+ OzTrekk Educational Services Home
 
 

Posts Tagged ‘University of Sydney’

Monday, October 23rd, 2017

10 reasons to study rehabilitation counselling

Thinking about a career in rehabilitation counselling, but not sure if it’s right for you?

Rehabilitation counselling is a dynamic, challenging and rewarding allied health profession that is grounded in social justice, human rights, community inclusion and the value and importance of work. A career in this area often draws on knowledge from several fields, including philosophy, psychology, sociology, medicine, education, community development, and law.

10 reasons to study rehabilitation counselling

Study rehabilitation counselling at the University of Sydney

Here are the top 10 reasons to study rehabilitation counselling at the University of Sydney.

1. Make a real difference to people’s lives

As a rehabilitation counsellor, you will assist diverse clientele, including people with physical and mental health conditions, with chronic pain, experiencing homelessness, drug and alcohol issues, and people who are at risk, such as refugees.

The University of Sydney‘s postgraduate program in rehabilitation counselling sets you up to provide life-changing support to help people achieve maximum participation in employment and community life through assessment, counselling, service provision and support.

“I have always seen rehabilitation counselling as the most well rounded, and grounded, of the allied health disciplines. It encompasses elements of positive psychology and biopsychosocial models, with a combined focus on vocation, ability, mental health, community engagement and case management.” Louise Bilato, Private Practice

2. You’ll be highly employable

The University of Sydney is ranked no. 1 in Australia and fourth in the world for graduate employability.* Many Sydney Uni students secure positions in the field while still in the program and the employment rate of graduates has consistently been 100% for a number of years.

With government investment in person-centred service models, for example the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS), increasing, the demand and range of opportunities for rehabilitation counsellors will rise for years to come.

“I obtained employment as a rehabilitation counsellor through my final placement at the University of Sydney and there has never been a shortage of work in this field. It has offered my family security since the day I graduated and it has been easy to transfer from one role to another due the variety of skills learnt from this course.”  Sam Antonas, Workplace Injury

3. Open doors to a wide range of career options

Graduates work in a variety of settings, including

  • advocacy and policy;
  • community-based rehabilitation;
  • community mental health;
  • disability management;
  • disability-specific community support services and centres;
  • life insurance and long-term care;
  • private consultant (vocational rehabilitation, career counselling, forensic); and
  • workers’ compensation.

“For the past twenty-two years I have worked as a rehabilitation counsellor in a range of industries. This course has provided me with a set of skills that I could take to occupational rehabilitation, human resources and injury management. I am enjoying being able to choose work that I am interested in and where I can balance work and life.” James Hill, private consultant

4. Gain experience working on real-life problems

As a rehabilitation counselling student at the University of Sydney, you will get to work on real cases, real problems and real solutions from day one of the program. You will complete a number of clinical and professional fieldwork opportunities across both the public and private sectors, enabling you to apply your knowledge and gain first-hand experience.

The university also has its own skill clinic, providing a physical space for students to practice their counselling skills under peer review and professional supervision.

“It’s an exciting time to be associated with the profession, with an opportunity to create some very positive noise in this space. Our skill set has great applicability in areas much broader than what is ever initially realised, and it is only self-limiting if you let it be.” Stuart Wing, Recovre

5. Choose from a range of specialisations

Select from a variety of specialisation tracks or develop your own in consultation with the course director. Popular topics include psychiatric rehabilitation, forensic assessment, substance abuse, at-risk populations, developmental/cognitive impairment disabilities, and chronic pain.

“Currently I work for Juvenile Justice as the Senior Practice Officer, which means I do a lot of internal consultancy, training and development. I like working with involuntary clients because it brings a whole gamut of challenges and really improves your skill level quickly. The most rewarding part is when an involuntary client almost becomes voluntary and they start engaging in treatment and actually wanting to achieve goals on their case plans.” Tim Warton, Juvenile Justice

6. Engage in international learning opportunities

The University of Sydney recruits and supports international students to study in the program and they cultivate international opportunities for Australian students. You will work in international policy and practice and action research projects with our regional partners in Asia and the Pacific Islands. The University of Sydney also offers a study abroad program that our students can pursue.

“My position involves leading the implementation of the community based rehabilitation program for geographically and culturally diverse districts of Nepal in close collaboration with self-help groups, disabled people’s organisations, government and non-government structures. I facilitate inclusion of more than 2,500 persons with disabilities and their families based on their needs in health (treatment, rehabilitation and assitive devices), education, livelihood/income generation activities and social empowerment.” Samridhi Rana Thapa, Karuna Foundation Nepal

7. Choose from two learning options

The University of Sydney offers two courses in rehabilitation counselling:

The graduate diploma focuses on the knowledge and skills required to enter the workforce as a strengths-based, solutions-focused case manager in the context of workers’ compensation.

The master’s course builds on the knowledge and skills gained in the graduate diploma where you will study the science of rehabilitation counselling practice, community-based inclusive development and issues of policy and systems change. You will gain broader experience in specialised applications with the opportunity to move into a management or leadership position.

“The foundational rehabilitation counselling skills that I have learnt are helping me in my role in health. The broad skills of communication, counselling and transferable skills analysis are very relevant to the human resources field. When combined with skills and knowledge of work, health and safety, workers compensation and employment of people with disabilities, rehabilitation counselling is a very transferable skill set.” Raychel Davis, NSW Health

8. Gain professional accreditation

The university’s rehabilitation counselling courses are accredited programs that enable you to work in a range of settings in Australia. Your professional skills are recognised by employers overseas.

“This course has provided me with the skills and qualifications enabling me to live and work in London as a Vocational Rehabilitation Counsellor for the National Health Service and be recognised as a professional member of the Vocational Rehabilitation Association (VRA) in the UK, which has been great to have on my resume.” Stacey Chapman, ANZ OnePath

9. You’ll join a diverse community

The University of Sydney actively seeks and supports a diverse student group where you will enjoy the richness of social learning and learn from other students’ experiences. The school integrates cultural competency into counselling theory and practice and teach community inclusion by example.

“I currently work for Mission Australia as the Homelessness Programs Specialist. I hope to challenge stigma, and to influence social policy, funding and reporting in service delivery, and ultimately change the way that we address homelessness as a community.” Erin Fearn, Mission Australia

10. Learn from leaders in the field

This rehabilitation counselling program is based on evidence, excellence and innovation. Sydney teaches leadership by example and are at the centre of the international discussion on the global identity of rehabilitation counselling. The current head of discipline has led efforts to organise rehabilitation counselling educators in Australia as a collective voice for professional advocacy.

*QS Graduate Employability Rankings 2018.

About the Master of Rehabilitation Counselling at the University of Sydney

During this two-year degree, you will be taught by leading academics as you learn how to provide specialist counselling, rehabilitation, and case management services to people who have experienced injury, disability or social disadvantage. You will have the opportunity to advance your knowledge in specialist areas of mental health, alcohol and drug misuse, developmental disability, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), public offenders, or other interest areas as approved by the Course Director.

As part of your studies, you will also complete a number of clinical and professional fieldwork opportunities across both the public and private sectors which will enable you to practically apply your knowledge and gain firsthand experience. As a graduate-entry program, this course is designed to accommodate all suitably qualified candidates regardless of their previous discipline. However, a formal background in psychology, rehabilitation, or related subjects is desirable.

Program: Master of Rehabilitation Counselling
Location: Sydney, New South Wales
Semester intake: March each year
Duration: 2 years
Application deadline: Candidates are encouraged to apply a minimum of 3 months prior to the program start date

Apply to the Master of Rehabilitation Counselling at the University of Sydney!

*

Learn more about how you can study the Master of Rehabilitation Counselling at the University of Sydney! Contact OzTREKK Australian Health Sciences Admissions Officer Heather Brown at heather@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Monday, October 9th, 2017

Sydney Virtual Fair for international students

Don’t miss the University of Sydney’s virtual fair for international students! This is a great opportunity to chat online with friendly uni staff and have all your questions answered about studying at Australia’s first university.

Sydney Virtual Fair for International Students

Don’t miss Sydney’s Virtual Fair for international students

You can find out about admission requirements, watch video presentations from leading academics and current students, and learn about accommodation, student services and life in Sydney. If you’ve applied to the Sydney Sydney Juris Doctor, you can find out more about the program at 6 p.m. (EDT)!

The fair will run from 4 a.m. until 8 p.m. (EST) on Thursday, October 12. No matter where you are in Canada, you can chat with admissions and faculty staff about the university’s huge range of study opportunities and have all your questions answered.

  • Virtual Fair starts – Oct. 12 @ 4 a.m. 
  • Juris Doctor – Oct. 12 @ 6 p.m. (EDT)
  • Received an offer? Get questions answered – Oct. 12 @ 6:30 p.m. (EDT)

Check out Time Zone Converter.

Don’t forget to register!

*

Find out more about this upcoming University of Sydney virtual fair! Contact OzTREKK for more information.

Wednesday, October 4th, 2017

University of Sydney graduates rated Australia’s most employable

University of Sydney graduates have been named the most employable in Australia for the third year running and in the top 5 globally, according to the 2018 QS Graduate Employability Rankings.

University of Sydney graduates rated Australia's most employable

Sydney Uni grads have been named the most employable in Australia for the third consecutive year (Photo: University of Sydney)

The 2018 QS Employability Rankings also reveal the university’s graduates are the fourth most sought after in the world, the same position as last year and up from 14th in 2015.

In addition to surveying over 30,000 employers, the QS rankings move beyond employment rates and evaluate the affiliations of high-achievers, as well as work placement partnerships and employers’ connections with graduates.

“We are delighted by the rankings which confirm our graduates continue to be the most sought-after by employers in Australia and in high demand worldwide,” said Vice-Chancellor and Principal Dr Michael Spence.

“It is testament to our exceptionally designed courses delivered by world-class teachers.

“This is why we have transformed our undergraduate curriculum with the Sydney Undergraduate Experience. Every University of Sydney student will have the opportunity to take on real-world industry, community, research and entrepreneurship projects,” said Dr Spence.

One of the main drivers of the university’s ranking was the networking and partnership opportunities made available to students by employers.

A recent event saw students pitch their best ideas to a panel that included entrepreneurs, industry and government. Students have also helped solve real-world challenges for Australia’s largest book retailer Dymocks, while in the faculty of engineering and information technology, students have helped engineering firm Cardno navigate a drone-enabled future.

This year, the QS rankings considered 600 universities, double that of last year, and expanded to a top 500 from 200 in 2016. The rankings also increased the number of Australian universities included from 15 to 24.

The results follow the recent announcement that the university has been ranked 61 in the world and third in Australia in the latest Times Higher Education World University Rankings.

To determine the rankings, QS mapped the following indicators:

  • Employer reputation (30%)
  • Alumni outcomes (25%)
  • Partnerships with employers (25%)
  • Employer/student connections (10%)
  • Graduate employment rate (10%)

Quacquerelli Symonds (QS) was founded in 1990 and provide a number of higher education rankings including World University Rankings and subject area rankings.

Thinking about studying at Sydney Uni? Here are the most popular schools for Canadians:

*

Think you might be interested in studying at the University of Sydney? Contact OzTREKK to find out more: info@oztrekk.com.

Friday, September 15th, 2017

A new student’s guide to activities in Sydney, Australia

Calling all University of Sydney and Macquarie University  students—no wait—all of you who are heading to Australia to study!

A new student’s guide to activities in Sydney, Australia

OzTREKK Eastern Territory Manager John Graham

Getting into the pre-departure phase of your “Study in Australia” journey can be slightly overwhelming: accepting your offer, getting a visa, booking your flight, finding accommodation—all of these things are currently at the forefront of your mind.

What comes next? Well, usually it’s concern about finding your way around campus, getting settled in classes, and making new friends. But OzTREKK’s John Graham reminds us that there is a lot more to “study in Australia” than just studying.

While this blog is targeted to everyone headed to Sydney, New South Wales, it’s also for anyone keen to take advantage of their school breaks, and we’ve had many OzTREKK students write to us about their Australian travel adventures! Here, John outlines a few of his favourite places in Sydney that you should check out:

Beach: Palm Beach

Palm Beach—a no-brainer

Palm Beach is located one hour north of Sydney and used at the set for the hit Australian TV series Home and Away. The beach is located on a long peninsula with a beautiful hike to Barrenjoey Lighthouse at the northern tip, the South Pacific Ocean to the east, and a small harbour know as Pittwater to the west.

Park: Pool in Prince Alfred Park

Prince Alfred Park and its massive pool

Prince Alfred Park is an amazing community space in the heart of Sydney. Its location is easily accessible as it is a 10-minute walk from Central Station. The park is home to basketball and tennis courts, an open-air workout area and lots of green space; however, the most important feature is the public pool to help you stay cool during the hot Sydney summers.

Food: Spice Alley – Kensington Street

Spice Alley on Kensington—yum!

Spice Alley is a unique open-air dining experience comprising six “hawker style” eateries that weave though a back alley and host tables beneath Asian lanterns. The prices in Spice Alley are very reasonable and this neat location is within walking distance of the University of Sydney campus and Central Station.

Bar: Soda Factory

Soda Factory

Soda Factory is one of the most famous speakeasy bars in Sydney. That being said, those interested have to be sure to keep their eyes peeled. The bar is hidden behind a Coca-Cola machine in an American-style hot dog joint. But on the other side you find a busy bar with a bare-bones industrial style and a happenin’ dance floor.

Entertainment: Sydney Football Club “football” match (soccer)

Sydney FC is a professional soccer team that plays in the top division in Australia. Their stadium holds more than 45,000 spectators and is located a short distance from the CBD in Moore Park. Some of the most exciting nights at Allianz Stadium are when they are playing their arch rivals, the Western Sydney Wanderers. Fans who want a true experience should also be sure to stop by one of the local pubs to have a beer with local Aussie fans before the game.

At a Sydney FC match at Allianz Stadium

*

Think you might like to study in Australia? Do you have a program or an Australian university in mind? Contact us info@oztrekk.com for more information!

Wednesday, August 2nd, 2017

About University of Sydney international scholarships

Did you know that when you receive an unconditional offer of admission to the University of Sydney, you are automatically assessed for a scholarship? Vice-Chancellor’s International Scholarships are up to AUD$40,000 in value and awarded to international students based on academic merit. Here are the details about how you can qualify:

About University of Sydney international scholarships

Find out more about the University of Sydney.

Semester 1, 2018
• Round 1 – November 3, 2017
• Round 2 – January 5, 2018
• Round 3 – January 26, 2018

Semester 2, 2018
• Round 1 – April 6, 2018
• Round 2 – May 4, 2018
• Round 3 – June 8, 2018

Top-ranked applicants will be offered a tuition fee reduction of their first year fees by A$5,000, A$20,000*, or A$40,000.

Tier 1 Scholarships capped at AUD$40,000 toward a recipient’s first year tuition fees for the enrolled CRICOS registered program of study at the University of Sydney is open to ALL international students enrolled in undergraduate and postgraduate coursework full degrees only.

*Tier 2 Scholarships capped at AUD$20,000 toward a recipient’s first year tuition fees for the enrolled CRICOS registered program of study at the University of Sydney will only be offered to citizens of selected countries and enrolled in undergraduate and postgraduate coursework full degrees only.

Tier 3 Scholarships capped at AUD$5,000 toward a recipient’s first year tuition fees for the enrolled CRICOS registered program of study at the University of Sydney is open to ALL international students enrolled in undergraduate and postgraduate coursework full degrees only.

Terms and Conditions

Selection criteria

  • Selection will be based strictly on academic merit as per the university’s admission requirements
  • Only applicants with unconditional offers of admission will be considered;
  • Only applicants who are not citizens of Australia and New Zealand nor a  permanent resident of Australia will be considered;
  • Specifically for tier 2 scholarships, only applicants who are citizens of the nominated country will be considered;
  • Students who have already commenced are not eligible.
  • Students applying for their second University of Sydney degree will be eligible for the scholarships so long as they have not been recipients of a University of Sydney scholarship in their first University of Sydney degree.
  • University of Sydney Foundation Program (USFP) students articulating into full degree University of Sydney CRICOS registered programs will also be eligible for the scholarships and will be assessed similarly to all other direct applicants on the basis of academic merit.

How to Apply

Great news: You won’t need a separate application! All eligible applicants with an unconditional offer by a specified cut-off date will be considered for the scholarships!

Conditions

  • The scholarship will be a one off payment and will cover tuition fees only and no living allowance is payable.
  • Tier 3 Scholarship recipients will be eligible to concurrently receive either the Tier 1 or 2 Scholarships. Should this be the case, the $5,000 will be deducted from the Tier 1 and Tier 2 scholarship amounts in order to ensure that the respective caps of AUD $40,000 and AUD $20,000 is not exceeded.

Successful candidates

  • Must not be in receipt of any other tuition scholarship or sponsorship from the University of Sydney or the Australian Government;
  • Must commence study as per the Scholarship offer – deferment to a later semester is not permitted and will result in the forfeiture of the scholarship;
  • Will be required to pay for their own airfares to Sydney, living expenses, study materials, text books, any ancillary fees (if applicable) and Overseas Student Health Cover each year;
  • Are also responsible for paying the balance of tuition fees as applicable each year;
  • Are required to enroll as full-time international students and must maintain their international student status on a full-time basis throughout their enrollment at the University of Sydney;
  • May not be entitled to a Leave of Absence during the duration of the scholarship, unless it is due to extenuating circumstances which the university will consider on a case by case basis; and
  • Will be asked to promote the program in which they are enrolled as well as represent the University of Sydney at student orientation, marketing events and corporate networking events.

The University of Sydney reserves the right to make changes to this Scholarships Program without notice and at its discretion.

Would you like more information about the University of Sydney Vice-Chancellor’s International Scholarships? Contact OzTREKK at info@oztrekk.com or call toll free at 1-866-698-7355.

Friday, June 30th, 2017

Why is recycling important? 5 ways the University of Sydney is turning garbage into gold

University of Sydney researchers are working on turning waste into new innovations for the health, agriculture, transport and construction industries. Here’s how:

1. Orange peel: a cure for cancer?

Every year around a third of food produced for human consumption is never eaten. That’s around 1.3 billion tonnes of food that is wasted. But University of Sydney research is breathing new life into these leftovers and using them to make people healthier.

From orange peel to malformed mushrooms, a lot of food waste is rich in nutrients that are vital for people’s well-being and can be used in our diet. Professor Fariba Dehghani is one of the scientists turning these scraps into life-saving medicine.

Professor Dehghani explains how her team is using waste in a meaningful way in a video, below, produced in association with the Sydney Morning Herald.

2. Seabed delicacy: a cold sore treatment?

Did you know the blue blood of abalone could be used to combat common cold sores and related herpes virus?

A team of chemical engineers and virologists at the University of Sydney found that the sea snail’s anti-viral properties could block the herpes virus’s entry into cells.

3. Turning algae into renewable jet fuel

Why is recycling important? 5 ways the University of Sydney is turning garbage into gold

Turning algae into jet fuel (Photo: University of Sydney)

A native freshwater algae grown in northern Australia can be used to create a high-quality, renewable jet fuel. A multi-disciplinary team including researchers from the University of Sydney, James Cook University and Israel’s Ben Gurion University has developed a proof-of-concept process to create high-quality renewable biofuel from the macroalgae, Oedogonium, ready for blending with regular gasoline, jet fuel and diesel.

4. Pee on the pods

Urine could be successfully recycled to fertilise crops, according to university researchers. A team from the University of Sydney School of Civil Engineering has examined the effectiveness of reusing nutrients from human waste and say there is growing evidence that the use of human urine in agriculture is completely viable.

5. A concrete idea for reusing industrial waste

The university’s School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering is investigating new technologies for the sustainable processing of industrial waste and by-products. One example of this could see fly ash—a byproduct of coal combustion—used as a supplement in concrete mix and its manufacture.

*

Would you like more information about studying civil engineering or environmental sciences at the University of Sydney? Email OzTREKK Admissions Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com!

Thursday, June 22nd, 2017

What do your music preferences say about your study habits?

It’s well known that certain human behaviours such as eating, having sex or shared social moments lead to a release of the neurotransmitter dopamine.

“Dopamine is a very common neurotransmitter, sometimes called a feel-good neurochemical. More accurately, it is released in response to a rewarding activity, and its presence helps drive our motivation and reinforces the activity that led to its release,” says University of Sydney Professor Alais.

What do your music preferences say about your study habits?

What you listen to may affect how you study

Now music can be added to the list, since it’s been found that listening to emotionally engaging melodies also results in the release of dopamine—one of few intangible practices to do this.

Prof Alais discussed a behavioural study on rats to demonstrate the relationship between dopamine and motivation.

“Given two pathways to find a food reward, rats with high dopamine levels took the effortful path to receive twice the amount of food, while those with low levels took the easy path and received less food,” he says.

So, how does this relate to studying?

“When you are sitting down to study, boosting dopamine through music is good because it will increase your motivation levels. The satisfaction you feel when reaching your study goals will be intrinsically rewarding and reinforce your willingness to study,” Prof Alais explains.

“For the maximum dopamine boost, you should choose music that gives you a positive emotional response,” he suggests. “People who are happy and less stressed are going to feel better and therefore learn better.”

Certain music can boost memory

In neuroscience there are several networks in the brain including the executive attention network and the default mode network, the latter being more active when you are calm and inwardly focused.

“In this reflective state you are more likely to imagine and visualise things; you can find connections between information and memories. You are less focused on logical sequences and instead on broader associative connections that can help you encode things in a richer network.”

And visualisation is apparently the best way to memorise things.

Alais gives the example of how famous Roman orators from times before cue cards harnessed the power of visualisation to recite their extraordinarily lengthy public speeches utilising the default mode network of their brain.

“They would model the sequence of their speech off their house which they knew backwards. They would use this to create an order for their talk and in each room of the house they would mentally input a couple of object cues,” the University of Sydney professor explains.

“They only had to remember the sequence of their speech in global terms (e.g., the route they would take to walk around their house) and the rest of the information would flow on from there.

“The imagination is a powerful tool and it’s one that we don’t use enough.”

In order to reach this part of the brain Alais suggests we need to remove extraneous stimuli.

“In order to switch off your externally focused frontal lobe and achieve a more reflective headspace you can meditate, practice mindfulness, take a walk or listen to calming, ambient music.”

Music with lyrics and complex technical sequences is more distracting, making it harder to reach this reflective inner state as you will be focused on outside factors.

“You can’t ignore someone speaking to you, even through song; so often the logical part of your brain that you’re trying to use when you’re studying is conflicted. You’re detracting from your focus.”

Alais suggests avoiding music with lyrics or that compels you to move physically, “choose music that flows over you rather than grabbing you.”

Work over twerk, if you will.

Tunes can be even more distracting if you have a background in music, something Professor Alais can attest to having worked for six years as a live sound engineer while an undergraduate and PhD student.

“If you are musically trained, you are probably a very analytical listener. You will likely engage more with the music and analyse the rhythm, key, chord changes, instrumentation etc. Something ambient may be better for you to reach that inner default mode network. Or perhaps a genre that is outside your area of expertise.”

What about personality and music preference?

Only a small amount of research exists, but what’s there suggests people can be broadly categorised into three types: empathisers, systemisers and those considered a little bit of both.

Empathisers were found to enjoy pop music because it speaks to the emotions with lyrics and in using rhythm and beat to convey mood. This type of person enjoys the global effect of the music rather than isolating aspects of it. A systemiser, meanwhile, will be more scientific in approach and therefore enjoy complex forms of music like jazz or electronica which requires some effort to decode it.

So as you settle in for another study session, give an extra thought to the tunes you choose because it’s proven that listening to certain music can indeed help you out come exam time. For Professor Alais nothing beats the Bach cello suites.

*

Find out how you can study science at the University of Sydney. Contact OzTREKK Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston for more information at shannon@oztrekk.com.

Monday, June 12th, 2017

Sydney School of Public wants to know if dogs make people happier

The effect of dog ownership on adult human health is the focus of a new pilot study by the University of Sydney.

Sydney School of Public wants to know if dogs make people happier

Do dogs make people feel happy?

Led by Associate Professor Emmanuel Stamatakis from the Charles Perkins Centre and Sydney School of Public Health, the research team is seeking 100 non-dog owners to participate in the trial—people who are considering owning a dog as well as those who have no interest in doing so.

“Dog ownership is very popular in Australia with over 40 percent of households owning at least one dog,” Associate Professor Stamatakis said. “While anecdotal evidence suggests dog ownership is beneficial for human health, there is currently scant scientific evidence to back up this perception.

“Our research will provide valuable insight into the health benefits of dog ownership which could support programs promoting and enabling dog ownership as a means to increase physical activity, improve general health and prevent cardiovascular and mental illness.”

Differences in physical activity, cardiovascular and metabolic health, and psychosocial well-being will be assessed for three groups: participants who acquire a dog within one month, after an eight-month waiting period, or do not adopt at all.

Over the course of eight months, participants in the Physical & Affective Wellbeing Study of dog owners (PAWS) pilot will be asked to complete a small number of questionnaires over the phone and visit the Charles Perkins Centre or be visited at home three times for some simple physical measurements.

“These initial results will also inform the methods of a much larger trial, the first controlled trial to examine the health effect of ‘real world’ dog ownership,” Associate Professor Stamatakis explained.

What is public health?

Public health is society’s response to threats to the collective health of its citizens. Public health practitioners work to enhance and protect the health of populations by identifying their health problems and needs, and providing programs and services to address these needs. Studying in this field as an international student gives Canadians an understanding of the public health realm on an international scale, making Australia a top choice for Canadians.

At the Sydney School of Public Health, the Master of Public Health program is open to students from health and non-health backgrounds. Public health is

  • preventing disease;
  • promoting health; and
  • prolonging life.

Program: Master of Public Health
Location: Sydney, New South Wales
Semester intakes: March and July
Duration: 1 year
Application deadline: Candidates are encouraged to apply a minimum of three months prior to the program’s start date.

Entry Requirements: A successful applicant for admission to the program requires

  • a minimum four-year full time degree or equivalent qualification from the University of Sydney or an equivalent qualification; or
  • a shorter degree from the University of Sydney or an equivalent qualification, and non-degree professional qualifications and/or substantial relevant experience and/or other relevant qualifications.

Apply to the Sydney Public Health School!

*

If you have any questions about studying at the Sydney School of Public Health, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Public Health Schools Admissions Officer Adam Smith at adam@oztrekk.com.

Wednesday, May 10th, 2017

University of Sydney explains the value in a graduate certificate or diploma

When considering a postgraduate degree, the choice isn’t only deciding whether to do a master’s degree (coursework) or a PhD (research). There are other postgraduate study options that could help you achieve your goals.

University of Sydney explains the value in a graduate certificate or diploma

Learn more about how you can study at the University of Sydney

If you’ve been out of university for more than 10 years but are interested in returning to study, you should consider a graduate certificate or a graduate diploma—a great way to further your education and the perfect step toward obtaining a master’s degree.

A crucial question to ask yourself is what do you hope to achieve by pursuing postgraduate study? The University of Sydney examines reasons to help decide where postgraduate study could lead you.

At its core, a postgraduate qualification can provide opportunity to take the next step in your career by upskilling and deepening your knowledge of a chosen field, or even launching into a new career direction. It may also be the catalyst for you to expand your horizons or pursue a personal ambition. Your motivations for postgraduate study are a useful guide when choosing which course is for you. With this in mind, a graduate certificate or graduate diploma are valuable options to consider.

You can try out postgraduate study to your level of commitment

At first glance the key difference between a graduate certificate versus a graduate diploma versus a master’s degree is the duration. Generally speaking, a graduate certificate would take six months of full-time study, a graduate diploma one year, and a master’s degree one to two years.

What is often overlooked about a graduate certificate or diploma is that they are embedded qualifications, meaning they will count towards the higher qualification should you decide you’d like to expand your knowledge further. The units studied, and by extension your time and money, can all contribute towards the completion of the higher degree.

In effect these degrees give you more flexibility over your level of commitment. With a minimum of six months’ study, you can choose to complete your postgraduate qualification with a graduate certificate, or potentially progress to a diploma and/or master’s degree.

You can invest to your needs

Graduate certificates and graduate diplomas are usually a subset of the units offered in a master’s degree, which is part of the reason they are embedded courses.

A graduate certificate will typically offer you the essential or core units of study. This is a great option if you are looking to extend your existing knowledge base or upskill in a certain area.

Building on from the graduate certificate, a graduate diploma will provide you the additional units needed to expand or deepen your knowledge in your chosen study area. As a guide, a graduate diploma is typically one year of full-time study or 48 credit points. This is equivalent to what would constitute a major at the undergraduate level.

If you are looking to gain professional qualifications for your next job or to attain specialised knowledge and skills, then a master’s degree could be for you. Depending on the degree in question, you may be able to tailor the qualification to your specific interests with electives, or a research project and potentially gain entry into a PhD.

There’s no need to make the decision from the outset if you’re unsure. Start your study and gauge for yourself.

Not eligible to apply for a master’s degree? You can still start one! Not all pathways to a master’s degree are the same. If you have the intention of completing a master’s degree, but don’t meet the entry requirements, look to the embedded graduate certificate or graduate diploma. These qualifications tend to have different entry requirements to the master’s but can be considered for admission into the master’s degree upon successful completion.

Are you considering studying at the University of Sydney but not sure where to start? Contact OzTREKK at info@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355 to find out which study option is best for you!

Tuesday, April 11th, 2017

University of Sydney ranks number one in sport, physiotherapy and rehabilitation

The University of Sydney has been ranked first in the world in the recently released 2017 QS subject rankings for the new category that comprises physical therapy, sports therapy and rehabilitation.

University of Sydney ranks number one in sport, physiotherapy and rehabilitation

Deputy Dean (Strategy) Prof Michelle Lincoln, Dean Prof Kathryn Refshauge, and Deputy Dean (Academic) Prof Sharon Kilbreath celebrate the news (Photo: University of Sydney)

The subject areas are encompassed by a range of disciplines within the Sydney Faculty of Health Sciences.

“We are enormously proud to have been recognised in this way by our peers in academia and employers of our graduates,” said Dean of the Faculty of Health Sciences Professor Kathryn Refshauge.

The QS subject rankings score universities around the world on their reputation with employers and academics, as well as measuring the productivity and citation impact of the publications of academics (also called the ‘H-Index’) as an institution and citations per research paper.

“The QS rankings are a particularly rich ranking system because it takes into account all aspects of our work: education, research and employability of our graduates.

“These rankings reflect performance across the whole faculty, from professional staff to academics to students,” said Professor Refshauge.

The Faculty of Health Sciences offers a range of undergraduate and graduate entry courses in the disciplines included in the ranking category, such as exercise and sport science, exercise physiology, physiotherapy, occupational therapy, and speech pathology.

*

Are you interested in studying at the Sydney Faculty of Health Sciences? Contact OzTREKK Admissions Officer Krista McVeigh at krista@oztrekk.com for more information about your study options.