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Posts Tagged ‘University of Sydney Occupational Therapy School’

Tuesday, November 7th, 2017

6 interesting things about studying occupational therapy

The University of Sydney followed second-year Bachelor of Applied science (Occupational Therapy) student Clement Lim around on a typical day on campus to ask him 15 questions about studying occupational therapy—why he chose it, what he likes about it, and what surprised him most about university life.

Here are six things interesting things about studying occupational therapy at the University of Sydney from Clement.

1. Why he chose an occupational therapy degree

Studying occupational therapy can make a genuine difference to people’s lives. When why he chose an occupational therapy degree, he said his main reason was “to empower others in the best way I can.”

Sydney occupational therapy students learn to help people with disabilities and those recovering from injury or with ongoing conditions to overcome barriers that may be preventing them from participating more fully in life. Students also learn alternative techniques that help people to achieve a given task and facilitate skill improvement.

2. What he learns in the practical classes

Occupational therapy students participate in practical classes in the OT Annex at Cumberland campus.

“The OT Annex contains some of the mobility equipment and assistive devices that we will prescribe to our clients should they require it,” explained Clement. “These include wheelchairs, crutches, hoists, slide sheets, transfer boards, walkers, over-toilet aids, and modified utensils (just to name a few), which essentially allow clients to be able to live independently and safely in a dignified manner.

“In our lessons, we learn about the functions of the equipment, how to operate them, what are the safety considerations, and what are the conditions that may require the use of this equipment.”

3. What surprised him about being at university

Studying occupational therapy offers students a supportive environment in which to learn. They are taught by leading academics, clinicians and researchers who play an important role the healthcare community. The student experience at university is a time to learn, change, grow and for recent high school graduates, and it’s often an opportunity to become more independent. Clement said that he was most surprised by the autonomy that he now has as a university student.

4. How quickly he was able to undertake a placement

Clement has already been able to gain real-world experience during a clinical placement at Liverpool Hospital’s cardiology ward.

“As it was my first placement, I was involved in doing the initial assessments of the clients, where we find out information that is pertinent to the care of the client, so that we can be better informed and gain a holistic understanding of our client to provide the best form of care that is tailored to their needs.

“My placement also provided me with further insights onto the different cardiovascular diseases and their impacts, which are often devastating, and can be insidious at times. Notably, I also learn about the wider healthcare system in Sydney, and what are the different policies implemented that support both clients and healthcare professionals,” said Clement.

5. What is his favourite subject

Clement’s favourite subject is neuroscience—the study of the nervous system of the human body, which includes learning about the structures involved (anatomy) and their role in our daily life (physiology).

“Essentially, we learn in greater depth about the brain and the spinal cord, and how these structures contain many other smaller structures and pathways that are crucial for life and functioning, which when damaged, can lead to disastrous effects.

“We also learn about the different structures and organs in our face and how they work; namely the eye, the ear, and the vestibular system. It is interesting to see first-hand how our daily subconscious actions involved so many intricate and delicate operations within our nervous system, especially since they are often done without much conscious thought and may even be unbeknownst to us!” said Clement.

6. How much he loves studying with different people

As highly trained and valued professionals, occupational therapists work with a diverse range of people, including other healthcare professionals and clients from all walks of life. Clement has loved that he has been able to study and work alongside people from a diverse range of backgrounds from around Australia and the world.

“My classmates are awesome! Everyone helps and supports one another in our learning; which makes the learning environment a conducive and optimal one.

“It is always interesting and exciting to talk to them and hear their ideas during class participations, which contains many thought-provoking and novel perspectives. Consequently, the class becomes spirited and learning becomes lively!” said Clement.

6 interesting things about studying occupational therapy

Learn more about Sydney occupational therapy degrees

About Occupational Therapy Degrees at the University of Sydney

Students at the Faculty of Health Sciences learn how to thrive in complex health environments and build an understanding of how to work with other health professionals to provide the highest quality patient-centered care.

The Sydney Master of Occupational Therapy is very popular among Canadian students. During this two-year degree, you will cover a wide range of topics including theories of what people do in daily life and why; knowledge of the development of human capabilities (e.g., cognitive, motor, psychosocial) and the ways in which injury and illness typically disrupt them; activity and environmental analysis; and theories and techniques for promoting participation in daily life. As part of your studies, you will complete more 1,000 hours of clinical placements, providing the opportunity to apply your knowledge and gain hands-on experience with real clients.

Program: Master of Occupational Therapy
Location: Lidcombe, (suburb of Sydney), New South Wales
Semester intake: March each year
Duration: 2 years

The Bachelor of Applied Science (Occupational Therapy) program covers a wide range of topics including theories of what people do in daily life and why; knowledge of the development of human capabilities (e.g., cognitive, motor, psychosocial) and the ways in which injury and illness typically disrupt them; activity and environmental analysis; and theories and techniques for promoting participation in daily life. Professional practice is an integral part of the program, and fieldwork education consists of block placements and other guided learning experiences.

Program: Bachelor of Applied Science (Occupational Therapy) Honours
Location: Lidcombe, (suburb of Sydney), New South Wales
Semester intake: March each year
Duration: 4 years

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Do you have any questions about studying occupational therapy at the University of Sydney? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Occupational Therapy Schools Admissions Officer Heather Brown at heather@oztrekk.com.

Monday, January 30th, 2017

Sydney Master of Occupational Therapy students gain practical experience on placement

A group of Master of Occupational Therapy students recently completed an eight-week placement in Broken Hill, a mining town in the the New South Wales outback.

The students worked with local children as part of the placement experience required for the two-year graduate entry master’s program.

University of Sydney OT students gain practical experience on placement

Sydney OT students found their placement on Broken Hill extremely rewarding (Photo credit: University of Sydney)

Lydia Tu, who took part in the placement, said that being a part of a program that makes a difference in children’s lives is an experience she’ll never forget.

“Often children in Broken Hill can have developmental delays because of factors like exposure to lead in their environment. When this is coupled with a shortage in the health workforce, it can be very difficult for these children. It was great to work with the children and see immense improvements in them at the end of the program.”

“Fieldwork provides hands on experience with real clients in a supervised environment allowing students to combine academic study with the practical abilities required of the occupational therapy profession,” said Dr Merrolee Penman, Senior Lecturer of Workplace Integrated Learning at the Faculty of Health Sciences.

“The best part of the placement experience was working with the children,” said, Sharon Yi Heng. “It’s great to be able to watch the children develop the skills required for school performance, achieve their goals, and grow in confidence. It was such an amazing feeling and very rewarding.”

The focus on peer supervision throughout the placement period encouraged leadership skills and the opportunity to put their learning into practice in real-world situations.

“One of the most valuable experiences I had was the peer supervision. We had lots of autonomy, meaning we had to be very independent in making clinical decisions. I definitely learned how to think on my feet and be flexible in my therapy session plans,” said Sharon.

Occupational therapists work with their clients to overcome barriers that may be preventing them from participating more fully in life. This might involve teaching alternative techniques to achieve a given task, or facilitating improvement of skills. Occupational therapists collaborate with family and carers where needed, and typically work in teams with other health professionals.

“I had the opportunity to practice my clinical reasoning, and develop my own style of practice and approach which is really great,” said Lydia. “I have definitely gained some paediatric skills which include understanding some of the underlying factors that contribute to difficulties with handwriting, how to be creative and make things interesting to engage children, and how to communicate and be firm with children when needed.”

University of Sydney Master of Occupational Therapy

The Sydney Master of Occupational Therapy is very popular among Canadian students. During this two-year degree, you will cover a wide range of topics including theories of what people do in daily life and why; knowledge of the development of human capabilities (e.g., cognitive, motor, psychosocial) and the ways in which injury and illness typically disrupt them; activity and environmental analysis; and theories and techniques for promoting participation in daily life. As part of your studies, you will complete more 1,000 hours of clinical placements, providing the opportunity to apply your knowledge and gain hands-on experience with real clients.

Program: Master of Occupational Therapy (MOT)
Location: Lidcombe, (suburb of Sydney), New South Wales
Semester intake: March
Duration: 2 years
Application deadline: TBA. For the 2017 intake, the application deadline was September 30, 2016.

Apply to Sydney Occupational Therapy School!

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Rehabilitation Sciences Information Sessions

Interested in rehabilitation sciences? Then don’t miss the upcoming OzTREKK Rehabilitation Sciences Information Sessions. Enjoy refreshments and the opportunity to speak with Australian uni representatives and alumni to learn more about how you can study in Australia and practice in Canada!

Simon Fraser University
Date: January 31, 2017
Time: 5 p.m.
Location: Blusson Hall, Room 9655

Western University
Date: February 9, 2017
Time: 5:30 p.m.
Location: UCC, Room 210

Don’t forget to RSVP for the OzTREKK Rehabilitation Sciences Information Sessions.

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Do you have any questions about studying OT at the University of Sydney? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Occupational Therapy Schools Admissions Officer Krista McVeigh at krista@oztrekk.com.

Wednesday, November 2nd, 2016

Sydney OT students work with remote Aboriginal communities

Four students from the Sydney Faculty of Health Sciences have embarked on an opportunity to work with Aboriginal communities in the state’s far west.

A memorandum of understanding (MOU) was signed between the university and the Murdi Paaki Region Assembly (MPRA) in far west New South Wales which will see the Master of Occupational Therapy students develop innovative aged care service models for remote communities in the region.

Sydney OT students work with remote Aboriginal communities

Occupational therapy students arriving in Bourke (Photo: University of Sydney)

“Traditional models of aged care service delivery have had limited success within these communities,” said Master of Occupational Therapy student Rachel Brunker. “We need to find a feasible way to utilise and develop local services to allow elders to age on country and not be sent far from their families and community,” she said.

Rebecca Lebler, who is in her final year of the Sydney OT program, said occupational therapy is based on the foundation of person-centred practice.

“We are in an ideal position to identify the expectations of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in the Murdi Paaki communities in regards to culturally safe and accessible health services,” she said.

In August, the University of Sydney announced an ambitious service learning program offering students opportunities to engage in meaningful community service while applying the experience to their academic and personal development.

Through the program, local community leaders inform the university of the issues that they would like support in managing. Students are then engaged on working on these issues with the communities.

Mr Sam Jeffries, Chairperson, Murdi Paaki Regional Assembly said, “This is a unique opportunity available to us. We are happy to partner with Australia’s oldest university to deliver real gains for Aboriginal people in the state’s far west.”

Arriving in Bourke, Michelle Packham said the role in the first phase of the project will be to develop strong relationships with the community. “We want to ensure a long-lasting collaborative relationship between the University of Sydney and the Murdi Paaki communities,” she said.

Students Rebecca Lebler, Rachel Brunker, Michelle Packham and Janielle Jondral will be joined by students from the Faculty of Engineering and IT who will work on producing alternative energy solutions for remote communities.

Sydney Master of Occupational Therapy

The Sydney OT program offers a two-year, graduate-entry program. It is intended for students coming from an undergraduate degree in any field who wish to gain the requirements to become an occupational therapist. As the course leads to eligibility to practice, students will be assisted in achieving prescribed professional competencies through practical and theoretical skill acquisition and clinical fieldwork placements. Clinical placements are undertaken in both the public and private sectors. Students will have the opportunity to develop an understanding of the career path they have chosen, and its place in contemporary health.

Program: Master of Occupational Therapy
Location: Lidcombe, (suburb of Sydney), New South Wales
Semester intake: March each year
Duration: 2 years

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Find out more about the Sydney OT program. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Occupational Therapy Schools Admissions Officer Krista McVeigh at krista@oztrekk.com for more information.

Friday, October 21st, 2016

Sydney occupational therapy student advocates children’s rights to free play

“I chose the field of occupational therapy because I have always loved working with children with disabilities or physical ailments in orphanages and I could use play as an effective means and end goal in therapy,” said Mandi Mills, an international occupational therapy student from Colorado State University, speaking at a presentation earlier this month to staff and students from her home university, as well as those that hosted her at the Sydney Faculty of Health Sciences.

Sydney occupational therapy student advocates children's rights to free play

Sydney OT student Mandi Mills (Photo credit: University of Sydney)

Mandi’s presentation focused on a child’s right to play that practitioners can use within any environment. She drew on her international experiences, including her involvement on the University of Sydney’s Playground Project, to working as a pediatric occupational therapist in Colorado, and a recent visit to Indonesia at an inclusive school for children with disabilities.

Working on the Sydney Playground Project as part of a 12-week rotation, Mandi says play is difficult to define and a difficult concept to study. “Researchers of all disciplines have come together on this team because they believe children have great potential to play.”

The Sydney Playground Project, begun in 2009, is a multidisciplinary research project that adheres to the principle that play should be an integral part of children’s daily activities and the value of the many benefits associated with outdoor, non-structured play.

“The project aims to increase children’s physical activity, social skills and resilience through a simple, low-cost intervention that is carried out on the school playground,” said Senior Research Associate Jo Ragen. “Rather than adults scaffolding and structuring interventions for children to play, we wanted to find out how much children can do on their own without adult interaction.”

The research has found that children became more imaginative, creative, and social in their play adults stepped back and they were given loose-part play material, including items such as car and bike tires, wooden planks, cardboard boxes, hay bales and long tubes.

“The items are delivered to the playgrounds of participating primary schools located throughout the greater Sydney region and children (both typically developing and those with disabilities such as autism) are able to make their own decisions on what, where, or how they want to engage with each other and the materials,” said Jo Ragen.

Mandi says the Sydney Playground Project has shifted her thinking into working with a community or entire population, versus solely an individual client in a clinical setting. “Here, I am out on the playgrounds or at parks watching children interact with materials or each other, and constantly thinking about environmental influences.”

“I cannot thank the research team enough for this opportunity. I have had an amazing twelve weeks exploring the city of Sydney through my involvement with the Sydney Playground Project.”

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Learn more about studying occupational therapy. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Occupational Therapy Schools Admissions Officer Krista McVeigh at krista@oztrekk.com.

Tuesday, April 26th, 2016

Master of Occupational Therapy at the University of Sydney

The Sydney Master of Occupational Therapy prepares graduates for clinical practice in the profession of occupational therapy.

University of Sydney Occupational Therapy School

Study occupational therapy at the University of Sydney

Occupational therapists work with their clients to overcome barriers that may be preventing them from participating more fully in life. This might involve teaching alternative techniques to achieve a given task, or facilitating improvement of skills. Occupational therapists collaborate with family and carers where needed, and typically work in teams with other health professionals.

The occupational therapy course is a graduate-entry program (students are required to have completed an undergraduate degree prior to entry); however, the MOT is designed to accommodate all suitably qualified candidates regardless of their previous discipline. If you already have a background in health you will be able to take on electives of your choice, while those without such experience will be required to take prescribed electives.

As the course leads to eligibility to practice, students will be assisted in achieving prescribed professional competencies through practical and theoretical skill acquisition and clinical fieldwork placements. Clinical placements are undertaken in both the public and private sectors. Students will have the opportunity to develop an understanding of the career path they have chosen, and its place in contemporary health.

University of Sydney Master of Occupational Therapy

Program: Master of Occupational Therapy (MOT)
Location: Lidcombe, (suburb of Sydney), New South Wales
Semester intake: March
Duration: 2 years
Application deadline: September 30, 2016

Apply to the University of Sydney Occupational Therapy School!

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Do you have any questions about studying OT at the University of Sydney? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Occupational Therapy Schools Admissions Officer Krista McVeigh at krista@oztrekk.com.

Monday, December 7th, 2015

Sydney occupational therapy students help kindergartners

A new pilot program pairing occupational therapy students from the University of Sydney with kindergartners from western Sydney public schools has ended its first year with breakthrough results.

The Little Hands program, designed to help early primary school students develop their learning and fine motor skills, launched in term two this year at Bexley, Fairfield and Wattawa Heights Public Schools.

Sydney Occupational Therapy School

Sydney OT students are helping primary school students develop their fine motor skills (Photo credit: University of Sydney)

Over the course of 11 weeks, 20 student and alumni volunteers from the University of Sydney‘s Compass program assisted 180 kindergarten and year 1 students through fun occupational therapy activities based on the Fingergym™ Fine Motor Skills School Readiness Program.

After completing the program, 83 per cent of kindergarten and year 1 students showed improved fine motor skills, with 78 per cent reporting an improved ability to complete self-care tasks independently, such as dressing and shoelace-tying.

The pilot survey also revealed 100 per cent of teachers involved in the program reported a general improvement in their students’ gross and fine motor skills, confidence and focus in the classroom.

“Simple skills like the ability to hold a pencil correctly or cut with scissors underpin a child’s whole schooling and attitude to learning,” said Assistant Principal of Wattawa Heights Public School, Nitsa Comninos.

Teachers from participating schools also gained professional learning assistance from OT Kids NSW as part of the pilot to help their classroom readiness for occupational therapy activities.

“Having this structured program has been really beneficial because it broke down into five key areas what sorts of skills are needed and provided specific examples of activities to be incorporated in the classroom,” said Ms Comninos.

Parents were encouraged to participate in the Little Hands pilot, with 175 parents attending information sessions to equip them with the skills to practice with their children at home.

Wattawa Heights Public School parent Antoinette Mouzayek said the hands-on nature of the program meant students gained a newfound motivation to learn.

“It’s not like a normal lesson where children can get easily bored. The program is so quick and fun that the students don’t even realise they’re developing their fine motor skills,” she said.

“‘Little Hands’ teaches the skills that many parents assume their children already come to school with.”

First year Master of Teaching (Primary) student Jade Fogarty said volunteering with the program has helped her gain an appreciation of the importance of developing children’s fine motor skills, an area not often covered in traditional teacher training.

“Comparing the students’ abilities at the start of the program to several weeks in showed how helpful the ‘Little Hands’ program has been,” she said.

“I’ve learnt many techniques I can incorporate into the classroom in future and it has helped me recognise when students need improvement.”

‘Little Hands’ is set to continue from term one next year.

University of Sydney’s Master of Occupational Therapy

The University of Sydney offers a two-year, graduate-entry Master of Occupational Therapy program. It is intended for students coming from an undergraduate degree in any field who wish to gain the requirements to become an occupational therapist. As the course leads to eligibility to practice, students will be assisted in achieving prescribed professional competencies through practical and theoretical skill acquisition and clinical fieldwork placements. Clinical placements are undertaken in both the public and private sectors. Students will have the opportunity to develop an understanding of the career path they have chosen, and its place in contemporary health.

Program: Master of Occupational Therapy
Location: Lidcombe, (suburb of Sydney), New South Wales
Semester intake: March each year
Duration: 2 years

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Would you like more information about the University of Sydney occupational therapy program? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Occupational Therapy Schools Admissions Officer Jaime Notman at jaime@oztrekk.com.

Monday, July 13th, 2015

Sydney occupational therapy capstone experience

The Master of Occupational Therapy at the Sydney Occupational Therapy School is a graduate-entry program (students are required to have completed an undergraduate degree prior to entry); however, the MOT is designed to accommodate all suitably qualified candidates regardless of their previous discipline. If you already have a background in health, you will be able to take on electives of your choice, while those without such experience will be required to take prescribed electives.

University of Sydney Occupational Therapy School

Study occupational therapy at the University of Sydney

As the course leads to eligibility to practise, students will be assisted in achieving prescribed professional competencies through practical and theoretical skill acquisition and clinical fieldwork placements. Clinical placements are undertaken in both the public and private sectors. Students will have the opportunity to develop an understanding of the career path they have chosen, and its place in contemporary health.

Capstone experience

A number of clinical and professional fieldwork opportunities are scheduled as part of the Master of Occupational Therapy program. Fieldwork provides hands-on experience with real clients in a supervised environment allowing students to combine academic study with the practical abilities required of the occupational therapy profession.

As part of this course eligible students also have the opportunity to take part in the FHS Abroad program which involves academic study and a 4- to 6-week placement with non-government organisations and other development agencies in one of a small number of countries in South and Southeast Asia. This experience (valued at 6 credit points) enables students to gain a real understanding of global health and make a lasting difference to communities worldwide.

University of Sydney’s Master of Occupational Therapy (MOT)

Program: Master of Occupational Therapy (MOT)
Location: Lidcombe, (suburb of Sydney), New South Wales
Semester intake: March
Duration: 2 years
Application deadline: October 1, 2015

Entry Requirements

To be eligible to apply to this program, you must have

  • completed an undergraduate degree (Applicants without a degree in a health-related area are welcome to apply; if successful, these applicants complete prescribed units of study in anatomy and/or psychology as electives.);
  • achieved a minimum cumulative GPA of 4.5, which the University of Sydney states is approximately equivalent to a credit average or better. A credit average at the University of Sydney is between a 65% and 74%. Your grades assessed for admission are based on your highest-ranked university degree.

Apply to Sydney Occupational Therapy School!

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Do you have questions about Sydney Occupational Therapy School? Please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Occupational Therapy Schools Officer Jaime Notman at jaime@oztrekk.com, or phone toll free at 1-866-698-7355.

Friday, June 12th, 2015

Sydney Occupational Therapy School students as aspiring artists

Cumberland campus played host to aspiring artists recently at the annual Occupational Therapy Art Exhibition.

Art by final year Master of Occupational Therapy and Bachelor of Applied Science (OT) students was displayed at the event that saw almost 200 students, their families and faculty staff in attendance.

University Sydney Occupational Therapy School

Study OT at the University of Sydney

Students were asked to think about the occupational nature of communities and consider how people experience inclusion and participation in everyday life and present their findings as art.

There were three winning artworks as decided by popular vote:

10 kilometres, 5 hours, 20 kilograms: Walking for Water – Is it worth it?
Artists: Rebecca War and Sarah Rickard
This artwork depicts a girl’s quest through the mud to collect water in Sub-Saharan Africa
Medium used: Canvas, acrylic paint, impasto additive

One Click Saves Two Lives
Artists: Shi Yi Heng and Subahari Ravindran
This artwork depicts a telephone app that can save lives and support education for teen mothers in Zambia
Medium used: Samsung phone, stethoscope, plasma globe, blu tac, paper and color pencils

Diaspora: frustrated by a future in limbo
Artists: Rosie Beadman & Katy Goura
This artwork depicts the disruption to typical occupations of children, such as education and play due to civil unrest in Syria.
Medium used: Mixed Media (canvas, fabric, plastic, cardboard, wood, string, collage, lit inside)

Professor Patrick Brennan, who opened the event, spoke about the importance of this assessment and the contribution of activities like this to support learning about culture.

His sentiments were echoed by event organiser Dr Michelle Villeneuve: “This course component is an important part of the development of professional competence as an occupational therapist and would not be possible without the support of the Learning and Teaching team, especially the Associate Dean, Dr Corinne Caillaud.”

All of the artwork demonstrated the dedication that University of Sydney occupational therapy students put into researching the occupations of a community and communicating their findings creatively through a visual medium. The abstracts that accompanied the each work provided insight into issues of everyday participation in occupation of a community.

“In some instances, artwork explored how occupation united a community; in other instances artwork explored disruption to everyday occupation. In both instances, our students examined the impact on inclusion and participation of a community. It was wonderful to see how students learned about different cultural contexts and translated that learning into artwork and abstracts,” said Dr Villeneuve.

University of Sydney’s Master of Occupational Therapy (MOT)

Program: Master of Occupational Therapy (MOT)
Location: Lidcombe, (suburb of Sydney), New South Wales
Semester intake: March
Duration: 2 years
Application deadline: October 1, 2015

The University of Sydney offers a two-year, graduate-entry Master of Occupational Therapy program. It is intended for students coming from an undergraduate degree in any field who wish to gain the requirements to become an occupational therapist.

As the course leads to eligibility to practice, students will be assisted in achieving prescribed professional competencies through practical and theoretical skill acquisition and clinical fieldwork placements. Clinical placements are undertaken in both the public and private sectors. Students will have the opportunity to develop an understanding of the career path they have chosen, and its place in contemporary health.

Apply to the University of Sydney Occupational Therapy School!

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Do you have any questions about the University of Sydney occupational therapy program? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Occupational Therapy Schools Admissions Officer Jaime Notman at jaime@oztrekk.com, or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Friday, May 29th, 2015

Occupational therapy at the University of Sydney

Occupational therapy is a profession that focuses on enabling people’s full participation and meaning in life. It assists people to achieve their goals by focusing on their strengths rather than their restrictions or barriers.

The Discipline of Occupational Therapy is committed to quality research and education which will contribute to a greater understanding of human occupations—their roles, performance and adaptation—in order to enhance the knowledge base of the profession.

Occupational therapists work with their clients to overcome barriers that may be preventing them from participating more fully in life.

The University of Sydney offers a two-year, graduate-entry Master of Occupational Therapy program. It is intended for students coming from an undergraduate degree in any field who wish to gain the requirements to become an occupational therapist.

University of Sydney’s Master of Occupational Therapy

Program: Master of Occupational Therapy
Location: Lidcombe, (suburb of Sydney), New South Wales
Semester intake: March
Duration: 2 years
Application deadline: October 1, 2015

The University of Sydney offers a two-year, graduate-entry Master of Occupational Therapy program. It is intended for students coming from an undergraduate degree in any field who wish to gain the requirements to become an occupational therapist.

As the course leads to eligibility to practice, students will be assisted in achieving prescribed professional competencies through practical and theoretical skill acquisition and clinical fieldwork placements. Clinical placements are undertaken in both the public and private sectors. Students will have the opportunity to develop an understanding of the career path they have chosen, and its place in contemporary health.

Apply to the University of Sydney Occupational Therapy School!

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Do you have any questions about occupational therapy programs in Australia? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Occupational Therapy Schools Admissions Officer Jaime Notman at jaime@oztrekk.com, or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Thursday, April 9th, 2015

Sydney Occupational Therapy School applications are open

Applications for the University of Sydney Occupational Therapy School for the 2016 intake are officially open via OzTREKK!

Sydney Occupational Therapy School

Study occupational therapy at the beautiful Sydney Uni!

The discipline of occupational therapy is part of the Sydney Faculty of Health Sciences. University of Sydney occupational therapist graduates work in a wide variety of settings, from youth and community centres to community mental health and aged care services, hospitals, private practices, residential and policy bodies, just to name a few. Staff and students of the discipline are active in a number of research projects across a broad range of areas such as children’s play, ageing and adolescent mental health.

The University of Sydney Occupational Therapy School offers a two-year, graduate-entry Master of Occupational Therapy program. It is intended for students coming from an undergraduate degree in any field who wish to gain the requirements to become an occupational therapist.

This program aims to provide students with the professional competency requirements for occupational therapy practice. The program is a mix of core coursework- and fieldwork-based units, along with elective units. Fieldwork placements are scheduled in both years of the program, and typically take place in full-time blocks. The second year of the course is predominantly based in fieldwork settings with some on-campus attendance.

Program: Master of Occupational Therapy
Location: Sydney, New South Wales
Semester intake: February
Duration: 2 years
Application Deadline: TBC. For the 2015 intake, the application deadline was October 31, 2014.

Entry Requirements

To be eligible to apply to this program, you must have

  • completed an undergraduate degree (Applicants without a degree in a health-related area are welcome to apply; if successful, these applicants complete prescribed units of study in anatomy and/or psychology as electives.);
  • achieved a minimum cumulative GPA of 4.5, which the University of Sydney states is approximately equivalent to a credit average or better. A credit average at the University of Sydney is between a 65% and 74%. Your grades assessed for admission are based on your highest-ranked university degree.

Apply to Sydney Occupational Therapy School!

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Do you have questions about Sydney Occupational Therapy School? Please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Occupational Therapy Schools Officer Jaime Notman at jaime@oztrekk.com, or phone toll free at 1-866-698-7355.