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Posts Tagged ‘rural medicine’

Tuesday, July 18th, 2017

James Cook University answers the call for rural doctors

James Cook University is answering the call for more doctors in regional, rural and remote Queensland.

James Cook University answers the call for rural doctors

Study medicine at James Cook University and be a specialist in rural medicine! (Photo: JCU)

This year, the university is training 593 GP registrars through the provision of its specialist training program, Generalist Medical Training (GMT).  This program has been contracted by the Australian Government Department of Health to deliver Australian General Practice training (AGPT) in North Western Queensland.

Associate Dean Strategy and Engagement, Professor Jacinta Elston from JCU’s College of Medicine and Dentistry said 123 of the current registrars are JCU medical graduates.

“We have a regional mission with a focus on the needs of rural, remote and under-served communities, tropical medicine and the health of Aboriginal peoples and Torres Strait Islanders.

“In the 2005 to 2016 JCU Medicine Graduate Survey, 84% of students said they intended to practice medicine outside of capital cities, compared to the national average of 16%.

“We are now seeing the follow through of those intentions with 92% of GMT registrars placed in regional, rural and remote areas, according to the Australian Statistical Geography Standard – Remoteness Area index.”

Steven Bajwa is a sixth-year medical student at JCU in Cairns. He said he is looking forward to a career in a rural hospital.

“Being from Brisbane when I started my degree, I always envisaged I would return or work in another tertiary centre (metropolitan hospital),” he said. “The degree and placement from JCU have completely changed my perspective on my graduate location. I no longer want to work in tertiary centres, but in smaller, more rural hospitals.”

Cloncurry registrar Dr Cameron Hoare said it was his JCU medical degree that set him on the rural career path: “When I started doing medicine I really enjoyed emergency medicine. Then I found a place (Cloncurry) where I could do proper general practice and still do emergency medicine.”

After his first medical student placement in the rural town, Dr Hoare returned in his sixth year of medicine, and then again later to undertake GP training with JCU’s GMT. He applauded the GMT program, saying it strongly encourages doctors to take up rural and remote posts.

“GMT definitely has an advantage there that they are providing registrar training and trying to support registrars training out west, which is actually a great success.”

Mackay GP and GMT Medical Educator Dr Ciara Ross is also a JCU medical School graduate. She said it set her up for a career in rural practice.

“I liked that their focus of the medical degree was more in rural and remote medicine, which was where I ultimately wanted to end up, working in more of a rural community,” she said.

As a Medical Educator, Dr Ross guides Mackay region GMT registrars through their training. She said the program is attracting more people who, like her, genuinely want to stay in rural areas.

“I’ve had quite a number of registrars come to me who live in Mackay and want to stay in Mackay, worried that they could potentially be moved. I am quite happy to be able to reassure them that if Mackay is the place they want to be, then generally they can stay here.

“There is a new generation of doctors coming through who are really interested in remote medicine and want to work in regional hospitals. I think maybe in years gone by, the epitome of medicine was working in a tertiary centre (metropolitan hospital), but I think people are genuinely chasing these rural jobs now because they are a bit different and exciting.”

Dr Ross encouraged anyone considering becoming a GP to study with James Cook University and GMT.

“I would recommend GMT for GP registrar training because they offer good quality and supportive education in a variety of training posts with experienced supervisors.

“Because GMT was developed by JCU, they have the staff and resources of a university with experience in post graduate education, so you know you will be in good hands.

“The program also prepares registrars well to face the college exams, with lots of practice throughout the program and additional support.”

JCU will now look to expand upon its success in the provision of General Practice Training via additional funding from the Australian Government (Regional Training Hubs Funding). This funding will allow JCU to further build and connect regional specialist training pathways across Queensland.

JCU Medical School MBBS

The 6-year, full-time MBBS degree is a comprehensive program with integrated instruction in biomedical sciences, professional practice and clinical medicine. Graduates will be uniquely qualified in the fields of rural, remote and Indigenous health, and tropical medicine.

Program: Bachelor of Medicine Bachelor of Surgery
Location: Townsville, Queensland
Semester intake: February
Duration: 6 years
Application deadline: August 30, 2017 (Note: Early offers of admission may be made to high-achieving international applicants! Candidates are encouraged to apply as early as possible and well before the August 30 deadline.)

Apply to JCU Medical School!

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Do you have questions about James Cook University and its medicine program? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com.

Wednesday, June 21st, 2017

Uni Reviews ranks JCU medicine as #1 in Australia

James Cook University is Australia’s Tropical University, and JCU medical graduates are be uniquely qualified in the fields of rural, remote and Indigenous health, and tropical medicine.

Uni Reviews ranks JCU medicine as #1 in Australia

RSVP to meet JCU in Toronto June 22!

Recently, Uni Reviews ranked the top Australian universities for medicine using a formula combining

  • medical school size (student numbers)
  • student and graduate satisfaction with medicine courses (% satisfied)
  • indicative graduate salaries (based on pay, study and unemployment rates).

Medicine includes General Medicine, Surgery, Psychiatry, Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Paediatrics, Anaesthesiology, Pathology, Radiology, Internal Medicine and General Practice.

Uni Reviews presents independent reviews, ratings and rankings of Australian universities. Site content is published by UniCurve for the benefit of students.

As listed by Uni Reviews, the top universities for medicine in Australia for 2017 are

  1. James Cook University
  2. University of Western Australia
  3. Monash University

James Cook University

JCU Medicine tops the subject rankings for Medicine in 2017. The program is relatively large (1,155 students), has the highest rate of satisfaction among student and graduates (92%) and produces solid job outcomes ($65,000 indicative graduate salary).

University of Western Australia

The University of Western Australian Medical School is ranked 2nd in Australia for Medicine. The faculty’s medical graduates enjoy the highest salaries in Australia ($68,130) and have a solid rate of course satisfaction (84%).

Monash University

Monash University Medical School is in the top 3 for Australia. The school is the largest in Australia (2,452 students) and is highly rated by students (85% satisfaction).

James Cook University Medicine & Dentistry Seminar

It’s no secret we are huge fans of JCU’s commitment to helping rural and under-served populations. If you are interested in a career in medicine or dentistry, but are looking for something more extraordinary, please join OzTREKK and JCU Deputy Vice-Chancellor Professor Ian Wronski for this upcoming seminar. Find out why JCU is interested in Canadian students, and how you can help bring better health to those in need.

Toronto
Venue: Pinnacle Room, Sheraton Centre Hotel, Toronto
Date: Thursday, June 22, 2017
Time: 6 – 9 p.m.

Make sure to RSVP to save your spot!

Study medicine at JCU Medical School

Program: Bachelor of Medicine Bachelor of Surgery
Location: Townsville, Queensland
Next semester intake: February 2018
Duration: 6 years
Application deadline: August 30, 2017

Apply now to James Cook University Medical School!

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Discover more about studying JCU Medicine. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com.

Thursday, June 15th, 2017

Sydney Medical School boosting economies and rural medical education

Sydney Medical School’s long history of training students in rural NSW is boosting local economies and the number of graduates who want to work as rural doctors.

“Rural training experience increases the likelihood that doctors will commit to working in rural locations long term,” said Professor Conigrave. “This is why we have had a longstanding commitment to the training of rural doctors for more than 20 years.”

Sydney Medical School boosting economies and rural medical education

Learn more about Sydney Medical School

The University of Sydney has a School of Rural Health in Dubbo and Orange and Departments of Rural Health in Broken Hill and Lismore.

“By the end of 2017, almost 1,000 of our medical students will have undertaken extended training placements in these four centres,” said Professor Conigrave.

“At graduation, these students are telling us that they would prefer to work in rural areas. The government’s new funding for the rural doctor training ‘pipeline’ will help these students to achieve their ambitions and their talents for rural health and medicine.”

However, Professor Conigrave said that there were not enough medical training positions to convert students’ intentions into medical careers in rural areas.

“We’re doing very well in priming the pipeline for the training of rural doctors—many more new medical graduates are now trying to get jobs in rural hospitals as interns. In fact, there are now significantly more applicants for these critical rural junior hospital training jobs than there are jobs available.”

Underlining the university’s contribution to rural economies, Professor Conigrave said, “We have a track record of excellence in rural medical education and we are making significant contributions to local economies.”

“At Dubbo and Orange, for example, the University of Sydney School of Rural Health contributes close to $7 million each year in direct local expenditures.

“This provide jobs for more than 50 people in central western NSW, all of whom live locally—they make up almost 30 full-time equivalents. Many of them are highly skilled, and might otherwise have been obliged to look elsewhere for work,” said Professor Conigrave.

“Then, of course, there are also indirect economic benefits. The 64 students that take extended rural placements each year bring business to local shops, sporting facilities and food outlets, and contribute to community life and projects of all sorts.

“In addition, the School of Rural Health requires many local services: motor vehicles, IT, transport services, plumbing, the maintenance of grounds and even the paint on the walls.

“But most importantly, the University of Sydney School of Rural Health in Dubbo and Orange and Departments of Rural in Broken Hill and Lismore are helping to lift access to quality healthcare among Australians in rural and remote areas,” added Professor Conigrave.

In April, the University of Sydney won $3 million in federal funds to establish Rural Training Hubs in Broken Hill, Dubbo and Lismore to boost rural-based training and career pathways for trainee doctors.

Commenting on the award of funding Professor Conigrave said, “We’re very pleased that the Federal Government has recognised the need to create this training pipeline.

“The funding will enable junior doctors with ambitions in rural medicine to undertake specialist training in rural rather than metropolitan centres, developing into fully fledged experts who can provide rural communities with specialist healthcare in all major fields of medicine, including general practice and rural and remote medicine and surgery.”

Study medicine at the #1 medical school in Australia

Did you know the University of Sydney Medical School is ranked #15 in the world and #1 in Australia (QS World University Rankings by Subject 2017)? It’s true!

Sydney offers the very popular MD program, a four-year professional postgraduate-entry course with three primary aims for graduates: excellent clinical skills and preparedness for practice; experience in research; and experience and awareness of health in an international setting. It includes weekly clinical experience in leading hospitals from the very first weeks, regular PBL (problem-based learning) exercises in small groups, traditional lectures with expert practitioners, and ongoing opportunities to participate in research.

Program: Doctor of Medicine (MD)
Location: Sydney, New South Wales (Camperdown/Darlington campus)
Semester intake: January 2018
Duration: 4 years
Application deadline: June 20, 2017
Deadline to submit all documents: Monday, June 26, 2017
Skype interview invitations sent: mid-July
Skype interviews: July 31 – August 11, 2017
First-round offers made: from late August (and may continue to be made until December 2017)

Apply now to Sydney Medical School!

If you have any questions about Sydney Medical School, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com.

Friday, April 21st, 2017

JCU medical research finds new drug to ease C-section trauma

James Cook University researchers from the College of Medicine and Dentistry may have found a way to reduce trauma and prevent infections after Caesarean births.

JCU medical research finds new drug to ease C-section trauma

L to R: Lisa Davenport, Professor Geoffrey Dobson, Dr Hayley Letson (Photo: JCU)

Caesarean delivery rates are increasing worldwide and around a third of all mothers in Australia, USA and UK give birth surgically each year, but a C-section is not without risks.

Fourth-year JCU Medical School student Lisa Davenport joined Dr Hayley Letson and Professor Geoffrey Dobson from the Heart, Trauma and Sepsis Research Laboratory at JCU to research ways to reduce the stress response to the trauma of surgery.

Caesarean sections involve one or more incisions in a patient’s abdomen, known as a laparotomy, and are a common option for delivering babies.

But they have a raft of potential side-effects, including cutting the baby, post-surgery infection, fever, excessive blood loss or clotting, scar tissue formation and extended stays in hospital.

Dr Letson said a single laparotomy is a major injury.

“It can activate the brain’s stress response from the multiple ‘damage’ signals sent out from the original incision,” she said.

The JCU research showed that a laparotomy causes inflammation and an early activation of the immune system, which can then spiral out of control.

Ms Davenport examined whether an Adenosine, Lidocaine and Magnesium (ALM) drip could reduce the trauma of surgery when used by itself in experimental models. She discovered that adverse responses were reduced when the subject was infused with a small amount of the ALM drip.

“Low volume therapies may be important, because you want to avoid large fluid volumes that can shock the body a second time,” she said.

Professor Dobson said that precisely how tiny volumes of the ALM drip works is an active area of investigation in the Dobson Laboratory, but experiments have shown it protects against infection as well.

Dr Letson said the ALM therapy appears to be linked to improved brain control over whole body function at times of surgical stress. “It suppresses signals that activate immune cells and promote inflammation,” she said.

The work has applications to other major surgery and especially to rural and remote medicine. Professor Dobson said new frontline drugs are urgently required to make major surgery safer for the patient and more predictable for the surgeon, with the potential to reduce complications and massively reduce health care costs, and possibly reduce waiting times for elective surgery.

“The global surgical statistics are staggering. Of the 234 million major surgeries performed every year, every hour there are around 1,000 deaths and 4,000 major complications, and 50% may be preventable,” he said.

Ms Davenport has completed the study and is currently analysing the data and writing a paper for a high-profile surgical journal.

Her study parallels the Dobson Lab’s ongoing trauma work being supported by the US Military, and a new collaboration that started late 2016 with the National Institutes of Health in the United States.

The research team is also pursuing funding opportunities to investigate the use of ALM fluid as a potential treatment for post-partum haemorrhage. Of the 500,000 maternal deaths each year, approximately 25% are due to haemorrhage.

Study medicine at JCU Medical School

JCU Medical School offers an undergraduate-entry medical program that specializes in rural, remote and indigenous medicine and is located in north Queensland, Australia. Rather than having to earn a bachelor degree first, undergraduate-entry medical programs allow students to enter directly from high school. If you have completed high school studies or would like to apply to a medical school in Australia without using your MCAT score, you may wish to learn more about undergraduate-entry medical programs offered by Australian universities.

Program: Bachelor of Medicine Bachelor of Surgery
Location: Townsville, Queensland
Next semester intake: February 2018
Duration: 6 years
Application deadline: August 30, 2017

Apply now to James Cook University Medical School!

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Would you like more information about studying medicine at JCU Medical School? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com.

Friday, November 4th, 2016

Global award for JCU medical school professor and Townsville Hospital doctor

Townsville Hospital director of urogynaecology Professor Ajay Rane has been awarded a global humanitarian award, named in honour of India’s most revered statesman, for his work in gynaecological and obstetric care in some of the world’s poorest places.

Professor Ajay Rane is a JCU Medical School Professor of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, and works at the Townsville Hospital. He is a multi-award-winning academic who was last week announced as a recipient of a global humanitarian award.

Global award for JCU Professor and Townsville Hospital doctor

JCU Professor Ajay Rane with his medal, which is crafted with Mahatma Gandhi’s image. (Photo: Ian Hitchcock)

The James Cook University professor was awarded the Mahatma Gandhi Pravasi Award for Humanitarian Work in Women’s Health by the NRI (non-resident Indians) Welfare Society at Britain’s House of Lords last month.

The society recognises a number of non-resident Indians each year for their work benefitting the global community.

“I was absolutely delighted, of course, to be a recipient this year and, especially, because this is an award from India, my country of origin,” Professor Rane said.

“While it’s always a thrill to see your work recognised, it’s more important to me that this sort of recognition helps to highlight the plight of women in crisis worldwide.”

Professor Rane, who is a naturalised Australian, has spent almost two decades treating and operating on women with catastrophic childbirth injuries in countries that include India, Nepal, Borneo, Malaysia and Kuwait.

He has also trained hundreds of local doctors in the techniques to perform specialised gynaecological surgery including fistula repair.

A fistula is a hole that develops between the bladder or bowel and the vagina after a difficult childbirth and is a debilitating and devastating condition, especially if left untreated as it often is in the poorest parts of the world.

Earlier this year, Professor Rane was appointed appointed Chair of the Fistula Committee for the International Federation of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (FIGO) and is leading the charge for fistula education and prevention in the developing world.

Townsville Hospital and Health Service Executive Director Medical Services Dr Andrew Johnson congratulated Professor Rane on the prestigious award.

“Professor Rane continues to shine a light on the critical dilemma of women globally who suffer serious injuries from child birth,” he said.

“He is a leading academic and surgeon and we are very privileged and proud to benefit from his clinical and teaching acumen and expertise.”

Professor Rane’s award was presented by the Baroness Verma, former Parliamentary Under-Secretary for the Department for International Development.

Courtesy of the Townsville Hospital and Health Service

About JCU MBBS

Located in Townsville, JCU Medical School offers the MBBS medical degree and aims to produce graduates of the highest academic standards who can progress to medical practice and to further studies in medical specialties.

The James Cook University medical program leads positive change in health and medical care for communities of tropical Australia and beyond through socially accountable health education, discoveries, partnerships and advocacy that make a difference.

The program has a distinctive regional mission with a focus on the needs of rural, remote and underserved communities, tropical medicine and the health of Aboriginal peoples and Torres Strait Islanders.

Would you like more information about JCU Medical School? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com.

Tuesday, October 11th, 2016

JCU opens Australian Institute of Tropical Health and Medicine building

Study medicine at JCU, get brand-new facilities!

Australian research into tropical health and medicine has received a major boost with the opening of a $31M world-class infectious diseases research facility at James Cook University’s Townsville campus.

JCU opens Australian Institute of Tropical Health and Medicine building

JCU has officially opened the Australian Institute of Tropical Health and Medicine building (Credit: JCU)

On Oct. 7, the Queensland Premier, Annastacia Palaszczuk officially opened the Australian Institute of Tropical Health and Medicine’s (AITHM) new facilities.

AITHM Townsville will undertake research into tropical infectious diseases and will develop vaccines, diagnostic tools, and the identification of bacterial pathogens.

James Cook University Vice Chancellor, Professor Sandra Harding said AITHM is a crucial element of JCU’s goal to create a brighter future for people living in the tropics, and the opening of the Townsville facilities cements Australia’s position as a global leader in tropical health and medicine.

“JCU has a proud history of research and development relevant to the tropics, and the research AITHM undertakes will improve health in the tropics both within Australia and worldwide.

“There are extraordinary opportunities for Australian tropical medicine given Northern Australia’s proximity to the fast-growing nations of the Asia-Pacific region,” Professor Harding said.

AITHM’s Director, Professor Louis Schofield said research programs underway within AITHM include identification, prevention and better treatments for tuberculosis, development of malaria vaccines and peripheral artery disease.

“The Institute will build essential research programs in tropical health and medicine for Australia and the region, specifically building important biosecurity capacity for Northern Australia.

“Our tropical locations and capabilities make a significant contribution to Queensland’s competitive advantage in knowledge-based industries directly relevant to Asia and the Pacific in the areas of research, research training, and the transfer and commercialisation of research findings.”

The Townsville facility and research undertaken within it will

  • focus on re-emerging bacterial diseases for which tropical Queenslanders are at significant risk, including tuberculosis, meliodosis and Q fever, and on communicable disease diagnostics and control;
  • provide a bio-bank facility for clinical and epidemiological samples;
  • engage new high-quality biomedical research staff to join existing researchers;
  • host visiting experts (visitors and trainees will include participants from Australia and from neighbouring countries);
  • train and mentor young researchers and health professionals involved in translating innovation into practice; and
  • accommodate proof-of-concept work leading to commercialisation opportunities.

Facilities include world-class physical containment laboratories for the safe handling of hazardous microorganisms (PC2 and PC3 laboratories). The PC3 laboratory will be used to for research into tuberculosis.

The building also includes a Translational Research Facility, which will allow patients to undergo clinical trials of research findings, improving the delivery of health care for those living in tropical regions.

It will also provide space for researchers in key supporting disciplines, including biostatistics, epidemiology, bioinformatics and health economics.

The Queensland Government has invested $21.49M in AITHM Townsville and the Federal Government has provided funding of $8M, via the Australian Research Council’s Special Research Initiative Scheme.

Study medicine at JCU Medical School

JCU Medical School offers an undergraduate-entry medical program that specializes in rural, remote and indigenous medicine and is located in north Queensland, Australia. Rather than having to earn a bachelor degree first, undergraduate-entry medical programs allow students to enter directly from high school. If you have completed high school studies or would like to apply to a medical school in Australia without using your MCAT score, you may wish to learn more about undergraduate-entry medical programs offered by Australian universities.

Program: Bachelor of Medicine Bachelor of Surgery
Location: Townsville, Queensland
Next semester intake: February 2018
Duration: 6 years
Application deadline: Generally the end of August each year

Apply now to James Cook University Medical School!

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Would you like more information about studying medicine at JCU Medical School? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com.

Wednesday, September 28th, 2016

Meet JCU medical student Helena Xiang

Meet first-year JCU Medical School student Helena Xiang. OzTREKK first spoke with Helena in February 2014, when she inquired about studying medicine in Australia. Still in high school at the time, Helena was determined to stick to her plan of applying to an undergraduate medical degree and begin her studies.

And so she did.

Application process: The starting point

Application processes can get difficult and tedious when you don’t know what you’re doing. When I started my application, I didn’t really know where to begin. Not much information was available on Australian schools, and my high school counsellors sent me away to Google everything myself. If you’re a student who’s thinking of applying to JCU, the following might be worth a read:

Sydney Dental School

Study medicine at JCU

Apply through an agent

I applied to James Cook University through an agent. There are many agents out there that provide services to Canadian students, but the one I personally got in touch with was OzTREKK. These people were friendly, provided information sessions, and were quick to respond to conundrums and queries. They made the entire process that much easier for me. They saved me so much time and effort! I didn’t have to worry about sending my application all the way to Australia, or have to worry about the time zone differences when contacting for more information. Plus, all these services were free!

Check all requirements

I’m a high school grad who just entered university this year, so this was the first time I applied to a university. It was extremely confusing when I was looking at the course requirements. I kept thinking, “What in the world is Maths A, ATAR, OP?!”. Needless to say, I was looking at the wrong section. Make sure you check the requirements for your country. Don’t freak yourself out unnecessarily like I did. (This is where your agent comes in!)

Don’t be scared to apply

That was something I wished someone told me. I wasn’t confident when I was applying to my program at JCU. I didn’t think I would be able to get in as medicine is a very competitive program. But, you never know right? Don’t belittle yourself, and even if you lack that confidence, it never hurts to try.

First impressions

I actually knew very little about Australian universities before I applied to JCU Medical School. When I was looking at my options during university application season, the undergraduate program offered at JCU seemed really appealing to me. It was different from other universities. Not only was it because it was a program I could enter straight out of high school, but also because of its focus on rural, remote, and Indigenous health—these are the places and people that have inadequate access to health care.

I can’t compare really compare JCU’s teaching and facilities to other universities because I’ve never attended one, but it has everything we really need. The cohort size is smaller than other schools, and I really like how the university incorporates the clinical portion with the science. Right from first year, medical students get the opportunity to do short placements at different clinics with different doctors, and apply the science part in real-life practice. The amount of clinical exposure will gradually increase over the years as well. Years 4 to 6 are the “clinical years” where students are predominantly in the hospital, and attend the occasional lecture on the side.

Tips for future students

Things in Australia generally cost more—especially their imported goods. If you can buy medical equipment in Canada, I would recommend that you do. Stethoscopes are much cheaper back home and online. Get to know the people around you who are studying the same degree, both in your year and upper year levels as well. They can be a really good support network and great to study with to keep you on track. The library is also quite a nice place to study if you live somewhere with lots of noise.

Homesickness

I think the most difficult thing would probably be living so far away from home. This doesn’t just apply to med students, but to all students. The start of an adventure seems exciting at first, but feeling homesick will hit eventually. Bring some things that remind you of home, and be sure to call home when you start missing it!

JCU Medical School MBBS program

Located in Townsville, JCU Medical School offers the MBBS medical degree and aims to produce graduates of the highest academic standards who can progress to medical practice and to further studies in medical specialties. Graduates will be uniquely qualified in the fields of rural, remote and Indigenous health, and tropical medicine.

The James Cook University medical precinct is opposite the Townsville Hospital, the largest teaching hospital in regional or tropical Australia. In later years, students have a base at one of the James Cook University clinical schools that include Townsville, Cairns, Mackay or Darwin.

Program: Bachelor of Medicine Bachelor of Surgery
Location: Townsville, Queensland
Semester intake: February
Duration: 6 years
Application deadline: Generally the end of August each year

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Do you have questions about JCU Medical School? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com for more information.

Wednesday, August 24th, 2016

James Cook University Private Hospital powers ahead

We’ve got great news for future JCU MBBS students!

James Cook University is taking the next big step towards the construction of a private hospital on its Townsville campus. This develop means that students beginning the JCU medical program in 2017 will be able to do clinical training in brand new facilities!

JCU has shortlisted to three the number of proponents who would build and operate the University Private Hospital in the JCU and Townsville Health and Hospital Service medical precinct in Townsville.

James Cook University Private Hospital powers ahead

Study medicine at JCU

The three shortlisted proponents have now been invited to make a Request For Proposal (RFP) to build and operate the facility.

The proponents will prepare detailed plans for the development, including concept designs, and information about clinical training, research and the range of medical services to be provided by the private hospital.

Details of construction will be finalised with the successful proponent, but Stage 1 of the development is expected to offer about 100 beds, which would cost about $113 M to build.

It’s estimated Stage 1 would create more than 300 full-time construction jobs and more than 350 operations jobs.

The Deputy Vice Chancellor of the Division of Services and Resources Tricia Brand said it’s another exciting announcement for the project and another step towards bringing the project to fruition.

“We warmly welcome the strong interest we have received for the university private hospital, and we look forward to seeing the detail of the proposals.

“JCU is dedicated to improving the health of people in the Tropics. The private hospital will offer world-class medical facilities and improve the healthcare options for Townsville and beyond.

“It will be co-located with existing JCU world-class medical teaching and research infrastructure and the public hospital, providing a tremendous boost to medical services, clinical training and research.

“It will ensure the Douglas medical precinct is the regional epicentre of health services in northern Australia,” Ms Brand said.

The RFP closes in November with construction of the university private hospital expected to be completed in 2019.

JCU Medical School MBBS program

Located in Townsville, JCU Medical School offers the MBBS medical degree and aims to produce graduates of the highest academic standards who can progress to medical practice and to further studies in medical specialties. Graduates will be uniquely qualified in the fields of rural, remote and Indigenous health, and tropical medicine.

The James Cook University medical precinct is opposite the Townsville Hospital, the largest teaching hospital in regional or tropical Australia. In later years, students have a base at one of the James Cook University clinical schools that include Townsville, Cairns, Mackay or Darwin.

Program: Bachelor of Medicine Bachelor of Surgery
Location: Townsville, Queensland
Semester intake: February
Duration: 6 years
Application deadline: August 30, 2016

Apply to James Cook University Medical School!

*

Do you have questions about JCU Medical School? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com for more information.

Monday, March 7th, 2016

JCU seeks investors for private hospital

James Cook University has opened registrations for an expression of interest (EOI) for a new university private hospital to be built in the JCU/THHS medical precinct in Townsville.

Details of construction will be finalised with the successful proponent, but Stage 1 of the development is expected to offer at least 100 beds.

JCU Medical School

Townsville, Queensland

Independent analysis estimates it would cost about $113 million to build a 100-bed private hospital. Stage 1 of the project would create more than 300 full-time construction jobs and more than 350 operations jobs.

The expression of interest process is being done in collaboration with the Townsville Hospital and Health Service.

The Deputy Vice Chancellor of the Division of Services and Resources Tricia Brand said the co-location of the university, private hospital, public hospital and medical research institutes would cement the Townsville (Douglas) medical precinct as the epicentre of the health industry in northern Australia.

“The existing public hospital and university medical school will combine with the new private hospital, providing a tremendous boost to medical services, training and research.

“The medical precinct will combine world-class medical facilities, clinical training, teaching and research,” Ms Brand said.

“The private hospital will improve the healthcare options for the people of northern Australia as well as provide a timely boost to Townsville’s skill base and economy to benefit our communities.”

Chair of the Townsville Hospital and Health Board John Bearne said it was an exciting opportunity.

“We are collaborating with the university to look at options that arise from the EOI process and we hope this will result in more opportunities for patients in Townsville and also increase the attractiveness of Townsville to health professionals to live and work.”

Mr Bearne said a colocated private hospital could allow for increased medical services and provide more streamlined services to patients.

“For example, it would allow the efficient transfer of patients from the public emergency department to private facilities.

“It could also allow medical specialists to work efficiently between private and public areas and to provide clinical training, rather than driving between facilities.”

Separately, JCU is also looking to provide consulting rooms for medical specialists and allied health activity to complement the university private hospital development.

Market research conducted by JCU has confirmed there is unmet demand in the region for health and hospital services and an opportunity to source patients from overseas, for example, Papua New Guinea and other tropical locations.

The private hospital will also expand the capacity of teaching and training opportunities for students and support the expansion of undergraduate and postgraduate training and beyond.

“The private hospital will also expand the university’s teaching and research portfolio and foster innovative laboratory research for future health treatments,” Ms Brand said.

It’s expected construction of Stage 1 of the university private hospital will be completed in 2019.

JCU Medical School MBBS program

Located in Townsville, JCU Medical School offers the MBBS medical degree and aims to produce graduates of the highest academic standards who can progress to medical practice and to further studies in medical specialties. Graduates will be uniquely qualified in the fields of rural, remote and Indigenous health, and tropical medicine.

Program: Bachelor of Medicine Bachelor of Surgery (MBBS)
Location: Townsville, Queensland
Semester intake: February
Duration: 6 years
Application deadline: TBA. For the 2016 intake, the application deadline was August 28, 2015.

Apply to James Cook University Medical School!

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Do you have questions about JCU Medical School or the MBBS program? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com.

Thursday, December 10th, 2015

Telemedicine focus to prevent diabetes-related amputations in remote Australia

A James Cook University scientist will be using an advanced 3D camera and software to fight extreme levels of diabetes complications found in remote areas of Australia.

JCU Medical School

Dr Malabu at the BUPA awards night where he received a grant to continue his work (Photo credit: JCU)

JCU Medical School Associate Professor Usman Malabu, who is also a diabetes specialist at the Townsville Hospital, said people living with diabetes in rural and remote areas have up to three times higher rates of amputations due to complications than other Australians.

Dr Malabu said many Indigenous people lived in remote areas, far from health centres.

“Indigenous people have a higher rate of diabetes than the general population and by the time they are seen by a doctor it’s almost too late,” he said. “In addition, people are often reluctant to be transferred for treatment to major centres far from their home and family.”

He said a late-stage diagnosis of a person in a remote area meant treatment could be extremely expensive, with high-level specialists involved and transfer and accommodation costs for sufferers and their support people.

Dr Malabu and his team have now received more than $460,000 from the Bupa Health Foundation to develop a telemedicine program. The funds will pay for the 3D camera and sophisticated software, which can scan the depth and size of diabetes-related injuries and allow doctors to track changes in the wound over time.

“With that sort of detail, it’s almost better than a face-to-face consultation,” said Dr Malabu.

Local nurses will be trained to use the equipment, and the uploaded information assessed by podiatrists and endocrinologists in the main centres.

Over time, it is expected the nurses will become more involved in assessing the information themselves.

Dr Malabu said the program will run in underserviced areas in North Queensland and focus on foot ulcers, but if it was a success, it would be ripe for expansion.

“Within five years, 50 per cent of patients with diabetes-related foot ulcers die—usually from other conditions. Once ulcers are identified there is a lot to be done for the patient other than treating the immediate problem,” he said.

Dr Malabu said the scheme had the potential to be introduced nationwide, with Australia second only to the US within the developed world for limb amputations related to diabetes.

JCU Medical School MBBS program

Located in Townsville, JCU Medical School offers the MBBS medical degree and aims to produce graduates of the highest academic standards who can progress to medical practice and to further studies in medical specialties. Graduates will be uniquely qualified in the fields of rural, remote and Indigenous health, and tropical medicine.

Program: Bachelor of Medicine Bachelor of Surgery (MBBS)
Location: Townsville, Queensland
Semester intake: February
Duration: 6 years

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Do you have questions about JCU Medical School or the MBBS program? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Officer Sarah Bridson at sarah@oztrekk.com or call 1-866-698-7355.