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Posts Tagged ‘rural doctors’

Friday, May 26th, 2017

James Cook University trains specialist doctors for regional and remote communities

James Cook University’s ability to train and keep GPs and medical specialists in regional and remote settings has been given a big boost.

As part of the Federal Government’s Rural Health Multidisciplinary Training program $54.4 million has been allocated over 2016–2017 to 2018–19 for new Regional Training Hubs and University Departments of Rural Health.

James Cook University trains specialist doctors for regional and remote communities

Prof Richard Murray (Photo: JCU)

JCU will operate three of the new Regional Training Hubs—in North, Western and Far North Queensland.

Professor Richard Murray, Dean of JCU’s College of Medicine and Dentistry, said the investment will allow JCU to be more involved in training the specialist doctors that regional and remote communities need.

“The number of graduating doctors in Australia has almost tripled over the past 15 years, yet what we have seen is graduates piling up in the cities, looking for city-based specialist training jobs. The regions are still left to rely on importing doctors from overseas. This announcement is a welcome first step towards a system that trains specialist doctors and GPs where they are most needed,” he said.

Professor Murray said it was time for Commonwealth, state and territory governments to commit to a revolution in the further training of medical graduates.

“We need a system that sees much more specialist training based in regional Australia, with a city rotation only as needed,” he said.

Professor Murray said JCU has long been a national leader and advocate of training medical graduates for work in regional Australia.

“This announcement shows that Assistant Minister for Health David Gillespie is listening to the arguments we have been making over the last decade,” he said.

Professor Sabina Knight, Director of JCU’s Mount Isa Centre for Rural & Remote Health, said the funding will enhance rural health.

“We do a lot of work encouraging students to stay and work in rural and remote areas, but if they can’t get an internship in a regional hospital such as Mount Isa, then they have to go to a city for training and often end up disappearing into metropolitan areas,” she said.

Professor Knight said the initiative fills in a crucial gap in the current system.

“This was the missing bit in the pipeline between having early year medical students and turning out medical specialists in a rural or remote area. We will have a better pathway now and a much better ability to follow through on their training,” she said.

Professor Murray welcomed the funding as a valuable first step, but said the program would be even more fruitful if states and territories now came on board with their support.

About the JCU Medical School MBBS Program

The 6-year, full-time MBBS degree at James Cook University is a comprehensive program with integrated instruction in biomedical sciences, professional practice and clinical medicine. Graduates will be uniquely qualified in the fields of rural, remote and Indigenous health, and tropical medicine.

Program: Bachelor of Medicine Bachelor of Surgery
Location: Townsville, Queensland
Semester intake: February
Duration: 6 years
Application deadline: August 30, 2017 (Note: early offers of admission may be made to high-achieving international applicants. It is recommended that students apply as early as possible and well before the August 30 deadline.)

As part of the MBBS application process, all candidates must participate in an interview with Prof Ian Wronksi. For the 2018 intake, JCU will hold interviews with eligible international applicants from Canada either

  • in person in Canada this June, or
  • via video-conferencing following the August 30th program application deadline.

In-person interviews in Canada (dates are subject to change)

June 22 – 23, 2017: Toronto
June 24, 2017: Edmonton
June 25 – 26, 2017: Vancouver

 

Apply to JCU Medical School!

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Would you like more information about studying medicine at Australia’s tropical university—James Cook University? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Monday, May 15th, 2017

UQ to provide major boost to regional health

Regional communities and future health professionals studying through The University of Queensland are big winners from a multi-pronged $54.4 million Federal Government initiative.

In Queensland, UQ will lead the establishment of a University Department of Rural Health (UDRH), providing a major boost to education, training and research in rural south Queensland for nurses, midwives and allied health workers.

UQ to provide major boost to regional health

UQ will lead the establishment of a University Department of Rural Health (Photo credit: UQ)

Three new medical training hubs under UQ control will also be established in Central Queensland, Wide Bay and South West Queensland, operating with an aim of retaining doctors in regional areas.

Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences Executive Dean Professor Bruce Abernethy said research indicated students who experienced rural practice were far more likely to return to work rurally once qualified.

“For the local communities, this is part of a long-term strategy to address maldistribution of the health workforce,” Professor Abernethy said.

“Rural and remote regions of Queensland and Australia often face challenges in attracting and retaining qualified health professionals.

“Students on rural placement will discover the diverse range of professional opportunities available in regional areas, thus enhancing the sustainability and viability of rural health care services.”

UQ joined with the University of Southern Queensland and the Hospital and Health Services of Darling Downs and South West in the successful bid to establish the Southern Queensland Rural Health UDRH.

The UDRH will help provide rural experience to student nurses, midwives, physiotherapists, pharmacists, psychologists, social workers, occupational therapists, speech pathologists, dieticians, and exercise physiologists.

Commonwealth funding has also been awarded to provide additional clinical, academic and administration staff at UQ’s three regional medical training hubs:

  • Central Queensland: located at Rockhampton, with sub-units at Gladstone and Emerald
  • Southern Queensland: located at Toowoomba, with sub-units at Charleville in south-west Queensland
  • Wide Bay: located at Bundaberg, with sub units at Hervey Bay and Theodore.

UQ Faculty of Medicine Acting Executive Dean Professor Robyn Ward said the hubs would offer doctors rural opportunities at all stages of their medical training.

“This will facilitate postgraduate training opportunities, including specialties, so doctors can stay in regional communities for training and not have to return to the city,” Professor Ward said.

“The Department of Rural Health and the training hubs will build on the high quality education and training experiences already offered by UQ’s Rural Clinical School.”

Announcing the funding, Assistant Minister for Health Dr David Gillespie said regional and rural health training not only addressed workforce shortages and service expectations, but was also essential to regional economic growth.

UQ Rural Clinical School

UQ Rural Clinical School is funded through the Australian Government’s Rural Clinical Training Support (RCTS) Program to address health workforce shortages in rural and regional Queensland. To achieve this mandate, UQRCS aims to lead and direct the rural health agenda through the highest quality education, training, research and community service.

Now in its second decade of operation, UQRCS is able to demonstrate a positive impact on the medical workforce in the region and elsewhere.  Studies demonstrate that a student who has experienced the Rural Advantage with UQRCS is 2.5 times more likely to work in a rural area when compared with other UQ medical graduates.

About the UQ Medical Program

The UQ Faculty of Medicine conducts a four-year, graduate-entry medical program, the Doctor of Medicine (MD). The faculty is a leading provider of medical education and research in Australia, and with the country’s largest medical degree program, they are the major single contributor to Queensland’s junior medical workforce.

Program: Doctor of Medicine
Location: Brisbane, Queensland
Semester intake: January
Duration: 4 years
Application deadline: Applications are assessed on a rolling admissions (first come, first served) basis. It is recommended that applicants apply as early as possible to increase their chances of timely assessment. This program can fill quickly!

Apply to the UQ Doctor of Medicine!

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Find out more about UQ Medicine. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com, or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Thursday, March 6th, 2014

JCU surgical professor appointed to international role

A JCU Medical School professor is set to represent North Queensland on the world stage after being appointed president-elect of the International College of Surgeons.

James Cook University Medical School

Study medicine at JCU Medical School

James Cook University Professor Yik-Hong Ho has a busy year ahead as he sets his sights on the role of national president in 2015.

Professor Ho is set to become only the second Australian to be awarded the top job, following in the footsteps of well-known hand surgeon Professor Earl Owen.

The Singapore-born professor began his career in his home country after training in England, and has been a colorectal surgeon at the Townsville Hospital for the past 12 years.

The International College of Surgeons (ICS) is a global organization dedicated to promoting excellence of surgeons and surgical specialists worldwide.

Founded in 1935 in Geneva, the college now has its headquarters in Chicago, Illinois. The ICS works though collaborative projects with the World Health Organization and the United Nations.

The JCU Medical School said the appointment came with a tremendous amount of responsibility.

“The International College of Surgeons was founded by a Hungarian plastic surgeon, who along with other surgeons saw there was a need on an international basis to improve the lives of patients through the advancement of surgery and education of surgeons,” he said.

“We now have 4,200 members with representation from over 100 countries, making us the largest surgical society in the world. There is a tremendous responsibility not just to educate but to push agendas like surgical safety, quality assurance and access to basic essential surgeries to underprivileged areas of the world.”

Professor Ho said he would continue in his surgical role at the hospital as well as lecturing commitments within the Faculty of Medicine, Health & Molecular Sciences at JCU Townsville.

“In the past I have been the only colorectal surgeon available at the Townsville Hospital but as of next month there will be another surgeon on hand,” he said, adding that he will have a lot more time to dedicate to his academic pursuits.

“I would also like to continue to do as much surgery as possible because I think it’s ridiculous to assume to represent surgeons if you’re not operating yourself. You need to still be able to stay in touch with the stress, the pressure and the reality of the job.”

Professor Ho said his work as president-elect had already begun.

“I’m already starting to push towards having a higher profile with the academic aspects as well as pushing the WHO agendas of patient safety and quality assurance,” he said.

“In many countries in the world, the way to improve conditions is not necessarily about buying the most expensive equipment.

“That means nothing if surgeons aren’t paying attention to the proper safety measures and making sure that the quality of work is there.”

JCU Medical School MBBS Program

James Cook University’s medical school offers a six-year, full-time undergraduate degree in medicine and surgery, the Bachelor of Medicine Bachelor of Surgery (MBBS). This medical program aims to produce graduates of the highest academic standards, who can progress to medical practice and to further studies in medical specialties. As mentioned above, the course places special emphasis on rural and Indigenous health and tropical medicine. If you are interested in global health, and the health people in rural and remote places, JCU medicine may be a great fit for you!

Apply to James Cook University Medical School!

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Do you have questions about JCU Medical School and its MBBS program? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Officer Broghan Dean at broghan@oztrekk.com or call 1 866-698-7355 (toll free in Canada) for more information about how you can study in Australia!

Wednesday, February 26th, 2014

JCU Medical School applications are open for 2015 intake

Applications to the undergraduate-entry MBBS program at James Cook University for the February 2015 intake are now officially open via OzTREKK!

James Cook University Medical School

Specialize in tropical medicine at JCU

The JCU Medical School offers the only full medical program in tropical Australia. Established in 2000, the school places a special emphasis on rural, remote and tropical medicine and the health of Aboriginal peoples and Torres Strait Islanders.

The 6-year, full-time Bachelor of Medicine Bachelor of Surgery degree is a comprehensive program with integrated instruction in biomedical sciences, professional practice and clinical medicine. Students attend the Townsville campus for the first half of the course with clinical experience from year one. The James Cook University medical precinct is opposite the Townsville Hospital, the largest teaching hospital in regional or tropical Australia. In later years, students have a base at one of the James Cook University clinical schools that include Townsville, Cairns, Mackay or Darwin.

About the JCU Medical School Medical Program

Program: Bachelor of Medicine Bachelor of Surgery (MBBS)
Location: Townsville, Queensland
Semester intake: February 2015
Duration: 6 years
Application deadline: August 29, 2014

Entry Requirements for the JCU Medical Program

  • Entry is directly from high school. Students may also transfer into the program during their undergraduate degree or at the completion of their undergraduate degree.
  • High school cumulative average necessary to be considered is a minimum of 85% in Grade 12 subjects, including prerequisite subject grades.
  • If you are applying to the program after you have partially or fully completed your post-secondary studies, you should have a Canadian GPA of 80% cumulative average across all university studies, but to have a competitive application, applicants should have achieved at least an 82% cumulative average.
  • Interview: held in-person and via video conference

Accreditation & Licensing

OzTREKK will be hosting its annual Canadian Medical Licensing seminars across Canada, which are exclusive to those who apply to an Australian Medical School via OzTREKK. These workshops provide you with the latest information regarding the accreditation and licensing process if you wish to return to Canada to practice, and provide you with options and the latest information if you wish to attain a residency in the U.S. or stay in Australia.

If you have any questions at all, please don’t hesitate to contact OzTREKK Medical School Admissions Officer Broghan Dean at any time to assist you with your JCU Medical School application, or to answer any questions you may have regarding medical school in Australia.

Apply to James Cook University Medical School!

Wishing you all the best with your application to the JCU Medical School!

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Do you have questions about JCU Medical School and its MBBS program? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Officer Broghan Dean at broghan@oztrekk.com or call 1 866-698-7355 (toll free in Canada) for more information about how you can study in Australia!

Friday, January 24th, 2014

JCU professor honoured with Australia Day Ambassador role

James Cook University’s Professor Peter Leggat AM has been named as a 2014 Australia Day Ambassador for Queensland.

JCU Medical School

Study medicine at James Cook University

He is among 47 Queenslanders in the Ambassadors Program, who help to capture the spirit of Australia Day by encouraging communities across Queensland to come together and celebrate Australia’s national day, Jan. 26.

Ambassadors are high-achieving, inspirational Queenslanders from diverse fields and backgrounds, and travel throughout the state to attend local council celebrations on Australia Day.

Professor Leggat, who is based in Townsville, is Head of JCU’s School of Public Health, Tropical Medicine and Rehabilitation Sciences, and Associate Dean for Faculty Affairs, Faculty of Medicine, Health and Molecular Sciences.

This weekend, Professor Leggat will travel to Richmond Shire in Western Queensland—a centre for sheep and cattle farming, but also growing in popularity for tourism as part of the Australia’s acclaimed Dinosaur Trail.

“I was surprised to be asked to be an Ambassador, but did not hesitate to agree,” Professor Leggat said.

“I am looking forward to joining the people of Richmond to celebrate our national day and also to thank them for their contribution to JCU, especially through health placements and workforce development.”

Professor Leggat will spend the Australia Day weekend in Richmond and will be hosted by the Richmond Shire Council.

Professor Leggat said he was initially approached by the Department of Premier and Cabinet in the Queensland Government to participate and they matched him with his host council.

The Australia Day Ambassador Program is now in its 10th year.

Professor Leggat is a highly respected medical educator, who has been teaching medical and other health science students for nearly 30 years.

He helped to establish the popular Australian Postgraduate Travel Medicine course, which has been conducted at James Cook University for more than 20 years, and more recently started JCU’s inaugural expedition and wilderness medicine course.

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If you have any questions about studying medicine or about JCU Medical School, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Broghan Dean at broghan@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1 866-698-7355.

Find out more about Australian Medical Schools and about how you can study in Australia!

Tuesday, January 7th, 2014

JCU Medical School strengthening Indigenous health care

Creating partnerships to improve the quality of primary health care provided to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders across Northern Australia is the aim of a nationally funded project led by researchers at James Cook University.

JCU Medical School

Study medicine at JCU Medical School

The National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC), which administers grants for health and medical research on behalf of the Australian Government, awarded the project nearly $600,000 in the latest grant round.

Associate Professor Sarah Larkins, from JCU’s School of Medicine and Dentistry, will lead Quality improvement in Aboriginal primary health care: lessons from the best to better the rest from early 2014.

Dr Larkins said improving the quality and consistency of primary health care (PHC) provided to Aboriginal people and Torres Strait Islanders was an essential part of the Federal Government’s Close the Gap program.

“A range of Indigenous PHC centres—both Aboriginal and Islander Community Controlled Health Services and government-provided health services—provide primary health care services for Indigenous people,” she said. “However, the quality of care provided by such services, and the intermediate health outcomes achieved, vary significantly, and the reasons for this are not known.”

Associate Professor Larkins said working in partnership with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peak bodies and government, researchers from JCU, Menzies School of Health Research and the Combined Universities Centre for Remote Health, the project aimed to find out what worked in primary health care services to help improve their performance.

“Working with existing data through the ABCD National Research Partnership, we will identify ‘high-improving’ PHC services over several cycles using Continuous Quality Improvement—or CQI—tools.

“Then we will use multiple case studies with these services that improve dramatically in response to CQI to investigate the factors that support a positive response to CQI processes and how they interact at each site.

“In partnership with participating services, we will then use action research to translate this knowledge through the existing ABCD National Research Partnership Network to services struggling to improve their performance using CQI tools.”

About James Cook University Medical School

James Cook University’s medical school specializes in rural and remote medicine. The JCU program has a unique place among Australian medical schools. The course is undertaken entirely in northern Australia and has an emphasis on tropical medicine, the health of rural and remote communities, and of Aboriginal peoples and Torres Strait Islanders. The JCU medical program is informed by a concern for social justice, innovation and excellence in medical education, research and service.

Medical students at JCU gain early experience in the tropical health care context and benefit from extensive clinical experience and a full course of medical education and training. The program attracts students, staff and clinicians with an ambition to make a difference, whatever their background, specialty or career direction.

James Cook University’s medical school offers a six-year, full-time undergraduate degree in medicine and surgery, the Bachelor of Medicine Bachelor of Surgery (MBBS). This medical program aims to produce graduates of the highest academic standards, who can progress to medical practice and to further studies in medical specialties. As mentioned above, the course places special emphasis on rural and Indigenous health and tropical medicine. If you are interested in global health, and the health people in rural and remote places, JCU medicine may be a great fit for you!

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Do you have questions about JCU Medical School and its MBBS program? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Officer Broghan Dean at broghan@oztrekk.com or call 1 866-698-7355 (toll free in Canada) for more information about how you can study in Australia!

Friday, October 25th, 2013

Australia is looking for rural doctors

Did you know that Canadian and New Zealand doctors are now being sought to work in regional and rural Australia? It’s true.

A new agreement will let some Canadian and New Zealand doctors work in Australia without supervision if they have relevant qualifications and rural and remote medical experience. Normally, an overseas-trained doctor would require to undergo one year of supervised work, but this new pathway will eliminate this requirement.

JCU School of Medicine

JCU is the hub of rural and remote medicine

This is a reflection on the need for doctors in Australia with expertise in Aboriginal health.

President of the Australian College of Rural and Remote Medicine (ACRRM)—and JCU Medical School Dean and Head of School—Richard Murray has signed a mutual recognition agreement with the College of Family Physicians of Canada.

“The engagement between rural doctors in Canada and Australia is warm and continues to strengthen,” he said.

The agreement will give its fellowship qualification reciprocal recognition in Canada. According to ACRRM, the draft MoU with Canada proposes that the Primary Qualifications of ACRRM and the College of Family Physicians of Canada (Fellowship and Certification, respectively) be recognized as equivalent qualifications. As a consequence, current holders of a FACRRM would qualify for “all the privileges and responsibilities of Certification with the CFPC.”

Similarly, a CFPC certified practitioner with appropriate rural experience would be entitled to apply for Fellowship of ACRRM.

Professor Murray said that the opportunities this creates for Australian and Canadian practitioners to gain experience in each other’s countries could only benefit the quality and depth of rural medical services.

“Working in unfamiliar environments sharpens people powers of observation and stimulates their curiosity,” says Professor Murray. “Like cultural, business, and sporting exchanges, the exchange of rural generalist-orientated practitioners between Australia and Canada would pay dividends over the long-term.”

About James Cook University Medical School

James Cook University’s medical school specializes in rural and remote medicine. The JCU program has a unique place among Australian medical schools. The course is undertaken entirely in northern Australia and has an emphasis on tropical medicine, the health of rural and remote communities, and of Aboriginal peoples and Torres Strait Islanders. The JCU medical program is informed by a concern for social justice, innovation and excellence in medical education, research and service.

Medical students at JCU gain early experience in the tropical health care context and benefit from extensive clinical experience and a full course of medical education and training. The program attracts students, staff and clinicians with an ambition to make a difference, whatever their background, specialty or career direction.

James Cook University’s medical school offers a six-year, full-time undergraduate degree in medicine and surgery, the Bachelor of Medicine Bachelor of Surgery (MBBS). This medical program aims to produce graduates of the highest academic standards, who can progress to medical practice and to further studies in medical specialties. As mentioned above, the course places special emphasis on rural and Indigenous health and tropical medicine. If you are interested in global health, and the health people in rural and remote places, JCU medicine may be a great fit for you!

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Do you have questions about JCU Medical School and its MBBS program? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Officer Broghan Dean at broghan@oztrekk.com or call 1 866-698-7355 (toll free in Canada) for more information about how you can study in Australia!