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Posts Tagged ‘pharmacist’

Wednesday, July 5th, 2017

Understanding UQ School of Pharmacy placements: Part 2

If you’re considering studying at the UQ School of Pharmacy, you know that you’ll have placements to help you get the best start in your career. Here’s part two of Understanding UQ School of Pharmacy placements.

Understanding UQ School of Pharmacy placements: Part 2

Study pharmacy at UQ

Are there any documents you have to fill out prior to placement?

Preparing for community placement is fairly simple; however, before hospital placement there are quite a few things which need to be completed. You must complete a number of online modules prior to the commencement your placement. You start on these modules as soon as the links become available as some take longer than others to complete, and a certification will be obtained at the end of the modules, which you will need to print out and take with you to your placement. It’s a good idea to print off a couple of the certificates to have on file for the following year(s) otherwise you will be required to complete the modules every year. Some of the modules, however, are required to be completed annually. Don’t panic: all of this information will be outlined to you when the time comes.

Do placements lead to potential part time jobs?

Placements are one of the best ways of not only expanding your knowledge but also allow you to network. Remember to always arrive at least 10 minutes early for any placement shift to make a good impression that you are keen. Little things like this may give you the chance to complete your placement at the same pharmacy again, but also may also land you a part time job. Be polite, kind, and respectful to everyone you meet. Many UQ Pharmacy students have been offered part-time paid jobs at the pharmacies where they have completed their placements.

Does placement define how well you’ll do in the future as a pharmacist?

Placement is designed to be a positive and uplifting experience. A pharmaceutical profession comprises of a lot of medications and there are a lot of details when it comes to medication usage, their individual side effects, contraindications, indications, etc. which is why placement exists. It allows students to apply their knowledge to real-life situations and make the best decisions when it comes to patient care. In reality, it is a learning process and at the end of the day, you will evolve into the pharmacist you aspire to be.

Study at the UQ School of Pharmacy

The UQ School of Pharmacy’s program prepares graduates for the contemporary role of the pharmacist in society, ensuring that patients optimize medication usage. Initial courses on chemical, physical and biological studies lead to professional specialties in later years. Practical and clinical science studies begin in first year, providing students with a strong background in professional practice.

Program: Bachelor of Pharmacy (Honours)
Location: Brisbane, Queensland
Semester intake: February
Duration: 4 years

Apply to the University of Queensland Pharmacy School!

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Do you need help with your UQ School of Pharmacy application and credit transfers? Please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Pharmacy Schools Admissions Officer Krista McVeigh at krista@oztrekk.com! We’re here to help!

Friday, June 9th, 2017

Understanding UQ School of Pharmacy placements: Part 1

The UQ Bachelor of Pharmacy (Honours) is one of Australia’s most comprehensive and well-respected pharmacy degrees, both domestically and internationally, and offers intensive pharmacy placements so students can get fully prepared for their career in pharmacy. UQ School of Pharmacy students undertake more than 350 hours of supervised clinical practice in a range of clinical settings, including hospital and community pharmacies. The school has partnerships with more than 500 pharmacies throughout rural and metropolitan Australia and overseas.

During their placements, students have the opportunity to apply their theoretical knowledge acquired through coursework and research to practice and develop their clinical skills in real-life settings, and will undertake a variety of sessional practical experiences from year one before commencing two 4-week block placements in year four.

Do you go to placement every year?

Placement is such a key part of the UQ program that it starts from second semester of the first year, and every semester after that. The first-year placement is only a one-day per week of a four-hour shift, making it a bit of an introduction into the community pharmacy world. In your second year it is slightly more intensive with a five-week placement, again attending the community pharmacy one day per week, but, also a second day at a hospital placement. This is a great experience because you get the best of both worlds while receiving hands-on experience in the differences of community and hospital pharmacies. In third year, the first semester comprises a six week community placement, and the second semester is comprised of a two-day hospital placement and a week-long community pharmacy placement. During that week-long placement you are required to be at the pharmacy for full days, like you would if you were working there full-time. In the final year of the program, there is a month long placement for the first month of each semester. One semester is community focused while your second semester is more research focused. Tip: you can also attend one semester placement overseas in any other part of the world!

Do you have to find your own placement every year?

During your first year, the UQ School of Pharmacy will allocate your placement. There is an online portal whereby you can list your top three suburbs, and international students are encouraged to a head start and fill out the portal as soon as it opens. For your future placements, you are required to find your own community locations. If you are unsure where you should start looking for pharmacies, ask friends who are in higher years to see if they can give you the contact information of the pharmacies where they completed their placement.

Are there any assignments or tasks you have to complete prior to placement?

Each year, there will be a set of required tasks you will need to complete over the course of your placement. It is important that you pay attention to each of the patients you encounter as well observe your preceptor’s interactions. You will be required to record an online diary of what your placement shift was like and what you encountered, learned, observed, and areas you think require improvement. In your later years you may be required to dispense a certain number of scripts prior to placement finishing or you may be required to set a number of goals you’d like to achieve prior to completing your placement, such as improving your over the counter (OTC) skills to a certain level.

Stay tuned for Part 2 for more UQ Pharmacy placement tips!

About the UQ Bachelor of Pharmacy Honours program

The UQ Bachelor of Pharmacy program prepares graduates for the contemporary role of the pharmacist in society, ensuring that patients optimize medication usage. Initial courses on chemical, physical and biological studies lead to professional specialties in later years. Practical and clinical science studies begin in first year, providing students with a strong background in professional practice.

Understanding UQ School of Pharmacy placements: Part 1

Learn more about the UQ School of Pharmacy

Program: Bachelor of Pharmacy
Location: Brisbane, Queensland
Semester intake: February
Duration: 4 years
Application deadline: November 29; however, candidates are encouraged to apply as early as possible, especially if they are seeking credit transfers

Entry Requirements

Applicants to UQ Pharmacy are required to have completed their high school diploma. Applicants should have completed Grade 12 English, Chemistry and Math to meet program prerequisites.

If you have commenced or completed a university degree or any post-secondary studies, your most recent studies will be assessed in terms of your grades. If you have not completed the necessary prerequisite subjects in your post-secondary studies, your high school transcripts will then be assessed for prerequisite subjects.

Credit Transfers

Many international students with prior study (especially those with a science background) are able to enter directly into Year 2. If credit is awarded, students can undertake an additional course in their first and second semester of enrollment and complete the program in just 3 years.

Apply to the University of Queensland School of Pharmacy!

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Learn more about UQ School of Pharmacy. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Pharmacy Schools Admissions Officer Krista McVeigh at krista@oztrekk.com.

Tuesday, January 3rd, 2017

UQ Pharmacy research: A good pharmacist-doctor relationship helps patients

Medication-related problems are one of the most common reasons for patients to be readmitted to hospital.

UQ School of Pharmacy researcher Dr Chris Freeman is investigating whether having a pharmacist working alongside your GP could save you that hassle in the future.

UQ Pharmacy research: A good pharmacist-doctor relationship helps patients

Learn more about UQ Pharmacy

“In Australian hospitals, up to 45 per cent of patients discharged from medical units and 61 per cent from geriatric units, have an unplanned readmission within a year,” Dr Freeman said.

“One of the main groups of people at high risk of readmission include those taking multiple medicines. Many of the medication-related problems encountered are preventable.”

Dr Freeman and his research team are trialling the concept of having a non-dispensing pharmacist embedded in 14 medical centres in the greater Brisbane area.

They anticipate that the presence of such a pharmacist could improve the transfer of information between hospitals and caregivers and ensure treatment plans remain appropriate to the patient.

The pharmacists can help patients negotiate changes to their dosage and assist in stopping and starting different medicines, as well as follow-up blood tests.

Aside from saving human lives, it’s forecast that placing pharmacists in general practice could result in $544.87 million savings in health care over four years.

“The pharmacists in the trial will perform a comprehensive review to identify any medication-related problems,” Dr Freeman said.

“They’ll assess medication adherence, review the patient medication discharge letter, and discuss any changes made to medication during hospital admission with the patient.

“The pharmacists will then update medical centre records and inform community pharmacies of the changes.

“After consultation, the patient will see their usual GP to receive any necessary new prescriptions and to consider any changes suggested by the embedded pharmacist.”

The research project is titled REMAIN HOME and is funded by the HCF Research Foundation and Brisbane South PHN and Brisbane North PHN.

Study at UQ Pharmacy School

The Bachelor of Pharmacy (Honours) program is a well-established, professionally accredited learning framework that is well received by both students and the profession. The program has evolved into one of the country’s most comprehensive and well-respected pharmacy degrees, both domestically and internationally.

Program: Bachelor of Pharmacy (Honours)
Location: Brisbane, Queensland
Semester intake: February
Duration: 4 years

Did you know you can apply for credit transfers?

Many international students with prior study (especially those with a science background) are able to enter directly into Year 2 of the Bachelor of Pharmacy (Honours) program. If credit is awarded, students can undertake an additional course in their first and second semester of enrollment and complete the program in three years instead of four!

Apply to the University of Queensland Pharmacy School!

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Do you need help with your UQ Pharmacy School application and credit transfers? Please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Pharmacy Schools Admissions Officer Krista McVeigh at krista@oztrekk.com! We’re here to help!

Friday, November 8th, 2013

Monash research shows role of pharmacist in general practice is crucial

New research has shown a role for pharmacists within general practice (GP) clinics is a key solution to help prevent medication errors by patients and health professionals.

Monash Pharmacy School

Study pharmacy at Monash University

Monash University study, led by Edwin Tan from the Centre for Medicine Use and Safety, explored the experiences of general practitioners, pharmacists and patients with the integration of pharmacists into general practice clinics in Australia.

The study published in the journal, BMJ Open, found the co-location of pharmacists with Australian GPs in primary health care clinics optimized the safety and provision of medication used by patients.

Practice pharmacists were placed in two primary healthcare clinics in Victoria, providing patient consultations, education sessions, drug information services and quality assurance activities. The integration process was examined over six months.

Mr Tan said the placement of highly trained pharmacists within Australian GP settings improved patient health outcomes, the use of medicines by patients, quality of prescribing, staff drug-knowledge and professional collaboration. 

Pharmacist consultations with patients resulted in resolution of medication-related problems and improved medication adherence,” Mr Tan said.

“A large proportion of Australians take some kind of medicine every day and pharmacists can offer extensive advice and education to detect and prevent drug-related problems that can result in hospitalizations.

“The pharmacist’s role was well accepted by GPs, patients, staff and pharmacists. GPs and staff particularly valued having the pharmacist as part of their team, improving access to medicines information and offering reassurance with medicines management. Overall, the results of this study support the benefits and feasibility of practice pharmacists in the Australian health system, and may help inform local policy and debate on this topic.”

It is hoped a government-subsidized program will be available in the future, similar to collaborative services already funded for nursing staff and allied health professionals to work in co-located settings.

About Monash University’s Bachelor of Pharmacy (BPharm) Program

Monash University’s Bachelor of Pharmacy (BPharm) program produces graduates with a sound knowledge and understanding of the science, technology and practice behind pharmacy as a profession. It comprises four major areas of study: medicinal chemistry (the chemistry of drugs); pharmacology (the action of drugs); pharmaceutics (the presentation and delivery of drugs); and pharmacy practice (the application of all these to the professional practice of pharmacy).

Program: Bachelor of Pharmacy (BPharm)
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Semester intake: February
Duration: 4 years
Application deadline: While there is no set application deadline, applicants are strongly encouraged by Monash University to submit their Bachelor of Pharmacy applications before the end of September for the February intake.

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Do you have questions about Monash University Pharmacy School and about studying pharmacy at Australian universities? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Pharmacy Schools Officer Rachel Brady by emailing rachel@oztrekk.com, or call toll free in Canada at 1 866-698-7355. Find out how you can study in Australia!

 

Wednesday, July 24th, 2013

What is the National Australian Pharmacy Students’ Association?

If you are interested in pursuing a career in pharmacy, and would like to study at an Australian Pharmacy School, then you may be interested in learning about the National Association of Pharmaceutical Students of Australia (NAPSA).

NAPSA was formed in 1948 as the National Association of Pharmaceutical Students of Australia, and originally consisted of six Australian university pharmacy associations, and was the largest representative body of pharmacy students in the world during that time. It served to represent the interests of pharmacy students on a national scale, via their individual state associations. NAPSA was dissolved in the late 1980s, but was reformed in 2001 by delegates from eight of the nine pharmacy schools in Australia.

The National Association of Pharmaceutical Students of Australia aims to establish a permanent form of contact between constituent organizations and to establish contact with the National Associations of the Pharmaceutical Students affiliated with the International Pharmaceutical Students Federation. By maintaining a policy platform that outlines the opinions and beliefs of the Association’s members, they aim to protect the status, rights and privileges, and to promote the interest of members of the association engaged as students, in any field of pharmacy, and to do all such things as may be necessary for such protection and/or promotion.

As well, NAPSA tries to promote the rights of non-member students and pre-registrants and to seek the establishment of uniform conditions regarding courses of study and qualifications for registration of pharmacists throughout Australia.

The association cooperates with other organizations on a scientific, cultural, and social plane with a view to furthering the objectives of the association, and arranges an annual conference between the constituent organizations and assists all constituent organizations.

Pharmacy Awareness

NAPSA’s vision is to promote the profession of pharmacy to students, other health professionals and the wider community and, in doing so, make them aware of the importance of the role of pharmacists in primary health care, the provision of health information and of their involvement in overall long term health care, the community’s health status and quality of life.

NAPSA claims that Pharmacy Awareness is all about working together to promote the benefits of pharmacy, services and future prospects, to the public.

The Pharmacy Awareness Committee works to promote the National Association of Pharmaceutical Students of Australia to the wider professional community and members and the public, whilst fulfilling the social responsibility of pharmacy students to the Australian community.

The associations believes it’s integral that they all play a part in promoting the profession as students and well into their future careers. This is to ensure that pharmacy continues to grow into strong profession and that pharmacists’ services are highly regarded and valued within the community, now and for the future.

Pharmacy Awareness encourages all pharmacy students and branches to work together to promote their future profession by advocating the benefits of pharmacy and the services pharmacists offer to the community, as well as by actively contributing to improving the health of the Australian public.

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Learn more about studying pharmacy at an Australian Pharmacy School:

Do you have questions about studying pharmacy at Australian universities? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Pharmacy Schools Officer Rachel Brady by emailing rachel@oztrekk.com, or by calling toll free in Canada at 1 866-698-7355. Find out how you can study in Australia!

Monday, June 24th, 2013

UQ Pharmacy School embraces diversity

A team of Pharmacy academics from the University of Queensland (UQ) have recently received a Vice-Chancellor’s Equity and Diversity Award, which recognizes UQ staff and students who have made a significant contribution to equity and diversity.

The team from Skills for Communicating and Relating in Pharmacy Training program (SCRIPT) was presented with the award, worth $5000 at a ceremony at the University on Thursday, May 23, 2013.

Historically, between 36 and 53 percent of pharmacy students don’t speak English at home, a language assessed in all years of the undergraduate pharmacy program at UQ. In order to be effective communicators in their field, students and graduates need to have a high quality of discipline-specific and colloquial English to be successful.

SCRIPT recognizes the challenges that these students face and developed the program, which teaches effective English communication skills.

SCRIPT is the result of multidisciplinary collaboration between pharmacy academics from the UQ School of Pharmacy, specialist language teachers from the Institute of Continuing and TESOL Education (ICTE-UQ), and higher education experts from the UQ Teaching and Educational Development Institute (TEDI).

Project team leader Jacqueline Bond from the UQ School of Pharmacy said the program aimed to identify and address the language barrier issues for non-native English speakers, such as Australian colloquialisms, early on in their studies.

It’s vital that graduates have excellent communication skills when they enter the pharmacy profession, to ensure that medicines are used safely and effectively.

Ms Bond said the program was established in 2008 to better prepare undergraduates for their experiential placements in pharmacies, and oral communication assessments, which begin in their first year of study.

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Apply to UQ Pharmacy School!

Do you have questions about University of Queensland Pharmacy School and about studying Pharmacy at Australian universities? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Pharmacy Schools Officer Rachel Brady by emailing rachel@oztrekk.com, or by calling toll free in Canada at 1 866-698-7355. Find out how you can study in Australia!

 

Friday, June 21st, 2013

Honorary doctorate for global pharmaceutical leader

When Professor Kamal Midha, immediate past president of the International Pharmacists Federation (FIP),  delivered the annual Barry L Reed Lecture at Monash University‘s Parkville Campus on June 4, he used an image of a small red tricycle to get his message across about what is needed to obtain better health outcomes.

Professor Midha designated the tricycle’s back two wheels as “science” and “practice,” which can be adjusted to move the front wheel,  “education”  forward to deliver a whole systems patient-centred approach to health care.

It was an image that resonated with the capacity audience of pharmacy professionals, academic staff and students who attended the presentation.

The Canadian-based Professor Midha identified one of the challenges for the science component of his trilogy for improving health outcomes as the need to change the emphasis of the health care spend.

“Currently more than thirty percent of the global health care spend is expended on just three diseases, while some thirty other neglected diseases kill more than eleven million people worldwide every year,” he said.

The challenge for practice, according to Professor Midha, is to improve access to essential medicines and to adhere to clinical guidelines when treating common diseases. The professor pointed out that “Less than two thirds of children suffering from diarrhea are provided with oral rehydration therapy, while more than forty percent are treated with antibiotics, often unnecessarily. ”

On the access front, Professor Midha cited World Health Organisation statistics that show more than 30 percent of the world’s population lacks regular access to medicines, with this figure rising to more than 50 percent in parts of Africa and Asia despite the increasing availability of low-cost generic medicines.

When it comes to education as a means of boosting health outcomes, Professor Midha expressed his concern about the capacity of countries where there is limited local education to deliver research into local solutions because of the lack of pharmacists to support the implementation.

While Australia is in the fortunate position of having 12 pharmacists for every 10,000 population (comparable in Canada), there is in fact a worldwide shortage of pharmacists, stating that there are 2 pharmacists per 1,000,000 population in Somalia for example, and 250 per 1,000,000 in South Africa.

The 2012 Global Pharmacy Workforce Report commissioned by FIP shows that in the 82 countries  surveyed there are just 2, 500,000 pharmacists servicing over 1.3 billion people.

Professor Midha’s message for professional associations, global health organizations and higher education bodies around the world was to take a focused and collaborative approach to improving pharmacy practice and science to enable better discovery and development.

Governments must also act to provide better access to cost effective quality medicines while simultaneously  improving the use of existing medicines to provide the best possible health care for patients.

Find out more about Professor Kamal Midha.

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Pharmacy programs in Australia are structured quite similarly to many other professional programs offered at Australian universities. Students can enter a pharmacy program directly from high school. Students from Canada who have already completed an undergraduate degree may also apply for entry into Australian Bachelor of Pharmacy programs.

The following Australian universities offer undergraduate pharmacy programs:

Do you have questions about studying Pharmacy at Australian universities? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Pharmacy Schools Officer Rachel Brady by emailing rachel@oztrekk.com, or by calling toll free in Canada at 1 866-698-7355. Find out how you can study in Australia!

 

Wednesday, June 19th, 2013

Sydney Pharmacy School does well in world rankings

The University of Sydney Pharmacy School confirmed its place as an elite teaching and research institution for pharmacy on the international stage, when it ranked 16th in the QS World University Rankings by Subject for pharmacy and pharmacology.

According to the results, Sydney climbed six places from the previous year and was second only to Monash University (seventh) as the top two Australian Pharmacy Schools on the list. In fact, over the last few years, the University of Sydney Pharmacy School has seen an increase in international applicants and new and exciting international research collaborations which reflect the quality of the Sydney Pharmacy program.

Harvard University sat atop the rankings, followed by Oxford and Cambridge.

“This result reaffirms the University of Sydney‘s place as a leading school of pharmacy, not only in Australia, but in the highly competitive world stage,” said Professor Iqbal Ramzan, Dean of the Faculty of Pharmacy, and added that the faculty has a proven record in teaching and learning excellence and world-leading research, which is evidenced by the high calibre of the Sydney Pharmacy graduates and the excellent academic reputation of the staff.

The rankings were calculated on several different categories, including academic reputation in which the University of Sydney was ranked third in the world, behind Harvard and the National University of Singapore, with an exceptionally high score of 97.6.

Of the institutions featured in the rankings offering degrees in pharmacy (and not only pharmacology), Sydney was ranked 10th in the world, and along with Monash were the only Australian Pharmacy Schools to appear in the list.

“Our key objective is delivering quality educational and research output, and this emphasis on quality shows us to be a truly world school for pharmacy,” said the Sydney Pharmacy dean.
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Do you have questions about University of Sydney Pharmacy School and about studying pharmacy at Australian universities? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Pharmacy Schools Officer Rachel Brady: Email Rachel at rachel@oztrekk.com, or phone Rachel toll free at 1 866-698-7355. Find out how you can study in Australia!

Tuesday, May 7th, 2013

University of Sydney outlines pharmacy graduates’ options

Are you considering studying pharmacy? Want more info about what your options are after you receive your Bachelor of Pharmacy degree? The University of Sydney outlines your options.

Community Pharmacy

The majority of pharmacists work in community practice (commonly known as a chemist’s shop in Australia or community pharmacy). The Pharmacy Act (1964 – Australia) requires that all community pharmacies are owned by pharmacists, so many practitioners own and operate their own pharmacies. Many pharmacists also work full time or part time as managers or pharmacists-in-charge.

Community pharmacists supply and distribute medicinal and related products. Advice and counselling given by the pharmacist play an important role in maximizing the usefulness of medications while minimizing side effects.

Community pharmacy is continuously evolving, most recently through offering additional services such as

  • providing information to the public and medical practitioners;
  • reviewing medication; and
  • advising medical practitioners about optimal drug therapy and disease-state management.

Community pharmacists are becoming a fully integrated part of the health-care system.

As well, community pharmacists play a role in primary health care and health education and are often the first point of contact with the health-care system. Pharmacists have the expertise to suggest or supply medications for minor illnesses, and to recommend that a customer consult another health professional. Pharmacists also provide a range of medical equipment and therapeutic devices (such as nebulisers and crutches) and explanations about how to use these correctly.

Hospital Pharmacy

Hospital pharmacists work in acute care settings in either the public or private sector. Like their counterparts in community pharmacy, they distribute and review medications, as well as educate patients and allied health professionals to achieve quality use of medicines. Hospital pharmacists perform clinical and applied research, including clinical drug trials, drug utilization studies, applied interventions and pharmaco-economic evaluations. Increasingly, hospital pharmacists provide hospital-to-community liaison services to help patients manage and monitor their medication upon discharge.

Hospital pharmacists work in multidisciplinary teams with medical staff and allied health professionals to provide optimal patient care. They monitor drug therapy to detect and/or minimize the risk of drug interactions and side effects. Many hospital pharmacists attain specialist status in selected therapeutic areas such as cardiology, immunology, manufacturing, hematology, oncology, pediatrics, aged care and anti-coagulation.

Industrial Pharmacy

Because of the broad medical knowledge and skills obtained as part of the pharmacy degree, graduates are also well suited for employment in the pharmaceutical industry. Pharmacists are sought after in the manufacturing, medical, sales and marketing sectors of the industry.

Pharmacy graduates have the potential to take part in all stages of drug utilization, from development and production to registration, clinical assessment, and sales and marketing of products to health care professionals. Employment in the pharmaceutical industry may also provide experience in business development and travel within Australia and overseas.

Research

Postgraduate study allows interested students to gain experience and skills in research. The Faculty of Pharmacy at the University of Sydney has a rich research track record and students have the opportunity to work with world leaders in several research fields. Pharmacy qualifications offer unique career options and flexibility, combining a professional degree with research experience. Graduates may seek employment in full-time research work or choose to pursue a research-based higher degree.

Pharmacy graduates with research experience are sought after candidates for senior roles in the pharmaceutical industry.

Other Opportunities

Pharmacists are employed by various government agencies in Australia, both Commonwealth and State, generally in positions concerned with the control, manufacture, supply and distribution of medicines and medicinal preparations. Openings also occur in the defence services and universities.

University of Sydney’s Bachelor of Pharmacy (BPharm)

Program: Bachelor of Pharmacy (BPharm)
Location: Sydney, New South Wales
Semester intake: February
Duration: 4 years
Application deadline: TBA

Entry Requirements

  • Applicants are required to have completed their high school diploma in order to be eligible for entry to the University of Sydney‘s Bachelor of Pharmacy (BPharm) program.
  • Assumed knowledge: Mathematics, Chemistry and Biology or Physics. To study in the Bachelor of Pharmacy (BPharm), you are expected to have knowledge of these subject areas. Grade 12 Physics is also recommended but not required.
  • If you have commenced or completed a university degree or any post-secondary studies, your most recent studies will be assessed in terms of your grades. If you have not completed the necessary prerequisite subjects in your post-secondary studies, your high school transcripts will then be assessed for prerequisite subjects. Applicants are assessed on a case-by-case basis.

Apply to the University of Sydney Pharmacy School!

Learn more about the University of Sydney Pharmacy School and about Australian Pharmacy Schools.

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Do you have questions about University of Sydney Pharmacy School and about studying pharmacy at Australian universities? Want to learn how to become a pharmacist? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Pharmacy Schools Officer Rachel Brady: Email Rachel at rachel@oztrekk.com, or phone Rachel toll free at 1 866-698-7355. Find out how you can study in Australia!

Friday, May 3rd, 2013

OzTREKK Funny Friday

A front-end clerk in a pharmacy was admonished by the owner for missing too many sales. “I’m sorry,” the boss glowered. “But one more missed sale and you will be fired.”

The next customer who came into the pharmacy had a terrible cough. Between his coughing and sputtering, he asked the clerk for help. Unable to recall where the cough remedies were, the nervous clerk pointed to a box of Ex-Lax and said, “Here, buy this then go over to our cooler and take all of it with plenty of water.”

The customer thanked him and proceeded to follow the clerk’s instructions. Finishing his last glass of water, the customer exited the pharmacy. Once outside he stopped, took a few faltering steps, then hugged a telephone pole. The boss, having witnessed the entire scene, approached the clerk and asked him what he recommended.

“Ex-Lax,” said the clerk hesitantly.

“Ex-Lax!” yelled the boss. “That won’t help a cough!”

“Sure it does,” replied the clerk. “Look, he’s afraid to cough.”

About Pharmacy Programs in Australia

Both Bachelor of Pharmacy and Master of Pharmacy programs educate students to become pharmacists. The main difference is that the Bachelor of Pharmacy is offered at the undergraduate level, and the Master of Pharmacy is offered at the postgraduate level. Bachelor of Pharmacy students can study the program directly from high school or after having completed post-secondary studies. In order to be eligible to apply for a Master of Pharmacy program, you must have completed your bachelor degree.

The following Australian universities offer Bachelor of Pharmacy programs:

The following Australian universities offer Master of Pharmacy programs:

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For more information about how to become a pharmacist, including entry requirements, application deadlines, tuition fees, scholarships, please visit OzTREKK’s Australian Pharmacy Schools page.

If you have any questions, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Pharmacy School Officer Rachel Brady: Email Rachel at rachel@oztrekk.com or call Rachel at 1 866-698-7355 (toll free in Canada).

Contact OzTREKK for more information about studying in Australia and about Pharmacy programs at Australian universities.