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Posts Tagged ‘Study Law in Australia’

Monday, February 12th, 2018

OzTREKK Study Law in Australia information sessions with Bond University

Would you like to learn more about studying at Bond Law School, Australia?

OzTREKK is proud to host the upcoming Study Law in Australia info sessions with Bond University. Joining OzTREKK’s John Graham will be Bond University International Regional Manager Stuart Floyd, who is based in Toronto full time and is familiar with what Canadians “need to know” about studying law in Australia!

OzTREKK Study Law in Australia information sessions with Bond University

Learn more about Bond Law School at the upcoming info sessions!

Bond is Australia’s largest law school for Canadian Juris Doctor and Bachelor of Laws candidates. Bond has strong links with Canada and has been training Canadian lawyers for more than 20 years. There are currently more than 150 Canadian students studying law at Bond University and an active Canadian Law Students’ Association.

OzTREKK Study Law in Australia Information Sessions

Date: Tuesday, Feb. 13, 2018
Time: 7 – 9 p.m.
Location: Trent University,  Gzowski College, Room 110

Date: Wednesday, Feb. 14, 2018
Time: 2:30 – 4:30 p.m.
Location: Carleton University, Southam Hall, Room 404

Date: Thursday, Feb. 15, 2018
Time: 6 – 10 p.m.
Location: Concordia University, John Molson School of Business, Conference Room 9B

Date: Friday, Feb. 16, 2018
Time: 12 – 1:30 p.m. & 2:30 – 4 p.m.
Location: McGill University,  SSMU University Centre, Lev Bukhman Room 203 (3480 McTavish St. )

Study at Bond Law School

Recognized as one of the top-ranked Australian law schools, Bond Law School has earned a reputation for its innovative teaching methods, international focus, skills training, and the outstanding success of its graduates. The Bond JD’s combination of excellent teaching, small classes and an extensive legal skills program differentiates Bond from other institutions. It provides an exciting learning experience that both challenges students academically and prepares them practically for a legal career.

With three intakes per year, January, May and September, Bond Law Juris Doctor candidates are able to apply any time throughout the year—and the LSAT is not required!

Program: Juris Doctor (JD)
Location: Gold Coast, Queensland
Semester intakes: January, May, September
Next available intake: May 2018
Duration: 2 years
Application deadline: Candidates are encouraged to apply a minimum of three months prior to the program start date.

Apply now to Bond Law School!

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For details about the upcoming OzTREKK Study Law in Australia info sessions with Bond University, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Law Schools Admissions Officer Molly Mahon at molly@oztrekk.com.

Friday, February 9th, 2018

Ryerson Law Practice Program webinars

Graduate qualifications in law from Australian Law Schools are recognized internationally. Very often, the process of coming back to Canada to practice law causes some confusion and concern, and we are often asked, What happens after I graduate? Articling or Law Practice Program?

Ryerson University will be holding two Law Practice Program webinars. Together with the Managing Director Chris Bentley, Director Gina Alexandris, and Assistant Director, Work Placement André Bacchus, you will also hear from current and former LPP candidates.

Ryerson Law Practice Program webinars

Study law in Australia—practice in Canada

  • Monday, February 12, 2018 (12–1:30 p.m. EST)
  • Tuesday, March 20, 2018 (6–7:30 p.m. EST)

Register now for a Ryerson LPP webinar.

About the Ryerson Law Practice Program

Ryerson’s Law Practice Program (LPP) is the innovative eight-month licensing program available to Law Society of Ontario licensing candidates seeking to get called to the Bar in Ontario.

Practical Training (August – December)

  • Candidates work both individually and in “law firms” supported by practicing lawyers
  • Practical—files developed by practicing lawyers
  • Relevant—interview clients, conduct research, draft documents, letters and agreements, develop an approach, conduct negotiations, prepare the client, argue motions, conduct examinations and cross-examinations, and manage the client and the practice

Work Placement (January – April)

  • Candidates are trained to hit the ground running
  • Employers include major institutions, large and small firms, specialty boutiques, governments, clinics and sole practitioners throughout Ontario
  • Practical—files developed by practicing lawyers

Join an upcoming Ryerson LLP webinar and learn more about an alternative pathway to articling in Ontario from the senior leadership at the Ryerson LPP.

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If you have any questions specific to the program or the webinars, please reach out to them directly at 416-979-5000, ext. 3024 or lpp@ryerson.ca.

Monday, January 30th, 2017

Don’t miss the Australian Law School seminars

If you’re wondering what it’s like to study law in Australia and then practice in Canada, then don’t miss the upcoming OzTREKK Australian Law Schools Information Sessions!

Meet Australian law alumni who are successfully practicing in Canada, and chat with Australian law school representatives to learn more about your study and career options!

Don't miss the Australian Law School seminars

Don’t forget to RSVP Australian Law Schools Seminars Jan. 30 – Feb. 9, 2017

During the seminars, you will have the opportunity to speak with Australian law school graduates who are successfully practicing law in Canada. Learn more about how to get into law school, the accreditation process, program structures, and much more!

VANCOUVER
Date: January 30, 2017
Time: 5 p.m.
Location: University of British Columbia, Allard Hall, Fasken Martineau Room 122

MONTREAL
Date: February 6, 2017
Time: 6 p.m.
Location: Adams Auditorium

TORONTO
Date: February 8, 2017
Time: 5 p.m.
Location: University of Toronto, Social Work Building, SK 720

Don’t forget to RSVP for an OzTREKK Australian Law Schools Information Session!

OzTREKK represents nine Australian Law Schools:

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Don’t miss the upcoming OzTREKK Australian Law Schools Information Sessions! Contact OzTREKK Australian Law Schools Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com if you have any questions. We’re here to help!

Friday, January 20th, 2017

Wondering how you can get into law school?

Are you interested in studying law but unsure about your options? Would you like to hear from law graduates who have studied in Australia and are now practicing lawyers in Canada?

Get into law school?

RSVP for an OzTREKK Australian Law Schools seminar!

Then please join OzTREKK, Australian law school representatives, and law school alumni for the upcoming OzTREKK Australian Law Schools Information Sessions!

During the seminars, you will have the opportunity to speak with Australian law school graduates who are successfully practicing law in Canada. Learn more about how to get into law school, the accreditation process, program structures, and much more!

VANCOUVER
Date: January 30, 2017
Time: 5 p.m.
Location: University of British Columbia, Allard Hall, Fasken Martineau Room 122

MONTREAL
Date: February 6, 2017
Time: 6 p.m.
Location: Adams Auditorium

TORONTO
Date: February 8, 2017
Time: 5 p.m.
Location: University of Toronto, Social Work Building, SK 720

Don’t forget to RSVP for an OzTREKK Australian Law Schools Information Session!

OzTREKK represents nine Australian Law Schools:

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Don’t miss the upcoming OzTREKK Australian Law Schools Information Sessions! Contact OzTREKK Australian Law Schools Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com if you have any questions. We’re here to help!

Monday, May 13th, 2013

National Law Week in Australia

National Law Week in Australia takes place throughout Australia in May each year. This year, it runs from May 13 – 1. Law Week provides Australians (and visitors) to get a closer look at how law and justice works in each Australian state.

Law Week events in Australia are organized individually or by a group of organizations collaborating to share ideas and resources. Some examples of organizations who participate in and support Law Week include the Courts Administration Authority, law firms, Australian police departments, municipal libraries, community legal centres, legal aid,  and the Attorney General’s Department. Usually, Law Week‘s major highlight is Courts Open Day, which provides a chance to explore the rich heritage of the courts. Tours, mock trials, sentencing exercises and meet-the-judge sessions give visitors an insight into court operations and personalities.

Law Week events are aimed at the whole community. These events provide opportunities for people from all walks of life to gain new perspectives on legal and justice issues. These events will be of interest to those who work in legal and justice agencies and students, especially students studying at Australian Law Schools.

About Law Programs in Australia

The Bachelor of Laws (LLB) is an undergraduate law degree. It is designed to equip students for a career in the legal profession. Australian students, like those from virtually all other Commonwealth countries except Canada, can enter the LLB program directly from high school. This is modelled on the system in the U.K. Some Australian universities also offer graduate-entry LLB degrees for those who have already completed a bachelor degree.

Both the Juris Doctor (JD) and the postgraduate Bachelor of Laws are graduate law degrees. They are designed to equip students for a career in the legal profession. Students must have completed an undergraduate degree to be eligible for entry into either one of these programs.

Apply to an Australian Law School:

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For more information about law school entry requirements, application deadlines, tuition fees, scholarships, please visit OzTREKK‘s Australian Law Schools page or contact OzTREKK Australian Law Schools Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston: Email Shannon at shannon@oztrekk.com or call (toll free in Canada) at 1 866-698-7355.

Contact OzTREKK for more information about how OzTREKK helps you to study in Australia and about law programs at Australian universities.


 

Monday, May 6th, 2013

Sydney Law School leads constitutional discussions in Myanmar

The Sydney Law School is leading Australia’s charge to lay the foundations for Burmese democracy by hosting a constitutional workshop in Yangon this week.

Initiated by a conversation in 2011 between Myanmar’s democratic stalwart Aung San Suu Kyi and the Sydney Law School‘s Chair of Jurisprudence Professor Wojciech Sadurski, the three-day workshop will bring academic constitutional experts together with key Burmese opinion leaders decision makers and intellectuals involved in the nation’s democratic transition. Suu-Kyi and others from across the political spectrum will attend.

Myanmar’s current constitution, adopted in 2008 after a lengthy convention, is generally regarded as needing amendment or an outright change if it is to support a robust democracy where the three arms of government—the executive, legislature and judiciary—keep each other in check, says the Sydney Law School professor. It also needs to review the role of the military in government and better support the country’s move towards decentralization, considered necessary to respect the country’s ethnic diversity.

“The current constitution requires a quarter of MPs to be from the military and gives the executive branch of government excessive control over the political system and the judiciary,” says Professor Sadurski. “More and more people in Myanmar conclude that the current constitution is not a good basis for transition to democracy.”

Recent reports of ethnic cleansing in the state of Arakan highlights the need for a federal approach that accounts for the country’s numerous ethnic groups, largely divided along geographic lines. “Federalism is an area in which Australia’s speakers are particularly well versed,” says Professor Sadurski.

Fellow event organizer, speaker and Sydney Law School adjunct lecturer Andrew McLeod says the workshop aims to teach Myanmar’s emerging leaders about the fundamental aspects of constitutionalism.

“We don’t propose to draft a new constitution or suggest specific changes. This needs to be worked out by people within the country. Our speakers will instead drive home the message that good constitutional design is crucial for creating an enduring democracy, outline key elements of effective constitutions in other democratic systems and emphasize that one can learn a lot from other ‘transitional democracies’.”

Project organizers have invited political leaders and activists, MPs, public servants, academics, journalists, lawyers and NGOs to participate in the Myanmar Constitutional Democracy Workshop. Speakers include experts from Australian universities, as well as from Canada and Singapore, and project patron Janelle Saffin, the federal MP for Page.

Professor Sadurski says it is intended that the May 8 – 10 event will lead to ongoing dialogue with those engaged in Myanmar’s democratic reform. “We hope that it will not be just a one-off event.”

The Myanmar Constitutional Democracy Workshop has been principally funded by the Australian Federal Government via the Australian embassy in Yangon. Additional funding has come from the Sydney Law School (which spearheaded the initiative), the University of NSW Law School, the Australian National University, the Konrad-Adenauer Foundation, DLA Piper and Rotary International.

About Sydney Law School

Sydney Law School is one of Australia’s leading law schools, preparing graduates for national, transnational and international legal career. The University of Sydney‘s international vision is supported by recent achievements:

Apply now to the University of Sydney Law School LLB program!

Apply now to  the University of Sydney Law School JD Program!

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For information about Sydney Law School’s entry requirements, application deadlines, tuition fees, scholarships, please visit OzTREKKs Law Schools in Australia page.

Questions about studying law at the University of Sydney? Contact OzTREKK Australian Law Schools Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston. You can email Shannon at shannon@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1 866-698-7355.

Contact OzTREKK for more information about how you can study in Australia and about law programs at Australian universities!


Friday, April 19th, 2013

OzTREKK chats with Jordan Assaraf about his Bond Law School experience

As many of you know, the majority of Canadian students that study at Bond University, study at the Bond Law School.

OzTREKK student Jordarn Assaraf studied at Bond University Law School

OzTREKK student Jordan Assaraf (left) with roommates Brandon Ament (middle) and Mikki Levy

Jordan Assaraf is no exception.

The Thornhill, Ontario native’s Australian journey brought him to Bond University Law School’s Juris Doctor program in 2009. We at OzTREKK like to keep in touch with former OzTREKK students, as we feel it is important to learn from our students’ journeys in order to better assist future students. Who better to pass on program information and experiences than students who have been there, done that?

Even though he is extremely busy at Toronto law firm Gluckstein Personal Injury Lawyers, Jordan graciously agreed to share his experiences about studying at Bond Law School. Interested in what it’s really like to study law at Bond? Read on, OzTREKKers!

OzTREKK: What  is the JD course load like at Bond?

Jordan: I treated school like a full-time job. I would wake up early morning, go for a run on the beach or a surf and then go to school for about 9 a.m. At school I would do any work I had, attend classes for the day, even go to gym, and then continue with my studies or readings until about 6 p.m. when I would go home for dinner. I was able to take most evenings off to relax. At the beginning of the semester, weekends were free and my course load was smaller. Toward the middle of the semester, if I had mid-term assignments or assessments, I would continue to work on my assignments and studies on the weekends. Following the middle of the semester, my course load would lighten again for about three weeks. At about week nine or 10, I would begin  exam preparation and my course load would increase to six days a week of study time. During exam time, I would have my head in the books and grind away until my exams were complete.

OzTREKK: What kind of school/life balance did you have?

Jordan: During the week, my evenings were usually free as I scheduled my classes, completion of assignments and studies during the day. On Thursday nights, most students would take off because that was the student “party night.”  Again, if you are diligent and stay on top of your work during the week and get your tutorials and readings done during the weekdays, you are able to go to Sydney or Melbourne at least one weekend per semester, like I did.

During exam time, however, you don’t have any free time—except for the gym or a surf, whichever break you decide to give yourself!

“By preparing and participating in your tutorials, you will better understand the course and will be better prepared for your upcoming exams.”

OzTREKK: Were you able to join any clubs at the university (e.g., the Canadian Law Students’ Association)?

Jordan: I was president of the Bond University Tennis Club, and I was able to organize one tournament, which was a great experience and taught valuable networking skills as well administrative skills, which are not typically taught in a lecture/classroom.  Also, I was able to train with the tennis team two mornings a week.

I am also proud to say that during my first semester at Bond I was part of the cheerleading team. (Laughs)

I have plenty of friends who were on the Canadian Law Students’ Association (CLSA), but because of the frequency and variety of meetings and events for the CLSA, one had to balance one’s time a little better than the average student.

OzTREKK: Did you take any of the NCA-approved courses at Bond? What were they like?

Jordan: The NCA-approved courses at Bond were challenging. Although you were not required to attend tutorials like the other Bond classes, you had to participate and stay up to date on your readings.

The NCA-approved courses at Bond are graded, whereas the NCA exams in Canada are pass or fail. If you do not receive a grade over 60%, there is a chance the Canadian accreditation centre would likely make you redo that particular course. With this being said, I took the Canadian Criminal Law and Procedure and Canadian Administrative Law electives at Bond. I passed both and did not have to redo them upon my return to Canada.

Bond Law School student Jordan Assaraf with roommate and fellow Bondie

Bond Law School student Jordan Assaraf (left) with roommate and fellow Bondie

Upon returning to Canada, I had to complete Foundations of Canadian Law and Canadian Constitutional Law. I didn’t take the Canadian Constitutional Law elective at Bond because it was a two-credit class (the others are just one credit). As Canadian Constitutional Law is very involved, I did not want to waste my elective courses on a difficult course worth double any other course, which would affect my overall average. Further, by not giving up two electives, I was able to take courses that interested me, like Sports Law, Mediation, and Alternative Dispute Resolution. Working within a firm has reinforced that decision as I am able to utilize the negotiations skills learned within these courses to assist with positive outcomes in mediations, motions and settlement discussions.

Although I feel it is important to take courses that interest you and provide exposure to the different areas of law, I would suggest taking the NCA-accredited courses to assist with obtaining your accreditation on a timely basis.

Canadian Foundations was an easy NCA. By taking Canadian Administrative Law, Canadian Criminal Law and Procedure and studying for Canadian Constitutional Law, I was able to use what I learned in those classes and condense the material, therefore providing me with a foundation of each subject in order to tackle the issues on the foundation NCA exam. Foundations of Canadian Law brushed on each course. By learning each course in depth, you gain the necessary tools to help ease the Foundations material and help you excel in that particular course or exam.

OzTREKK: Do you feel these courses are relevant?

Jordan: I have found that theory within school is a good foundation in law; however, some of the courses were not as relevant because of the complexity of each practice area. Theory is important, but working in the field and learning by the example of mentors and actual cases will provide much more in-depth knowledge of the actual workings of the law and administration of the law.

The good thing about Bond Law School—compared to Canadian law schools—is the hands-on, practical approach. Bond University includes a skills assessment with every class. The skills assessments range from memos to advocacy skills, such as moot trials, mediations, and presentations. By making these skills mandatory to pass, you gain more experience through this practical approach.

OzTREKK: Do you have any tips for students undertaking LLB/JD program?

Jordan: I think it’s important for students studying at Australian university to be aware of some of the challenges that they may face upon their return to Canada. For example, returning students need to be aware of the on-campus interview (OCI) process in which typical Canadian firms participate. It is more difficult to obtain a summer position (with a chance of securing an articling position afterward) if you aren’t aware of the list of firms the students attending Canadian law schools are given.

When undertaking a JD or LLB program in Australia, I suggest that you take courses that interest you, and courses that will help you to prepare for your Bar Exam, upon returning to Canada.

The best part about Australian law school are tutorials, compared to Canadian law schools, where they don’t have any.

Use your tutorial teachers as resources. Go to each tutorial as it will help prepare you for your final. Take your tutorials seriously: they are free marks. By preparing and participating in your tutorials, you will better understand the course and will be better prepared for your upcoming exams. (If you can answer your tutorial questions without a problem, and prepare properly for them, your exam will be nothing out of the ordinary.)

We are also faced with a typical stereotype when coming back to Canada: You could not get into law school here, so you went to Australia. This is a battle one must learn to overcome. The positive aspects of attending Bond Law School and returning to Canada to practice are the invaluable experiences you gather as well as a well-rounded knowledge of the law and administration of law. The ability to participate in group tutorials builds your sense of teamwork, which is an asset to any law firm. When speaking with prospective employers and articling firms, you may be able to emphasize the vast international experience and knowledge you gained, as well as demonstrate the discipline required to travel abroad and succeed in your chosen field.

Stay tuned for the next installment from Bond Law student Jordan Assaraf, where he discusses his articling experiences and how he obtained his position at Gluckstein Personal Injury Lawyers.

Apply now to Bond Law School!

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Interested in studying at Bond Law School? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Law Schools Admissions officer Shannon Tilston for more information at shannon@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada 1-866-698-7355.

Thursday, January 17th, 2013

Sydney Law School appoints new dean

Sydney Law School’s new dean Joellen Riley would like to imbue in her students the deep engagement with the law she experienced while studying at Oxford University in the mid 1990s.

“At Oxford I learned to appreciate the great benefit of classroom dialogue between student and tutor,” says Professor Riley, appointed Dean at the University of Sydney‘s law faculty last month. “Although we are never likely to be able to fund the Oxford tutorial teaching model in Australian law schools, we should still work towards ensuring engaged debate in classrooms.”

“The removal of caps on student university places and the emergence of massive open online courses (MOOCs) have been identified as presenting particular challenges to traditional face-to-face university courses,” Professor Riley said. “Straight lectures are easy to replicate online, so the classroom experience needs to offer more than just content delivery. Our challenge is to provide a classroom experience that engages students, with us and with each other, so that they value the time spent in classes.” Professor Riley believes face-to-face dialogue with teachers who undertake world class research is crucial to a university education, and this won’t be threatened by MOOCs.

It will be particularly challenging funding that kind of experience, in an environment where governments are committing less funding toward tertiary education, Professor Riley says. Her focus during her first year as Dean will be on consolidating recent growth at the Sydney Law School.

“It’s incumbent on us not to provide more places if we feel this will diminish the quality of educational experience we can offer,” she says. “There is always a temptation to add new programs and courses, but it is important to bed down new initiatives before we expand further.”

Professor Riley studied to be a teacher, worked as a journalist at Fairfax media and had two daughters before starting a postgraduate law degree at the University of Sydney in 1992.

After completing her postgraduate law degree, she worked at Malleson Stephen Jaques before receiving the Ivan Roberts scholarship to study at Oxford. It was on her return home, shortly after Paul Keating had lost office and as John Howard’s Workplace Relations Act 1996 was being tabled in Parliament, that she was drawn to academia. Co-authoring a book on the Act with her mentor Greg McCarry launched Professor Riley into a career as a labour lawyer. She later began teaching employment and industrial law and completed a PhD blending her interests in employment, equity and commercial law. Her doctoral supervisors were the eminent labour lawyer, Emeritus Professor Ronald C McCallum AO and Professor Patrick Parkinson.

After a stint as associate professor in commercial law at the University of New South Wales, Riley returned to her alma mater as Professor of Labour Law in 2009. She stepped into the role of Pro-Dean at the Sydney Law School after Professor Gillian Triggs departed to become president of the Human Rights Commission.

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Would you like to learn more about the Sydney Law School and about studying law in Australia? Contact OzTREKK for more information about Australian law schools! Learn about how to obtain a Bachelor of Laws (LLB) degree or a Juris Doctor (JD) degree, and about the accreditation process when you return to Canada.

 

 

Wednesday, May 12th, 2010

Bond Law School Professor Visits Canada

Bond University Law School Professor (and Canadian!) Eric Colvin will be visiting Canada in late May to host information sessions providing interested Canadians and their families with information about Bond’s Law School.

OzTREKK’s Matt Miernik will travel with Prof. Colvin, and offer guidance to Canadians wanting to study law at Bond University.


Prof. Colvin will host the following information sessions:

Vancouver

Date: Saturday, May 29, 2010
Time: 3-5 p.m.
Venue: Renaissance Vancouver Hotel Harbourside, 1133 West Hastings street, Vancouver

Edmonton
Date: Sunday, May 30, 2010
Time: 3-5 p.m.
Venue: Fairmont Hotel McDonald, 10065 100th Street, Edmonton

Calgary
Date: Monday, May 31, 2010
Time: 6-8 p.m.
Venue: Delta Bow Valley Hotel, 209-4th Avenue SE, Calgary

Toronto
Date: Saturday, June 5, 2010
Time: 3-5 p.m.
Venue: Sheraton Centre Toronto Hotel, 123 Queen Street West · Toronto

Toronto
Date: Sunday, June 6, 2010
Time: 12.30pm 3.30 p.m.
Venue: Music Room, Hart House, University of Toronto, 6 Hart House Circle, University of Toronto, Toronto

Applications are now open to the Sept 2010 & Jan 2011 intakes at Bond University Law School. Click here to apply now!

Want to learn more about the Bond University Juris Doctor program?

Want to learn more about the Bond University Bachelor of Laws program?

Canadians studying at Bond Law School rave about the campus, professors and program as they feel they are properly prepared for a career in law.

Now, Canadians interested in pursuing a law degree at the Bond Law School can find out more about the degree options and campus highlights when Prof. Eric Colvin travels across Canada to host information seminars.

Located on the Gold Coast, Australia, Bond Law School has earned a well-respected reputation. With its combination of excellent teaching, small classes and an extensive legal skills program, the Bond Law School differentiates from other institutions. It provides an exciting learning experience that both challenges students academically and prepares them practically for a legal career. When it comes to earning a Bond Law School degree, students have two options.

The Bond University Juris Doctor degree is intended for those who have already completed an undergraduate degree, while high school graduates apply to the LLB program.

The Bond University Juris Doctor is a graduate law degree and is designed to equip students for a career in the legal profession. Students must have completed an undergraduate degree to be eligible for entry into this program.

The Bond University Bachelor of Laws (LLB) is an undergraduate degree. It is designed to equip students for a career in the legal profession. Australian students, like those from virtually all other Commonwealth countries except Canada, can enter the LLB program directly from high school.

Learn more about the Bond University Juris Doctor Program!

Learn more about the Bond University Bachelor of Laws Program!

Learn more about Australian Law Schools for Canadians