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Posts Tagged ‘UQ Medical School’

Tuesday, November 14th, 2017

UQ Faculty of Medicine Information Session Nov. 14, 2017

Why is the University of Queensland the #1 choice for Canadian students studying medicine in Australia?

The Doctor of Medicine offered at the University of Queensland is a postgraduate medical program designed to produce highly skilled doctors capable of meeting future medical challenges in a wide variety of settings.

UQ Faculty of Medicine Information Session Nov. 14, 2017

RSVP for the upcoming UQ Faculty of Medicine info session!

If you’re considering studying medicine in Australia, you are welcome to join OzTREKK and members of the UQ Faculty of Medicine for the upcoming seminar at Western University.

This is your opportunity to meet Professor Robyn Ward AM, Executive Dean (Acting), Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Research) and Vice President (Research); Prof Stuart Carney, Deputy Executive Dean and Medical Dean, Faculty of Medicine; and Ms Cecile McGuire, Manager International, Faculty of Medicine.

Canadian students interested in studying medicine at UQ can learn more about this world-renowned medical program. Find out more about entry requirements, program structure, clinical placements, and about the accreditation process—how you can practice in Canada!

Location: Western University, McKellar Theatre
Date: Tuesday, November 14, 2017
Time:  3 – 5 p.m.
RSVP!

Why study the UQ Doctor of Medicine?

The UQ Doctor of Medicine is a postgraduate medical program designed to produce highly skilled doctors capable of meeting future medical challenges in a wide variety of settings.

Years 1 and 2 combine biomedical sciences, public health, medical ethics and clinical skills training in a case-based learning context, focused around a series of patient-centred cases, each designed to highlight principles and issues in health and disease. Early patient contact, clinical reasoning and research training are embedded to develop advanced clinical skills and medical knowledge required for evidence-based clinical practice. In Years 3 and 4, clinical placements are organised around 10 core medical disciplines delivered across 11 clinical schools (hospitals).

Program: Doctor of Medicine
Location: Brisbane, Queensland
Next available Intake: January 2019
Duration: 4 years
Application deadline: Applications are assessed on a rolling admissions (first come, first served) basis. It is recommended that applicants apply as early as possible to increase their chances of timely assessment. Applications generally open in early spring each year.

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Would you like more information about this upcoming UQ Faculty of Medicine information session? Please Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Kaylee Templeton at kaylee@oztrekk.com or 1-866-698-7355.

Monday, May 15th, 2017

UQ to provide major boost to regional health

Regional communities and future health professionals studying through The University of Queensland are big winners from a multi-pronged $54.4 million Federal Government initiative.

In Queensland, UQ will lead the establishment of a University Department of Rural Health (UDRH), providing a major boost to education, training and research in rural south Queensland for nurses, midwives and allied health workers.

UQ to provide major boost to regional health

UQ will lead the establishment of a University Department of Rural Health (Photo credit: UQ)

Three new medical training hubs under UQ control will also be established in Central Queensland, Wide Bay and South West Queensland, operating with an aim of retaining doctors in regional areas.

Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences Executive Dean Professor Bruce Abernethy said research indicated students who experienced rural practice were far more likely to return to work rurally once qualified.

“For the local communities, this is part of a long-term strategy to address maldistribution of the health workforce,” Professor Abernethy said.

“Rural and remote regions of Queensland and Australia often face challenges in attracting and retaining qualified health professionals.

“Students on rural placement will discover the diverse range of professional opportunities available in regional areas, thus enhancing the sustainability and viability of rural health care services.”

UQ joined with the University of Southern Queensland and the Hospital and Health Services of Darling Downs and South West in the successful bid to establish the Southern Queensland Rural Health UDRH.

The UDRH will help provide rural experience to student nurses, midwives, physiotherapists, pharmacists, psychologists, social workers, occupational therapists, speech pathologists, dieticians, and exercise physiologists.

Commonwealth funding has also been awarded to provide additional clinical, academic and administration staff at UQ’s three regional medical training hubs:

  • Central Queensland: located at Rockhampton, with sub-units at Gladstone and Emerald
  • Southern Queensland: located at Toowoomba, with sub-units at Charleville in south-west Queensland
  • Wide Bay: located at Bundaberg, with sub units at Hervey Bay and Theodore.

UQ Faculty of Medicine Acting Executive Dean Professor Robyn Ward said the hubs would offer doctors rural opportunities at all stages of their medical training.

“This will facilitate postgraduate training opportunities, including specialties, so doctors can stay in regional communities for training and not have to return to the city,” Professor Ward said.

“The Department of Rural Health and the training hubs will build on the high quality education and training experiences already offered by UQ’s Rural Clinical School.”

Announcing the funding, Assistant Minister for Health Dr David Gillespie said regional and rural health training not only addressed workforce shortages and service expectations, but was also essential to regional economic growth.

UQ Rural Clinical School

UQ Rural Clinical School is funded through the Australian Government’s Rural Clinical Training Support (RCTS) Program to address health workforce shortages in rural and regional Queensland. To achieve this mandate, UQRCS aims to lead and direct the rural health agenda through the highest quality education, training, research and community service.

Now in its second decade of operation, UQRCS is able to demonstrate a positive impact on the medical workforce in the region and elsewhere.  Studies demonstrate that a student who has experienced the Rural Advantage with UQRCS is 2.5 times more likely to work in a rural area when compared with other UQ medical graduates.

About the UQ Medical Program

The UQ Faculty of Medicine conducts a four-year, graduate-entry medical program, the Doctor of Medicine (MD). The faculty is a leading provider of medical education and research in Australia, and with the country’s largest medical degree program, they are the major single contributor to Queensland’s junior medical workforce.

Program: Doctor of Medicine
Location: Brisbane, Queensland
Semester intake: January
Duration: 4 years
Application deadline: Applications are assessed on a rolling admissions (first come, first served) basis. It is recommended that applicants apply as early as possible to increase their chances of timely assessment. This program can fill quickly!

Apply to the UQ Doctor of Medicine!

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Find out more about UQ Medicine. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com, or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Friday, May 5th, 2017

Hugh Jackman and the UQ Med Revue

Are you planning to study medicine at the University of Queensland? If so, let us introduce you to the UQ Medical Society (UQMS) and their shenanigans (which we hope you plan to be a part of next year!).

The UQ Med Revue is a medical student variety show at the University of Queensland, put on by the UQMS, that normally has in the order of 250 students involved. Students from all four years of med come together to create a hilarious comedy that is jam-packed with puns, parodies, and Professor Parker’s pecs.

UQ medical students act, sing, dance, write, direct, play instruments, make props, design costumes, do hair and make-up and most of the tech for the show making it a truly home-grown production! As the biggest event on the UQMS calendar, the show runs three sold-out nights. In 2017, the dates will be August 13–15th, so mark it in your calendar!

Last year’s Med Revue took them on an adventure “Inside Gout,” with the help of Mr. Hugh Jackman.

Hugh Jackman and the UQ Med Revue

2017 UQ Med Revue Convenors (L-R): Joel Russell, Ailsa Lee, Will Saunders, Jessica Monteiro and Chris Strom (Photo credit: UQ)

About the UQ Medical Program

The UQ Medicine conducts a four-year, graduate-entry medical program, the Doctor of Medicine (MD). The UQ Faculty of Medicine is a leading provider of medical education and research in Australia, and with the country’s largest medical degree program, they are the major single contributor to Queensland’s junior medical workforce.

Program: Doctor of Medicine (MD)
Location: Brisbane, Queensland
Semester intake: January
Duration: 4 years
Application deadline: Applications are assessed on a rolling admissions (first come, first served) basis. It is recommended that applicants apply as early as possible to increase their chances of timely assessment. This program can fill quickly!

Apply to the Doctor of Medicine program at UQ!

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Would you like more information about studying at UQ Medicine? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com.

Wednesday, March 15th, 2017

Australian medical school rankings 2017

Why do so many Canadians consider studying at an Australian medical school?

Austrlian medical school rankings 2017

Find out how you can study medicine in Australia (Photo: Griffith University)

Because Australian and Canada share similar medical systems, similar medical education, and similar medical issues.

Medical schools in Australia offer high-quality education and clinical training in an amazing setting. Studying medicine in Australia is a great experience and really helps students appreciate the worldwide aspect of health, since many clinical placements are offered around the globe.

Another great reason to study in Australia is because of their high world rankings! The QS World University Rankings has recently released its 2017 rankings by subject, and here are the basics regarding how our Australian medical schools stacked up:

World Medical School Rankings 2017

Australian Medical Schools
Canadian Medical Schools
15th University of Sydney
11th University of Toronto
19th University of Melbourne
22nd McGill University
29th Monash University
27th University of British Columbia
42nd University of Queensland
35th McMaster University
(4 OzTREKK Australian Medical Schools in top 50)
(4 Canadian Medical Schools in top 50)
QS World University Rankings by Subject: Medicine, 2017

Undergraduate- versus Graduate-entry Medical Programs

Undergraduate Entry: Rather than having to earn a bachelor degree first, undergraduate-entry medical programs allow students to enter directly from high school. If you have completed high school studies or would like to apply to a medical school in Australia without using your MCAT score, you may wish to learn more about undergraduate-entry medical programs offered by Australian universities.

Graduate Entry: Some Australian Medical Schools offer a graduate-entry medical program where you first have to complete an undergraduate degree, such as a Bachelor of Science, in order to apply to a four-year medical program.

The following Australian medical schools offer a medical program at a graduate-entry level, which are similar to those medical programs offered in Canada and the United States:

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For more information about applying to Australian medical schools, contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com.

Wednesday, March 8th, 2017

Applying to Australian medical schools: when do you need to sit the MCAT?

Are you considering applying to Australian Medical Schools? Then you’ll probably want to write the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT). The MCAT is administered multiple times from late January through early September, and offered at hundreds of test sites in the United States, Canada, and around the world.

Applying to Australian medical schools: when do you need to sit the MCAT?

Don’t forget to study! (Photo: Monash University)

The following graduate-entry medical programs require applicants to sit a medical admission test such as the MCAT:

Keep the score release dates in mind when you are registering, as you will need to have your MCAT score at the time of application.

All deadlines are at 11:59 PM ET on the day of the deadline.

Test date Score release date
March 31 May 2
April 22 May 23
April 28 May 30
May 13 June 13
May 18 June 20
May 19 June 20
June 1 July 6
June 16 July 18
June 17 July 18
June 29 Aug. 1
June 30 Aug. 1
July 21 Aug. 22
July 22 Aug. 22
July 27 Aug. 29
July 28 Aug. 29
August 3 Sept. 5
August 4 Sept. 5
August 11 Sept. 12
August 18 Sept. 19
August 19 Sept. 19
August 24 Sept. 26
August 25 Sept. 26

The first three sections organized around 10 foundational concepts in the sciences (biology, biochemistry, organic chemistry, general chemistry, physics, psychology, sociology). In the Critical Analysis and Reasoning Skills (CARS) section, students are asked to analyze, evaluate, and apply information provided by passages from a wide range of social sciences and humanities disciplines.

  1. Biological and Biochemical Foundations of Living Systems
  2. Chemical and Physical Foundations of Biological Systems
  3. Psychological, Social, and Biological Foundations of Behavior
  4. Critical Analysis and Reasoning Skills

Register to write the MCAT.

If you are in high school, you can still apply to an Australian medical school—and you don’t need to sit the MCAT! The following Australian medical schools offer medical programs that international students may enter directly from high school:

Wondering about when you need to write the MCAT? Please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com for more information.

Monday, February 6th, 2017

UQ Medicine graduate shares 9 things he wishes he’d been told as a med student

Hailing from Canada, Shaun completed his medical degree at UQ before undertaking his fellowship at the University of Toronto and his residency with University of Calgary. He currently works full time as a Queensland Health registrar within intensive care and in his spare time he works for House Call Doctor— a 100% bulk-billed, after-hours, home GP service operating in Queensland. If you’d like to hear firsthand from a Canadian who is now practicing medicine in Australia, check out Shaun’s advice!

UQ Medicine graduate shares 9 things he wishes he'd been told as a med student

Canadian Shaun Hosein, now practicing in Australia! (Photo credit: UQ)

1. Study medicine for the right reasons.
Medicine is a highly rewarding career that has many opportunities in various sub-specialty fields. However it is a long road, requires intensive study, and at times can seem impossible. It is not a decision to be made lightly, and there are times I wish I could fix that leaky pipe in my kitchen. I chose medicine, because it not only helps people, but I enjoy thinking on my feet and problem solving. Reflecting a bit more, it has also developed my personal ethics and communication skills.

2. For international medicine students, you can’t beat UQ for education and lifestyle.
UQ is constantly improving their medicine course which I feel is important when choosing a university and medical school. When I was applying they were very approachable and efficient throughout the application process.  The case-based learning style made me nervous, but I think it is the best way to learn and study medicine. Brisbane is also an amazing city, it has the best climate of all Australian cities (none of this “four seasons in one day” stuff). Plus the Gold Coast and the Sunshine Coast are about an hour away! Perfect study and lifestyle balance.

3. Studying internationally is incredible, but it can be difficult when you return home.
I have spoken to numerous potential Canadian medical school candidates over the years, and my advice is the same. Studying medicine at UQ was a life-changing event for me, and provided me unique opportunities in an amazing country. I won’t lie—you will find it challenging being away from home, and to be honest, getting back into the Canadian system is difficult. UQ does facilitate opportunities to make this process easier, but it is still a challenge. Be prepared to finish internship training in Australia before considering the road back or please at least obtain and maintain general registration with AHPRA.

4. There are pros and cons to working in different health systems, so consider what’s important to you.
I can only speak in relation to the Canadian and Australian healthcare systems, but in my honest experience you get paid more, will have better shifts and rosters, and overall better work-life balance in Australia.  On the other hand, internship training is structured better in Canada: training is slightly shorter and there are no primary exams, but the programs are very difficult to get accepted into.

5. In medicine, you can have a “typical routine” but you’ll never have a “typical day.”
I currently work for Queensland Health and for House Call Doctor when I have extra time in the evenings, usually on nights off, or weekends. Being a home GP after-hours is very flexible and works well with my schedule. Working with House Call Doctor means I get to visit a wide variety of patients who need urgent after-hours care, treating everything from acute cold and flus to more serious conditions, such as gastro, home accidents or chronic illness. You really never know what kind of patients you’ll treat!

6. Sometimes taking the road less travelled will put you on the right path.
I always wanted to work in primary care, but it was quite difficult to get any experience and determine if it suited me. House Call Doctor has given me this experience but it’s also shown me another side to medical practice. I honestly feel after-hours care is becoming its own sub-specialty of medicine. I enjoy it because it allows me to have a simple chat with patients, to see children or speak with a young mum. It is very rewarding, and not something I could have experienced working in the adult system alone.

7. As a student, it’s easy to get run down from all that studying (and perhaps socialising). When you do get sick there are probably more healthcare options available to you than you think.
House Call Doctor offers 100% bulk-billed home GP visits to anyone with a Medicare or DVA (Department of Veteran’s Affair) Card.  Having a GP visit your home can be particularly useful in acute medical situations that don’t warrant an emergency department response, but can’t wait until normal clinic hours. House Call Doctor visits a wide cross-section of patients, including students living in shared accommodation. International students can also take advantage of the after-hours medical care, rebated if they travelling with BUPA, NIB, Allianz or Medibank insurance. For more information you can visit www.housecalldoctor.com.au, or you can phone the after-hours line on 13 55 66 to book an appointment.

8. Support networks and technology are invaluable for international students.
Having a strong family and supportive Australian peer group is extremely important throughout your medical degree. At the same time, don’t underestimate the impact of technology. Skype, FaceTime, and WhatsApp will ensure you can easily stay in touch with loved ones back home.

9. Your medical degree can take you anywhere and you’re likely to end up somewhere completely different to where you thought you would.
I have worked in numerous medical fields, and I have definitely not taken a straight path. Initially I was very keen on critical care (ICU), but when I worked in Haiti post-earthquake and again in Africa I got a better understanding of health and the need for public health medicine and primary care. I have since completed Canadian postgraduate training in public health medicine, and am now working towards translating my qualification here in Australia. I also have a public health interest in illicit substance abuse and drug use patterns and am completing a fellowship in toxicology. I tell everyone, especially medical students, to never discount the idea of being a GP; I’m still considering it, if I get time.

About the UQ Medical School Program

The UQ Medical School conducts a four-year, graduate-entry medical program, the Doctor of Medicine (MD). The School of Medicine is a leading provider of medical education and research in Australia, and with the country’s largest medical degree program, they are the major single contributor to Queensland’s junior medical workforce.

Program: Doctor of Medicine (MD)
Location: Brisbane, Queensland
Semester intake: January
Duration: 4 years
Application deadline: Applications are assessed on a rolling admissions (first come, first served) basis. It is recommended that applicants apply as early as possible to increase their chances of timely assessment. This program can fill quickly!

Apply to the UQ School of Medicine!

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Find out more about the UQ School of Medicine. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com, or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Friday, December 16th, 2016

UQ Medical School congratulates the Class of 2016

On Dec. 14, more than 450 UQ Medical School students became doctors as they graduated as the Class of 2016. Among them were approximately 43 OzTREKK students!

The cohort included a myriad of remarkable medical practitioners including Rachel Colbran, this year’s valedictorian.

With a GPA of 6.93, Rachel was recognised as an exemplary student who had been decorated with awards such as the UQ Excellence scholarship and published photos in the Medical Journal of Australia.

UQ Medical School congratulates the Class of 2016

There are some OzTREKKers in this pic! (Photo: UQ)

In addition to the class’s valedictorian, you didn’t have to look too far around the room to be inspired, and once such inspiration was graduand John Maunder who has a story from which each of us can take inspiration….

The last time John Maunder graduated from the University of Queensland, it was the same day he become one of the 120,000 new cases of cancer diagnosed in Australia each year.

This time around, he’s qualifying as a doctor and survivor of nodular lymphocyte predominant Hodgkin’s lymphoma, a rare form of blood cancer.

He graduated Tuesday, Dec. 13 at 6 p.m. with a Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery at UQ Centre, St Lucia Campus.

John said it was on the day of his engineering graduation he learned the test results of his biopsy for a lump that surgeons had told him was ‘likely to be nothing.’

“I was at the Regatta Hotel having a beer with my friends and family before the ceremony and I got the call,” John said. “My doctor told me the pathology results from my tests actually showed I had blood cancer and I was to see an oncologist immediately.

“I can’t really explain how I felt after this, I returned to my table where lunch had arrived, told my parents and cried.”

After the initial shock of the news, John had another decision to make upon finding out he had successfully earned a spot in medical school.

“Throughout my engineering degree I was never satisfied that would be my career, I had always toyed with the idea of studying medicine so I ended up sitting the GAMSAT test before I graduated,” John said.

“I didn’t know what to expect, but I got in.

“The thing about medicine is you can’t defer your place for six months and you can’t take on half loads of work, which makes it difficult when you’re facing chemotherapy.”

Not wanting to delay his career any further, John decided to accept his place in the medical course while fighting cancer and undergoing intensive treatments.

“I had intensive chemo for six months, which was also the first semester of my medical studies.

“I’d have chemo every Friday, be wrecked all weekend, then have to front up for class on Monday.”

John’s inspirational commitment means he has now completed his medical degree and has secured a placement at Nambour Hospital on the Sunshine Coast next year.

In addition to full-time study and treatment John has been an active fundraiser for the Leukaemia Foundation, raising more than $100,000 dollars for the charity through events like World’s Greatest Shave.

“I’m so grateful to my friends, family, doctor and the community who helped me over the last few years,” John said.

John is now in remission but requires six-monthly check-ups. He still has some words of wisdom for students going through rough times.

“It’s important to remember if you’re struggling or don’t know what to do, to ask for help.

“There are people around you who know more than you and you should always seek their knowledge whether the issue is big or small, know that it’s okay to talk to someone.”

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Since the beginning of OzTREKK, we’ve had the pleasure and privilege to assist more than 300 students achieve their dreams of studying medicine at UQ.  All of us at OzTREKK offer a hearty congratulations to all of you!

Wondering if studying medicine is for you? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Wednesday, November 23rd, 2016

New Medical Dean at UQ Faculty of Medicine

The UQ Faculty of Medicine has appointed Professor Stuart Carney, from King’s College London in the United Kingdom, to the position of Medical Dean.

Acting Executive Dean Professor Robyn Ward announced the appointment following a comprehensive international search which generated interest from a strong field.

UQ appoints Medical Dean

Professor Stuart Carney (Photo: UQ)

“Professor Carney joins UQ from King’s where he is currently the Dean of Medical Education, overseeing the largest MBBS program in the UK,” Professor Ward said.

“At King’s he has led a major turnaround to transform the student experience and medical program, and before that he was Vice Dean of Education of the newly created University of Exeter Medical School.

“A psychiatrist by training, Professor Carney holds a strong track record in medical education as well as extensive experience as a clinical teacher, examiner and curriculum developer.”

Professor Carney completed his Bachelor of Medicine, Bachelor of Surgery at Edinburgh University and went on to obtain his Master of Public Health in Quantitative Methods at Harvard University.

As Medical Dean at UQ, Professor Carney will be responsible for academic management and will have oversight of all aspects of the program through the Office of Medical Education.

He will also serve as Deputy Executive Dean and work as part of the faculty executive team dedicated to ensuring a world-class comprehensive and integrated medical program.

Professor Carney said he wants to help students to become the best possible doctors they can—safe and effective from day one.

“I want them to be lateral thinkers who are capable of pushing the boundaries to improve patient and population health, and become the medical leaders of today and tomorrow.”

Professor Carney will start in the position in the New Year.

About the UQ Medical School Program

The UQ School of Medicine conducts a four-year, graduate-entry medical program, the Doctor of Medicine (MD). The school is a leading provider of medical education and research in Australia, and with the country’s largest medical degree program, they are the major single contributor to Queensland’s junior medical workforce.

During Phase 1 of their medical degree, students are taught foundation knowledge and skills in preparation for medical practice. During this time, students work in small groups around a planned series of cases to highlight principles and issues in health and disease. Many tutorials take place at UQ’s St Lucia and Herston Campuses.

Phase 2 of the program is taught across 11 academic disciplines with opportunities for students to undertake placements within in Australia and overseas.

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Find out more about the UQ School of Medicine. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com, or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Friday, October 28th, 2016

UQ School of Medicine consultations… and other adventures

I just returned from a mini whirlwind with one of my favorite people in international education: Dr. Jenny Schafer, Director of Student Affairs at the UQ School of Medicine.

Dr. Schafer was recently in Canada for the second of her twice-annual visits and, as is becoming very usual, we all had a blast—students included.

UQ School of Medicine consultations... and other adventures

Dr Schafer about to enjoy… a cricket

First up was a stop in Vancouver where she met with a few dozen students at Simon Fraser University. I can’t lie; I wasn’t there but I have heard that it was a great time and questions needed to be cut off after two solid hours. I think that’s a good sign!

I picked Dr. Schafer up in Toronto where we were hosting the University of Toronto Pre-Med Society for a Q&A about studying medicine abroad. Before that event though, we needed some grub.

Dr. Schafer is a foodie and likes some good eats. In a city with some of the best restaurants, I’m always on the hunt for something a little different. With a surprising 22-degree October evening, I was banking on a patio, so we headed to El Catrin in the Distillery District. Looking for different, nestled among the tacos, charred corn and smoke-infused avocado sauce were… crickets. Like, crickets. How could we not, right? Well, we did, and while they didn’t taste like chicken, I’d argue they didn’t taste like much. Totally worth the few bucks to now know that I don’t necessary need to eat crickets again.

Following dinner—and the Jays’ ultimate demise—the weather took a turn and we got back into the regular October weather we’d expect forcing the switch out of flip flops. Neither of us had the appropriate clothing for the weather.

UQ School of Medicine consultations... and other adventures

OzTREKK Director Jaime Notman and her not-chicken nacho topping

The following evening the UofT Pre-Med Society hosted about 50 students where we to learned more about the UQ School of Medicine, about Dr. Schafer’s field of study, and her suggestions for success. Dr. Iqbal Jaffer (UQ MBBS ’09) joined her for a student-focused Q&A, which was incredible. Currently doing his residency in cardiac surgery at McMaster, Dr. Jaffer had the students peppering him with questions about his experience in Australia, his return to Canada, and his current practice. I should also say he’s currently in the final throes of completing his PhD, which is being defended early in 2017! We had to cull the questions just before 9 p.m. as the cleaning staff was waiting to get home.

I am obviously biased, but it was really great to have such an interactive experience for our future students. Hearing what it’s really like is so invaluable and I’m sure that everyone in attendance felt similarly. We had some students who are leaving in a few short weeks and most in their final (some in their first!) year all eager to understand if this experience is for them. I’m very excited to see their decision!  I’d love to hear if any students found it as interesting as I did!

After UofT it was a quick trip to meet with the Queen’s Medicine team (UQ and Queen’s have a long-standing and exiting partnership if you didn’t know!) where the goodbyes took place and Dr. Schafer headed back to the Brisbane springtime.

Jaime Notman
OzTREKK Director / Operations Manager

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Do you have any questions about your UQ medicine offer? Wondering if studying medicine is for you? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Friday, September 2nd, 2016

UQ Medical School celebrates 80 years of teaching medicine

Generations of doctors have started their medical careers at the University of Queensland, which is celebrating 80 years of medicine in 2016.

UQ celebrates 80 years of teaching medicine

Classes were held in various hastily adapted buildings across the city, until the purpose-built Mayne Medical School at Herston was officially opened in 1939 (Photo credit: UQ)

The UQ Medical School program has graduated more than 13,000 students over the past eight decades, forging an enduring connection to the state’s medical community.

Dean of Medicine Professor Darrell Crawford said the anniversary provided an opportunity to reflect on UQ’s distinguished history of health and medical leadership.

“We are proud to celebrate 80 years of teaching, and to continue to be the leading provider of medical education and research within our state,” Professor Crawford said.

“I am especially proud of the more than 2500 unpaid clinicians—mostly alumni—who return to the university to teach in the medical program and pass on their broad experience to a new generation of learners.”

Established in 1936, the UQ Faculty of Medicine offered Queensland’s first complete medical course. Classes were held in various hastily adapted buildings across the city, until the purpose-built Mayne Medical School at Herston was officially opened in 1939.

The school has grown to become a global medical school, delivering Australia’s largest medical program with nine state-of-the-art clinical schools across Queensland.

“Close links with major hospitals and health services across Queensland ensure students are at the forefront of clinical teaching and practice,” Professor Crawford said.

UQ Medical School’s reach has also extended internationally, with clinical schools located in New Orleans and Brunei, giving medical students an opportunity to be part of a global medical experience.

To celebrate the anniversary, more than 600 guests attended an 80 Years of Medicine Gala Dinner at Brisbane City Hall recently.

The event showcased family connections among alumni, including families with three generations of medical graduates.

UQ celebrates 80 years of teaching medicine

Guests included descendants of the inaugural class and father and son Bert and Peter Klug, graduates of the classes of 1953 and 1978 (Photo credit: UQ)

Guests included descendants of the inaugural class and father and son Bert and Peter Klug, graduates of the classes of 1953 and 1978.

Dr Bert Klug, who is now 94, survived the Holocaust and migrated to Australia in 1948.

“I had always had the ambition to become a doctor but because of war time events my education had been interrupted,” Dr Klug said.

“When we came here I still wanted to be a doctor and I was able to obtain an interview with the Dean of the Medical School who at the time was Professor Meyers.”

Professor Errol Solomon Meyers had been an ardent campaigner for a medical school in Queensland and the ES Meyers Lecture Theatre at the Herston campus is named in his honour.

The 80 Years of Medicine celebrations will continue when the Mayne Medical School Building at Herston opens its doors to the public during Brisbane Open House on Sunday, Oct. 9.

Ten Reasons to Study Medicine at UQ

1. Top 50 in the world for clinical and pre-clinical health and medicine metrics (QS World University Rankings 2016)
2. One of Australia’s leading medical programs
3. World-class scientists, facilities and investment
4. Quality clinical skills training
5. Integrated, problem-based learning approach
6. Early patient contact
7. A wide range of clinical training opportunities with 11 clinical schools
8. 80 per cent of students complete an elective overseas
9. Clinical schools based in USA and Brunei
10. Links to major teaching hospitals and research institutes

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Find out more about the UQ School of Medicine. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com, or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.