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Posts Tagged ‘University of Queensland’

Tuesday, March 21st, 2017

UQ School of Veterinary Science supports international students

Moving to a new country can be daunting. So can starting at a new university, and doing both at once can be a real challenge! The UQ School of Veterinary Science helps international students make a smooth and successful transition to life and studying on Gatton Campus.

UQ vet science supports international students

UQ School of Veterinary Science supports its international students! (Photo: UQ)

International student representatives

In each year of the Bachelor of Veterinary Science (Hons) program, two international year representatives are elected. They provide a collective voice for international students in a single year and are the first contact for international student issues. The international year representatives also discuss international student issues with the veterinary school international student mentor, organise international students’ events and provide mentoring services to international students.

Email addresses for international year representatives will also be provided to international students of each year.

International student representatives

  • communicate any international students issues directly with the international student mentor;
  • develop and maintain an international student Facebook page;
  • help organise events;
  • are involved in the international student peer-support/mentoring.

Peer support for international students

An international (peer) mentor is a current student who volunteers their time to help new students settle into life in Gatton and study at the UQ School of Veterinary Science.  All new students have to make adjustments to be successful at university.  Mentors provide peer support and thus a student’s perspective of university life by sharing their experiences, challenges and insights.  The international student mentors are a mix of local and international students working together to assist new students from the time they arrive in Australia, attend orientation and throughout the semester.

Academic mentor for international students

Dr Joerg Henning is the International Student Mentor at the School of Veterinary Science. He liaises directly with international students and international student representatives and provides support, guidance and advice on any issues that might be important for international students.

UQ Bachelor of Veterinary Science Honours

The vet program at the University of Queensland is one of the most sought after in Australia, attracting the very best students and producing veterinarians that are in high demand, both domestically and internationally. The university’s Bachelor of Veterinary Science provides the broadest base in the biological sciences of any undergraduate course and provides a very wide range of career options as well as its professional qualifications, enabling graduates to practice veterinary medicine and surgery.

Program: Bachelor of Veterinary Science (Honours)
Location: Gatton, Queensland
Semester intake: February
Duration: 5 years
Application deadline: UQ Veterinary School has a general application deadline of November 30; however, late applications may be accepted. It is strongly recommended that students apply a minimum of three months prior to the program’s start date.

Apply to UQ Veterinary School!

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If you have any questions about UQ Veterinary School, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Veterinary Schools Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com or at 1-866-698-7355.

Tuesday, March 14th, 2017

UQ physiotherapy aims to improve mobility of multiple sclerosis sufferers

An international team of researchers is trialing specially designed shoe insoles aimed at improving the mobility of people with multiple sclerosis (MS).

The study, led by UQ School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences physiotherapy lecturer Dr Anna Hatton, is seeking 176 people affected by MS to take part in a three month trial of the insoles.

UQ physiotherapy aims to improve mobility of multiple sclerosis sufferers

Study physiotherapy at the UQ SHRS!

“Many people with MS experience problems with walking which can make day-to-day activities difficult and often leads to falls, so improving walking ability is of primary importance in maintaining health, independence, and quality of life,” Dr Hatton said.

“Evidence suggests that wearing textured shoe insoles, which are designed to stimulate receptors on the soles of the feet, may be one possible option to help improve gait.

“We now need people with MS to help us investigate whether the novel insoles influence the way the leg and trunk muscles work while walking on both even and uneven surfaces.”

The study will also look for changes in the perception of foot sensation and the awareness of foot position.

“Foot sensation plays an important role in keeping the body upright and balanced when walking, yet we know from previous studies that people with MS often have poor sensation on the soles of their feet,” Dr Hatton said.

“Therefore, wearing a specially designed shoe insole, which enhances sensory information at the feet, could help people affected by MS to walk better. “

Dr Hatton’s international research team includes UQ’s Professor Sandra Brauer and Ms Katrina Williams, Professor Graham Kerr of the Queensland University of Technology, Professor Keith Rome of the Auckland University of Technology, New Zealand, and Dr John Dixon of Teesside University, UK.

The trial is supported through funding from Multiple Sclerosis Research Australia.

“It is hoped that the study leads to the development of a new treatment technique, specifically an inexpensive, easy-to-administer shoe insole, which could assist mobility and independent living,” Dr Hatton said.

About the University of Queensland Physiotherapy program

The University of Queensland offers a learning environment and has assessment requirements designed to facilitate the advanced and intensive learning appropriate for a master’s-level program. The Master of Physiotherapy Studies introduces graduates to the profession of physiotherapy and its key concepts in intensive mode during an initial summer semester. It focuses on developing core knowledge and skills in the areas of musculoskeletal, neurological, cardiorespiratory and physical therapy across the lifespan, and integrates this knowledge and skill and application of clinical reasoning in supervised clinical practice.

Did you know there are 40 spots available in the program; 30 places for domestic Australians and 10 places for international students? For the 2016 intake, 10 international student offers were awarded to OzTREKK students!

Program: Master of Physiotherapy Studies
Location: Brisbane, Queensland
Semester intake: November
Duration: 2 years
Application deadline: UQ has a general application deadline of May 30 each year; however, candidates are encouraged to apply as early as possible.

Apply now to the UQ Physiotherapy School!

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Would you like more information about studying at UQ Physiotherapy School? Email OzTREKK’s Australian Physiotherapy School Admissions Officer Krista McVeigh at krista@oztrekk.com.

Tuesday, February 28th, 2017

UQ serves up new Food Science Innovation Precinct

Australia’s food-centric culture—illustrated by the popularity of dining out, healthy eating and television cooking shows—will benefit from a new $1-million facility at the University of Queensland.

UQ is serving up a smorgasbord of opportunity for the food industry with the opening of the new Food Science Innovation Precinct at the St Lucia campus.

 UQ serves up new Food Science Innovation Precinct

Study food science at the new UQ Food Science Innovation Precinct (Photo credit: UQ)

Deputy Vice-Chancellor (External Engagement) Professor Iain Watson said UQ had worked hard to position itself as a research powerhouse in areas such as agriculture, land management, genetics and chemistry, which all feed into food innovation.

“UQ has the largest university food research capability in Australia and ranks at number seven in the world for agriculture research,” he said.

“The Food Science Innovation Precinct is the icing on the cake. It will give students access to world-class training, innovations and facilities, and will ultimately help food companies create more innovative products.”

The Food Science Innovation Precinct has two state-of-the-art laboratories—a food-grade laboratory and an analytical laboratory for chemical and microbiological analysis.

Master of Food Science students will have the opportunity to work on a range of projects, including

  • cholesterol-lowering baked goods and dairy foods
  • ultra-low-fat cheese that tastes like full-fat cheese
  • 3D printed fruits
  • fresher milk produced without heat pasteurisation
  • new Omega-3 and probiotic foods and drinks

UQ Business School Entrepreneur in Residence and UniQuest Commercial Director (Food) Cameron Turner said the new facilities would allow students to work on research projects in collaboration with food companies.

“The food industry in Australia is rapidly growing and evolving, largely driven by consumers who are willing to pay for taste and convenience and are better informed about health and nutrition through media channels,” Mr Turner said.

“There’s also an increased awareness of functional foods and the importance of our gut microbiota, and rising opportunities in Asia, particularly China, for Australian-made foods.

“All of these factors create excellent opportunities for food manufacturers, retailers and our researchers.”

UQ announced in November a project to investigate if friendly bacteria could be introduced to bagged salad leaves to help ward off salmonella and listeria outbreaks.

UQ Master of Food Science and Technology

The Master of Food Science and Technology will cover the integrative disciplines of food science and food technology. In this program, you will gain a comprehensive theoretical and practical knowledge within fields of food science and food technology, and you will have the opportunity to apply these in either a research project or an industry placement.

Program: Master of Food Science and Technology
Location: St Lucia Campus, Brisbane
Duration: 1.5 years
Semester intakes: February and July
Application deadline: May 30 (July intake); November 29 (February intake)
Prerequisites: Bachelor degree in food science, food technology, science or engineering (in food science or technology) or an approved discipline. GPA of 5 or above on a 7-point scale.

Apply to the University of Queensland!

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Would you like more information about studying food science? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Sciences Degrees Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com!

Monday, February 27th, 2017

Why choose to study veterinary science at the University of Queensland?

The UQ School of Veterinary Science is located on the Gatton campus of the University of Queensland. This campus represents Queensland’s premier hub for animal and agricultural training and is 100 km west of Brisbane, Queensland’s capital city and a major national and international transport hub.

Why choose to study veterinary science at the University of Queensland?

UQ Vet Centre at the Gatton campus

The veterinary teaching facilities on the Gatton Campus were built in 2010 and are among the best in the southern hemisphere. The University of Queensland Gatton campus provides access to all animal species and clinics and teaching facilities are located at the one site, so there is no need to switch between campuses!

Approximately 24% of students in each year of the program are international students, hailing from a diverse range of home countries, including Canada. Modern veterinary practice must have a global perspective, and the  Bachelor of Veterinary Science (Hons) curriculum has been designed to offer internationally aligned content and methods of teaching, preparing students for professional roles in whichever region they choose.

UQ and the School of Veterinary Science demonstrate their excellence in a number of ways, not least being highly ranked on global tertiary education quality indicators. The latest QS Global Employability Ranking placed UQ within the top 5 universities in Australia, and within the top 60 internationally, with respect to employability of its graduates.

The school has full accreditation with the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA), and with both the Australasian Veterinary Boards Council and the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons in the UK, enabling UQ graduates to also practice in North America, Australia, New Zealand, UK, Hong Kong and most of Asia.

Studying veterinary science at the University of Queensland

Since its first intake of students in 1936, the UQ School of Veterinary Science has been recognized for a sustained record of excellence in teaching and learning across the veterinary disciplines and the quality of its research. The school is based at a purpose-built site with first-rate facilities for teaching and research and access to horses, cattle, pigs and poultry.

Program: Bachelor of Veterinary Science (Honours)
Location: Gatton, Queensland
Semester intake: February
Duration: 5 years
Application deadline: General application deadline of November 30; however, late applications may be accepted. It is strongly recommended that students apply a minimum of three months prior to the program’s start date.

Apply to UQ Veterinary School!

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Discover more about studying at UQ Veterinary School! Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Veterinary Schools Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com.

Thursday, February 23rd, 2017

Introducing the new UQ School of Earth and Environmental Sciences

Resources and energy, climate change, urbanisation, population growth, conservation and sustainability will be areas of focus for a new University of Queensland school.

Introducing the new UQ School of Earth and Environmental Sciences

Professor Aitchison is head of the new UQ School of Earth and Environmental Sciences (Photo: UQ)

The UQ School of Earth and Environmental Sciences came into being on Jan. 1 and now combines UQ’s School of Earth Sciences and the School of Geography, Planning and Environmental Management.

Professor Jonathan Aitchison, who will head the new school, said it would be an interdisciplinary powerhouse of academic expertise, developing practical solutions to big issues.

“The school will give greater breadth and depth to the study of earth and environmental sciences, greatly benefitting students, strengthening research capacity, and will provide greater disciplinary coherence and opportunity,” said Professor Aitchison, the Head of UQ’s School of Earth and Environmental Sciences.

“It makes sense to bring earth and environmental sciences together in the university.

“The new school is a recognition of the increasingly interdisciplinary nature of geological and geographical sciences, environmental management, coastal processes, urban planning and safety science.”

Professor Aitchison said UQ had a strong international reputation for excellence in earth and environmental sciences.

It ranks number 1 in Australia in life sciences in the Times Higher Education Ranking and number 12 globally, number 32 internationally in geography, and is in the world’s top 100 Earth and Marine Sciences institutions in the 2016 QS rankings by subject.

“The combined staff of the new school are recognised as experts in their fields,” Professor Aitchison said.

“They conduct pure and applied research with strong links to our industry, government and university partners who have provided excellent support over many years.

“In addition, our people have a strong reputation for quality teaching of undergraduate and postgraduate students in all discipline areas across the new school.”

Professor Aitchison said integrated teams of earth scientists, physical and social scientists, environmental management specialists, health and safety experts, and urban planners would work together to generate new knowledge and opportunities for further discovery.

Current collaborative research projects and consulting pieces would continue as usual and new projects would begin as funding and support becomes available.

“By providing a new academic structure for these related disciplines we will provide opportunities to improve end-to-end delivery of services and research outcomes,” he said.

“This benefits industries, government, university partners, and communities, and continues availability of state-of-the-art facilities for industry and research project work.”

Professor Aitchison is a geologist and an expert in plate tectonics, palaeontology and geo-microbiology.

University of Queensland Environmental Science Degrees

Master of Agribusiness
Master of Agricultural Science
Master of Conservation Biology
Master of Conservation Science
Master of Environmental Management
Master of Geographic Information Science
Master of Integrated Water Management
Master of Mineral Resources
Master of Responsible Resource Development (Environment)
Master of Rural Development
Master of Sustainable Energy

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Find out more about your study options at the new UQ School of Earth and Environmental Sciences. Contact OzTREKK Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com.

Tuesday, February 21st, 2017

UQ offers more free dental care in new alliance

The University of Queensland will help deliver more free public dental care thanks to a new partnership with the State Government.

The alliance between UQ and Metro North Hospital and Health Service (MNHHS) will give an extra 8,000 eligible public patients with access to dental treatment at the Oral Health Centre in Herston.

SUQ offers more free dental care in new alliance

The UQ Oral Health Centre at Herston (Photo credit: UQ)

UQ Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences Executive Dean Professor Bruce Abernethy said the alliance was an integrated operation that would begin with the amalgamation of UQ and MNHHS teaching, research and clinical activities at the Oral Health Centre in January 2017.

“UQ will be responsible for the academic function of the alliance, providing evidence-based teaching and clinically focused research, while Metro North will be responsible for clinical service delivery and clinical supervision of students,” Professor Abernethy said.

“Brisbane Dental Hospital will be relocated in a staged fashion from its current Turbot Street location to our state-of-the-art facility in the Herston Health Precinct throughout the year.”

Head of UQ Dental School Professor Pauline Ford said the partnership was another opportunity for dental students to improve the quality of life of those in need.

“Our students are committed to providing healthcare to those who require it most,” Professor Ford said.

“Research assistant and oral health therapist Nicole Cockburn organised Dental Rescue Week for youth experiencing homelessness earlier this year, and our existing partnership with Ozcare gives free dental care to men in South Brisbane hostels.”

Professor Ford has spent much of her professional life researching and enhancing dental care for the disadvantaged.

“Both personally and professionally, I am proud to announce that one of the main tenets of the alliance is the focus on providing dental treatment for the Brisbane North area’s most vulnerable population,” Professor Ford said.

The model for the alliance is comparable to arrangements in other states, such as the Westmead Centre for Oral Health (University of Sydney), The Royal Dental Hospital of Melbourne (University of Melbourne), and the Adelaide Dental Hospital (University of Adelaide).

Studying at the UQ School of Dentistry

UQ Dental School’s dentistry program has been in operation for more 75 years, and is one of Australia’s longest-running dental programs and also its highest-ranked dental program. The Bachelor of Dental Science (BDSc) (Honours) program which provides students with the knowledge, skills and attitude they require in order to become competent practitioners of dentistry. These include the application of scientific principles to the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of oral diseases and abnormalities.

Program: Bachelor of Dental Science
Location: Brisbane, Queensland
Semester intake: February
Duration: 5 years
Application deadline: October 30 each year

Apply now to UQ Dental School!

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Would you like more information about UQ Dental School? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Dental Schools Admissions Officer Adam Smith at adam@oztrekk.com.

Friday, February 17th, 2017

Studying at UQ Pharmacy is more than just counting pills

Studying pharmacy is more than just counting pills. Meet current UQ Pharmacy student, Sakina, who applied through OzTREKK in 2013. In Part 1 of his blog, Sakina offers advice for anyone considering studying pharmacy in Australia.

My name is Sakina. I am currently in my third year of pharmacy at UQ. I was born and raised in Canada and made my big move to Australia two and a half years ago. I am a chemistry nerd at heart so pharmacy seemed the best fitting career for me. I aim to be a high achiever but I don’t like to get consumed by classes or work, so in my downtime, I love to explore the outdoors such as going on hikes, to the beach, traveling, going on road trips, and hanging with friends. Fashion is another passion of mine so that is another aspect of my life that I really want to continue to develop.

Studying at UQ Pharmacy is more than just counting pills

Former OzTREKK student Sakina enjoying the UQ Bachelor of Pharmacy program (Photo credit: UQ)

I have found that sometimes uni students become so obsessed with their grades and results that they forget to focus their attention on the key experiences which are designed to develop them into a valued professional.

When you first come to uni you realise very quickly that university and high school are two completely different beasts. There are a range of changes which make them so vastly different and it can feel intimidating at first, but trust me when I say this: you can achieve anything you put your mind to. Patience and hard work are some of the key elements which will help you to achieve your goals. Regardless of the field of study you are in, communication and social skills are essential when it comes to life in general, so best to get good at this early on. These are the factors which many students forget about. They think that achieving straight high distinctions will lead to their future success, when in reality it really doesn’t guarantee anything.

Pharmacy is one of those fields where these skills are more essential than you may think. Regardless of whether you choose to become a hospital or community pharmacist, you will be communicating with patients on a daily basis. It is important that you learn how to communicate with patients in the most simplistic, informative, and non-frightening manner, especially when it comes to medication administration and usage. As a healthcare professional, patient care should be at the core of your profession, which is why the UQ Pharmacy program places so much emphasis on this.

Stay tuned for part 2 of Sakina’s story: Placements

Are you interested in studying pharmacy at the University of Queensland?

Program: Bachelor of Pharmacy
Location: Brisbane, Queensland
Semester intake: February
Duration: 3–4 years, depending on candidate’s education background
Application deadline: Generally November 29 each year; however, late applications may be accepted.

Entry Requirements

Applicants are required to have completed their high school diploma. Applicants should have completed Grade 12 English, Chemistry and Math to meet program prerequisites. If you have commenced or completed a university degree or any post-secondary studies, your most recent studies will be assessed in terms of your grades. If you have not completed the necessary prerequisite subjects in your post-secondary studies, your high school transcripts will then be assessed for prerequisite subjects.

Apply to the University of Queensland Pharmacy School!

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Learn more about UQ Pharmacy School. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Pharmacy Schools Admissions Officer Krista McVeigh at krista@oztrekk.com.

Tuesday, February 14th, 2017

UQ sport science ranks in global top 5

The UQ School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences has ranked 4th and 5th in the world for sport science in two highly respected global rankings systems.

This January, UQ placed 4th in CEOWORLD Magazine’s World’s Top Universities for Sport Science In 2016.

UQ sport science ranks in global top 5

UQ School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences has ranked 4th and 5th in the world for sport science! (Photo: UQ)

Head of School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences Professor Andrew Cresswell said the accolade was a reflection of UQ’s dedication to being a world-leader in sport and exercise science education and research.

“Our strong commitment to excellence in teaching and research is paramount to our success, and permeates everything we do,” Professor Cresswell said.

“We aspire to be at the forefront of learning and strive to ensure students meet the needs of the sport science industry, are job-ready, and equipped with the skills and knowledge to succeed in their chosen careers.”

The ranking is based on six key indicators of quality, including academic reputation, admission eligibility, job placement rate, recruiter feedback, specialisation, and global reputation and influence.

It comes one month after UQ ranked 5th in the ShanghaiRanking’s Global Ranking of Sport Science Schools and Departments 2016.

The ShanghaiRanking assessed key areas of research performance, including the number of papers published in top sport science journals and the number of citations of articles.

Professor Cresswell said the school’s performance was led by outstanding teaching and research staff, and work being undertaken in the research centres.

“To be rated among the very best in the world by two highly respected ranking systems, and to score higher than many larger universities with celebrated kinesiology and human movement departments, is a huge accolade,” Professor Cresswell said.

Why study the UQ Bachelor of Exercise and Sports Sciences (Honours)?

This program will ignite your interest in the complexities of maintaining an active, healthy human body and allow you to make an essential contribution to well-being, rehabilitation and performance. This program focuses on understanding how to enhance human performance, how the body responds to exercise and physical activity, and how to conduct research which could help build healthier communities and stronger athletes.

Career opportunities are varied and may include prescribing and delivering exercise and physical activity programs in the fitness industry, developing strength and conditioning programs to assist elite athletes and sporting teams, delivering workplace health promotion and executive health management programs, or conducting diagnostic measurements (cardiac, sleep, respiratory or neurophysiology) in hospitals or other clinical services.

Program: Bachelor of Exercise and Sports Sciences (Honours)
Location: Brisbane, Queensland
Semester intake: February
Program duration: 4 years
Application deadline: November 29, 2017

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Learn more about studying UQ sports science! Contact OzTREKK Australian Health Sciences Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston: shannon@oztrekk.com or 1-866-698-7355.

Monday, February 6th, 2017

UQ Medicine graduate shares 9 things he wishes he’d been told as a med student

Hailing from Canada, Shaun completed his medical degree at UQ before undertaking his fellowship at the University of Toronto and his residency with University of Calgary. He currently works full time as a Queensland Health registrar within intensive care and in his spare time he works for House Call Doctor— a 100% bulk-billed, after-hours, home GP service operating in Queensland. If you’d like to hear firsthand from a Canadian who is now practicing medicine in Australia, check out Shaun’s advice!

UQ Medicine graduate shares 9 things he wishes he'd been told as a med student

Canadian Shaun Hosein, now practicing in Australia! (Photo credit: UQ)

1. Study medicine for the right reasons.
Medicine is a highly rewarding career that has many opportunities in various sub-specialty fields. However it is a long road, requires intensive study, and at times can seem impossible. It is not a decision to be made lightly, and there are times I wish I could fix that leaky pipe in my kitchen. I chose medicine, because it not only helps people, but I enjoy thinking on my feet and problem solving. Reflecting a bit more, it has also developed my personal ethics and communication skills.

2. For international medicine students, you can’t beat UQ for education and lifestyle.
UQ is constantly improving their medicine course which I feel is important when choosing a university and medical school. When I was applying they were very approachable and efficient throughout the application process.  The case-based learning style made me nervous, but I think it is the best way to learn and study medicine. Brisbane is also an amazing city, it has the best climate of all Australian cities (none of this “four seasons in one day” stuff). Plus the Gold Coast and the Sunshine Coast are about an hour away! Perfect study and lifestyle balance.

3. Studying internationally is incredible, but it can be difficult when you return home.
I have spoken to numerous potential Canadian medical school candidates over the years, and my advice is the same. Studying medicine at UQ was a life-changing event for me, and provided me unique opportunities in an amazing country. I won’t lie—you will find it challenging being away from home, and to be honest, getting back into the Canadian system is difficult. UQ does facilitate opportunities to make this process easier, but it is still a challenge. Be prepared to finish internship training in Australia before considering the road back or please at least obtain and maintain general registration with AHPRA.

4. There are pros and cons to working in different health systems, so consider what’s important to you.
I can only speak in relation to the Canadian and Australian healthcare systems, but in my honest experience you get paid more, will have better shifts and rosters, and overall better work-life balance in Australia.  On the other hand, internship training is structured better in Canada: training is slightly shorter and there are no primary exams, but the programs are very difficult to get accepted into.

5. In medicine, you can have a “typical routine” but you’ll never have a “typical day.”
I currently work for Queensland Health and for House Call Doctor when I have extra time in the evenings, usually on nights off, or weekends. Being a home GP after-hours is very flexible and works well with my schedule. Working with House Call Doctor means I get to visit a wide variety of patients who need urgent after-hours care, treating everything from acute cold and flus to more serious conditions, such as gastro, home accidents or chronic illness. You really never know what kind of patients you’ll treat!

6. Sometimes taking the road less travelled will put you on the right path.
I always wanted to work in primary care, but it was quite difficult to get any experience and determine if it suited me. House Call Doctor has given me this experience but it’s also shown me another side to medical practice. I honestly feel after-hours care is becoming its own sub-specialty of medicine. I enjoy it because it allows me to have a simple chat with patients, to see children or speak with a young mum. It is very rewarding, and not something I could have experienced working in the adult system alone.

7. As a student, it’s easy to get run down from all that studying (and perhaps socialising). When you do get sick there are probably more healthcare options available to you than you think.
House Call Doctor offers 100% bulk-billed home GP visits to anyone with a Medicare or DVA (Department of Veteran’s Affair) Card.  Having a GP visit your home can be particularly useful in acute medical situations that don’t warrant an emergency department response, but can’t wait until normal clinic hours. House Call Doctor visits a wide cross-section of patients, including students living in shared accommodation. International students can also take advantage of the after-hours medical care, rebated if they travelling with BUPA, NIB, Allianz or Medibank insurance. For more information you can visit www.housecalldoctor.com.au, or you can phone the after-hours line on 13 55 66 to book an appointment.

8. Support networks and technology are invaluable for international students.
Having a strong family and supportive Australian peer group is extremely important throughout your medical degree. At the same time, don’t underestimate the impact of technology. Skype, FaceTime, and WhatsApp will ensure you can easily stay in touch with loved ones back home.

9. Your medical degree can take you anywhere and you’re likely to end up somewhere completely different to where you thought you would.
I have worked in numerous medical fields, and I have definitely not taken a straight path. Initially I was very keen on critical care (ICU), but when I worked in Haiti post-earthquake and again in Africa I got a better understanding of health and the need for public health medicine and primary care. I have since completed Canadian postgraduate training in public health medicine, and am now working towards translating my qualification here in Australia. I also have a public health interest in illicit substance abuse and drug use patterns and am completing a fellowship in toxicology. I tell everyone, especially medical students, to never discount the idea of being a GP; I’m still considering it, if I get time.

About the UQ Medical School Program

The UQ Medical School conducts a four-year, graduate-entry medical program, the Doctor of Medicine (MD). The School of Medicine is a leading provider of medical education and research in Australia, and with the country’s largest medical degree program, they are the major single contributor to Queensland’s junior medical workforce.

Program: Doctor of Medicine (MD)
Location: Brisbane, Queensland
Semester intake: January
Duration: 4 years
Application deadline: Applications are assessed on a rolling admissions (first come, first served) basis. It is recommended that applicants apply as early as possible to increase their chances of timely assessment. This program can fill quickly!

Apply to the UQ School of Medicine!

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Find out more about the UQ School of Medicine. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com, or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Thursday, February 2nd, 2017

Record number of women graduating from engineering at UQ

The University of Queensland is celebrating the graduation of a record number of female engineering students last semester with women making up 35 per cent of all graduates—more than double the national average of 17 per cent.

Record number of women graduating from engineering at UQ

UQ female engineering graduates exceeded the national average of 17 per cent (Image credit: UQ)

UQ’s engineering cohort has seen significant growth in female graduate numbers since 2012, when they numbered 21 per cent, and the national average was 15 per cent.

Faculty of  Engineering, Architecture and Information Technology, (EAIT) Executive Dean, Professor Simon Biggs said the increase in female graduates highlights UQ’s leadership in shaping a more inclusive and equitable engineering industry, bolstered by the very successful Women in Engineering (WE) program which has been running for four years.

“The Women in Engineering program was established at UQ as a university-led, industry-funded initiative to address the gender disparity in engineering at both the tertiary and industry levels, and the results so far speak volumes for the value of the program.” said Professor Biggs.

“UQ also recently hosted the first joint university workshop to collaborate and share best practice for recruiting females into engineering.

More than 30 representatives from 18 universities across Australia, New Zealand and the US state of Colorado attended the event with the long-term objective to see female participation in engineering increase collectively across Australia.

“We don’t just want to see gender diversity improve in engineering at UQ, we want to see broad change across the industry in Australia and globally.”

Women currently account for less than 13 per cent of the engineering workforce in Australia, and industries that employ engineers are missing out on the benefits that diversity brings to technically-grounded problem solving.

EAIT faculty is leading from the top with a record increase in female academic appointments in engineering in 2016, especially in the area of chemical engineering. A popular area of study for female students, chemical engineering is an exemplar of female participation with women making up over 40 per cent of the graduating cohort this semester.

Second-year chemical and environmental engineering student Geethu George says young women need strong female role models when setting out in engineering careers.

“Being in contact with female academics in my field of study encourages me to keep moving forward with my decision to pursue engineering,” Ms George said.

“Having women in these senior positions and watching them achieve success is essential to increasing female participation in engineering.”

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Want more information about engineering programs available at the University of Queensland? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Engineering Schools Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com.