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Posts Tagged ‘University of Sydney Nursing School’

Monday, July 17th, 2017

5 inside tips about studying nursing at the University of Sydney

First-year Bachelor of Nursing (Advanced Studies) student Mackenzie O’Toole agreed to answer 15 questions about studying nursing at the University of Sydney, including why she chose it, what she likes about it, and what surprised her most about university life.

5 reasons to study nursing at the University of Sydney

University of Sydney Nursing School

Here, Mackenzie discusses the five things she enjoys about studying nursing at the University of Sydney. To check out the full list, watch the video below, “15 questions with nursing student Mackenzie O’Toole.”

1. Where is the best spot at Sydney Nursing School?

Mackenzie’s favourite spot at Sydney Nursing School are the clinical simulation labs (SIM labs). The SIM labs are home to full-body manikins installed with the latest simulation technology. They provide a safe environment where students like Mackenzie can practice and improve their clinical skills while developing their confidence in the procedures they are learning in lectures.

Through simulated learning, students become proficient at

  • taking blood pressure
  • checking a pulse
  • listening to breath
  • heart and bowel sounds
  • dressing wounds
  • preparing and administering medications
  • conducting interviews, and
  • documenting patient information.

2. Why she chose a nursing degree

When asked why she chose a nursing degree, Mackenzie’s main reason was “to help others in need.” Nurses make a genuine difference to people’s lives. Mackenzie was also inspired by the nursing care she received when she contracted meningitis at just three months of age, an event that left her with hearing loss in one ear. Her passion for helping others grew from that point on. She wanted to treat others with the same care she had received.

3. How quickly she was able to undertake a placement

Mackenzie was amazed by how soon into her degree she was able to gain real-world experience in her placement. She was placed at Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, which is located only blocks away from the university campus.

From the first year of the Bachelor of Nursing (Advanced Studies) degree, students gain invaluable practical experience through 880 hours of clinical placements across a wide variety of healthcare settings including emergency departments, intensive care units, paediatric units, mental health facilities and community health centres. Students also have the opportunity to undertake a clinical placement overseas.

4. How supportive her lecturers have been

Sydney Nursing School offers students a supportive environment in which to learn. They are taught by leading academics, clinicians and researchers who are part of the nursing and healthcare community. Mackenzie found her lecturers to be “amazingly supportive.”

Helping students from day one through to graduation, the University of Sydney has a network of services, facilities and experts to make university experience as smooth and rewarding as possible.

5. How much she loves working with different people

As highly trained and valued professionals, nurses work with a diverse range of people, including other healthcare professionals and patients from all walks of life. Mackenzie has loved how she has been able to study and work alongside people from a diverse range of backgrounds from around Australia and the world.

Students learn how to thrive in complex health environments and will build an understanding of how to work with other health professionals to provide the highest quality patient-centered care.

Study Nursing at the University of Sydney

Sydney Nursing School has been ranked number one in Australia for research and educational excellence in the latest QS World University Rankings by Subject. Currently, the University of Sydney is ranked 9th in the world for nursing, according the QS World University Rankings by Subject 2017.

Program: Master of Nursing 
Location: Sydney, New South Wales
Intake: March 2018
Duration: 2 years
Application deadline: International applications are managed in rounds: Round 1 – May 25, 2017; Round 2 – August 17, 2017; Round 3 – October 6 2017

Apply to the University of Sydney Nursing School!

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Find out more about the programs offered at Sydney Nursing School! Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Nursing Schools Admissions Officer Adam Smith at adam@oztrekk.com.

Tuesday, January 17th, 2017

3 reasons why you should become a nurse specialist

Nursing is a career that has been, and will continue to be in high demand. In fact, it’s expected that Australia will have a significant shortfall of nurses in the next 10 years, with 85,000 less than will be required by 2025.* The increasing need for registered nurses and nurse specialists is due to the need for healthcare in general, driven by an ageing population, the rising cost of technology and treatment as well as rising consumer expectations.

Sydney Nursing School looks at the three big reasons why you might choose to specialise in a range of fields by undertaking postgraduate nursing studies.

3 reasons why you should become a nurse specialist

There is an increasing need for registered nurses and nurse specialists (Photo credit: University of Sydney)

Nurse specialists become leaders

Nurse specialists are increasingly needed to take on leadership positions, mentor new nurses and influence future health policy.

Students can choose to specialise in a range of areas including Cancer and Haematology, Clinical Trials Practice, Emergency, Intensive Care, Mental Health, Primary Health Care and Advanced Nursing Practice/Clinical Nursing.

“Through completing my masters I gained knowledge which gave me the confidence to create my current clinical nurse consultant role,” said former Master of Cancer and Haematology Nursing student Katrina Wilczek.

“My studies shaped my focus on areas such as leadership and roles within health services, and clarified my interests as a bone marrow transplant nurse.”

Specialist nursing offers career progression

Amanda Hunneybell, Master of Mental Health Nursing student said: “The qualification I will gain from my Master of Mental Health Nursing course will demonstrate my commitment to my field and significantly broaden my future employment opportunities.”

“I hope to apply for higher positions to help those most marginalised in our society, and inspire others to do the same.”

As a graduate of a specialist nursing degree, you can expect to progress your career through promotion and advance your salary by a minimum of 30 percent from that of an experienced registered nurse.**

Nursing specialists make a difference

It’s no secret that nurses play a major role in the overall health of the population. Not only do they care for patients on a daily basis, they also help teach local communities, improve patient care, act as advocates and provide counselling.

Master of Intensive Care Nursing student Unaani Mani said her long-term goals include working in an educational health institution to contribute to the production of quality and competent nurses her home country of Botswana.

“I am also looking forward to refining my skills in evidence-based practice through involvement in research and publication,” she said.

Registered nurses with specialised qualifications are highly sort after as health leaders. Sydney Nursing School, is the Australian leader in providing educational excellence in nursing*** and has been providing our Advanced Learning Masters programs to registered nurses who wish to become nurse specialists since 2011. Sydney’s postgraduate specialty programs are offered at master’s, graduate diploma and graduate certificate levels and offer you the opportunity to not only progress your career, but make a tangible difference in the lives of others.

*Health Workforce Australia 2014: Australia’s Future Health Workforce – Nurses Detailed.
**Industrial Relations Commission of NSW, Public Health System Nurses’ and Midwives’ (State) Award 2015.
***QS World University Rankings by Subject 2016

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Find out more about your study options at Sydney Nursing School. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Nursing Schools Admissions Officer Adam Smith at adam@oztrekk.com.

Friday, December 9th, 2016

Sydney Nursing School hosts mass casualty simulation

One hundred thirty-six Bachelor of Nursing students took part in a mass casualty simulation event recently.

Held at Sydney Nursing School’s Mallett Street Campus, the simulation is an interprofessional event that’s the culmination of the First-Line Interventions unit of study compulsory for all Bachelor of Nursing (Advanced Studies) students.

Sydney Nursing School hosts mass casualty simulation

Sydney Nursing School during its mass casualty simulation (Photo credit: University of Sydney)

Playing the role of both nurse and patient, students took part in two scenarios: a fire that has broken out in a hospital ward in which patients and staff members have been injured, and a 21st birthday party where the roof of the hall has collapsed and injured the party-goers.

Jane Currie, Unit Coordinator and Lecturer in Nursing at Sydney Nursing School, said students are completely immersed in the experience. “Students not only perform the role of nurse on the day, but also experience what it’s like to be a casualty.”

Some of the many symptoms students have to treat include seizures, burns, smoke inhalation, traumatic head injuries, and fractured bones.

Bachelor of Nursing (Advanced Studies) student Casey Baldock spoke about how the experience will be greatly beneficial when working as a registered nurse. “You can only learn so much in the clinical labs. Being really immersed in the scenario and working with real people with real symptoms reiterates what we’ve learnt and consolidates our clinical skills.”

The unit aims to provide student nurses with the skills and knowledge for them to participate in the care of patients in the out of hospital environment.

“The idea of it is to both embed and consolidate clinical skills and non-clinical skills such as teamwork, leadership and communication,” said Ms Currie.

Coming together to share their knowledge with the students were a team of paramedics, medical practitioners, nurses and second-year medical students. “This is the best possible practice the nursing students can do before they go into the workplace,” said Ms Currie.

Four doctors from Bankstown Hospital also joined in the simulation to facilitate and provide support and guidance to the nursing students.

“It’s a fantastic opportunity for nursing students to be involved in these type of disaster scenarios so that they are prepared in how to manage real-life emergency situations,” said Dr Lai Heng Foong, Emergency Department Staff Specialist from Bankstown Hospital.

This is the third year the simulation has been running at Sydney Nursing School, growing from 57 students in 2014.

Sydney Nursing School

Sydney Nursing School  has been ranked number one in Australia for research and educational excellence in the latest QS World University Rankings by Subject. Globally, a ranking of 13th was achieved, ahead of Yale and Columbia universities.

Program: Bachelor of Nursing (Advanced Studies)
Location: Sydney, New South Wales
Semester intake: March
Duration: 3 years
Application deadline: Candidates are encouraged to apply a minimum of three months prior to the program start date.
Entry requirements: Applicants must satisfy the university’s English language requirements for admission and have a high school diploma with at least a 66% average.

Apply to Sydney Nursing School!

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Find out more about the programs offered at Sydney Nursing School! Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Nursing Schools Admissions Officer Adam Smith at adam@oztrekk.com.

Tuesday, May 31st, 2016

Sydney Nursing School celebrates International Nurses Day 2016

International Nurses Day is celebrated each May 12—the birth date of Florence Nightingale, the founder of modern nursing.

This year’s theme was “Nurses: A Force for Change: Improving health systems’ resilience” and was celebrated by staff at the university’s Mallett Street campus with a pledge for nurses to continue to be an impetus for change.

Sydney Nursing School celebrates International Nurses Day 2016

Sydney Nursing School celebrates International Nurses Day 2016 (Photo credit: University of Sydney)

As the number one nursing school in Australia (QS Rankings by Subject, 2016) Sydney Nursing School expects their nursing graduates to contribute to improving health systems throughout their career.

Sydney Nursing School is a major force in securing the future of nursing and healthcare in Australia.

“Staff and students [at Sydney Nursing School] collaboratively engage in quality education and research that has impact on international policy and practice and aims to improve the health of all people and their communities” said Sydney Nursing School Dean Donna Waters.

This year, Sydney Nursing School awarded 30 scholarships to students from a range of backgrounds, and celebrated this at an event in April. Twelve of these scholarships were made possible by a generous $10.8 million donation from the Susan and Isaac Wakil Foundation.

More recently, the Wakil Foundation exceeded their generosity by giving the largest ever gift to the university—$35 million to enable construction of the Susan Wakil Health Building as Stage 1 of the new Health Precinct, due for completion in 2019.

Also this year, Sydney Nursing School extended its reach into Sydney’s growing western suburbs and welcomed a new cohort of graduate-entry masters students based at Westmead Hospital. Students studying at the Westmead Precinct are now experiencing learning in a new purpose-built clinical simulation lab on site.

Often at the forefront of health crises, nurses and the health systems they support respond, adapt and provide strength to individuals and communities when exposed to major shocks, including individual health threats through to outbreaks of disease, conflict or natural disasters. Sydney Nursing School continues to prepare nurses who able to adapt and respond to such health crises and is proud to celebrate International Nurses Day.

Study Nursing at the University of Sydney

Program: Master of Nursing
Location: Sydney, New South Wales
Semester intake: March
Duration: 2 years

Admissions Timeline

Round 1: May 26, 2016
Round 2: August 18, 2016
Round 3: October 6, 2016

Applicants who lodge an application and meet the academic requirements will be contacted directly by the faculty to attend an interview and sit a numeracy and literacy test. International applicants will be interviewed via Skype and conduct their test online with instructions given by the faculty.

Entry Requirements

A successful applicant for admission to the Master of Nursing

  • will hold a bachelor degree in a discipline other than nursing; and
  • will perform satisfactorily in an interview; and
  • will perform satisfactorily on an admissions test.

Applicants who successfully meet the admission criteria will receive a conditional offer and an invitation to undertake an interview and literacy and numeracy tests. Literacy and numeracy tests for international students will be undertaken online and interviews will be held via Skype.

Apply to Sydney Nursing School!

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If you have any questions about Sydney Nursing School, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Nursing Schools Admissions Officer Adam Smith at adam@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Monday, April 11th, 2016

Sydney Nursing School is number one in Australia

Sydney Nursing School has been ranked number one in Australia for research and educational excellence in the latest QS World University Rankings by Subject.

University of Sydney Nursing School

Sydney Nursing School is number one in Australia

Globally, a ranking of 13th was achieved, ahead of Yale and Columbia universities.

“The University of Sydney expects excellence from staff and students and it is a testament to this expectation that we have achieved the number one ranking for nursing in Australia in the latest QS ranking,s” said Sydney Nursing School Dean Professor Donna Waters.

“This achievement is the result of a common vision to creatively sustain a vibrant, respectful environment in which staff and students collaboratively engage in quality education and research that has impact on international policy and practice and aims to improve the health of all people and their communities.”

Sydney Nursing School will continue to excel in education and research excellence with the aim of returning a world top three result in the future.

“I think we have a clear mandate to make this our goal,” said Professor Waters.

University of Sydney Nursing School

Studying nursing at the University of Sydney provides students access to teaching and research across all the health professions in an academically rigorous yet stimulating and supportive environment. Learning from world experts and studying alongside students from other health professions gives Sydney nursing students unique educational perspectives and inter-disciplinary practice experiences, appropriately preparing them for the complexities, challenges and rewards of health care.

Program: Master of Nursing
Location: Sydney, New South Wales
Semester intake: March
Duration: 2 years

Entry requirements

A successful applicant

  • will hold a bachelor degree in a discipline other than nursing; and
  • will perform satisfactorily in an interview; and
  • will perform satisfactorily on an admissions test.

Applicants who successfully meet the admission criteria will receive a conditional offer and an invitation to undertake an interview and literacy and numeracy tests. Literacy and numeracy tests for international students will be undertaken online and interviews will be held via Skype.

Apply to Sydney Nursing School!

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If you have any questions about Sydney Nursing School, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Nursing Schools Admissions Officer Adam Smith at 1-866-698-7355 or adam@oztrekk.com.

Monday, March 21st, 2016

Activity monitoring devices could become instrumental in cardiac rehabilitation

Cardiovascular researchers from the University of Sydney have found that Fitbit, the popular physical activity monitoring device, is a valid and reliable way of monitoring physical activity for cardiac patients.

Published in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, the study found that Fitbit-Flex accurately identified whether patients met physical activity guideline recommendations, such as number of steps per day.

University of Sydney Nursing School

Physical activity has been proven to aid cardiovascular health

“The use of devices such as Fitbit offers valuable data for clinicians and researchers working in cardiac rehabilitation programs to monitor, evaluate and encourage their patient’s physical activity levels,” said senior author Professor Robyn Gallagher, from the university’s Charles Perkins Centre and Sydney Nursing School.

“Physical activity is a major component in a cardiac rehabilitation program and is key to a patient’s recovery from coronary heart disease (CHD).

“A substantial body of evidence shows that an increase in physical activity levels results in significant improvements in many well-known CHD risk factors including obesity, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, insulin resistance and psychological health.

“Physical activity appears to prevent heart disease from progressing so is the cornerstone of prevention of further cardiac events,” she said.

Whilst Fitbit-Flex is one of the most popular wearable devices currently available to measure physical activity, very little research has been conducted on its accuracy.

To ascertain the reliability of Fitbit devices and evaluate their effectiveness for monitoring the physical activity of cardiac patients, the researchers evaluated 48 patients and family members participating in community-based exercise programs. The 48 participants wore the device over four days to monitor daily step counts and minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA).

Lead author Muaddi Alharbi, undertaking this work for his PhD, said that these devices are more accurate and useful than standard pedometers because they detect different types of activity and can transmit information real-time to patients and staff.

“Fitbit provides a good patient-doctor partnership and helps doctors and clinicians to work with patients more effectively, leading to better treatments and outcomes,” he said.

“Activity tracking offers researchers and clinicians the potential to influence physical activity behaviour change in their patients in order to maximise their recovery.”

The study was conducted by University of Sydney researchers Professor Robyn Gallagher, Muaddi Alharbi, Professor Adrian Bauman and Dr Lis Neubeck.

Study Nursing at the University of Sydney

Program: Master of Nursing
Location: Sydney, New South Wales
Semester intake: March
Duration: 2 years

Entry Requirements

A successful applicant for admission to the Master of Nursing

  • will hold a bachelor degree in a discipline other than nursing; and
  • will perform satisfactorily in an interview; and
  • will perform satisfactorily on an admissions test.

Applicants who successfully meet the admission criteria will receive a conditional offer and an invitation to undertake an interview and literacy and numeracy tests. Literacy and numeracy tests for international students will be undertaken online and interviews will be held via Skype.

Apply to Sydney Nursing School!

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If you have any questions about Sydney Nursing School, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Nursing Schools Admissions Officer Adam Smith at adam@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Wednesday, February 24th, 2016

Sydney Nursing School gets new clinical simulation lab

Sydney Nursing School’s new clinical simulation lab is in the final stage of completion in time for the first cohort of Master of Nursing (Graduate Entry) students beginning in semester 1.

University of Sydney Nursing School

Study at the Sydney Nursing School

The lab will be the practical learning hub for over 30 students enrolled in the graduate-entry course, based at the University of Sydney Westmead campus.

Nursing students undertake more than 800 hours of clinical practice, in addition to professional learning and lectures at the Westmead precinct during the two-year course.

“In the clinical simulation lab, students will have the opportunity to learn a range of clinical skills such as hand decontamination, wound dressings, catheterisation, medication administration and intravenous therapy,” said Dr Jacqueline Bloomfield, Associate Dean (Education) Sydney Nursing School.

“Students are supervised in the lab, but are also encouraged to engage in independent learning through practice sessions.”

The clinical simulation lab is part of the university’s commitment to promoting health education and research in Western Sydney.

“The Faculties of Medicine and Dentistry have been at Westmead for over 25 years. It’s really exciting that nursing can now join our colleagues in exploring multidisciplinary approaches to improving health and health care at this precinct,” said Sydney Nursing School Dean Donna Waters.

“The cohort of nursing students studying at Westmead will be offered the same world-class teaching as that already offered at Sydney Nursing School’s Mallet Street campus.”

The new students will be welcomed to the Westmead Precinct during an official launch on Wednesday, March 2. University of Sydney Vice Chancellor Dr Michael Spence will address staff and students and officially open the clinical simulation space.

University of Sydney Nursing School

Studying at the Sydney Nursing School provides students access to teaching and research across all the health professions in an academically rigorous yet stimulating and supportive environment. Learning from world experts and studying alongside students from other health professions gives Sydney nursing students unique educational perspectives and inter-disciplinary practice experiences, appropriately preparing them for the complexities, challenges and rewards of health care.

Program: Master of Nursing
Location: Sydney, New South Wales
Semester intake: March
Duration: 2 years
Application deadline: TBA. For the 2016 intake, the application deadline was October 2, 2015.

Entry Requirements

A successful applicant for admission to the Master of Nursing

  • will hold a bachelor degree in a discipline other than nursing; and
  • will perform satisfactorily in an interview; and
  • will perform satisfactorily on an admissions test.

Applicants who successfully meet the admission criteria will receive a conditional offer and an invitation to undertake an interview and literacy and numeracy tests. Literacy and numeracy tests for international students will be undertaken online and interviews will be held via Skype.

Apply to Sydney Nursing School!

*

If you have any questions about Sydney Nursing School, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Nursing Schools Admissions Officer Adam Smith at adam@oztrekk.com.

Friday, November 20th, 2015

Sydney Nursing School at the heart of cardiovascular research

Top researchers from the University of Sydney Nursing School have been awarded a $200,000 grant to further their research in preventing stroke through early detection of atrial fibrillation via technologies such as smartphones.

Dr Lis Neubeck, Professor Robyn Gallagher, and Dr Nicole Lowres from Sydney Nursing School, and Professor Ben Freedman, Sydney Medical School, were awarded the grant at the NSW Cardiovascular Research Network State of the Heart Showcase and Awards ceremony this week hosted by NSW Minister for Health, the Hon. Jillian Skinner MP.

University of Sydney Nursing School

Sydney Nursing School Dean Donna Waters with grant recipients Lis Neubeck and Robyn Gallagher (Photo credit: University of Sydney)

Led by Dr Lis Neubeck, their research focuses on diagnosing an irregular heart rhythm (atrial fibrillation), which causes blood clots to form in the heart and travel to the brain to cause a stroke.

“It’s been shown that strokes can be prevented through early identification of atrial fibrillation (AF) and up to two-thirds of people with AF don’t know they have it,” Dr Neubeck explains.

“We need a way to find people who have asymptomatic AF before they get a stroke, since treatments with blood thinning medications are very effective in preventing strokes.”

The team have pioneered a handheld smartphone electrocardiograph (iECG) device to screen for unknown asymptomatic AF in pharmacies.

“The simplest way of testing for atrial fibrillation is a pulse check, but it is not a very sensitive method. As an alternative, we’ve been investigating an electrocardiogram (ECG) device which attaches to a smartphone. In just 30 seconds, the hand-held device can check the ECG and tell if the rhythm is likely to be atrial fibrillation.”

Dr Neubeck and colleagues have previously shown how the device can be used by community pharmacists and practice nurses to screen for atrial fibrillation. Their future research will focus on translation of this research into real-world practice.

“International guidelines suggest everyone over 65 should have a check-up to see if they have AF, since it’s when your risk goes up,” Dr Neubeck said.

“Screening with a smartphone device is quick and cost effective, so suitable to use as part of a national screening program for atrial fibrillation—which is necessary to prevent stroke deaths. Screening for AF in this way could prevent thousands of strokes every year.”

Atrial fibrillation affects five percent of people over 65 and while early identification has been shown to prevent strokes, screening is rarely implemented. One in three strokes is AF-related, and the associated annual health system cost is $874 million.

Together with partners from the George Institute for Global Health, UTS, UNSW, and the NSW Agency for Clinical Innovation, the research network led by Dr Neubeck will develop ways to scale the intervention, so the maximum numbers of strokes can be prevented.

Cardiovascular disease remains a major health concern for NSW claiming the lives of women, men and children, with thirty per cent of all deaths in NSW currently attributable to cardiovascular disease.

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If you have any questions about Sydney Nursing School, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Nursing Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Wednesday, September 16th, 2015

Sydney Nursing School researchers honoured

Outstanding contribution and commitment to nursing recognised

University of Sydney Nursing School Associate Professor Kate Curtis has won Nurse of the Year in Research and Innovation at the 2015 NSW Health Excellence in Nursing and Midwifery Awards, for her outstanding contribution and commitment to improving the lives of major trauma patients and their families.

University of Sydney Nursing School

Associate Professor Kate Curtis awarded Nurse of the Year in Research and Innovation (Photo credit: University of Sydney)

The 2015 NSW Health Excellence in Nursing and Midwifery Awards recognise the significant contribution of nurses and midwives in improving the health of the community through their professional practice and commitment to their professions.

The winners were announced by the Hon. Jillian Skinner MP, NSW Minister for Health, and the Chief Nurse of NSW at a ceremony held at State Parliament House.

Kate Curtis is an internationally renowned emergency and trauma nurse researcher and practicing trauma nurse. The trauma case management model of care validated by Kate has been implemented in trauma centres in Australia and worldwide.

Major injury in children is a life changing event for the child, their parents, caregivers and wider family.  Injury is a major cause of hospitalisation of Australia’s children, with more than 1,000 children hospitalised after sustaining an injury every week. The number of children hospitalised after injury is double those hospitalised for asthma, diabetes and cancer combined.

Kate’s mentorship of clinicians to translate their research into practice, and the ongoing impact of the research she leads into improving emergency and trauma care and was recognised at the awards.

“To receive this award is an honour, there are so many deserving nurses conducting and implementing their research that improves the way we provide care for our patients,” said Associate Professor Curtis.

Kate currently leads the multi-disciplinary Paediatric Critical Injury Research Program, the first of its kind in Australia, which consists of seven research projects and is funded by numerous stakeholders including the Day of Difference, Thyne Reid Foundation, NHMRC and the Agency for Clinical Innovation. Kate and her team work closely with NSW Ambulance, NSW Institute of Trauma and Injury Management, the clinicians in Australia’s paediatric trauma centres and parents of injured children.

Sandie Bredemeyer, affiliate of Sydney Nursing School, was awarded the Judith Meppem Lifetime Achievement Award for her strong leadership and commitment to improved health outcomes as a neonatal nurse. Sandie has previously been awarded an OAM and is a registered nurse and midwife with 35 years of experience with a background in newborn care, paediatric nursing and midwifery.

Dean of Sydney Nursing School Professor Donna Waters said the faculty is so proud of Kate and Sandie. “Both are more than deserving of having their contribution recognized and celebrated through the 2015 NSW Health Excellence in Nursing and Midwifery Awards. We offer them our warmest congratulations,” she said.

University of Sydney Nursing School

Studying nursing at the University of Sydney provides students access to teaching and research across all the health professions in an academically rigorous yet stimulating and supportive environment. Learning from world experts and studying alongside students from other health professions gives Sydney nursing students unique educational perspectives and inter-disciplinary practice experiences, appropriately preparing them for the complexities, challenges and rewards of health care.

Program: Master of Nursing
Location: Sydney, New South Wales
Semester intake: March
Duration: 2 years
Application Deadline: October 2, 2015

Entry Requirements

A successful applicant for admission to the Master of Nursing

  • will hold a bachelor degree in a discipline other than nursing; and
  • will perform satisfactorily in an interview; and
  • will perform satisfactorily on an admissions test.

Applicants who successfully meet the admission criteria will receive a conditional offer and an invitation to undertake an interview and literacy and numeracy tests. Literacy and numeracy tests for international students will be undertaken online and interviews will be held via Skype.

Apply to Sydney Nursing School!

*

If you have any questions about Sydney Nursing School, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Nursing Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Wednesday, July 15th, 2015

Research in nursing and midwifery celebrated

Sydney Nursing School held its annual Nursing and Midwifery event at the Charles Perkins Centre on Tuesday, June 30.

The event showcased the crucial role that nursing plays in the healthcare system, and highlighted the research strengths of academics and students who are working on the ground in communities in Sydney, across Australia and internationally.

University of Sydney Nursing School

Sydney Nursing School held its annual Nursing and Midwifery event at the Charles Perkins Centre on June 30 (Photo credit: University of Sydney)

In her opening remarks, the Dean of Sydney Nursing School Professor Donna Waters emphasised the breadth of work conducted by the faculty, “the research and the scholarship that is undertaken in the Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery is quite multi-faceted and quite varied, much like the health system itself.”

Vice Chancellor Dr Michael Spence spoke about the changes that the nursing and health professions have undergone at the university in the past seven years: “Like the rest of the world, we had a very illness-focused understanding of health, a very doctor-centric and a very hospital-centric approach to health… we knew that that model of healthcare was simply unsustainable and had reached the limits of its clinical effectiveness.”

Dr Spence congratulated the faculty and its committed supporters in the profession, the community and from donors.

“People get the fact that it is critical to the future of the healthcare systems that these professions [nursing and midwifery] thrive,” he said.

Tuesday night’s event brought together hospital and community health representatives, government, current higher degree research students, academic colleagues, donors, alumni and faculty staff.

PhD students Tara Flemington and Rebecca Ogilvie gave presentations of their work, as did Senior Lecturer Dr Thomas Buckley. The presentations demonstrated the diverse research activity undertaken by academics and students within the Sydney Nursing School, and showed how this work continues to contribute to real-world change in health policy.

Associate Professor Ross Steele (AM) spoke about the recent $10.8 million dollar donation to the Nursing School by Susan and Isaac Wakil, the largest ever donation to a nursing school in Australia. The donation will establish 12 scholarships in perpetuity with some reserved specifically for rural, regional and indigenous students.

Study nursing at the University of Sydney

Program: Master of Nursing
Location: Sydney, New South Wales
Semester intake: March
Duration: 2 years
Application Deadline: October 2, 2015

Entry Requirements

A successful applicant for admission to the Master of Nursing

  • will hold a bachelor degree in a discipline other than nursing; and
  • will perform satisfactorily in an interview; and
  • will perform satisfactorily on an admissions test.

Applicants who successfully meet the admission criteria will receive a conditional offer and an invitation to undertake an interview and literacy and numeracy tests. Literacy and numeracy tests for international students will be undertaken online and interviews will be held via Skype.

Apply to Sydney Nursing School!

*

If you have any questions about Sydney Nursing School, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Nursing Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.