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Posts Tagged ‘UQ MD’

Monday, June 11th, 2018

Don’t miss the upcoming UQ Medicine webinar tomorrow!

We’re pleased to announce the next webinar in our UQ Med Summer Series: Meet UQ Medicine Academic Lead Dr Tammy Smith! Please join us and Dr. Tammy Smith, clinical lead for Phase 1 of the UQ MD program.

Don't miss the upcoming UQ Medicine webinar tomorrow!

UQ Medicine Phase 1 Clinical Lead Dr Tammy Smith

Interactive Q & A throughout the webinar—get your questions answered!

  • Studying medicine at UQ
  • UQ Medicine pre-clinical years
  • What to expect and how to prepare

Date: Tuesday, June 12, 2018
Time: 7 – 8 p.m. (EDT)

To register, please email kaylee@oztrekk.com!

About the UQ Medicine Phase 1

In the UQ Medicine program, years 1 and 2 combine biomedical sciences, public health, medical ethics and clinical skills training in a case-based learning context, focused around a series of patient-centred cases, each designed to highlight principles and issues in health and disease. Early patient contact, clinical reasoning and research training are embedded to develop advanced clinical skills and medical knowledge required for evidence-based clinical practice.

Phase 1 consists of the pre-clinical years, and Phase 2 comprises the clinical rotations. Each course is a separate entity with its own curriculum, assessment, and course coordinator. In between Years 1 and 2, there is an Observership conducted during the Summer Semester.

Here’s a list of what you will study during Phase 1 of the UQ MD:

Year 1, Semester 1

  • Clinical Science 1
  • Clinical Practice 1
  • Ethics and Professional Practice 1
  • Health, Society & Research 1

Year 1, Semester 2

  • Clinical Science 2
  • Clinical Practice 2
  • Ethics & Professional Practice 2
  • Health, Society & Research 2

Would you like to apply to UQ Medical School?

Program: Doctor of Medicine (MD)
Location: Brisbane, Queensland
Semester intake: January
Duration: 4 years
Application deadline: Applications are assessed on a rolling admissions (first come, first served) basis. Candidates are encouraged to apply as early as possible to increase their chances of timely assessment. This program can fill quickly!

Apply to the UQ School of Medicine!

Do you have any questions about the UQ Medicine Summer Series? Please email OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Kaylee Templeton at kaylee@oztrekk.com for details!

Friday, October 28th, 2016

UQ School of Medicine consultations… and other adventures

I just returned from a mini whirlwind with one of my favorite people in international education: Dr. Jenny Schafer, Director of Student Affairs at the UQ School of Medicine.

Dr. Schafer was recently in Canada for the second of her twice-annual visits and, as is becoming very usual, we all had a blast—students included.

UQ School of Medicine consultations... and other adventures

Dr Schafer about to enjoy… a cricket

First up was a stop in Vancouver where she met with a few dozen students at Simon Fraser University. I can’t lie; I wasn’t there but I have heard that it was a great time and questions needed to be cut off after two solid hours. I think that’s a good sign!

I picked Dr. Schafer up in Toronto where we were hosting the University of Toronto Pre-Med Society for a Q&A about studying medicine abroad. Before that event though, we needed some grub.

Dr. Schafer is a foodie and likes some good eats. In a city with some of the best restaurants, I’m always on the hunt for something a little different. With a surprising 22-degree October evening, I was banking on a patio, so we headed to El Catrin in the Distillery District. Looking for different, nestled among the tacos, charred corn and smoke-infused avocado sauce were… crickets. Like, crickets. How could we not, right? Well, we did, and while they didn’t taste like chicken, I’d argue they didn’t taste like much. Totally worth the few bucks to now know that I don’t necessary need to eat crickets again.

Following dinner—and the Jays’ ultimate demise—the weather took a turn and we got back into the regular October weather we’d expect forcing the switch out of flip flops. Neither of us had the appropriate clothing for the weather.

UQ School of Medicine consultations... and other adventures

OzTREKK Director Jaime Notman and her not-chicken nacho topping

The following evening the UofT Pre-Med Society hosted about 50 students where we to learned more about the UQ School of Medicine, about Dr. Schafer’s field of study, and her suggestions for success. Dr. Iqbal Jaffer (UQ MBBS ’09) joined her for a student-focused Q&A, which was incredible. Currently doing his residency in cardiac surgery at McMaster, Dr. Jaffer had the students peppering him with questions about his experience in Australia, his return to Canada, and his current practice. I should also say he’s currently in the final throes of completing his PhD, which is being defended early in 2017! We had to cull the questions just before 9 p.m. as the cleaning staff was waiting to get home.

I am obviously biased, but it was really great to have such an interactive experience for our future students. Hearing what it’s really like is so invaluable and I’m sure that everyone in attendance felt similarly. We had some students who are leaving in a few short weeks and most in their final (some in their first!) year all eager to understand if this experience is for them. I’m very excited to see their decision!  I’d love to hear if any students found it as interesting as I did!

After UofT it was a quick trip to meet with the Queen’s Medicine team (UQ and Queen’s have a long-standing and exiting partnership if you didn’t know!) where the goodbyes took place and Dr. Schafer headed back to the Brisbane springtime.

Jaime Notman
OzTREKK Director / Operations Manager

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Do you have any questions about your UQ medicine offer? Wondering if studying medicine is for you? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Friday, September 2nd, 2016

UQ Medical School celebrates 80 years of teaching medicine

Generations of doctors have started their medical careers at the University of Queensland, which is celebrating 80 years of medicine in 2016.

UQ celebrates 80 years of teaching medicine

Classes were held in various hastily adapted buildings across the city, until the purpose-built Mayne Medical School at Herston was officially opened in 1939 (Photo credit: UQ)

The UQ Medical School program has graduated more than 13,000 students over the past eight decades, forging an enduring connection to the state’s medical community.

Dean of Medicine Professor Darrell Crawford said the anniversary provided an opportunity to reflect on UQ’s distinguished history of health and medical leadership.

“We are proud to celebrate 80 years of teaching, and to continue to be the leading provider of medical education and research within our state,” Professor Crawford said.

“I am especially proud of the more than 2500 unpaid clinicians—mostly alumni—who return to the university to teach in the medical program and pass on their broad experience to a new generation of learners.”

Established in 1936, the UQ Faculty of Medicine offered Queensland’s first complete medical course. Classes were held in various hastily adapted buildings across the city, until the purpose-built Mayne Medical School at Herston was officially opened in 1939.

The school has grown to become a global medical school, delivering Australia’s largest medical program with nine state-of-the-art clinical schools across Queensland.

“Close links with major hospitals and health services across Queensland ensure students are at the forefront of clinical teaching and practice,” Professor Crawford said.

UQ Medical School’s reach has also extended internationally, with clinical schools located in New Orleans and Brunei, giving medical students an opportunity to be part of a global medical experience.

To celebrate the anniversary, more than 600 guests attended an 80 Years of Medicine Gala Dinner at Brisbane City Hall recently.

The event showcased family connections among alumni, including families with three generations of medical graduates.

UQ celebrates 80 years of teaching medicine

Guests included descendants of the inaugural class and father and son Bert and Peter Klug, graduates of the classes of 1953 and 1978 (Photo credit: UQ)

Guests included descendants of the inaugural class and father and son Bert and Peter Klug, graduates of the classes of 1953 and 1978.

Dr Bert Klug, who is now 94, survived the Holocaust and migrated to Australia in 1948.

“I had always had the ambition to become a doctor but because of war time events my education had been interrupted,” Dr Klug said.

“When we came here I still wanted to be a doctor and I was able to obtain an interview with the Dean of the Medical School who at the time was Professor Meyers.”

Professor Errol Solomon Meyers had been an ardent campaigner for a medical school in Queensland and the ES Meyers Lecture Theatre at the Herston campus is named in his honour.

The 80 Years of Medicine celebrations will continue when the Mayne Medical School Building at Herston opens its doors to the public during Brisbane Open House on Sunday, Oct. 9.

Ten Reasons to Study Medicine at UQ

1. Top 50 in the world for clinical and pre-clinical health and medicine metrics (QS World University Rankings 2016)
2. One of Australia’s leading medical programs
3. World-class scientists, facilities and investment
4. Quality clinical skills training
5. Integrated, problem-based learning approach
6. Early patient contact
7. A wide range of clinical training opportunities with 11 clinical schools
8. 80 per cent of students complete an elective overseas
9. Clinical schools based in USA and Brunei
10. Links to major teaching hospitals and research institutes

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Find out more about the UQ School of Medicine. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com, or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Friday, July 22nd, 2016

UQ appoints new Head of Rural Clinical School

The University of Queensland has appointed Professor Sarah Strasser as Head of Rural Clinical School with the Faculty of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences.

The appointment has been announced by Acting Executive Dean of the Faculty, Professor Robyn Ward.

UQ appoints new Head of Rural Clinical School

Professor Sarah Strasser is the new Head of Rural Clinical School (Photo credit: UQ)

“Professor Strasser is an academic rural general practitioner with significant experience in leading and managing rural clinical programs within Australia and Canada,” Professor Ward said.

She has held several leadership roles and has been instrumental in expanding rural medical schools, including in the Northern Territory for Flinders University.

“Professor Strasser is recognised nationally and internationally for developing successful innovative medical education programs which have improved the rural health workforce.”

Professor Strasser will be responsible for leading the faculty’s Rural Clinical School, developing the rural medical workforce and fostering the faculty’s relationships with the state’s rural and regional hospitals and health services.

“I am delighted to be returning to Australia to take up this important position with The University of Queensland,” Professor Strasser said.

“The UQ Rural Clinical School will have a major teaching and research role in the newly shaped UQ medical programs.

“This is an exciting opportunity for UQ to provide leadership in rural health nationally and internationally.”

The UQ Rural Clinical School aims to address health workforce shortages in rural and regional areas through providing the highest quality education, training, research and community service.

Professor Strasser will commence as Head of School in August.

UQ Rural Clinical School

UQ Rural Clinical School is funded through the Australian Government’s Rural Clinical Training Support (RCTS) Program to address health workforce shortages in rural and regional Queensland. To achieve this mandate, UQRCS aims to lead and direct the rural health agenda through the highest quality education, training, research and community service.

Now in its second decade of operation, UQRCS is able to demonstrate a positive impact on the medical workforce in the region and elsewhere.  Studies demonstrate that a student who has experienced the Rural Advantage with UQRCS is 2.5 times more likely to work in a rural area when compared with other UQ medical graduates.

About the UQ Medical School Program

The UQ Medical School conducts a four-year, graduate-entry medical program, the Doctor of Medicine (MD). The School of Medicine is a leading provider of medical education and research in Australia, and with the country’s largest medical degree program, they are the major single contributor to Queensland’s junior medical workforce.

Program: Doctor of Medicine (MD)
Location: Brisbane, Queensland
Semester intake: January
Duration: 4 years
Application deadline: Applications are assessed on a rolling admissions (first come, first served) basis. It is recommended that applicants apply as early as possible to increase their chances of timely assessment. This program can fill quickly!

Apply to the UQ School of Medicine!

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Find out more about the UQ School of Medicine. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com, or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Wednesday, July 13th, 2016

UQ MD offers released!

We’ve been busy the last few days: we’ve received a boatload of UQ MD offers! Congratulations!

UQ MD offers released

Study medicine at UQ Medical School

If you’ve received an offer, please note the lapse date on your offer letter. Waiting for your offer? Keep your eyes on your email inbox!

Still wondering if you should apply? UQ MD applications are assessed on a rolling admissions (first come, first served) basis. While it is recommended that applicants apply early to increase their chances of timely assessment, you are still permitted to apply as long as there are spots available!

Students who have completed their MCAT and have met the minimum MCAT requirements, and those who have completed their studies with a minimum 65% cumulative average are encouraged to apply.

Entry Requirements

  • Completed degree (Bachelor, Master, PhD)
  • GPA equivalent to 5.0 on UQ’s 7.0 scale
  • MCAT score (minimum of 8/8/8) or an overall score of 499; or GAMSAT score (minimum of 50 in each section)
  • Compulsory consultative meeting with the UQ School of Medicine

While there are no prerequisites for admission into the Doctor of Medicine program, the University of Queensland’s School of Medicine recommends that students prepare themselves for the MD by undertaking undergraduate, second-year university-level courses in anatomy, physiology and biochemistry. Students with this level of knowledge will more easily transition into the clinical case-based model that forms the foundation of the UQ MD program in Years 1 and 2.

Program: Doctor of Medicine (MD)
Location: Brisbane, Queensland
Semester intake: January 2017
Duration: 4 years
Application deadline: Rolling admissions. Applications close when the program is filled. The sooner you apply the better.

Apply to UQ Medical School!

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If you need assistance regarding how to accept your UQ MD offer, or if you have questions about medical schools in Australia, email Courtney at courtney@oztrekk.com.

Wednesday, May 25th, 2016

Menzies scholarship propels UQ medicine alumnus to Harvard

A prestigious scholarship is helping University of Queensland alumnus Dr Nick Gattas pursue dreams of designing a prototype hi-tech hospital that specialises in chronic illness.

Dr Gattas has been awarded the RG Menzies Scholarship to Harvard, and plans to focus on digital innovation during his Master of Business Administration study there.

UQ School of Medicine

Dr Nick Gattas … planning to combine digital innovation skills with his medical knowledge (Photo credit: UQ)

“Ultimately I hope the combination of digital innovation skills and medical knowledge will allow me to improve the quality, access and cost of healthcare in Australia,” said Dr Gattas, who graduated from UQ in 2013 with a Bachelor of Medicine / Bachelor of Surgery (Honours).

“I hope to use the MBA to enter a leadership role where I can directly change the model of care for patients with chronic disease, with a greater focus on data-enabled prevention, telehealth, and innovative funding.

“One way to do this would be to develop the model of care for a single hospital and then expand it across Australia.”

While at Harvard, Dr Gattas will look at launching a start-up company to address a specific problem, such as delivering specialist diabetes care to patients in remote areas, while developing services that can be scaled up in Australia and abroad.

“The challenge facing all health systems is providing care to an ageing population burdened by chronic disease, in a world where more funding simply is not sustainable,” he said.

“How can we consistently provide high-quality care to those who need it, using the few resources we have available?”

As part of the UQ Medical Leadership Program, Dr Gattas worked on a project with global management and consulting firm McKinsey & Co in Sydney.

After graduating as valedictorian and dux of his year in 2013, he decided he could better influence health systems at a strategic rather than clinical level, and accepted an offer to work at McKinsey.

“Addressing the challenges around an ageing population and chronic disease is my passion in life,” he said.

The RG Menzies Scholarships, valued at $81,860 ($US60,000), are Australia’s leading national awards for postgraduate study in the United States and are jointly awarded by the Harvard Club of Australia, Australian National University and the Menzies Foundation.

Selection panel members said they were impressed by Dr Gattas’s vision for improving systems and using international knowledge not currently maximised in Australia.

About UQ’s Medical Leadership Program

For UQ Medicine students who are also considering leadership roles in their career futures, the UQ School of Medicine has partnered with the UQ Business School to provide an accredited Medical Leadership Program offered exclusively to UQ MD students. Interested applicants may apply at the end of their first year of study of their medical degree.

Key benefits

By participating in this program, students will be able to

  • discover the keys to building strategies to affect continued transformation in the medical profession;
  • develop their personal and professional capabilities in areas such as leadership and management, managing change, thinking strategically, managing people, thinking innovatively, developing teams and an action learning culture, to name just a few areas;
  • explore how they can create a longer-term focus and make a significant impact on their medical outcomes, aligning their professional development around the core capabilities central to the achievement of their professional strategies;
  • formulate practical ideas, models and tools of behaviour, which will help participants advance their own personal and professional development; and obtain a Graduate Certificate in Executive Leadership

If you would like more information about UQ Medical School and the Medical Leadership Program, contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com or call toll free at 1-866-698-7355.

Tuesday, April 19th, 2016

UQ School of Medicine celebrates 80 years

In 2016, the UQ School of Medicine will celebrate 80 years of medicine. It’s an auspicious occasion and a great opportunity to stop and reflect on their long and distinguished history of health and medical leadership and the features that makes UQ one of the world’s great medical schools.

UQ Medicine is a leading provider of medical education and research in Queensland, with the country’s largest medical degree program. The UQ MD is case-based learning program includes graduate-entry and high school-leaver entry streams. UQ also offers early exposure to clinical training, and a vast array of opportunities to extend learning through special projects, research experience and clinical placements overseas.

Why study the UQ Doctor of Medicine?

The UQ Doctor of Medicine is a postgraduate medical program designed to produce highly skilled doctors capable of meeting future medical challenges in a wide variety of settings.

Years 1 and 2 combine biomedical sciences, public health, medical ethics and clinical skills training in a case-based learning context, focused around a series of patient-centred cases, each designed to highlight principles and issues in health and disease. Early patient contact, clinical reasoning and research training are embedded to develop advanced clinical skills and medical knowledge required for evidence-based clinical practice.

In Years 3 and 4 clinical placements are organised around 10 core medical disciplines delivered across 11 clinical schools (hospitals) in Queensland, Brunei and United States.

UQ School of Medicine

Learn more about the UQ School of Medicine

Program: Doctor of Medicine
Location: Brisbane, Queensland
Semester intake: January
Duration: 4 years
Application deadline: Applications are assessed on a rolling admissions (first come, first served) basis. It is recommended that applicants apply as early as possible to increase their chances of timely assessment. This program can fill quickly!

Entry requirements for the UQ Medical Program

1. Performance in a key degree within the last 10 years. The GPA will be based on the student’s most recently completed key degree. A key degree is a bachelor’s degree, honours degree, master’s degree (coursework or research) or a PhD. Applications must meet a minimum average to be eligible. For the 2017 intake, an applicant must have a minimum average of 5.0 on UQ’s scale of 7.0 (65%) to apply.

2. Performance in the North American Medical College Admission Test (MCAT or GAMSAT). Applications must meet a minimum of 8/8/8 or an overall score of 496 on the MCAT to be eligible. UQ will accept MCAT scores with one ‘7’ score, as long as there’s no more than one ‘7’, nothing less than a ‘7’, and meets the total requirement of 24.

Only completed applications (including MCAT results) will be assessed. By sitting the MCAT sooner, you are potentially increasing your chances of program spots being available when your application is complete.

MCAT test results from January 2014 onward will be accepted for the 2017 intake.

3. Compulsory consultative meeting with the UQ School of Medicine program director, in person, in Canada. Consultations will be one-on-one meetings with the UQ School of Medicine program director to determine your suitability for the program and motivations for practicing medicine. You will have the opportunity to ask questions about the UQ medical program, clinicals, opportunities in Canada, licensing, internships in Australia, etc.

Apply to the UQ School of Medicine!

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Find out more about the UQ School of Medicine. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com, or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Monday, February 8th, 2016

Jaime’s adventures in Oz: UQ Medical School

Last week, Jaime of OzTREKK went to Brisbane to welcome our University of Queensland students. Here’s her latest installment!

Hi everyone!

It’s noon and our UQ MD students are heading into their orientation kick-off. It ends with the stethoscope ceremony for which many are excited-slash-nervous. There was much discussion (among the guys and the gals) about what to wear. I think it’s the balance of 1) want to make a good first impression and 2) holy smokes, it’s super hot. Which it is. The super-cell did nothing (it didn’t even rain but a little sprinkle) and it’s toasty right now. It’s 33 degrees now and is going up to 39 tomorrow, I believe.

UQ Medical School

UQ Medical School information session

I’m excited to get to the horrible weather of Melbourne (where it will be 27 and sunny tomorrow).

Before I get into the details of the shuttle I thought I would share my lesson: So, at each orientation I warn people about the sun and advise that they should put on sunscreen. I’ve been pretty diligent and am pretty much as white as I was on January 13th. Yesterday I took eight students out to North Lakes (which, for the record is not Brisbane) because they needed 50 rolls of toilet paper…. I kind of joke because they were all very thankful and very happy for a little familiarity, I think. I’ve realized that students—at least initially—really cling to things they know. They go to Kmart and Coscto and IKEA even though some of the better deals are at Aldi and Fantastic Furniture, you know? They have four years to realize. 🙂

Anyway, while I was waiting for the “Coscto Kids” I decided to go for a walk (I’m really trying to stay active and avoid crap food as much as possible). It was on the verge of rain and so I took off. Well, sure enough the clouds part and the Aussie sun comes out. Now, I’m about 30 minutes away from the car and I don’t have sunscreen on. I do a little on my face but not on my body. I spent the remaining time of my walk darting between shadows and trees trying to avoid the crisp I can feel forming around my neck. I even let my hair down for a sec but then the sweat house that created was difficult to deal with. Anyway, I ended up with some pretty burnt collarbones and back of neck. I feel like a rookie.

So… UQ. Well, I’m the new captain of the UQ Medical School Rocks team. The former OzTREKKers who helped out were AMAZING. They were really, really amazing. They came out for the breakfast and stuck around for some students until around 1 p.m. And that’s when I left. A former OzTREKK student even invited some students back the next day and she took them around campus again and answered their questions… again. They were incredible.

So the UQ turnout was incredible. There were about eight parents and about 60 to 70 people there total. It was really great. Everyone was sooooooo appreciative of the setup and the food was delicious. The people at Cromwell were really super friendly and accommodating. Sarah, no spider slaying this year. Just in case you were wondering 🙂

I would say that the vast majority of students had their accommodations by the time I was there. There were a few that had booked accomms but hadn’t moved in yet. I’d guess that students seemed to be pretty split between managed student accommodation and houses. Probably more so than any other uni I’ve visited thus far. The UQ’ers were very friendly and were very thankful to OzTREKK (Sarah, your speed at replying was mentioned quite a few times!) for our help.

University of Queensland Medical School

OzTREKK Shuttle, at your service!

UQ was the busiest shuttle—back and forth to IKEA, groceries, Kmart, etc. I roughly counted and estimated that 30 to 40 students got in the shuttle at one point or another. I felt that this group really used the services and that made me happy! Shuttle ran from about 8 a.m. (if not earlier) through to about 6 or 7 p.m. It didn’t stop, although after having completed the shuttle tour I can say that I didn’t turn anyone down who needed to go somewhere. So hopefully students are feeling settled. I think the UQ’ers—many of whom I’d met at the consultations—were the most ready and prepared. There was a lot of excitement. Actually, at most unis, as many students had been there for a while they were all really anxious to get going, you know? I heard that students were “bored” a fair bit. Just wanted to get it started. Speaking of get it started… the Costco version of highlighters was a pack of 30 (!) so there’s lot of work ahead!

Oh, and accomms, just for your reference: I felt the majority of students actually seemed to be around the CBD—South Bank, West End and Toowong. Very few seemed to be in St. Lucia. Most students were really comfy with the transit and seemed to judge the commute by “on bus” which was great. A few others in the Gabba, Spring Hill and Dutton Park.

So many of the students were so lovely. I am so excited for them. I’m very fortunate to be here right now and see this exciting time in their lives.

Anyway, I’m meeting university people shortly so I should get going. I miss you guys!

Onward to Melbourne where it should be a really great time.

Toodles, y’all!

Jaime.

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Find out more about the UQ School of Medicine and the 2017 intake of the Doctor of Medicine program. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com.

Wednesday, January 13th, 2016

About the UQ Medical Society

University of Queensland Medical Society (UQMS)

UQ Medical School

UQ School of Medicine

The University of Queensland Medical Society (UQMS) is a student-run, not-for-profit organization that aims to serve more than 1,800 medical students enrolled at the University of Queensland.

Operated independently of the University of Queensland Union, an elected executive committee oversees the management of the society with crucial support from dozens of volunteer social convenors and academic representatives.

Full membership of the UQMS is open to all enrolled UQ medical students.

Long-term objectives of the UQMS

  • To advance and promote the interests of medical students at the University of Queensland
  • To enrich both the social and academic environments of medical study
  • To promote and foster links and professional associations with student colleagues at other medical schools within Australia and overseas
  • To promote the health of the community via participation in community projects and charity functions

Mission Statement

Their mission is to be regarded as the peak body concerning medical student education issues at the University of Queensland. Among our long-term objectives:

  • To advance and promote the interests of medical students at the University of Queensland;
  • To enrich both the social and academic environments of medical study;
  • To promote and foster links and professional associations with student colleagues at other medical schools within Australia and overseas; and
  • To promote the health of the community via participation in community projects and charity functions.

The UQMS works to achieve its mission and meet its goals by networking within the wider medical profession, fostering the development of partnerships with sponsors, and by raising the society’s profile in the public eye. Through their advocacy and community activities, the UQMS will ensure its members graduate from the University of Queensland with more than just a degree.

About the UQ Medical School Doctor of Medicine Program

Program: Doctor of Medicine (MD)
Location: Brisbane, Queensland
Next semester intake: January 2017
Duration: 4 years
Application deadline: UQ Medical School applications are assessed on a rolling admissions (first come, first served) basis. It is strongly recommended that applicants apply as early as possible to increase their chances of timely assessment.

Entry Requirements

  • Completed degree (Bachelor, Master, PhD)
  • GPA equivalent to 5.0 on UQ’s 7.0 scale
  • MCAT score (minimum of 8/8/8 or an overall score of 496) or GAMSAT score (minimum of 50 in each section)
  • Compulsory consultative meeting with the UQ School of Medicine

Apply to the University of Queensland Doctor of Medicine program!

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Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Courtney Frank for more information about how to apply to the MD program at UQ Medical School. Email courtney@oztrekk.com or call 1-866-698-7355 (toll free in Canada).

Wednesday, September 23rd, 2015

UQ medical students promote Indigenous health through song and dance

Medical students from the University of Queensland attended the Biennial Laura Aboriginal Dance Festival with a focus on promoting health and inspiring future health professionals.

The festival is a celebration of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture and showcases the people of the Cape York Peninsula through song and dance ceremony.

UQ Medical School

UQ med students at the Biennial Laura Aboriginal Dance Festival (Photo credit: UQ)

The medical students were representing TROHPIQ (Towards Rural and Outback Health Professionals in Queensland) and RHINO (Rural Health in Northern Outback).

Ms Sarah Ayles said their main objective for the weekend was to engage with the youth of the Cape York and promote health careers.

“We hope that we have inspired some future health professionals,” Ms Ayles said.

“Most importantly, as future clinicians, we had the opportunity to learn and participate in Indigenous culture.

“We were truly blown away with the level of engagement of everyone at the festival.

“Our booth was frequently visited by people who were willing to have a yarn about their experiences with the health system from Weipa to Thursday Island,” she said.

“We were interviewed for the National Indigenous Radio Service and one of the most consistent messages being broadcast over the weekend was that of healthy starts for children and ongoing involvement with health professionals.

“Our UQ Frisbees, casts for the children, apple Slinkies, and anatomy game were very popular, not to mention our free sunscreen and hats in the thirty-degree heat.”

As well as attending the festival, the students had the opportunity for some sightseeing, visiting the Split Rocks with famous rock art in the Laura area, and also got to spend an afternoon at Mossman Gorge.

“We would like to thank TROHPIQ for their support and allowing students to have these experiences and UQ Faculty of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences for their generous donations of merchandise for the weekend,” Ms Ayles said.

About the UQ Medical School Program

The UQ Medical School conducts a four-year, graduate-entry medical program, the Doctor of Medicine (MD). The School of Medicine is a leading provider of medical education and research in Australia, and with the country’s largest medical degree program, they are the major single contributor to Queensland’s junior medical workforce.

Program: Doctor of Medicine (MD)
Location: Brisbane, Queensland
Next available intake: January 2017
Duration: 4 years

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Find out more about the UQ School of Medicine and the 2017 intake of the Doctor of Medicine program. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Sarah Bridson at sarah@oztrekk.com, or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.