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Posts Tagged ‘Sydney School of Public Health’

Monday, June 12th, 2017

Sydney School of Public wants to know if dogs make people happier

The effect of dog ownership on adult human health is the focus of a new pilot study by the University of Sydney.

Sydney School of Public wants to know if dogs make people happier

Do dogs make people feel happy?

Led by Associate Professor Emmanuel Stamatakis from the Charles Perkins Centre and Sydney School of Public Health, the research team is seeking 100 non-dog owners to participate in the trial—people who are considering owning a dog as well as those who have no interest in doing so.

“Dog ownership is very popular in Australia with over 40 percent of households owning at least one dog,” Associate Professor Stamatakis said. “While anecdotal evidence suggests dog ownership is beneficial for human health, there is currently scant scientific evidence to back up this perception.

“Our research will provide valuable insight into the health benefits of dog ownership which could support programs promoting and enabling dog ownership as a means to increase physical activity, improve general health and prevent cardiovascular and mental illness.”

Differences in physical activity, cardiovascular and metabolic health, and psychosocial well-being will be assessed for three groups: participants who acquire a dog within one month, after an eight-month waiting period, or do not adopt at all.

Over the course of eight months, participants in the Physical & Affective Wellbeing Study of dog owners (PAWS) pilot will be asked to complete a small number of questionnaires over the phone and visit the Charles Perkins Centre or be visited at home three times for some simple physical measurements.

“These initial results will also inform the methods of a much larger trial, the first controlled trial to examine the health effect of ‘real world’ dog ownership,” Associate Professor Stamatakis explained.

What is public health?

Public health is society’s response to threats to the collective health of its citizens. Public health practitioners work to enhance and protect the health of populations by identifying their health problems and needs, and providing programs and services to address these needs. Studying in this field as an international student gives Canadians an understanding of the public health realm on an international scale, making Australia a top choice for Canadians.

At the Sydney School of Public Health, the Master of Public Health program is open to students from health and non-health backgrounds. Public health is

  • preventing disease;
  • promoting health; and
  • prolonging life.

Program: Master of Public Health
Location: Sydney, New South Wales
Semester intakes: March and July
Duration: 1 year
Application deadline: Candidates are encouraged to apply a minimum of three months prior to the program’s start date.

Entry Requirements: A successful applicant for admission to the program requires

  • a minimum four-year full time degree or equivalent qualification from the University of Sydney or an equivalent qualification; or
  • a shorter degree from the University of Sydney or an equivalent qualification, and non-degree professional qualifications and/or substantial relevant experience and/or other relevant qualifications.

Apply to the Sydney Public Health School!

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If you have any questions about studying at the Sydney School of Public Health, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Public Health Schools Admissions Officer Adam Smith at adam@oztrekk.com.

Tuesday, July 19th, 2016

Study at the Sydney School of Public Health

Public health is
•   Preventing disease
•   Promoting health
•   Prolonging life

How do we encourage a more physically active population? How can we campaign to reduce tobacco use? How do we influence health policy?

Public health analyses and acts upon the problems that prevent us from enjoying a good healthy life. Achieving these goals comes in many forms: generating knowledge of the public health problem, advocating for change and solutions, and helping implement those changes. Above all, public health is about people – often the most vulnerable in our communities – giving them the power of education and programs which will improve their health, prevent diseases and prolong their lives.

Every day, graduates from the Sydney School of Public Health are making a difference to the lives of people in Australia and across the globe.

Sydney public health students and alumni talk about what drew them to the field, and where their postgraduate studies are taking them.

Learning opportunities are aimed at developing the essential knowledge and required skills of practitioners in the practice of public health, including the effective management of community health problems to improve conditions and outcomes. The programs are offered at a graduate diploma and master’s degree level with an emphasis on a modern approach to improving health outcomes within disadvantaged and developing communities.

With a large number of units of study to choose from, you can tailor the program to suit your individual needs. You may choose to take a variety of subjects or study subjects within one of five pathways:

  1. Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (Communicable Disease)
  2. Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (Injury)
  3. Public Health Research
  4. Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (Chronic Disease)
  5. Health Economics/Health Policy

Program: Master of Public Health
Location: Sydney, New South Wales
Semester intakes: March and July
Duration: 1 year
Application deadline: Candidates are encouraged to apply a minimum of three months prior to the program’s start date.

Entry Requirements: A successful applicant for admission to the Master of Public Health program requires

  • a minimum four-year full time degree or equivalent qualification from the University of Sydney or an equivalent qualification; or
  • a shorter degree from the University of Sydney or an equivalent qualification, and non-degree professional qualifications and/or substantial relevant experience and/or other relevant qualifications.

Apply to the Sydney Public Health School!

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If you have any questions about studying at the Sydney School of Public Health, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Public Health Schools Admissions Officer Adam Smith at adam@oztrekk.com.

Friday, January 29th, 2016

University of Sydney scholars named among world’s most influential scientific minds

Six University of Sydney scholars have been named among the world’s most influential scientific minds in a new analysis of thousands of academic papers by Thomson Reuters.

The World’s Most Influential Scientific Minds 2015 report is based on the number of cited research papers an academic published from 2003 to 2013.

University of Sydney Medical School

Learn more about studying at the University of Sydney

It identifies the best and most influential scholars from among the world’s estimated nine million researchers who publish upwards of two million papers each year.

The report also includes a ranking of the “hottest researchers” whose recently published papers were cited at extraordinarily high levels over a short period of time.

Highly cited scholars were assigned to one of 21 main specialty areas, based on a majority of the specific journals in which they published their highly cited papers between 2003 and 2013. The large, populous and active life-sciences fields of Clinical Medicine, Biology and Biochemistry, and Molecular Biology and Genetics were prolific in producing highly cited researchers.

By contrast, smaller fields such as Computer Science, Mathematics and Economics and Business, with comparatively lower numbers of researchers and journals, produced proportionally fewer highly cited scholars.

The six University of Sydney scholars named among the world’s most influential scientific minds:

Emeritus Professor Bruce Armstrong – Sydney School of Public Health, Sax Institute, Sydney Medical School. Citation field: social sciences.

Professor Adrian Bauman – Sydney School of Public Health, Charles Perkins Centre, Sydney Medical School. Citation field: social sciences.

Professor Manfred Lenzen – School of Physics, Faculty of Science. Citation field: economics and business.

Professor Stephen MacMahon – The George Institute for Global Health, Sydney Medical School. Citation field: clinical medicine.

Professor Bruce Neal – The George Institute for Global Health, Sydney Medical School. Citation field: clinical medicine.

Professor Mark Woodward – The George Institute for Global Health, Sydney Medical School. Citation field: clinical medicine.

Australia had 103 highly cited scholars, ranking fifth behind the US, UK, Germany and China. The USA’s University of California System was the leading university represented with 160 highly cited researchers, followed by Harvard University.

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Would you like more information about the programs offered at the University of Sydney? Contact OzTREKK at info@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Monday, December 22nd, 2014

Sydney Master of Public Health

Public health aims to improve the health of populations through knowledge (collecting data to develop and test explanations and hypotheses), values (combining ethics with knowledge to assist in decision-making), action (making decisions to translate research into policy and practice and advocate for change) and outcomes (understanding research and practice to systematically evaluate public health programs).

University of Sydney Public Health School

Study public health at the University of Sydney

About Sydney Public Health School

The public health program at the Sydney Public Health School focuses on the prevention of illness and the promotion of health, with practitioners playing a proactive rather than a reactive role, especially with regard to the coordination of relevant community resources. The program provides the opportunity to develop skills and acquire knowledge essential for the effective practice of public health, including the effective management of community health problems.

Students in the public health program at the University of Sydney will be exposed to public health values, decision-making, practice and policy throughout their studies.

Graduate opportunities

The Master of Public Health leads to hands on careers in public health, such as working with people in the field, as well as research-oriented jobs which involve conducting studies and examining overall health trends. Careers in public health include working as a public health officer in government health departments; health education/promotion officer; clinical research manager; health information manager or health project manager.

Program: Master of Public Health
Location: Sydney, New South Wales
Semester intakes: March and July
Duration: 1 year

Apply to the Sydney Public Health School!

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If you have any questions about studying public health at the Sydney Public Health School, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Public Health Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Wednesday, June 25th, 2014

Sydney Public Health School studies the road to poor health

As little as two hours a day behind the wheel is a potential risk factor for a range of poor health behaviours and outcomes, a University of Sydney study has shown.

University of Sydney Public Health School

Study public health at the University of Sydney

Published in PLOS One journal, the study of nearly 40,000 Australians aged 47-75 years found that people who drive for two hours or more per day are more likely to smoke, to be obese, and to be less physically active.

Lead author Dr Ding Ding, from the University of Sydney School of Public Health, said that “The research also reveals that people who drive for two hours or more daily are more likely to be stressed, sleep-deprived, have poorer self-rated health and quality of life.

“We found a dose-response relationship between driving time and a clustering of health risk behaviours, particularly smoking, physical inactivity, and insufficient sleep. The more time people spent driving, the greater their odds of having poor health and risk factors for poor health.”

People who drive more than two hours a day had 78% elevated risk of being obese, and 57% elevated risk of insufficient physical activity.

“The study’s findings are relevant to middle aged and older people who drive on a daily basis, for any reason, not just professional drivers,” Dr Ding said.

Elevated risks linked to driving two hours or more a day:

  • 78% obesity
  • 57% insufficient physical activity (less than 150 minutes per week)
  • 86% insufficient sleep (less than 7 hours a day)
  • 43% poor quality of life
  • 33% psychological distress

The observed link between driving time and health risks were independent of socioeconomic factors such as age, gender and education levels.

This cross-sectional study is among the first to examine the associations of driving time with a range of health behaviors and outcomes.

“Findings from the current study are consistent with some previous research that linked driving to cardio-metabolic health,” says Dr Ding. “However, further research is needed to confirm causality and to understand the mechanisms for the observed associations.

“This study highlights driving as a potential lifestyle risk factor for public health, and future lifestyle interventions and transportation planning initiatives may consider reducing driving time as a strategy for promoting health and well-being in the community.”

About the public health program at the University of Sydney

The public health program at the Sydney Public Health School focuses on the prevention of illness and the promotion of health, with practitioners playing a proactive rather than a reactive role, especially with regard to the coordination of relevant community resources. The program provides the opportunity to develop skills and acquire knowledge essential for the effective practice of public health, including the effective management of community health problems.

Program: Master of Public Health
Location: Sydney, New South Wales
Semester intakes: July 2014 and March 2015
Duration: 1 year
Application deadline: June 30 for the July 2014 intake; January 31, 2015 for the March 2015 intake. International applicants are strongly encouraged to apply as early as possible (a minimum of three months prior to the program’s start date).

Apply to the Sydney Public Health School!

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If you have any questions about studying public health at the Sydney Public Health School, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Public Health Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1 866-698-7355.

Wednesday, April 30th, 2014

Sydney Public Health School’s vision, mission, and values

Public health analyses and acts upon the problems that prevent us from enjoying a good healthy life. It also promotes ways in which we can achieve justice for people no matter what their background. Achieving these goals comes in many forms: generating knowledge of the public health problem, advocating for change and solutions, and helping implement those changes. The Sydney Public Health School’s teaching and research is driven by the common goal of improving the health of people.

University of Sydney Public Health School

Find out how you can study at the University of Sydney

Vision

The Sydney Public Health School vision is for a global community where everyone’s needs for good health and well-being are met. The school’s vision extends to those with the greatest need, who would benefit most from improved health and reduced inequalities.

Mission

Their mission is to lead improvements in health, well-being and equity in Australia and worldwide by

  • contributing to the definition of public health problems and clinical epidemiology;
  • advancing and disseminating knowledge in public health and clinical epidemiology to inform policy and practice;
  • understanding the social, cultural, political, economic and ethical context of health problems and solutions;
  • promoting action through policy and interventions that focus on systems, places and markets, as well as on individuals and their behaviours; and by
  • excelling in evaluation to improve health policy and practice.

The Sydney Public Health School will do this by providing high quality, accessible education, conducting outstanding, high-impact research and working in partnership to translate knowledge into policy, action and evaluation. Where possible, they will use the latest technology and media to extend their reach, accessibility and impact in communities well beyond the school vicinity.

Values

The University of Sydney School of Public Health values innovation, justice and respect for others. The pursuit of their vision and mission requires integrity, rigorous social and scientific inquiry, and a collegiate environment. The school is committed to

  • its staff members—providing a happy, diverse and supportive work environment;
  • its students—stimulating engaged learning that encourages critical thinking—about old and new ideas, and a culture that promotes originality and honesty;
  • communities—staying connected with communities both by sharing knowledge widely and by communicating directly with those who stand to benefit most, including through contemporary information technology and advancement of open-access publication of research;
  • the public health profession—the advancement of public health and its constituent disciplines, including participating in all activities that support the peer review system and advancement of ideas;
  • its partners—working in partnership with government, non-government and other agencies, both within and outside health, to increase the effectiveness and impact of the school’s work;
  • financial responsibility and sustainability.

University of Sydney School of Public Health

The Sydney School of Public Health is a vibrant, multidisciplinary network of individuals and centres which combine to provide exceptional and internationally recognized education opportunities in the field of public health. Sydney Public Health School has gained an outstanding reputation for the quality of its research programs and for the expertise of its academic staff.

The school is renowned for its excellence in teaching in areas such as epidemiology, biostatistics, health promotion, health economics, health advocacy and evidence-based healthcare. Study opportunities include research degrees and coursework master’s degrees, graduate diplomas and in some cases graduate certificates, most of which are open to local and international students.

Program: Master of Public Health
Location: Sydney, New South Wales
Semester intake: March and July
Duration: 1 year
Application deadline: May 31, 2014 for the July 2014 intake; and January 31, 2015 for the March 2015 intake.

Entry Requirements: A successful applicant for admission to the Master of Public Health program requires

  • a minimum four-year full time degree or equivalent qualification from the University of Sydney or an equivalent qualification; or
  • a shorter degree from the University of Sydney or an equivalent qualification, and non-degree professional qualifications and/or substantial relevant experience and/or other relevant qualifications.

Apply to the Sydney Public Health School!

*

If you have any questions about studying public health at the Sydney Public Health School, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Public Health Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Friday, April 4th, 2014

Sydney Public Health studies lower back pain

Lower back pain linked to workplace factors accounts for a third of all work-related disability worldwide, according to research led by the University of Sydney and conducted by an international team of researchers.

University of Sydney Public Health School

Study at the University of Sydney, Australia

The research, published recently in the Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, aimed to assess the burden arising from lower back pain due to occupational exposure to ergonomic risk factors.

Lead author Professor Tim Driscoll, Sydney School of Public Health, said that lower back pain arising from ergonomic exposures at work is a major cause of disability.

“The people most at risk were those who work in the agricultural sector, and those aged 35–65. However, low back pain is a problem for people in many occupations.

“Based on published research, agricultural sector workers were almost four times as likely to develop low back pain disability as any other group of workers,” he said.

Ergonomic factors linked to low back pain occurrence are lifting, forceful movement, awkward positions and vibration.

“These factors are common in the agricultural sector,” Professor Driscoll said.

Published data shows that in Australia, back pain is the leading cause of work loss days with 25 per cent of sufferers in the 18–44 age group taking 10 or more days off per year, and costing Australia around $4.8 billion each year for health care.

On any given day in Australia, one quarter of the population is suffering back pain, and nearly 80 per cent of adult Australians will experience back pain some time during their lives.

In the study, disability arising from work was measured as disability adjusted life years (DALYs), calculated from a combination of years of life lost due to premature death and years of life lived with disability.

“The calculations showed that in 2010 there were nearly 22 million DALYs worldwide caused by workplace related low back pain,” Professor Driscoll said.

“The burden was considerable in all regions, all age groups, and both genders with 13.5 million DALYs in men and 8.3 million in women.

“The highest rate of DALYs occurred in Asia, Oceania and parts of Africa—places where employment in agriculture is more common, but rates were considerable in all regions.

“Lower back pain arising from ergonomic exposures at work is a major cause of disability worldwide. There is a need for improved information on exposure risks, particularly in developing countries, to help better understand the burden. This should lead to better prevention of back pain and injury, as well as decreased lost work time due to back pain,” Professor Driscoll said.

The work was undertaken as part of the Global Burden of Disease 2010 study (GBD 2010), which assesses ill health and disability arising from all conditions in 187 countries for 1990, 2005, and 2010. The GBD 2010 study was funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.

About Sydney Public Health School

The public health program at the Sydney Public Health School focuses on the prevention of illness and the promotion of health, with practitioners playing a proactive rather than a reactive role, especially with regard to the coordination of relevant community resources. The program provides the opportunity to develop skills and acquire knowledge essential for the effective practice of public health, including the effective management of community health problems.

Program: Master of Public Health
Location: Sydney, New South Wales
Semester intake: July 2014 and March 2015
Duration: 1 year
Application deadline: Application deadlines for the University of Sydney’s Master of Public Health are May 31, 2014 for the July 2014 intake, and Jan. 31, 2015 for the March 2015 intake.

Apply to the Sydney Public Health School!

*

If you have any questions about studying public health at the Sydney Public Health School, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Public Health Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1 866-698-7355.

Monday, March 17th, 2014

What is public health?

Are you considering a career in the healthcare industry, but not convinced hands-on medicine or nursing is up your alley? Or maybe you are a nurse who is looking to expand your career opportunities. Have you considered a career in public health?

University of Sydney Public Health School

The University of Sydney has many public health programs

How do we encourage a more physically active population? How can we campaign to reduce tobacco use? How do we influence health policy?

These are some of the questions in public health.

The cultural and professional diversity of University of Sydney students makes studying at the university a unique experience. Students learn from their peers as well as from their teachers. The environment is stimulating and intellectual. Sydney Public Health students graduate with skills, knowledge and passion, making them lifelong advocates for improving population health.

Public health a the University of Sydney is open to students from health and non-health backgrounds. Public health is

  • preventing disease;
  • promoting health; and
  • prolonging life.

Sydney Public Health graduates work in Australia and internationally in a wide variety of careers in government and non-government organizations, and are in demand in international aid agencies such as the World Health Organization (WHO) and the United Nations Population Fund. Opportunities for further research are available at universities and in private sectors.

University of Sydney School of Public Health

The Sydney School of Public Health is a vibrant, multidisciplinary network of individuals and centres which combine to provide exceptional and internationally recognized education opportunities in the field of public health. Sydney Public Health School has gained an outstanding reputation for the quality of its research programs and for the expertise of its academic staff.

The school is renowned for its excellence in teaching in areas such as epidemiology, biostatistics, health promotion, health economics, health advocacy and evidence-based healthcare. Study opportunities include research degrees and coursework master’s degrees, graduate diplomas and in some cases graduate certificates, most of which are open to local and international students.

Public health programs at the University of Sydney

Public health (Graduate Diploma and Master) – These courses are usually chosen by those who plan to work in developed countries.

International Public Health (Graduate Diploma and Master’s) – Sydney offers the longest-running Master of International Public Health program in NSW, and one of only a few in Australia. These courses are usually chosen by those who wish to work in developing countries or resource-poor settings.

Clinical Epidemiology (Graduate Certificate, Graduate Diploma and Master’s) – The range of courses gives clinicians—doctors, nurses, and other health professionals—the opportunity to appraise and carry out research and to practice evidence-based health care.

Health Policy (Graduate Certificate, Graduate Diploma and Master’s) – A critical perspective on the health care system and skills in developing and implementing health policy.

Biostatistics (Specialist courses Graduate Certificate, Graduate Diploma and Masters) – In the use of highly sophisticated mathematical models to evaluate public health data, intended for those interested in a career as a biostatistician.

Health Communication (Graduate Certificate, Graduate Diploma and Master’s) – Provide both media skills for professional communicators in health and medicine working in public affairs, public relations, community relations and journalism as well as a solid, evidence-based education in public health issues.

Bioethics  (Graduate Certificate, Graduate Diploma and Master’s) – Provide an understanding of the interaction between advances in biotechnology and society, the complex relationship between morality, mental health and the law, euthanasia and end-of-life care, human and animal research ethics, stem cell research and cloning.

Qualitative Health Research (Graduate Certificate, Graduate Diploma and Master’s) – Provide hands-on training in qualitative research practice, sophisticated engagement with qualitative research theory and methodology, and solid preparation in health issues. Would you like to spend your days sorting out how health fits into people’s everyday lives? Untangling the way things work in health and medical organizations? Making sense of people’s stories about their illness? Better understanding health-related practices in different cultures (or your own cultures)? Then qualitative research is for you!

Indigenous Health Promotion and Indigenous Health (Substance Use) – Courses are offered for Aboriginal health professionals.

Program: Master of Public Health
Location: Sydney, New South Wales
Semester intake: March and July
Duration: 1 year
Application deadline: May 31, 2014 for the July 2014 intake; and January 31, 2015 for the March 2015 intake.

Entry Requirements: A successful applicant for admission to the Master of Public Health program requires

  • a minimum four-year full time degree or equivalent qualification from the University of Sydney or an equivalent qualification; or
  • a shorter degree from the University of Sydney or an equivalent qualification, and non-degree professional qualifications and/or substantial relevant experience and/or other relevant qualifications.

Apply to the Sydney Public Health School!

*

If you have any questions about studying public health at the Sydney Public Health School, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Public Health Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Friday, February 14th, 2014

Sydney researchers say number one cause of ill health is poor diet

Australians are being failed by national efforts to make foods healthier, Australian researchers have found. Foods continue to be laden with fat, sugar and salt with few controls on food manufacturers.

Sydney Public Health School

Learn more about Sydney Public Health

Professor Bruce Neal, at The George Institute and the University of Sydney, led a team that evaluated the Federal Government’s Food and Health Dialogue, and found it wanting. “It has fantastic aims but a very weak implementation plan,” he said.

The evaluation was published recently in the Medical Journal of Australia.

The Food and Health Dialogue was launched by the government in mid-2009 to improve the nutritional profile of foods and help educate consumers about their diets.

But the new research shows that in the first 4 years, targets were set for just 11 out of a possible 124 action areas (8.9%) and none had been delivered. There was also no evidence that any of the proposed educational programs had been implemented.

“Poor diet is now an even bigger cause of ill health for Australia than smoking,” said Professor Neal.

“Unfortunately, while the government has been doing a stellar job on tobacco control, it’s not doing quite so well in the food space.”

“If we are to get on top of health problems like obesity, diabetes and heart disease we have to fully implement the Dialogue objectives. The huge quantities of salt, sugar and fat added to the food supply by industry are now the main cause of ill health in the country, and the dialogue is the only serious attempt to get on top of this.”

“Clearly this is a complex and ongoing process. Some companies have been making a real effort, but if you look at the big picture progress has been depressingly slow,” Professor Neal said.

Professor Rob Moodie, a co-author from the University of Melbourne, reinforced the urgent need for action: “We need the government to make this a priority, and we have to find a way to strengthen a process that relies upon the voluntary engagement of industry. Powerful industry lobby groups like the Australian Food and Grocery Council are stifling action.”

The authors compared the dialogue to successful programs in the US and the UK and highlight the need for stronger leadership, transparency and regular reporting.

Jane Martin from the Obesity Policy Coalition said, “The UK experience has shown that these types of initiative can be effective but action in Australia is occurring at a glacial pace. If we don’t want to be the first generation to outlive our children, then we need to get serious about improving diets, particularly in children. We need meaningful targets, with sanctions for non-compliance and we need the government to take a strong stance and lead the way on this.”

The evaluation is calling for more effective implementation, Professor Neal says, with three key groups of recommendations:

  • Rationalizing of stakeholder roles – government and public health groups must set the policies. The food industry must deliver them. Government needs to take a stronger leadership role.
  • Clear targets and timelines, with consequences for non-achievement – i.e., enforcement if voluntary measures fail to deliver. Currently, business incentives all push for the addition of more salt, fat and sugar in order to maximize profit.
  • Better transparency and reporting – the successes and failures of individual industry players need to be highlighted, with easy community access to information that will empower consumer choices.

About Sydney Public Health School

The public health program at the Sydney Public Health School focuses on the prevention of illness and the promotion of health, with practitioners playing a proactive rather than a reactive role, especially with regard to the coordination of relevant community resources. The program provides the opportunity to develop skills and acquire knowledge essential for the effective practice of public health, including the effective management of community health problems.

Program: Master of Public Health
Location: Sydney, New South Wales
Semester intake: July 2014 and March 2015
Duration: 1 year
Application deadline: Application deadlines for the University of Sydney’s Master of Public Health are May 31, 2014 for the July 2014 intake, and Jan. 31, 2015 for the March 2015 intake.

Apply to the Sydney Public Health School!

*

If you have any questions about studying public health at the Sydney Public Health School, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Public Health Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1 866-698-7355.

Monday, January 13th, 2014

Sydney Public Health taking the heat out of jellyfish stings

Everyone has their own theory about how to best relieve the pain of a jellyfish sting (remember the Friends episode about how Chandler has to “step up” to help Monica after she was stung by a jellyfish?); however, a team of University of Sydney researchers has examined a host of often-used methods to determine which is the most effective.

Sydney Public Health School

Study public health at the University of Sydney

Their research, published in the Cochrane Library in December 2013, has revealed that the best way to relieve the pain of a sting is not vinegar as commonly thought, but hot water immersion.

Senior author of the paper Associate Professor Angela Webster, from the Sydney School of Public Health, said that despite jellyfish stings being such a common problem in Australia, particularly in the summer months, a summary of good-quality research has not existed to guide effective treatment.

“Between 2010 and 2011, there were 40,000 cases of marine sting emergency care around Australia, as reported by Surf Life Saving Australia. Many treatments have been suggested to relieve the symptoms of jellyfish stings; however, it was unclear which interventions were most effective,” she said.

All jellyfish possess specialized stinging cells called nematocysts, which are triggered by physical or chemical stimuli, after which a barb is fired and venom is injected into the victim.

A jellyfish sting may produce a range of signs and symptoms, of varying severity, due to the number of nematocysts which may discharge during a “sting” and the potential toxicity of the venom.

Milder symptoms of a jellyfish sting include pain and skin reactions (redness and itching at the site of the sting), with more severe reactions including tachycardia (increased heart rate) and hypertension (high blood pressure). The pain of a jellyfish sting can be severe and may last for weeks.

“Our research showed that immersing the sting in hot water was fifty percent more effective than ice packs in relieving pain,” she said.

“A hot shower following bluebottle stings is the best treatment for pain. Treating the sting with vinegar or Adolph’s meat tenderiser compared with hot water actually made the skin appear worse,” the Sydney Public Health School associate professor, adding that this research will allow organizations like Surf Life Saving to make evidence-based treatment recommendations and help thousands of people experiencing painful jellyfish stings this summer.

About the study

The research was a collaboration of lead author Li Li (Sydney Medical School), Richard McGee (Sydney School of Public Health), Geoff Isbister (University of Newcastle), and Angela Webster (Sydney Medical School).

The collaborative research paper was published on the Cochrane library, which is renowned worldwide for producing reliable summaries of the best evidence available for treatments.

About Sydney Public Health School

The Sydney School of Public Health is a vibrant, multidisciplinary network of individuals and centres which combine to provide exceptional and internationally recognized education opportunities in the field of public health.

The public health program at the Sydney Public Health School focuses on the prevention of illness and the promotion of health, with practitioners playing a proactive rather than a reactive role, especially with regard to the coordination of relevant community resources. The program provides the opportunity to develop skills and acquire knowledge essential for the effective practice of public health, including the effective management of community health problems.

Program: Master of Public Health
Location: Sydney, New South Wales
Semester intake: March and July
Duration: 1 year
Application deadline: Application deadlines for the University of Sydney’s Master of Public Health are Jan. 31, 2014 for the March 2014 intake; and May 31, 2014 for the July 2014 intake.

Entry Requirements: A successful applicant for admission to the Master of Public Health program requires

  • a minimum four-year full time degree or equivalent qualification from the University of Sydney or an equivalent qualification; or
  • a shorter degree from the University of Sydney or an equivalent qualification, and non-degree professional qualifications and/or substantial relevant experience and/or other relevant qualifications.

Apply to the Sydney Public Health School!

*

If you have any questions about studying public health at the Sydney Public Health School, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Public Health Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1 866-698-7355.

Contact OzTREKK for more information about how you can study in Australia and about public health programs at Australian universities.