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Posts Tagged ‘tropical health’

Thursday, February 1st, 2018

JCU Medical School student taking the rural world by storm

James Cook University student Carolyn Reimann will be the public face of rural health students around Australia for 2018.

JCU Medical School student taking the rural world by storm

Former OzTREKK student and now fifth-year JCU med student Carolyn Reimann (Photo credit: JCU)

Carolyn, also a former OzTREKK student, is a fifth-year international student studying medicine at JCU medical school. She is set to take on the role of Executive Chair of the National Rural Health Student Network (NRHSN). She will head the multidisciplinary student health network, which comprises of 28 University Rural Health Clubs, including JCU’s Rural Health in the Northern Outback (RHINO) student club.

“I had heard about the NRHSN through my involvement with RHINO,” Carolyn said.

“In 2016, I was one of six health students chosen for the Northern Territory PHN’s High School Visits. I had a chat with the guy who was going to be the Chair of the NRHSN in 2017, and joining the NRHSN Executive Committee sounded like something right up my alley. I love to get involved,” Carolyn said.

“As the Executive Chair you represent the network around the country, and are the public face of the NRHSN. It includes meeting politicians, attending stakeholder meetings, writing policy and position papers and presenting at conferences. It also includes advocating for and overseeing all the different rural health clubs. It’s a big, complex role.”

Carolyn had always dreamed of studying medicine and helping people in need. She was particularly attracted to studying in north Queensland by the focus of JCU’s medical program.

“I always had an interest in doing something around public health. I know that I can make a difference and JCU has an amazing reputation for their program.

“Every focus that JCU has, on tropical health, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health and rural and remote health is something that I am interested in, and that’s what brought me over here.

“It was the perfect fit, like Cinderella and her glass slipper.”

The National Rural Health Student Network represents the future of rural health in Australia. It has more than 9,000 members who belong to 28 university Rural Health Clubs from all states and territories, and is Australia’s only multi-disciplinary student health network, bringing together people studying medicine, nursing and allied health, encouraging them to pursue rural health careers.

The NRHSN has two aims:

  1. To provide a voice for students who are interested in improving health outcomes for rural and remote Australians
  2. To promote rural health careers to students and encourage students who are interested in practicing in rural health care.

JCU Medical School medical program

The 6-year, full-time Bachelor of Medicine Bachelor of Surgery degree is a comprehensive program with integrated instruction in biomedical sciences, professional practice and clinical medicine. JCU has a regional mission with a focus on the needs of rural, remote and under-served communities, tropical medicine and the health of Aboriginal peoples and Torres Strait Islanders.

Program: Bachelor of Medicine Bachelor of Surgery
Location: Townsville, Queensland
Semester intake: February
Duration: 6 years
Application deadline: August 30, 2018 (Note: Early offers of admission may be made to high-achieving international applicants! Candidates are encouraged to apply as early as possible and well before the August 30 deadline.)

Apply to JCU Medical School!

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Do you have questions about studying medicine at JCU medical school? Email OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Kaylee Templeton at kaylee@oztrekk.com.

Tuesday, October 11th, 2016

JCU opens Australian Institute of Tropical Health and Medicine building

Study medicine at JCU, get brand-new facilities!

Australian research into tropical health and medicine has received a major boost with the opening of a $31M world-class infectious diseases research facility at James Cook University’s Townsville campus.

JCU opens Australian Institute of Tropical Health and Medicine building

JCU has officially opened the Australian Institute of Tropical Health and Medicine building (Credit: JCU)

On Oct. 7, the Queensland Premier, Annastacia Palaszczuk officially opened the Australian Institute of Tropical Health and Medicine’s (AITHM) new facilities.

AITHM Townsville will undertake research into tropical infectious diseases and will develop vaccines, diagnostic tools, and the identification of bacterial pathogens.

James Cook University Vice Chancellor, Professor Sandra Harding said AITHM is a crucial element of JCU’s goal to create a brighter future for people living in the tropics, and the opening of the Townsville facilities cements Australia’s position as a global leader in tropical health and medicine.

“JCU has a proud history of research and development relevant to the tropics, and the research AITHM undertakes will improve health in the tropics both within Australia and worldwide.

“There are extraordinary opportunities for Australian tropical medicine given Northern Australia’s proximity to the fast-growing nations of the Asia-Pacific region,” Professor Harding said.

AITHM’s Director, Professor Louis Schofield said research programs underway within AITHM include identification, prevention and better treatments for tuberculosis, development of malaria vaccines and peripheral artery disease.

“The Institute will build essential research programs in tropical health and medicine for Australia and the region, specifically building important biosecurity capacity for Northern Australia.

“Our tropical locations and capabilities make a significant contribution to Queensland’s competitive advantage in knowledge-based industries directly relevant to Asia and the Pacific in the areas of research, research training, and the transfer and commercialisation of research findings.”

The Townsville facility and research undertaken within it will

  • focus on re-emerging bacterial diseases for which tropical Queenslanders are at significant risk, including tuberculosis, meliodosis and Q fever, and on communicable disease diagnostics and control;
  • provide a bio-bank facility for clinical and epidemiological samples;
  • engage new high-quality biomedical research staff to join existing researchers;
  • host visiting experts (visitors and trainees will include participants from Australia and from neighbouring countries);
  • train and mentor young researchers and health professionals involved in translating innovation into practice; and
  • accommodate proof-of-concept work leading to commercialisation opportunities.

Facilities include world-class physical containment laboratories for the safe handling of hazardous microorganisms (PC2 and PC3 laboratories). The PC3 laboratory will be used to for research into tuberculosis.

The building also includes a Translational Research Facility, which will allow patients to undergo clinical trials of research findings, improving the delivery of health care for those living in tropical regions.

It will also provide space for researchers in key supporting disciplines, including biostatistics, epidemiology, bioinformatics and health economics.

The Queensland Government has invested $21.49M in AITHM Townsville and the Federal Government has provided funding of $8M, via the Australian Research Council’s Special Research Initiative Scheme.

Study medicine at JCU Medical School

JCU Medical School offers an undergraduate-entry medical program that specializes in rural, remote and indigenous medicine and is located in north Queensland, Australia. Rather than having to earn a bachelor degree first, undergraduate-entry medical programs allow students to enter directly from high school. If you have completed high school studies or would like to apply to a medical school in Australia without using your MCAT score, you may wish to learn more about undergraduate-entry medical programs offered by Australian universities.

Program: Bachelor of Medicine Bachelor of Surgery
Location: Townsville, Queensland
Next semester intake: February 2018
Duration: 6 years
Application deadline: Generally the end of August each year

Apply now to James Cook University Medical School!

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Would you like more information about studying medicine at JCU Medical School? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com.

Tuesday, June 28th, 2016

JCU will celebrate the International Day of the Tropics

James Cook University is defined by the tropics, unique among Australian universities, woven into the intellectual, economic and social fabric of its tropical location and set amid irreplaceable ecosystems and cultures.
JCU has warmly welcomed the United Nations’ recent decision to create an International Day of the Tropics.

The UN has decided that the International Day of the Tropics will be celebrated every year on the 29th of June. The date is the anniversary of the launch of the inaugural State of the Tropics 2014 report, the first major output of the State of the Tropics project, which is convened by JCU and draws on the expertise of leading institutions from around the world.

JCU will celebrate the International Day of the Tropics

Harding says Tropical regions of the world will play a greater part in world affairs (Photo: JCU)

JCU Vice Chancellor Professor Sandra Harding has worked with the Australian Government to build international support for the campaign.

“This is wonderful news. The Tropics is a crucial region and deserves to be recognised with an International Day of its own. The annual celebration will quite rightly focus attention on the sustainable development of the region and the tremendous potential the Tropics holds for the world,” Professor Harding said.

The ground breaking State of the Tropics 2014 report confirmed the great demographic, environmental and geopolitical significance of the region. The report revealed the Tropics is home to 40% of the world’s population, and it hosts about 80% of its terrestrial biodiversity. By 2050, more than two-thirds of the world’s children under 15 years of age will be living in the Tropics.

The JCU Vice Chancellor said the focus on the Tropics would also deliver great benefits for northern Australia.

“We have so much knowledge to share with the rest of the Tropics. This ‘tropical expertise’ promises new export industries to meet the infrastructure and other needs of the growing Tropics.

“Australia is a developed country with the largest tropical land mass and we have the experience, skills, and knowledge to share to the benefit of this region. The focus on similar geographies and climates, health, environment and the sustainable economic development challenges of the tropical world offer opportunities for northern Australia.”

The inaugural International Day of the Tropics will be held on June 29, 2016.

In September 2015 the Australian Government announced it would lead efforts to establish the International Day of the Tropics.

Nobel Laureate, Aung San Suu Kyi, launched the State of the Tropics’ inaugural report in Yangon, Myanmar on June 29, 2014.

Defined by the Tropics

James Cook University is dedicated to creating a brighter future for life in the tropics worldwide, through graduates and discoveries that make a difference. The university conducts nationally significant and internationally recognised research in areas such as marine sciences, biodiversity, tropical ecology and environments, global warming, tourism, and tropical medicine and public health care in under-served populations.

JCU teaching and research focuses on four themes:

  • Tropical Ecosystems and Environment
  • Industries and Economies in the Tropics
  • Peoples and Societies in the Tropics
  • Tropical Health, Medicine and Biosecurity.
Tuesday, April 19th, 2016

Push for International Day of Tropics gathers speed

James Cook University Vice Chancellor Professor Sandra Harding has travelled to the United Nations in New York to participate in the launch of the public campaign for the creation of an International Day of the Tropics, which would deliver benefits for Northern Queensland and beyond.

In September, the Australian Government announced it would lead efforts to establish the 29th of June as the International Day of the Tropics. The proposal was be formally launched at the UN last week.

James Cook University Australia

Aerial shot of JCU Cairns campus

Professor Harding said she strongly supports the Australian Government’s push to recognise the global significance of the Tropics.

“An International Day of the Tropics will call into account the development of the tropical world. Australia is a developed country with the largest tropical land mass and we have the experience, skills, and knowledge to share to the benefit of this region,” Prof Harding said.

Professor Harding said an International Day of the Tropics would be very important step forward for Northern Queensland.

“We know how to do business, build cities and prosper in tropical conditions. The things we do here each day are going to be in high demand throughout the tropical world.”

Prof Harding said the North is standing on the cusp of an enormous growth in export earnings.

“Jobs growth, innovation—all of that can come out of this particular focus on similar geographies and climates, health, environment and the economic development challenges of the tropical world. We can advance a new set of exporting industries that tap into our ‘tropical expertise’ and provide the infrastructure and other needs of the growing Tropics.”

The 29th of June is the anniversary of the launch of the inaugural State of the Tropics report. Nobel Laureate, Aung San Suu Kyi, launched the project’s first major report in Yangon, Myanmar in 2014. State of the Tropics is convened by James Cook University and draws on the expertise of leading institutions from around the world.

The ground-breaking State of the Tropics report confirms the great demographic, environmental and geopolitical significance of the region, describes the grand challenges facing the world’s tropical regions, and provides a baseline for a more sustainable global future.

The Tropics is home to 40% of the world’s population, and it hosts about 80% of its terrestrial biodiversity. By 2050, more than two-thirds of the world’s children under 15 years of age will be living in the Tropics.

James Cook University

As a leading research university, JCU provides excellent facilities for teaching and learning. JCU teaching staff are highly qualified and dedicated, and many JCU academics are considered to be leaders in their fields. The unique location of James Cook University allows nationally significant and internationally-recognized research to be conducted by both staff and students. Much research focus is based on the industries and environments of northern Australia including marine biology, biodiversity, tropical environmental studies, earth sciences/geology, engineering, tropical health and tourism. JCU is a member of the prestigious national alliance, Innovative Research Universities and has as its vision to be one of the world’s leading research universities in the tropics.

Tuesday, June 3rd, 2014

JCU Medical School student impresses Brazil conference

A JCU Medical School student has added to his growing list of accolades after being invited to make a presentation at an international rural health conference.

JCU Medical School

JCU Medical School specialises in rural and remote medicine

Jerry Abraham, who is based at the Mackay Base Hospital, was awarded the national Rural Medical Student of the Year last year, in a rare coup for a regional medical graduate.

Last month, Mr Abraham was invited to speak at the 12th WONCA World Rural Health Conference that was held in Gramado, Rio del Sur, Brazil.

This was in his capacity as a health student and the Co-Chair of the National Rural Health Students’ Network (NRHSN) in Australia.

Mr Abraham said the title of his talk was “National Rural Health Students’ Network: A multi-disciplinary approach to rural health.”

“I talked about who the NRHSN is and the activities that we do in raising the profile of rural health,” he said.

“I spoke about the need for a multi-disciplinary approach to holistic health, advocacy for health students, and strategies that will hopefully address the rural health workforce shortage in Australia.

“We also discussed our priorities as an organisation and how the health clubs from across the nation were helping us achieve these.”

The NRHSN is is the only student body in Australia that collectively represents medical, nursing and allied health disciplines, and has more than 9,000 members who belong to 28 university rural health clubs throughout the nation.

The NRHSN is funded by the Federal Department of Health and is managed by Rural Health Workforce Australia, the peak body for the state and territory rural workforce agencies. It aims to provide a voice for students who are interested in improving health outcomes for rural and remote Australians and to promote rural health careers to students and encourage students who are interested in practicing in rural health care.

Mr Abraham, who was born and raised in Dubai, but is now an Australian citizen, said it was an honour to be the first JCU student to be elected as the Co-Chair of the NRHSN.

“It’s nice to know that us northerners are now considered just as good as our southern counterparts,” he joked.

Prior to his medical studies at JCU Medical School, Mr Abraham completed a Bachelor of Engineering (Hons) overseas and moved to Australia in order to complete his Master of Telecommunication Engineering, at the University of Melbourne.

He also achieved a Graduate Diploma of Education and a Master of Education before starting his medical studies at James Cook University.

Mr Abraham said it was an honour and privilege to present at an international conference.

“It was great to share what we have been doing in Australia through the NRHSN to address rural and remote health issues as most of the other representatives had similar concerns.

“The various representatives were greatly encouraged by what we have been able to achieve here in Australia, as students, and described our approach as very mature and proactive.”

Mr Abraham said he was hoping to become a rural surgeon “if all things work out to plan.”

“I will be looking at definitely working rural or remote and doing some overseas mission work in various countries across a few continents.”

Mr Abraham said four Queensland organisations had been instrumental in helping cover his flight fares and living expenses for his trip to Brazil: Lee and Maree from Marlee Constructions Moranbah, Moranbah Medical Centre, Dr Reyno Niewoudt and Laura Terry and the Mackay Christian Family Church.

About James Cook University Medical School

JCU Medical School specializes in rural and remote medicine. The JCU program has a unique place among Australian medical schools. The course is undertaken entirely in northern Australia and has an emphasis on tropical medicine, the health of rural and remote communities, and of Aboriginal peoples and Torres Strait Islanders. The medical program is informed by a concern for social justice, innovation and excellence in medical education, research and service.

Program: Bachelor of Medicine Bachelor of Surgery (MBBS)
Location: Townsville, Queensland
Semester intake: February 2015
Duration: 6 years
Application deadline: August 29, 2014

Entry Requirements for the JCU Medical Program

  • Entry is directly from high school. Students may also transfer into the program during their undergraduate degree or at the completion of their undergraduate degree.
  • High school cumulative average necessary to be considered is a minimum of 85% in Grade 12 subjects, including prerequisite subject grades.
  • If you are applying to the program after you have partially or fully completed your post-secondary studies, you should have a Canadian GPA of 80% cumulative average across all university studies, but to have a competitive application, applicants should have achieved at least an 82% cumulative average.
  • Interview: held in-person and via video conference

Apply to James Cook University Medical School!

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Do you have questions about JCU Medical School and its MBBS program? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Officer Broghan Dean at broghan@oztrekk.com or call 1-866-698-7355 (toll free in Canada) for more information about how you can study in Australia!

Thursday, May 15th, 2014

$42M Federal investment in tropical health and medicine at JCU

The Australian Federal Government will contribute an additional $42 million to the Australian Institute of Tropical Health and Medicine (AITHM) based at James Cook University, matching the Queensland Government’s funding commitment.

JCU Medicine

Study medicine at JCU Medical School

Commonwealth funds will enable the expansion and consolidation of planned activities in Cairns, Townsville, Mackay and the Torres Strait to establish the following:

Tropical Health Research and Training facilities, JCU Townsville, Cairns and Torres Strait – $25.5m
Research and training in virology, disease and vector control, and development of new treatments and vaccines for tropical diseases, complementing Queensland Government funding in all locations.

Translational Research Centre, JCU Townsville – $10m
Research and training facilities and expertise to support clinical trials, tele-health and translational research and training to support world-class contributions in infectious and chronic diseases.

Occupational Health Research Centre, Mackay – $1.5m
Research to investigate, develop and test strategies to reduce the incidence of work-related death, injury and illness in key regional industries.

Network and general operating activities – $5m
Support linkages with medical researchers and health workers throughout Australia to maximise the quality and impact of research and to ensure that it is focused on the key health problems of tropical Australia.

AITHM is based at James Cook University and aims to establish northern Australia as a centre of excellence in tropical health, medical and biotechnology research and research training.

AITHM has three research priorities: Australia’s health security and biosecurity; health in rural, remote, Indigenous and tropical Australia; and health in the tropics, regionally and globally.

James Cook University Vice Chancellor, Professor Sandra Harding said AITHM is a critical element of JCU’s goal to create a brighter future for people living in the tropics.

“The research AITHM undertakes will improve health in the tropics both within Australia and world-wide. JCU has a proud history of research and development relevant to the tropics,” Professor Harding said.

The Deputy Vice Chancellor of the Division of Tropical Health and Medicine, Professor Ian Wronski said JCU’s location puts it in on the frontline for biosecurity and health security.

“We are ideally placed to tackle issues including the prevalence of tuberculosis in neighbouring Papua New Guinea, as well as dengue fever, chikungunya, Japanese encephalitis and soil-transmitted parasites,” Professor Wronski said. “These are diseases that have a devastating effect on many developing nations in the tropics and also pose a threat to Australians, given our frequent interactions with neighbouring countries.

“AITHM builds on the university’s existing expertise in these areas, including our connection with Australia’s first medical research institute, the Australian Institute for Tropical Medicine, which opened in Townsville in 1913.”

AITHM operational funding through the Australian Government will help to expand research and training expertise in the microbiology of infectious diseases, including virology, as well as in disease modelling, disease control, surveillance methodologies, health information systems, health economics and occupational health and safety.

About James Cook University Medical School

JCU Medical School specializes in rural and remote medicine. The JCU program has a unique place among Australian medical schools. The course is undertaken entirely in northern Australia and has an emphasis on tropical medicine, the health of rural and remote communities, and of Aboriginal peoples and Torres Strait Islanders. The medical program is informed by a concern for social justice, innovation and excellence in medical education, research and service.

Medical students at JCU gain early experience in the tropical health care context and benefit from extensive clinical experience and a full course of medical education and training. The program attracts students, staff and clinicians with an ambition to make a difference, whatever their background, specialty or career direction.

Program: Bachelor of Medicine Bachelor of Surgery (MBBS)
Location: Townsville, Queensland
Semester intake: February 2015
Duration: 6 years
Application deadline: August 29, 2014

Entry Requirements for the JCU Medical Program

  • Entry is directly from high school. Students may also transfer into the program during their undergraduate degree or at the completion of their undergraduate degree.
  • High school cumulative average necessary to be considered is a minimum of 85% in Grade 12 subjects, including prerequisite subject grades.
  • If you are applying to the program after you have partially or fully completed your post-secondary studies, you should have a Canadian GPA of 80% cumulative average across all university studies, but to have a competitive application, applicants should have achieved at least an 82% cumulative average.
  • Interview: held in-person and via video conference

Apply to James Cook University Medical School!

*

Do you have questions about JCU Medical School and its MBBS program? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Officer Broghan Dean at broghan@oztrekk.com or call 1-866-698-7355 (toll free in Canada) for more information about how you can study in Australia!