

“The centres are purpose-built to offer a high-quality clinical training environment comparable to the best facilities offered anywhere in the world,” Professor Høj said.

“Australians in regional and remote areas on average face greater health care challenges, higher injury rates and higher mortality rates, so we need the best doctors to be rural doctors.

“That’s why UQ and the State and Federal Governments have partnered to deliver a locally trained and self-sustaining rural, regional and remote medical workforce of home-grown medical graduates.

“UQ operates one of Australia’s largest rural clinical schools, so our investment will help to ensure students who train rurally get the very best education and are more likely to return to or remain in rural areas after they finish their degree.”

UQ research has shown that students from rural backgrounds who complete at least a year of their medical training at a rural clinical school are more likely to continue training in the local hospital or serve in rural communities as qualified doctors.

UQ Rural Clinical School Head Associate Professor Riitta Partanen said rurally trained medical students got a taste of the diversity of the rural lifestyle, clinical hands-on experience, smaller classes, greater one-on-one exposure to specialists and trainers, and had the chance to become part of a working clinical team.

She said the Learning and Discovery Centres were a boon to the entire community, benefitting students and local health professionals alike.

“Our co-location on hospital grounds enables us to build relationships with outstanding teaching clinicians who not only welcome our students into their teams, but use our teaching spaces for professional development and community health education opportunities,” Associate Professor Partanen said.

“The centres feature Simulated Learning Environments and make training more interactive and more realistic than ever before.

“What’s more, our technology ensures students can observe training in an on-site lecture theatre or remotely from their desktop from anywhere in the world.

“Best of all, we are then able to record and store clinical scenarios and offer a library of experiences to students to further enhance their learning.”

Federal Member for Hinkler Mr Keith Pitt MP officially opened the buildings.

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Interested in studying medicine? Find out more about the UQ School of Medicine and the 2017 intake of the Doctor of Medicine program. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Sarah Bridson at sarah@oztrekk.com.

Thursday, February 19th, 2015

UQ study shows doctors trained rurally, stay rural

Medical students with a rural background who train in a rural setting are more likely to practice in regional and remote areas, a UQ study shows.

The study provides evidence that could help tackle the uneven distribution of doctors between urban and rural areas.

UQ Rural Clinical School Head Professor Geoff Nicholson and Research Director Associate Professor Srinivas Kondalsamy-Chennakesavan led the study.

UQ School of Medicine

Learn more about the UQ School of Medicine

They looked at the background of UQ medical graduates and followed their careers to determine what led to their final practice location.

Professor Nicholson said the study showed that students from regional and rural backgrounds who did at least a year of their medical training at a rural clinical school were more likely to practice outside urban areas.

“The exposure to high-quality rural training at a rural clinical school enhanced the probability of that graduate practicing rurally,” he said.

Professor Nicholson said nearly a third (31.3 per cent) of the 754 doctors who responded to a research questionnaire had a rural background, while 36.6 per cent had attended UQRCS. Overall, 27.2 per cent were now working in a rural area.

Of those who had attended one of the UQ School of Medicine’s metropolitan clinical schools, 18.8 per cent were practicing rurally and that percentage rose to 41.7 for those students who spent time at UQ’s Rural Clinical School.

“The findings reinforce the need for medical schools to have a strong rural presence. Without it we run the risk of losing medical graduates to metropolitan areas,” Professor Nicholson said.

The UQ Rural Clinical School is one of the largest in Australia, and has campuses in Rockhampton, Bundaberg, Hervey Bay and Toowoomba.

UQ Medical School clinical placements

Clinical Placements are an integral component of the UQ MD program. Students complete an elective placement at the end of year 1. In years three and four of the program students undertake clinical rotations within the school’s clinical schools (including rural clinical school). Students wishing to undertake a clinical placement in an international location may be permitted to do so under certain conditions.

UQ Medical School Doctor of Medicine Program

Program: Doctor of Medicine (MD)
Location: Brisbane, Queensland
Next semester intake: January 2016
Duration: 4 years
Application deadline: Applications are assessed on a rolling admissions (first come, first served) basis.

Entry Requirements

  • Completed degree (Bachelor, Master, PhD)
  • GPA equivalent to 5.0 on UQ’s 7.0 scale
  • MCAT score (minimum of 8/8/8 or 8/8/M/8) or GAMSAT score (minimum of 50 in each section)
  • Compulsory consultative meeting with the UQ School of Medicine

Apply to UQ Medical School!

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Find out more about the UQ School of Medicine and the Doctor of Medicine program. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Sarah Bridson at sarah@oztrekk.com, or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.