+ OzTrekk Educational Services Home
 
 

Posts Tagged ‘University of Sydney Veterinary School’

Wednesday, July 20th, 2016

Sydney Faculty of Veterinary Science experts help Indira the tiger

A team of experts at the University of Sydney Veterinary Teaching Hospital were recently visited by “Indira” the famous tiger to prepare for an operation to arrest her deteriorating eyesight.

“Indira,” who has appeared in numerous movies and TV series such as George of the Jungle and Anaconda, is in the care of Zambi Wildlife Retreat, which among other things provides a home for retired animals from the entertainment industry.

Anaesthesia specialist Dr Alastair Mair and radiologist Dr Mariano Makara at the University of Sydney’s veterinary teaching hospital collaborated with Taronga Zoo chief veterinarian Dr Larry Vogelnest and affiliate veterinary ophthalmologist Dr Cameron Whittaker to anaesthetise the tiger. Diagnostic imaging work including ultrasound, MRI and computerised tomographic CT/CAT scan took longer than exptected, so Indira will return for surgery in a few weeks’ time.

The hospital’s veterinary director, Professor Vanessa Barrs from the Sydney Faculty of Veterinary Science, said the multi-specialist team ensured the exotic animal received the best possible treatment.

“This is the first time in more than a decade that we have had a tiger in our facility,” Professor Barrs said.

Zambi director Donna Wilson said the 15-year-old Bengal tiger had been born at the Bullen’s Animal World facility and as a cub underwent cataract surgery with good results.

“Indira is a very quiet, happy girl who is exceptionally well behaved and easy to handle, but unfortunately her eyesight has deteriorated over the years to the point that she now walks into objects, falls into open ditches and at times has trouble finding her food,” Ms Wilson said.

Veterinary Science

The Sydney DVM aims to produce career ready graduates with excellent fundamental knowledge and skills in managing animal health and disease; and in protecting and advancing animal, human and environmental health and welfare locally and globally.

The program encourages enrolment of students from diverse backgrounds and aims to help them achieve their goals to become veterinary medical professionals in the global community. Teaching is research-driven to ensure students learn from the latest developments and advances in evidence-based practice, veterinary science research, animal behaviour and welfare science and veterinary public health.

Program: Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM)
Location: Sydney, New South Wales
Semester intake: March
Program duration: 4 years
Application deadline: September 14, 2016

Apply to the Sydney Veterinary School!

*

Wildlife Health

The Master of Wildlife Health and Population Management is an innovative program offered by the University of Sydney that provides holistic training in wildlife population management. Students will be taught by experts from academia, industry, and government in one of the most beautiful and ecologically diverse settings in the world yet will only be a short distance from the cosmopolitan and vibrant city of Sydney.

Program: Master of Wildlife Health and Population Management
Location: Sydney, New South Wales
Semester intake: March and July
Duration: 1 year
Application deadline: January 31 for the March intake; June 30 for the July intake. Applicants are strongly encouraged to apply as early as possible, as offers are made on a rolling basis and places are limited.

Apply to the University of Sydney!

*

Discover more about studying wildlife health or veterinary science! Please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Veterinary Schools Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Monday, July 11th, 2016

Giving horses a voice on painful nosebands

The first study to confirm stress responses when horses are prevented from moving their jaws has brought the spotlight on increasingly popular nosebands, with estimates that one in two horses competing in dressage, show-jumping and eventing cannot open their mouths because of tight-fitting nosebands.

University of Sydney veterinary School

Learn more about Sydney Veterinary School

A serious animal welfare issue for horses in equestrian events has been highlighted by new research from the Sydney Faculty of Veterinary Science.

This is the first study to show physiological stress responses when horses are prevented from moving their jaws.

The use of restrictive nosebands to bind together the jaws of sport horses is increasingly popular, with some estimates suggesting that half of the horses competing in dressage, show-jumping and eventing cannot open their mouths at all.

The study’s senior author, Professor Paul McGreevy, said the research shows how restrictive nosebands compromise natural behaviours and trigger a significant stress response in horses, which may violate the International Equestrian Federation’s (FEI) rule that nosebands are “never as tightly fixed so as to harm the horse.”

“In light of the current results, horse sport administrators may need to decide which oral behaviours they can afford to see eliminated in the name of sport,” the Sydney Veterinary School professor said.

“Tight nosebands can mask unacceptably rough riding. While wearing a bitted bridle, horses are highly motivated to open their mouths to find comfort, but in dressage competitions, this response attracts penalties.”

To avoid such penalties, many riders now crank the jaws together with a system of leather pulleys (a crank noseband). This device is permitted under noseband rules, written before cranking was conceived, even though it increases pain and discomfort from the bits. This increase in aversive pressure boosts the rider’s control of the horse, which is why such nosebands appeal not only to dressage riders but also to many show-jumpers and eventers.

Pressure from nosebands has been likened to pressure from a tourniquet and often exceeds levels associated in humans with tissue and nerve damage. Crank nosebands are padded to avoid cutting into the surface of the skin, but inside the mouth, they force the cheeks against naturally sharp molars and are associated with lacerations and ulcers.

“The horse’s challenge when managing discomfort from a single bit is magnified if it is required to accommodate two bits, as is common at the elite level in dressage,” said Professor McGreevy.

“For example, every dressage horse at Olympic level must compete with a double bridle which means there are two metal bits in its mouth, one of which is a lever that tightens a metal chain under the chin. The incentive for riders to bind these horses’ jaws together to prevent displays of resistance increases accordingly.”

The team from the University of Sydney has been studying the effects of noseband tightening on horses’ behaviour, cardiac responses and eye temperature (a proxy for physiological stress).

In a paper published recently in PLOS ONE, the team reports that tight nosebands profoundly reduce yawning, licking, chewing and, perhaps worst of all, swallowing in horses wearing a double bridle.

The unique study is also the first to show that when the nosebands are removed and yawning, chewing, licking and swallowing are no longer prevented, horses show more of these behaviours.

”This so-called post-inhibitory rebound reveals the fundamental importance of these oral comfort behaviours,” Professor McGreevy said.

Many manuals and older rule books propose two fingers be used as a spacer to guard against over-tightening but some fail to specify where these should be placed or the size of the fingers.

In light of the prevalence of noseband tightening, the International Society for Equitation Science has called for a limit on noseband tightening and for the routine use of a standardised taper gauge, proposing this would be good for horse welfare and the sustainability of the sports themselves.

Sydney Doctor of Veterinary Medicine

The Sydney Veterinary School’s DVM program encourages enrolment of students from diverse backgrounds and aims to help them achieve their goals to become veterinary medical professionals in the global community. Teaching is research-driven to ensure Sydney veterinary students will learn from the latest developments and advances in evidence-based practice, veterinary science research, animal behaviour and welfare science and veterinary public health.

Program title: Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM)
Location: Sydney, New South Wales
Semester intake: March
Program duration: 4 years

*

Would you like more information about Sydney Veterinary School? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Veterinary Schools Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Tuesday, June 14th, 2016

Indigenous Sydney veterinary student helping animals in the outback

“A connection with animals and land is deeply ingrained in my personality and who I am,” University of Sydney student Simone Armstrong explained. “As a child, we had a rottweiler. Animals were my family.”

Now in the second year of a Bachelor of Veterinary Biology /Doctor of Veterinary Medicine double degree, Armstrong’s passion is set to become her profession—although she’s in no hurry to leave the university, just yet.

Indigenous Sydney veterinary student helping animals in the outback

Simone took the time out of the busy program to recharge with regular puppy cuddles (Photo credit: University of Sydney)

The big discovery of veterinary science and Armstrong’s decision to make animals the focus of her career began in year 10.

“During subject selections I was flicking through a booklet and thinking what can I do,” she said.

It was her career adviser who urged her to pursue her animal aspirations.

“I still remember exactly where I was sitting when I was talking with my career adviser. He was amazing. He knew every single student by their first name. He was hugely influential. I’ll never forget him.”

Looking back, Armstrong says it was an impulsive but instinctive decision that has helped shape her future ever since.

“I took really strategic steps from there to ensure it was a good decision, and I’ve not ever regretted it.

“I feel like I’ve really tasted it [veterinary sciences] and discovered so many avenues of where this could potentially go.”

One of those avenues involved a trip to the Northern Territory in February this year.

With the support of her academic adviser and mentor, Associate Professor and Sub Dean of Indigenous Education at the Sydney Faculty of Veterinary Science Jaime Gongora, Armstrong participated in an animal management program with the group Animal Management in Rural and Remote Indigenous Communities (AMRRIC). The program stretched across three outback communities: Nyirripi, Yuelamu and Yuendumu.

AMRRIC is a not-for-profit charity that coordinates veterinary and education programs in Indigenous communities.

The organisation’s approach recognises the inextricable links between human, animal and environmental health and well-being.

The group’s team of staff, partners and volunteers made more than 250 visits to communities and numerous outstations over the past year, desexing more than 3,440 dogs, treating 12,150 dogs for parasites, and visiting more than 1,720 homes to consult with pet owners.

“Unlike previous animal management protocols, these programs respectfully treat animals,” Armstrong explained

“They build trust and strong connections, which is far more efficient in creating a healthier and happier environment for members of the community and the animals themselves.

“I was able to treat a large number of pets and pests while on my trip, and make some meaningful relationships which changed my life.”

Armstrong says it was both challenging and rewarding.

“I learned so much during this trip. Being accepted and invited into such a rich cultural community is inexpiable and something I will deeply miss—until next time.”

Back on campus, ‘intensely competitive’ are the words Armstrong used to describe getting into veterinary sciences at Sydney, a course which is ranked number one in Australia and nine globally in the 2016 QS Subject Rankings.

Indigenous student realises dreams helping animals in outback

Vet student Simone Armstrong desexes a dog in Northern Territory rural aboriginal community (Photo credit: University of Sydney)

Outside of the classroom, Armstrong makes time each week for one shift at Sydney Animal Hospitals.

“It’s really good for me because if I have anything tricky at uni, I can rack the vets’ brains.”

Armstrong says she finds working with fellow student nurses and talented vets immensely rewarding and inspiring.

So what’s the most surprising thing about uni?

“Maybe the fact that I’m happy to stay here for ages,” Armstrong candidly shared. “I want to stay at uni forever! Uni provides a platform where I can explore all my interests and passions.”

Aside from furry friends, Armstrong’s passions include rural Australia and indigenous education—which she has been able to explore at the university through both the AMRRIC program and in her role as a Student Ambassador.

The infectious animal lover has set her sights high and aims on studying a PhD after her double degree, doing “some sort of research.”

Eventually Armstrong wants a career in which she can combine her research aspirations with a clinical veterinary doctor position, but for now she’s quite comfortable right where she is.

Bachelor of Veterinary Biology/Doctor of Veterinary Medicine

The Bachelor of Veterinary Biology /Doctor of Veterinary Medicine is a 6-year program and allows students to enter into the veterinary program directly from high school. As it encompasses the biological sciences aspect of studies prior to the DVM portion, it is perfectly designed for recently graduated high school students who are high achieving and ready to become knowledgeable and successful veterinarians.

Program: Bachelor of Veterinary Biology /Doctor of Veterinary Medicine
Location: Sydney, New South Wales
Semester intake: March
Program duration: 6 years
Application deadline: It is recommended that students apply a minimum of three months prior to the program start date.

*

Find out more about veterinary sciences at Sydney. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Veterinary Schools Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com.

Friday, May 27th, 2016

Sydney vet students on exchange in Indonesia

For the second year running, the University of Gadjah Mada has collaborated with the University of Sydney to develop a successful exchange program between the veterinary faculties of the two universities.

This program saw four students (Charis Hii, Weiling Koh, Magalani Tan Liang and Anita Trinh) travel to Yogyakarta as part of the university’s Public Practice rotation for the final year of the Bachelor of Veterinary Science.

Sydney vet students on exchange in Indonesia

Sydney vet students on exchange in Indonesia (Photo: University of Sydney)

The four weeks encompassed sub-rotations involving visits to smallholder farmer collectives, Prof Soeparwi Hospital (the university’s small animal hospital), Balai Besar Veteriner Wates (the Central Disease Investigation Centre of Yo gyakarta), and the wet markets. The Sydney veterinary students quickly realised from their farm visits that “common things do [indeed] occur commonly,” with herd health problems similar to those of Australia—such as mastitis and parasitism and common small animal clinical presentations such as the “blocked cat” or the “itchy dog.”

The Sydney Veterinary School students were also very privileged to learn about notifiable diseases that present a public health risk in Indonesia, such as anthrax, brucellosis and avian influenza. These diseases were seen as a recurring issue on smallholder farms, within wet markets, on commercialised production systems and within the national disease investigation centres. Being able to discuss with the people affected on multiple platforms, gave the students a better perspective of public health as an integrated system of prevention, management and surveillance in Indonesia.

Throughout their stay, the students were graced with wonderful hospitality from the students and staff of the University of Gadjah Mada and have formed many friendships along the way. This program is highly recommended to any student willing to learn about veterinary medicine and public health in a developing country and are open to new and exciting cultural experiences.

This exchange program was led by Prof Aris Junaidi at the University of Gadjah Mada and A/Prof Jenny-Ann Toribio at the University of Sydney. Accommodation was kindly provided at the Faculty Guest House by UGM Dean Joko Prastowo.

Doctor of Veterinary Medicine at Sydney Veterinary School

The Sydney DVM is an exciting new graduate-entry veterinary program that is internationally recognised and accredited so graduates can work around the world.

Program: Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM)
Location: Sydney, New South Wales
Semester intake: February
Duration: 4 years
Application deadline: September 14, 2016

Entry requirements

Students can apply for a position into the Sydney DVM after completing any kind of bachelor degree at a recognized university, as long as program prerequisite units of study have been met.

Applicants must have completed the following prerequisite units of study at bachelor-degree level to be eligible for entry:

  • general chemistry (physical and inorganic)
  • organic chemistry
  • biology
  • biochemistry

The minimum GPA for entry is a 2.8 on a 4.0 scale; however, places are limited and there is a strict quota for this course. Entry is highly competitive so students who have achieved the minimum GPA (and other admission requirements) are then ranked on academic performance. The higher your GPA, the better your chances of receiving an offer.

Apply to the Sydney Veterinary School!

*

Learn more about Sydney Veterinary School! Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Veterinary Schools Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Friday, April 29th, 2016

You’re invited to join the Sydney Veterinary School webinar May 5!

Study Veterinary Medicine in Sydney, Australia!

Join the University of Sydney on May 5  for an informative webinar where you will find out everything about studying the Sydney DVM at the Sydney Veterinary School.

University of Sydney Veterinary School

Join the Sydney Vet School webinar May 5, 2016 (Photo: Sydney Uni)

Learn what makes the Sydney DVM program unique and why they are ranked number 1 in Australia and number 9 in the world for veterinary science (QS World Rankings 2016).

Date: Thursday, May 5, 2016
Time: 7 p.m. (Ontario)

This is your chance to ask questions about

  • what’s new and different in the program
  • what you will learn
  • how to plan your studies
  • what the opportunities are after you graduate
  • find out more about campus life

Register your participation by 5 p.m. Wednesday May 4: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/5089242775460249092

Doctor of Veterinary Medicine at Sydney Veterinary School

Program: Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM)
Location: Sydney, New South Wales
Semester intake: March
Program duration: 4 years
Application deadline: January 4, 2016; however it is recommended that students apply as soon as possible as this program can fill quickly.

Admissions Criteria/Entry Requirements for Canadians

Students can apply for a position into the Sydney DVM after completing any kind of bachelor degree at a recognized university, as long as program prerequisite units of study have been met.

Applicants must have completed the following prerequisite units of study at bachelor-degree level to be eligible for entry:

  • general chemistry (physical and inorganic)
  • organic chemistry
  • biology
  • biochemistry

The minimum GPA for entry is a 2.8 on a 4.0 scale; however, places are limited and there is a strict quota for this course. Entry is highly competitive so students who have achieved the minimum GPA (and other admission requirements) are then ranked on academic performance. The higher your GPA, the better your chances of receiving an offer.

Apply to the Sydney Veterinary School!

*

If you have questions about this webinar or about Sydney Veterinary School, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Veterinary Schools Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Friday, April 22nd, 2016

Sydney Veterinary Science ranked 9th in world in latest QS Rankings

The Sydney Faculty of Veterinary Science has been ranked ninth in the world and number one in Australia in the 2016 QS World University Rankings by Subject, cementing its position as a global leader in research and educational excellence.

The school’s core strength is their exceptional staff. Their dedicated work improves animal health, well-being and productivity and contributes to the unique roles of the profession in protecting human health, food supply and societal well-being. This work is more valuable than ever as veterinarians and animal scientists are increasingly acknowledged as playing vital roles in addressing the big issues the world faces: food security, animal conservation, control of emerging disease and protecting the health and welfare of animals.

University of Sydney Veterinary Science

Learn more about Sydney Veterinary Science

The veterinary school strives to provide the very best education in veterinary and animal science through bachelor’s degrees, postgraduate coursework, continuing education and research training. Alumni have shaped the professions locally, nationally and globally. Their sustained, stellar achievements in practice, public service, research, academia and the media provide the best advertisement for the success of Sydney’s programs.

Veterinary science is part of the University of Sydney’s rich tradition of excellence in pursuit of intellectual discovery. The university’s research portfolio is world class, enriched by links with the university’s research leaders in health sciences, science and agriculture and mature collaborations with government and industry research organizations. The mix of heritage and new buildings on the Camperdown campus and the rural campus at Camden reflect its history and ongoing renewal. The school’s farms, laboratories, hospitals, lecture theatres, computer facilities and accommodation provide well-equipped venues for cutting-edge research, teaching and clinical practice.

The Sydney Faculty of Veterinary Science veterinary teaching hospitals provide world-class clinical services and have the latest technology for the care of companion animals, wildlife, livestock and horses. These facilities allows the university to train the next generation of veterinary practitioners and specialists.

A career in veterinary or animal science offers remarkable opportunities and benefits and the university is dedicated to providing graduates with the best preparation for success. When you study with the University of Sydney you will also enjoy the great life that Sydney offers as a global city in a wonderful location.

Doctor of Veterinary Medicine

Program: Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM)
Location: Sydney, New South Wales
Semester intake: February
Program duration: 4 years
Application deadline: Candidates are encouraged to apply as soon as possible as this program can fill quickly.

Admissions Criteria/Entry Requirements for Canadians

Students can apply for a position into the Sydney DVM after completing any kind of bachelor degree at a recognized university, as long as program prerequisite units of study have been met.

Applicants must have completed the following prerequisite units of study at bachelor-degree level to be eligible for entry:

  • general chemistry (physical and inorganic)
  • organic chemistry
  • biology
  • biochemistry

The minimum GPA for entry is a 2.8 on a 4.0 scale; however, places are limited and there is a strict quota for this course. Entry is highly competitive so students who have achieved the minimum GPA (and other admission requirements) are then ranked on academic performance. The higher your GPA, the better your chances of receiving an offer.

Apply to the Sydney Veterinary School!

*

If you have questions about Sydney Veterinary School, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Veterinary Schools Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com.

Wednesday, April 6th, 2016

Man’s best friend is getting smaller

Australian pedigree dog lovers are choosing pugs and bulldogs over Labradors and German shepherds, analysis by University of Sydney researchers shows.

Published in Canine Genetics and Epidemiology, the findings reveal Australian fans of purebred dogs now favour small, brachycephalic breeds—with shorter and wider heads—which are more susceptible to respiratory problems, skin and eye conditions, and digestive disorders. The data on numbers of each breed registered are published each year by the Australian National Kennel Council (ANKC), and suggest veterinarians may need to prepare to treat more dogs with these conditions.

University of Sydney Veterinary School

Pugs are among the breeds predisposed to respiratory problems

The study investigated changes in the AKNC’s registration statistics between 1986 and 2013, examining trends in demand for Australian purebred dogs of various height, size and head shape.

The preference for smaller dogs correlates with a trend towards more high-density living, says one of the lead researchers Professor Paul McGreevy from the Sydney Faculty of Veterinary Science. Professor McGreevy co-authored the research with PhD candidate Kendy Teng.

“Changes in the types of dwellings Australians are buying may indicate the space available for dogs has shrunk. Moreover, the purpose of dog ownership has continued to shift from the early days of domestication, away from duties such as hunting and guarding properties, for which dogs are more likely to be larger, to pure companionship, which can be fulfilled by a dog of any size.”

Reasons behind the penchant for dogs with short, wide faces are less obvious but could reflect fashion, says Professor McGreevy.

“Other studies also indicate the infantile facial features commonly seen in brachycephalic dogs with their round faces, chubby cheeks, big eyes and small nose and mouth, stimulate feelings of affection in humans.”

Unfortunately, life expectancy among these popular breeds is an estimated four years lower than non-brachycephalic breeds. Brachycephalic Airway Obstruction Syndrome (BAOS) is particularly prevalent, often resulting in mild to life-threatening respiratory problems.

“A study in the UK shows half of owners of breeds susceptible to these health issues seem unaware of BAOS in their dogs,” says Professor McGreevy. “This implies owners did not make a fully informed decision when purchasing their brachycephalic dog, and that they may be unaware of treatment options when BAOS emerges, and that affected dogs may breed and pass the predisposition to BAOS onto future generations.”

Professor McGreevy and Kendy Teng co-wrote Trends in popularity of some morphological traits of purebred dogs in Australia with Dr Navneet Dhand and Dr Jenny-Ann Toribio, also from the Sydney Faculty of Veterinary Science.

The AKNC data used in the study accounted for 16.5 percent of newborn puppies in 2014 therefore may not be representative of the general dog population in Australia. It is more likely to better reflect trends in Australia’s purebred population.

Doctor of Veterinary Medicine at Sydney Veterinary School

Program: Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM)
Location: Sydney, New South Wales
Semester intake: February
Duration: 4 years
Application deadline: It is recommended that candidates apply a minimum of three months prior to the program start date.

Entry requirements

Students can apply for a position into the Sydney DVM after completing any kind of bachelor degree at a recognized university, as long as program prerequisite units of study have been met.

Applicants must have completed the following prerequisite units of study at bachelor-degree level to be eligible for entry:

  • general chemistry (physical and inorganic)
  • organic chemistry
  • biology
  • biochemistry

The minimum GPA for entry is a 2.8 on a 4.0 scale; however, places are limited and there is a strict quota for this course. Entry is highly competitive so students who have achieved the minimum GPA (and other admission requirements) are then ranked on academic performance. The higher your GPA, the better your chances of receiving an offer.

Apply to the Sydney Veterinary School!

*

If you have questions about Sydney Veterinary School, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Veterinary Schools Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com.

Thursday, March 10th, 2016

Sydney Veterinary School research and teaching facilities

All University of Sydney Veterinary School students are supported to develop their leadership skills and veterinary interests through academic and co-curricular activities. Campus life in both Sydney and Camden provides unique opportunities for personal growth, networking and exploration of career directions. The school supports and guides students as they learn and help them to meet the challenges of student life.

Sydney Veterinary School

Learn more about Sydney Veterinary School

Veterinary science is part of the university’s rich tradition of excellence in pursuit of intellectual discovery. Sydney Veterinary School’s research portfolio is world class, enriched by links with the university’s research leaders in health sciences, science and agriculture and mature collaborations with government and industry research organizations. The mix of heritage and new buildings on the Camperdown campus and rural campus at Camden reflect the university’s history and ongoing renewal. The school’s farms, laboratories, hospitals, lecture theatres, computer facilities and accommodation provide well-equipped venues for cutting-edge research, teaching and clinical practice.

Arthursleigh

Arthursleigh (7900 ha) is located at Marulan near Goulburn. The property was bequeathed to the university in July 1979 from the estate of the late Eric Thomas Wallis Holt, AFC. The farm is operated commercially, and used for teaching and research in pasture agronomy and animal science. It is a valuable teaching resource for the university as it allows access to wildlife areas and provides an ideal venue field trips.

Camden Farms

The University of Sydney operates three commercial dairy farms on the Cumberland Plain, southwest of Sydney. One of these farms is in the Camden area.

Corstorphine (named after a Scottish village by its original owner) lies on the banks of the Nepean River west of the historic village of Cobbitty. The farm supports 220 registered Holstein cows producing high-quality milk for the Sydney market. The deep alluvial soils are ideal for growing lush pastures required for milk production.

University of Sydney Veterinary Teaching Hospitals

There is a veterinary teaching hospital on campus at both Camden and Sydney, providing high-quality services to business and the public as well as exemplary stages for the teaching of clinical expertise.

The University Veterinary Teaching Hospital Camden is predominantly large animal focused, though caters for small animals as well. It contains a specialist equine and large animal centre, which is one of the largest equine hospitals in Australia and offers medical and surgical specialists who are available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

The University Veterinary Teaching Hospital Sydney is acclaimed internationally for its health care and welfare of small animals. It contains two state-of-the-art specialist centres, the Valentine Charlton Cat Centre, which is a showcase of best feline practice; and the Canine Teaching Hospital, which is Australia’s most advanced specialist canine veterinary facility.

Doctor of Veterinary Medicine

Program: Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM)
Location: Sydney, New South Wales
Semester intake: February
Program duration: 4 years
Application deadline: TBA. For the 2016 intake, the application deadline was January 4, 2016; however it is recommended that students apply as soon as possible as this program can fill quickly.

Admissions Criteria/Entry Requirements for Canadians

Students can apply for a position into the Sydney DVM after completing any kind of bachelor degree at a recognized university, as long as program prerequisite units of study have been met.

Applicants must have completed the following prerequisite units of study at bachelor-degree level to be eligible for entry:

  • general chemistry (physical and inorganic)
  • organic chemistry
  • biology
  • biochemistry

The minimum GPA for entry is a 2.8 on a 4.0 scale; however, places are limited and there is a strict quota for this course. Entry is highly competitive so students who have achieved the minimum GPA (and other admission requirements) are then ranked on academic performance. The higher your GPA, the better your chances of receiving an offer.

Apply to the Sydney Veterinary School!

*

If you have questions about Sydney Veterinary School, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Veterinary Schools Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com or 1-866-698-7355.

Friday, January 8th, 2016

Sydney Faculty of Veterinary Science launches crowdfunding campaign

A new crowdfunding initiative from the Sydney Faculty of Veterinary Science is seeking to raise $5,000 for vulnerable animals in need of veterinary care.

Every year, the University of Sydney’s,Veterinary Teaching Hospitals in Camperdown and Camden see hundreds of animals who require quality veterinary care but have no one who can pay for their treatment, including abandoned or stray dogs, animals belonging to homeless people or the elderly, and injured wildlife.

While the Faculty of Veterinary Science established the Animals in Need Fund in 2012, funding limitations meant they were only able to come to the aid of one animal a fortnight.

Now the Animals in Need fund is appealing to the public for donations through crowdfunding, joining with the University of Sydney‘s recently launched crowdfunding platform.

It’s also been a chance for them to raise awareness of their critical work in helping vulnerable animals thanks to their adorable new mascot and video starlet, “Brooklyn.”

The young British bulldog had a series of problems related to her urethra and uterus, requiring four operations, which she received with assistance from the Animals in Need Fund.

Now Brooklyn is on the mend, she has made a video to show off the university’s teaching hospitals and inspire donations.

The Sydney Crowdfunding platform launched last month and raised almost $13,000 to support Aboriginal students through the NSW Freedom Rides Scholarship Fund.

This was almost double the fund’s original goal of $7,000.

University of Sydney Director of Advancement Rosalind Ogilvie said she hoped the Animals in Need Fund would experience similar success.

“Our target is to raise $5,000 which means the Animals in Need Fund can assist in funding roughly one case a week, but we’d love to be able to do more,” Ms Ogilvie said.

“Without support from this fund, many animals would go without the vital care they need to survive and lead happy, healthy lives.”

Further crowdfunding campaigns are already in the pipeline for 2016 and will allow academics from across the university to talk about their research goals and appeal directly to the public to make their research hopes a reality.

To check out the Animals in Need Fund, go to http://sydney.edu.au/crowdfunding.

Sydney Doctor of Veterinary Medicine

The Sydney Veterinary School’s DVM program encourages enrolment of students from diverse backgrounds and aims to help them achieve their goals to become veterinary medical professionals in the global community. Teaching is research-driven to ensure Sydney veterinary students will learn from the latest developments and advances in evidence-based practice, veterinary science research, animal behaviour and welfare science and veterinary public health.

Program title: Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM)
Location: Sydney, New South Wales
Semester intake: March
Program duration: 4 years

*

Would you like more information about Sydney Veterinary School? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Veterinary Schools Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Wednesday, December 9th, 2015

Study vet medicine at the #1 vet school in Australia

According to the QS World University Rankings by Subject 2015, the University of Sydney is ranked 11th in the world and number one in Australia for veterinary science!

The University of Sydney strives to provide the very best education in veterinary medicine and animal science through bachelor’s degrees, postgraduate coursework, continuing education and research training. Sydney alumni have shaped professions locally, nationally and globally. Their sustained, stellar achievements in practice, public service, research, academia and the media provide the best advertisement for the success of the university’s programs.

All Sydney Uni students are supported to develop their leadership skills and veterinary interests through academic and co-curricular activities. Campus life in both Sydney and Camden provides unique opportunities for personal growth, networking and exploration of career directions. Students are always supported and guided as they learn and help them to meet the challenges of student life.

Doctor of Veterinary Medicine at Sydney Veterinary School

Program: Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM)
Location: Sydney, New South Wales
Semester intake: March
Program duration: 4 years
Application deadline: January 4, 2016; however it is recommended that students apply as soon as possible as this program can fill quickly.

Admissions Criteria/Entry Requirements for Canadians

Students can apply for a position into the Sydney DVM after completing any kind of bachelor degree at a recognized university, as long as program prerequisite units of study have been met.

Applicants must have completed the following prerequisite units of study at bachelor-degree level to be eligible for entry:

  • general chemistry (physical and inorganic)
  • organic chemistry
  • biology
  • biochemistry

The minimum GPA for entry is a 2.8 on a 4.0 scale; however, places are limited and there is a strict quota for this course. Entry is highly competitive so students who have achieved the minimum GPA (and other admission requirements) are then ranked on academic performance. The higher your GPA, the better your chances of receiving an offer.

Apply to the Sydney Veterinary School!

*

If you have questions about Sydney Veterinary School, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Veterinary Schools Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or 1-866-698-7355.