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Posts Tagged ‘pharmacy placements’

Wednesday, July 5th, 2017

Understanding UQ School of Pharmacy placements: Part 2

If you’re considering studying at the UQ School of Pharmacy, you know that you’ll have placements to help you get the best start in your career. Here’s part two of Understanding UQ School of Pharmacy placements.

Understanding UQ School of Pharmacy placements: Part 2

Study pharmacy at UQ

Are there any documents you have to fill out prior to placement?

Preparing for community placement is fairly simple; however, before hospital placement there are quite a few things which need to be completed. You must complete a number of online modules prior to the commencement your placement. You start on these modules as soon as the links become available as some take longer than others to complete, and a certification will be obtained at the end of the modules, which you will need to print out and take with you to your placement. It’s a good idea to print off a couple of the certificates to have on file for the following year(s) otherwise you will be required to complete the modules every year. Some of the modules, however, are required to be completed annually. Don’t panic: all of this information will be outlined to you when the time comes.

Do placements lead to potential part time jobs?

Placements are one of the best ways of not only expanding your knowledge but also allow you to network. Remember to always arrive at least 10 minutes early for any placement shift to make a good impression that you are keen. Little things like this may give you the chance to complete your placement at the same pharmacy again, but also may also land you a part time job. Be polite, kind, and respectful to everyone you meet. Many UQ Pharmacy students have been offered part-time paid jobs at the pharmacies where they have completed their placements.

Does placement define how well you’ll do in the future as a pharmacist?

Placement is designed to be a positive and uplifting experience. A pharmaceutical profession comprises of a lot of medications and there are a lot of details when it comes to medication usage, their individual side effects, contraindications, indications, etc. which is why placement exists. It allows students to apply their knowledge to real-life situations and make the best decisions when it comes to patient care. In reality, it is a learning process and at the end of the day, you will evolve into the pharmacist you aspire to be.

Study at the UQ School of Pharmacy

The UQ School of Pharmacy’s program prepares graduates for the contemporary role of the pharmacist in society, ensuring that patients optimize medication usage. Initial courses on chemical, physical and biological studies lead to professional specialties in later years. Practical and clinical science studies begin in first year, providing students with a strong background in professional practice.

Program: Bachelor of Pharmacy (Honours)
Location: Brisbane, Queensland
Semester intake: February
Duration: 4 years

Apply to the University of Queensland Pharmacy School!

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Do you need help with your UQ School of Pharmacy application and credit transfers? Please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Pharmacy Schools Admissions Officer Krista McVeigh at krista@oztrekk.com! We’re here to help!

Friday, June 9th, 2017

Understanding UQ School of Pharmacy placements: Part 1

The UQ Bachelor of Pharmacy (Honours) is one of Australia’s most comprehensive and well-respected pharmacy degrees, both domestically and internationally, and offers intensive pharmacy placements so students can get fully prepared for their career in pharmacy. UQ School of Pharmacy students undertake more than 350 hours of supervised clinical practice in a range of clinical settings, including hospital and community pharmacies. The school has partnerships with more than 500 pharmacies throughout rural and metropolitan Australia and overseas.

During their placements, students have the opportunity to apply their theoretical knowledge acquired through coursework and research to practice and develop their clinical skills in real-life settings, and will undertake a variety of sessional practical experiences from year one before commencing two 4-week block placements in year four.

Do you go to placement every year?

Placement is such a key part of the UQ program that it starts from second semester of the first year, and every semester after that. The first-year placement is only a one-day per week of a four-hour shift, making it a bit of an introduction into the community pharmacy world. In your second year it is slightly more intensive with a five-week placement, again attending the community pharmacy one day per week, but, also a second day at a hospital placement. This is a great experience because you get the best of both worlds while receiving hands-on experience in the differences of community and hospital pharmacies. In third year, the first semester comprises a six week community placement, and the second semester is comprised of a two-day hospital placement and a week-long community pharmacy placement. During that week-long placement you are required to be at the pharmacy for full days, like you would if you were working there full-time. In the final year of the program, there is a month long placement for the first month of each semester. One semester is community focused while your second semester is more research focused. Tip: you can also attend one semester placement overseas in any other part of the world!

Do you have to find your own placement every year?

During your first year, the UQ School of Pharmacy will allocate your placement. There is an online portal whereby you can list your top three suburbs, and international students are encouraged to a head start and fill out the portal as soon as it opens. For your future placements, you are required to find your own community locations. If you are unsure where you should start looking for pharmacies, ask friends who are in higher years to see if they can give you the contact information of the pharmacies where they completed their placement.

Are there any assignments or tasks you have to complete prior to placement?

Each year, there will be a set of required tasks you will need to complete over the course of your placement. It is important that you pay attention to each of the patients you encounter as well observe your preceptor’s interactions. You will be required to record an online diary of what your placement shift was like and what you encountered, learned, observed, and areas you think require improvement. In your later years you may be required to dispense a certain number of scripts prior to placement finishing or you may be required to set a number of goals you’d like to achieve prior to completing your placement, such as improving your over the counter (OTC) skills to a certain level.

Stay tuned for Part 2 for more UQ Pharmacy placement tips!

About the UQ Bachelor of Pharmacy Honours program

The UQ Bachelor of Pharmacy program prepares graduates for the contemporary role of the pharmacist in society, ensuring that patients optimize medication usage. Initial courses on chemical, physical and biological studies lead to professional specialties in later years. Practical and clinical science studies begin in first year, providing students with a strong background in professional practice.

Understanding UQ School of Pharmacy placements: Part 1

Learn more about the UQ School of Pharmacy

Program: Bachelor of Pharmacy
Location: Brisbane, Queensland
Semester intake: February
Duration: 4 years
Application deadline: November 29; however, candidates are encouraged to apply as early as possible, especially if they are seeking credit transfers

Entry Requirements

Applicants to UQ Pharmacy are required to have completed their high school diploma. Applicants should have completed Grade 12 English, Chemistry and Math to meet program prerequisites.

If you have commenced or completed a university degree or any post-secondary studies, your most recent studies will be assessed in terms of your grades. If you have not completed the necessary prerequisite subjects in your post-secondary studies, your high school transcripts will then be assessed for prerequisite subjects.

Credit Transfers

Many international students with prior study (especially those with a science background) are able to enter directly into Year 2. If credit is awarded, students can undertake an additional course in their first and second semester of enrollment and complete the program in just 3 years.

Apply to the University of Queensland School of Pharmacy!

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Learn more about UQ School of Pharmacy. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Pharmacy Schools Admissions Officer Krista McVeigh at krista@oztrekk.com.

Thursday, January 26th, 2017

UQ pharmacy student’s community placement

The UQ Bachelor of Pharmacy (Honours) is one of Australia’s most comprehensive and well-respected pharmacy degrees, both domestically and internationally, and offers intensive pharmacy placements so students can get fully prepared for their career in pharmacy. Here, a current UQ Pharmacy student talks about the community placement experience.

I have had three blocks of placements (over the course of the past three years) while undertaking the Bachelor of Pharmacy, and I have learnt many different things from each experience. I hope that this post helps anyone thinking about studying pharmacy to have a slight insight into the degree, and helps those already enrolled in the program to prepare for their first placement.

UQ pharmacy student's community pharmacy placement

Study at UQ Pharmacy School

As a first-year pharmacy student, I wasn’t quite sure why we needed to do a community placement in the first place. Since then the answers have become quite obvious. Community placement gave me an insight into the operations and running of a small business and got me familiar with the daily practices of a pharmacy. This was particularly helpful as it was segmented throughout my degree and in plenty of time for my final intern year (which all students must complete after graduation). The experience also helped me to plan my study more effectively and assisted me in making career decisions, e.g., whether to be a community or hospital pharmacist. After my very positive placement experiences in community pharmacies, I have now decided to pursue this career avenue.

How to prepare for your first placement?

When on placement, you must be aware and switched on at all times. An attendance sheet must be signed by your preceptor (supervisor) after each placement, so it is important to try to impress them with your professionalism and pharmacy knowledge. You will be taking notes on every patient case that you observe; therefore, remember to pack a good pen (possibly a backup too), your attendance sheets, and your pharmacy student badge. For your second year you will also have to remember your graduated descriptor tools; however, you won’t need these in the first year. These tools allow your preceptor to grade your performance and enables open communication and advice between the two of you. It’s actually quite fun when you get to this stage and start to discuss your performance and things which you could improve on, with a graduated professional. Often the things that you feel like you are doing wrong, do not look the same (or as bad) for others. This feedback really helps shape and improve your placement performance.

What do you do on placement?

On your very first day on placement you will be required to observe and answer a list of questions provided by your course coordinator. These questions prompt your thoughts and help you to familiarise yourself with the business and how to deal with customer interactions. They may also teach you some of the basics including compounding medicine and using the cashier machine. Try to soak up as much experience and knowledge as possible in your four-hour shift. The time seems to fly past!

On your second placement (which is in second year, second semester) you will be required to get much more involved in the customer interactions, you may even handle some of the customer cases in regard to over-the-counter medications (either from direct-product request cases or symptom-based cases). Try to write down or remember each of your cases after your shift. These examples will be useful for your weekly reflective diary. Each year your responsibilities will grow and by year three you will be required to dispense a number of scripts and be confident with your patient interactions.

How to find a placement location?

In most cases for first-year students the placement locations will be arranged by the UQ Pharmacy administration. Or, if you have a specific pharmacy in mind, you can be proactive and find your placement site yourself. If you are planning to find it yourself, I would recommend you to search for the pharmacies nearest to your house, or at least those you can reach easily through public transport. Make sure you also take into consideration the services they provide, such as compounding, dose administration aids and any specialty services. Remember to take into account the business environment in which it operates. If it’s a busy pharmacy you may get to learn more and receive more opportunities to learn.

Choose the pharmacy that fits your preferences, then approach the manager in person to politely ask about their placement opportunities. Be prepared with your resume, university timetable and preceptor introduction letter (provided by the school). This will make you look organised and professional. This preparation will give you practice for your future placements, which must be found yourself. My suggestion is to not put all your eggs in one basket by only approaching one pharmacy. Many students are looking for placements and it takes them some time to filter through the students. Visit as many pharmacies as you can and put your best foot forward (including dressing smartly) to give a good first impression and increase your chances of being chosen.

What happens if you mess up on placement?

Mistakes do happen, which is why it is important to wear your student placement badge. This allows customers to be aware that you are still studying and are not completely armed with the knowledge and skills of a qualified professional.  Often this makes customers much more forgiving and considerate if you do make a mistake. If there is something you are not sure of then don’t freak out. Apologise and get help from one of the other pharmacy professionals. Make sure you listen to how they deal with the problem in order to learn from the experience and get it right next time around. Don’t be shy to speak out and ask the other staff members lots of questions on placement. You will learn much more from them than from reading a book or studying your lecture notes.

Do placements lead to paid jobs?

Many of my friends got hired by their preceptors and started to work part-time in the pharmacies whilst finishing their degree. If you are hoping for the same result then I would suggest you to try to go on placement at the big franchise pharmacies like Chemist Warehouse or Terry White Chemist. They will have greater job opportunities due to their many locations.

Finally, double-check everything before you go for your first day on placement: badge, attendance sheets, and pens. The last thing you want is to look disorganised on your first day. Most importantly, enjoy the experience and learn as much as you can. The skills you learn during this time will be the backbone of your future career as a pharmacist.

Story via UQ School of Pharmacy
Meet the author

Hi, my name is Pei Sin. I am in my third year of the Bachelor of Pharmacy at UQ. I am originally from Malaysia and am enjoying my time studying in Australia. I am a creative person so in my downtime, outside of uni, I enjoy painting, sketching and drawing. If I can find the time amongst study I also am a big fan of crime and investigations shows like NCIS, CIS and Bones—I definitely get a kick out of it when they mention chemical/medical terms which I understand.

UQ Bachelor of Pharmacy (Honours)

The UQ Bachelor of Pharmacy program prepares graduates for the contemporary role of the pharmacist in society, ensuring that patients optimize medication usage. Initial courses on chemical, physical and biological studies lead to professional specialties in later years. Practical and clinical science studies begin in first year, providing students with a strong background in professional practice.

Program: Bachelor of Pharmacy (Honours)
Location: Brisbane, Queensland
Semester intake: February
Duration: 4 years

Apply to the University of Queensland Pharmacy School!

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Learn more about UQ Pharmacy! Krista McVeigh is OzTREKK’s Australian Pharmacy Schools Admissions Officer. Contact Krista at 1-866-698-7355 or krista@oztrekk.com.

Tuesday, February 23rd, 2016

UQ School of Pharmacy student placements

The UQ School of Pharmacy Bachelor of Pharmacy program prepares graduates for the contemporary role of the pharmacist in society, ensuring that patients optimize medication usage. Initial courses on chemical, physical and biological studies lead to professional specialties in later years. Practical and clinical science studies begin in first year, providing students with a strong background in professional practice.

UQ School of Pharmacy

Learn more about the UQ School of Pharmacy

Experiential placements in the pharmacy program are viewed as valuable, integral and essential for the attainment of a pharmacy degree. During the four years of the undergraduate degree, these experiential placements may be in community pharmacy, hospital pharmacy, the pharmaceutical industry or other related health-care sites as required by the teaching and learning requirements of the pharmacy program curriculum.

Preceptors are a vital link between the UQ School of Pharmacy and the pharmacy profession. The input of preceptors into the course is greatly valued.

The UQ School of Pharmacy has developed the following set of guidelines to clarify the role of Preceptors and Students:

1. All placements which involve professional pharmacy must be supervised by a registered pharmacist:

  • the preceptor is considered to be a professional role model who will guide and encourage the student to apply the principles of best pharmacy practice
  • a preceptor should provide appropriate and lawful supervision of the student
  • a preceptor must be regularly available to oversee the student
  • it is acceptable for the student to have more than one preceptor supervising their placement
  • customers should not be misled that the student is a registered pharmacist

2. During the 4 years of the undergraduate course, students should experience all facets of community pharmacy:

  • In year 1, the student may take a purely observational role and may include learning about and participating in the duties of all pharmacy staff
  • In later years, they should be given opportunities to practice their pharmaceutical skills and knowledge
  • The preceptor should assist the student in the integration of theory with practice noting the student’s current level of theoretical knowledge
  • This should include supervised interaction with pharmacy customers
  • The student may be encouraged to research any questions during their placement

3. For each placement the preceptor should ensure

  • the student is orientated to any specific expectations that the preceptor (e.g., expected hours, dress requirements) may have in addition to those stipulated in the Placement Guidelines for Pharmacy Students
  • they verify that the student attends their regular placement
  • they complete and return the assessment forms
    (the feedback from preceptors is important for evaluating the student’s professional development and improving the placement programs)
  • confidentiality with regard to the student’s personal details is maintained
  • they notify the placements officer or academic supervisor of any issues or problems

4. The student must NOT receive any remuneration for their placement:

  • This would undermine the flexibility of the learning experience
  • Remuneration invalidates any University of Queensland insurance cover
  • Students do not have professional liability insurance

Apply to the University of Queensland Pharmacy School!

*

Would you like more information about studying at the UQ School of Pharmacy? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Pharmacy Schools Admissions Officer Krista McVeigh at krista@oztrekk.com.

Tuesday, June 25th, 2013

UQ Pharmacy School placements

The University of Queensland Bachelor of Pharmacy (BPharm) program prepares graduates for the contemporary role of the pharmacist in society, ensuring that patients optimize medication usage. Initial courses on chemical, physical and biological studies lead to professional specialties in later years. Practical and clinical science studies begin in first year, providing students with a strong background in professional practice.

Experiential placements in the pharmacy program are viewed as valuable, integral and essential for the attainment of a pharmacy degree. During the four years of the undergraduate degree, these experiential placements may be in community pharmacy, hospital pharmacy, the pharmaceutical industry or other related health-care sites as required by the teaching and learning requirements of the pharmacy program curriculum.

Preceptors are a vital link between the UQ School of Pharmacy and the pharmacy profession. The input of preceptors into the course is greatly valued.

The UQ School of Pharmacy has developed the following set of guidelines to clarify the role of Preceptors and Students:

1. All placements which involve professional pharmacy must be supervised by a registered pharmacist:

  • the preceptor is considered to be a professional role model who will guide and encourage the student to apply the principles of best pharmacy practice
  • a preceptor should provide appropriate and lawful supervision of the student
  • a preceptor must be regularly available to oversee the student
  • it is acceptable for the student to have more than one preceptor supervising their placement
  • customers should not be misled that the student is a registered pharmacist

2. During the 4 years of the undergraduate course, students should experience all facets of community pharmacy:

  • in year 1, the student may take a purely observational role and may include learning about and participating in the duties of all pharmacy staff
  • in later years, they should be given opportunities to practice their pharmaceutical skills and knowledge
  • the preceptor should assist the student in the integration of theory with practice noting the student’s current level of theoretical knowledge
  • this should include supervised interaction with pharmacy customers
  • the student may be encouraged to research any questions during their placement

3. For each placement the preceptor should ensure

  • the student is orientated to any specific expectations that the preceptor (e.g., expected hours, dress requirements) may have in addition to those stipulated in the Placement Guidelines for Pharmacy Students
  • they verify that the student attends their regular placement
  • they complete and return the assessment forms
    (the feedback from preceptors is important for evaluating the student’s professional development and improving the placement programs)
  • confidentiality with regard to the student’s personal details is maintained
  • they notify the placements officer or academic supervisor of any issues or problems

4. The student must NOT receive any remuneration for their placement:

  • this would undermine the flexibility of the learning experience
  • remuneration invalidates any University of Queensland insurance cover
  • students do not have professional liability insurance

Apply to the University of Queensland Pharmacy School!

*

Would you like more information about studying pharmacy at the UQ Pharmacy School? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Pharmacy Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at  1 866-698-7355. Find out more about pharmacy programs and about how OzTREKK helps you to study in Australia!