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Posts Tagged ‘mooting competition’

Thursday, January 4th, 2018

Sydney Law School students excel in Tokyo moot

Team Australia, a group of law students from across six Australian universities, including Sydney Law School, have won the inaugural Chartered Institute of Arbitrators’ Prize for Best Performance in the English-language Arbitration round and landed second overall in the 2017 Intercollegiate Negotiation and Arbitration Competition in Tokyo.

Sydney Law School

Team Australia in Tokyo (Photo: University of Sydney)

The Australian Network for Japanese Law, a unique cross-institutional initiative including Sydney Law as a core member and Professor Luke Nottage as founding co-director, has supported Team Australia law students competing in the innovative Intercollegiate Negotiation and Arbitration Competition in Tokyo since 2005.

Hundreds of students from around 30 universities across Japan and the Asia-Pacific competed the competition held Nov. 18–19, comprising arbitration and negotiation days, with English and Japanese language divisions in each. The arbitration round concerned the mooting of a dispute governed by the UNIDROIT Principles of International Commercial Contracts. The negotiation round required teams to reach a deal to bring an international joint venture to fruition, teaching and testing somewhat different skills that are also essential for legal advisors in the 21st century.

Team Australia’s success is the culmination of over three months of intensive preparations by the group of law students from the University of Sydney, the Australian National University (ANJeL member), Monash University, the University of the Sunshine Coast, and the University of Western Australia. These students made up four sub-teams, competing in the Japanese language division and three in the English language division.

Study law at the University of Sydney Law School

The Sydney Law program has a strong global focus on international, comparative and transnational aspects of law. Students are required to study Public International Law and Private International Law as part of their program. The Sydney Law School equips students with the skills to work in a competitive legal environment of the 21st century, so that they can move with confidence across national boundaries when providing legal advice.

Program: Juris Doctor (JD)
Location: Sydney, New South Wales
Duration: 3 years
Semester intake: February
Application deadline: January 18, 2018; however, it is recommended that candidates apply a minimum of three months prior to the program start date.

  • Completed an undergraduate degree
  • Achieved a minimum cumulative grade point average (cGPA) of at least 3.0/4.0

Apply now to the Sydney Juris Doctor!

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Find out more about studying at Sydney Law School. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Law Schools Admissions Officer Molly Mahon at molly@oztrekk.com for more law school information.

Wednesday, October 18th, 2017

Bond Law finishes the mooting year on the winner’s podium

Bond University has capped off an outstanding year for its mooting teams by winning the biggest national moot competition in Australia.

Bond Law School students, Pierfrancesco Benedetti, Matthew Keyte, Oceane Pearse and Cameron Simpson out-argued 26 teams representing 17 of the country’s most prestigious universities and law schools to take out the Annual Michael Kirby Moot on Contract Law for 2017.

Bond Law finishes the mooting year on the winner's podium

Bond Law mooting champions  (Photo: Bond University)

The team’s winning achievements also included Honourable Mentions for Best Written Claimant Memorandum and Best Written Respondent Memorandum, while Oceane Pearse was awarded the prize for (joint) Best Oralist in the final round.

Named in honour of retired high court judge, the Honourable Michael Kirby, the competition involved four intense days of mooting, and written summaries of argument before each moot. The moot problem involved a contractual law dispute, and included the cutting-edge issue of a smart contract.

“Winning the Kirby Moot is particularly significant for the Bond team, given Justice Kirby’s long association with the university,” said Mooting Director and team coach, Assistant Professor Louise Parsons.

“It was also an honour for our students to argue the final round against the Queensland University of Technology team in front of Justice Kirby who served as one of the competition judges.”

This recent win adds to Bond’s list of national and international successes this year.

In the global arena, Bond teams were declared world champions in the Red Cross International Humanitarian Law Moot in Hong Kong and the Wanhuida Cup Intellectual Property Moot Court Competition hosted by Beijing Foreign Studies University (the sixth time Bond has won this event).

At the Vis (East) international Commercial Arbitration Moot Competition, they reached the quarter finals in a record field of 800 students from 125 teams representing 32 different countries.

On the national mooting scene, Bond University were runners up in the QUT Torts Moot Competition and the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Moot Competition.

Bond Law has a strong tradition in mooting and a formidable reputation for its many successes around the world,” said Assistant Professor Parsons.

“Our teams and coaches put in an incredible amount of work preparing and practicing for each event but most students rate it as one of the most rewarding aspects of their time at University.

“Winning the Kirby Moot makes 2017 the fourth consecutive year when Bond has won three major competitions in a 12-month period and our students have already started preparing for some 2018 competitions.”

About Bond Law School and Juris Doctor (JD) Program

Bond University’s Juris Doctor program is a professional legal qualification designed to equip students for a career in the legal profession, business, industry or government, in Australia and overseas. This law program features excellent teaching, small classes and an extensive legal skills program, which provides an exciting learning experience that challenges students academically and prepares them practically for a legal career.

With three intakes per year, January, May and September, Bond Law Juris Doctor candidates are able to apply any time throughout the year—and the LSAT is not required!

Program: Juris Doctor (JD)
Location: Gold Coast, Queensland
Semester intakes: January, May, September
Next available intake: January 2018
Duration: 2 years
Application deadline: There is no official application deadline. Students from Canada should apply early, particularly if they are seeking entry for a September intake.

Apply now to Bond University Law School!

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Do you have any questions about how to apply to Bond Law School? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Law Schools Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com or call 1-866-698-7355 for more information!

Thursday, September 22nd, 2016

Bond Law win at Australian Law Students’ Association conference

Bond Law students Lara Sveinsson and Marty Campbell made a stunning debut at the 2016 International Humanitarian Law moot when they defeated 14 universities from across Australia.

The International Humanitarian Law (IHL) Moot Competition is a national mooting competition run jointly by the Australian Red Cross and the Australian Law Students’ Association (ALSA) every year during the ASLA’s annual conference. This year’s event was held in Hobart.

The purpose of the IHL Moot is to assist Australian university students in understanding and appreciating the growing importance of international humanitarian law, its nature as a system of protection during times of armed conflict and its role as fundamental part of international law.

Bond Law win at Australian Law Students’ Association conference

Champion mooting team Lara Sveinsson and Marty Campbell (Photo credit: Bond University)

The talented Bondies went head to head with a team of very strong opponents from the University of New South Wales (UNSW) in the final but managed to secure victory, having gained a confidence boost early on in the competition when they progressed after a tough quarter-final moot.

Ms Sveinsson said the conference was brilliant and provided a fantastic opportunity to meet law students from across Australia, though the moot itself was initially quite a daunting prospect.

“Neither Marty nor I had studied International Humanitarian Law before, so for us it was a huge learning curve to get up to speed on new laws, rules and jurisdictions,” she said.

“It was a massive challenge to go from zero knowledge to arguing our case in front of humanitarian law experts in court, but it was absolutely worth it.

“War is something you usually only see on the news—you don’t appreciate or understand the legal framework behind it—so to learn about the law behind those kind of conflicts was fascinating.

“It was such an honour to moot before, and receive feedback from, a high-profile judging panel consisting of a Supreme Court Judge and Head of the Australian International Committee of the Red Cross.

“Marty and I were also deeply appreciative of the daily messages of support we received from Bond Law students and staff.

“There is nothing better than mooting to test your oral advocacy and problem solving skills, build your confidence and make sure you can perform under pressure.

“These skills—that have been developed and honed through our law and mooting experience here at Bond—are incredibly transferable into everyday life, and hopefully one day into careers as international legal professionals.”

Assistant Professor Louise Parsons, Bond’s Director of Mooting, said Lara and Marty both gained a lot of confidence in their own abilities as law students and as researchers through their participation in the moot.

“They were required to do the necessary research and get on top of the legal issues without formal classes in this subject area, and this research continued right up to the night before the final.

“Also, Lara and Marty’s time to prepare for this moot was substantially impacted by a trip they both undertook as part of the Bond Model United Nations group to Japan in the two weeks preceding the competition.

“Marty and Lara have done Bond proud. They overcame many obstacles, demonstrated great resilience and composure, and ultimately their hard work and sacrifices paid off.

“Their achievement evidences the fact that if you take on a challenge, and buckle down and do what is required, it can pay enormous dividends!”

As the winner of this competition, the team will now be the Australian representative in the International Red Cross International Humanitarian Moot Competition in Hong Kong next March.

The IHL Moot was not Bond’s only success at the 2016 ALSA Conference in Hobart.

The University’s Law Students Association (LSA) was also recognised by ALSA as having the country’s Best Health and Wellbeing Initiative.

Bond Law student Bryan Parsons wrote the winning submission about the LSA’s creation of a new student position in the Faculty of Law—the LSA Special Interests Director.

The role of the LSA Special Interests Director is to promote the health and well-being of Bond Law students and create a more supportive environment for members of its LGBTIQ+ community.

The submission outlined a number of creative and innovative student services to be introduced at Bond including the creation of an LGBTIQ+ terminology sensitivity guide for staff and students.

Bond Law School Juris Doctor

Program: Juris Doctor (JD)
Location: Gold Coast, Queensland
Semester intakes: January, May, September
Duration: 2 years
Application deadline: There is no official application deadline. Candidates are encouraged to apply a minimum of three months prior to the program start date.

Entry Requirements

  • Applicants must have completed an undergraduate degree in any discipline in order to apply to the Bond JD  program. Students who have not yet completed a bachelor degree may apply, as long as they will have graduated prior to commencing the program.
  • Two reference letters are required.
  • Applicants who have a cumulative average of 70% or above should apply to the program.

In common with most other Australian Law Schools, Bond does not use the LSAT as an entry criterion.

Apply now to Bond University Law School!

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Find out more about studying at Bond Law School! Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Law Schools Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston for more information at shannon@oztrekk.com.

Tuesday, June 21st, 2016

Bond Law students retain world champion crown at international IP Moot

Both OzTREKK and Bond Law School have great reason to be very proud!

Bond Law students Justina Sebastiampillai (also a former OzTREKK student!) and Jeremy Butcher have cemented Bond’s position as world champions of the Beijing Foreign Studies University (BFSU) Wanhuida Cup Intellectual Property Moot Court Competition with a victory at the 2016 event. This is the fifth time Bond has won the moot.

The BFSU Wanhuida Cup Intellectual Property Moot Court Competition, which is held annually in Beijing, is an English-language moot competition. The moot focuses on real-life intellectual property issues similar to some that have arisen in the Chinese business sector.

Bond Law students win international IP Moot

Proud moot victors, Jeremy Butcher and former OzTREKK student Justina Sebastiampillai (Photo credit: Bond University)

The competition is judged by high-profile judges and internationally renowned intellectual property lawyers and experts.

Bond defeated 15 teams to become the 2016 winners; 11 from leading Chinese universities, one from Taiwan and the others from the US and Australia. The legal problem that was the subject of this year’s moot concerned employees claiming compensation for an invention created during their term of employment.

In addition to taking out the top honour, Justina also received the ‘Best Oralist’ award and was asked to deliver the prestigious ‘thank you’ speech to the Judges, on behalf of all the teams in the competition.

Bond Law School’s Professor William van Caenegem, who coached the team on the ground in Beijing, said they performed strongly from the start of the competition.

“From the outset, Justina’s and Jeremy’s style and oral advocacy skills were outstanding,” he said. “It was a tough moot but they performed flawlessly.”

“An amazing amount out of hard work went into both their preparation in the six weeks leading up to the event, and from the moment they touched down in Beijing.

“The team worked tirelessly, day and night, and in the end this certainly paid off.”

Justina Sebastiampillai, who is graduating with a Juris Doctor degree later this month, said the BFSU IP moot was a complex challenge on many levels.

“Although the moot was in English, the case itself was Chinese, so research was a major challenge,” she said.

“Not only did we have to very quickly get to grips with Chinese Law and the foundations of the Chinese legal system, but the sources of information at our disposal about the case were very limited, and largely in the Chinese language.

“Thankfully, Bond’s Faculty of Law provided a huge level of support: our academics shared their expertise, feedback and perspectives; we had after-hours access to the moot courts and case study rooms; we received a constant barrage of messages of support from staff and students when we were in Beijing; and we even had alumni who were living and working in Beijing come forward to offer their support.

“It was hard work, preparing without background, but we were determined and committed to continuously improving ourselves throughout the competition process. When we saw how the bench responded to our first moot we knew whether or not we won, we were good enough to win, which gave us an enormous sense of pride and confidence.

“I felt very fortunate to have such a bright and talented teammate as Jeremy, and a coach that was as incredibly experienced and knowledgeable as William.

“It was exciting to see that Bond University has a degree of fame in this competition. The Bond name was instantly recognised and respected thanks to our success and high-quality performances in previous years’ events.

“I was very lucky to have a couple of days in Beijing after the competition when the Chinese students took me under their wing and together we went to see the Great Wall and the Forbidden City and visited some of the best restaurants in the city.

“We were overwhelmed by the hospitality of the students and competition organisers. They were so friendly and welcoming that true friendships were forged and we can’t wait for them to come to Australia and visit Bond.”

Justina has participated in four moots during her time at Bond: the Sir Harry Gibbs Constitutional Law Moot; the Wilson Moot in Canada; the Universite Paris 13 Sports Law Moot; and the BFSU Wanhuida Cup Intellectual Property Moot Court Competition.

“Although the topics change, the skills required—and acquired—are the same: hard work, dedication, a desire to solve legal problems and a commitment to never stop learning,” Justina said.

“Being part of Bond Law moots has made me realise the importance of understanding law in different jurisdictions and how fundamental relationships with students and academics in other countries are as a future global law professional.

“I am very thankful to Bond for these incredible learning opportunities. The moots have been my favourite experiences so far and are a fantastic way to end my time at Bond.

“I now understand firsthand why Bond has the reputation of having the best mooting program in the world.”

All of us at OzTREKK are very proud of you, Justina! Way to go!

Bond Law School Juris Doctor

Program: Juris Doctor (JD)
Location: Gold Coast, Queensland
Semester intakes: January, May, September
Duration: 2 years
Application deadline: There is no official application deadline. Students from Canada should apply early, particularly if they are seeking entry for a September intake.

Entry Requirements

  • Applicants must have completed an undergraduate degree in any discipline in order to apply to the Bond JD  program. Students who have not yet completed a bachelor degree may apply, as long as they will have graduated prior to commencing the program.
  • Two reference letters are required.
  • Applicants who have a cumulative average of 70% or above should apply to the program.

In common with most other Australian Law Schools, Bond does not use the LSAT as an entry criterion.

Apply now to Bond University Law School!

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Find out more about studying at Bond Law School! Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Law Schools Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston for more information at shannon@oztrekk.com.

Friday, June 3rd, 2016

Bond Indigenous law students make mooting debut at the Supreme Court

Bond Law School students Bethany Allen and Joan Cassimatis took to the Supreme Court of Queensland to present their arguments in the second annual Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander (ATSI) Students’ Moot Competition recently.

Bond Indigenous law students make their ‘mooting debut’

Bond Law students Bethany Allen and Joan Cassimatis (Photo credit: Bond University)

In what was their first-ever mooting competition, Bethany and Joan finished runners up to the team from University of Queensland and received excellent feedback on their mooting skills from the event judges. The Bond team was coached by Assistant Professor Kylie Fletcher-Johnson.

The competition was run by Allens, Ashurst, North Quarter Lane Chambers and the Indigenous Lawyers Association of Queensland Inc and saw students from Bond, UQ and QUT explore a commercial law question concerning the legal consequences of a lender’s reliance on false information and an allegedly negligent third-party valuation in approving a loan application.

The students prepared both sides of the case, and provided written submissions to the opposing counsel before the preliminary round. The moots were judged by high-profile members of the Queensland judiciary and the Bar, including Honourable Justice Margaret A McMurdo AC, President of the Queensland Court of Appeal, Honourable Justice David Boddice and Mr Damien O’Brien QC.

Assistant Professor Louise Parsons, Bond Law School’s Director of Mooting said she was very proud of the students’ achievement.

“Not only is this the first time Bond has entered a team in the ATSI Students’ Moot, but Joan has only one semester of law studies under her belt, so for Joan and Bethany to have performed so well is a remarkable accomplishment. We are very proud of them,” she said.

Bethany Allen, who is just commencing her fifth semester of Laws, said she and Joan were very pleased at the unexpected outcome.

“We really didn’t expect to do as well as we did—especially considering this was our first-ever moot—and we never dreamed we would get this kind of experience,” Bethany said.

“Mooting in the Banco Court and meeting the ‘who’s who’ of the Queensland legal community was incredible.

“We learnt so much, not just through the moot itself but through the workshop days and the networking nights run by Allens, Ashurst and North Quarter Lane Chambers.

“We were also really impressed by the number of Bondies we encountered through the competition, from new graduates through to those in senior leadership roles. Some were clerking, some were associates at the Supreme Court and some were solicitors from the firms involved. It was just incredible to feel a part of the thriving Bond legal community.

“Getting the chance to meet and talk to President McMurdo and the other Justices and Barristers involved in the competition after the final moot was a definite highlight; and to get feedback from these high-level legal professionals on our personal performances was something I never imagined would be possible at this stage of our careers.

“We also really enjoyed being part of the community of mooters here at Bond,” Bethany said.

“While we were preparing and rehearsing on campus in the Law library and moot courts, we would see Bond’s International Criminal Court and International Commercial Arbitration mooting teams and they gave us advice and feedback on procedural questions, which was brilliant.

“Having to argue both sides of the moot, in the preliminary and then the final, was a massive challenge. It really forced us to have to prepare thoroughly and be able to think on our feet.

“Being involved in the ATSI student moot has been a huge learning curve and a great accomplishment for us.

“We’ve gained incredible real-world experience and insight into what it’s like to work in law, we’ve learned new skills, become more confident and acquired a real taste for mooting.”

As runners-up, Bethany and Joan will receive $100 and be given the opportunity to shadow barristers from the North Quarter Lane Chambers.

Bond Law School Juris Doctor

The Bond JD was constructed to enable graduates to take leading positions in the public and private sectors. Bond graduates are now employed in top law firms throughout Australia and across 38 countries, including the United States, U.K., Canada, Malaysia and Singapore, as solicitors in private practice, barristers, government lawyers, in-house counsel and academics. Students are encouraged to emphasize specific areas of study that they feel will best serve their proposed career paths.

Program: Juris Doctor (JD)
Location: Gold Coast, Queensland
Semester intakes: January, May, September
Duration: 2 years
Application deadline: There is no official application deadline. Students from Canada should apply early, particularly if they are seeking entry for a September intake.

Apply now to Bond University Law School!

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If you would like more information about Bond Law School, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Law Schools Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com.

Friday, April 8th, 2016

Monash Law School team finishes in top 5% at Vis Moot Vienna finals

The Monash Law School mooting team has finished in the top 5% at the 23rd annual Willem C. Vis International Commercial Arbitration Moot in Vienna, Austria.

Three hundred eleven university teams from 67 countries took part in the competition, including teams from Harvard, Standford, King’s College London and National University Singapore.

Monash Law School mooting team

The 2016 Monash mooting team (L to R): Ayesha Singh, Lucy Hodgkinson, Marco Paoletti, Madeleine Salinger, Jarred Gerson, Thomas Egan, Thomas Smalley, Olivia Wan (Photo credit: Monash University)

Monash made it through to the third round of finals, comprising the top 16 teams.

The Monash mooting team comprised Maddy Salinger, Lucy Hodgkinson, Jarred Gerson, Thomas Egan, Thomas Smalley, Olivia Wan, Ayesha Singh and Marco Paoletti. The team was assisted by Dr Lisa Spagnolo.

Individual Speaker prizes were awarded to Ayesha Singh, Marco Paoletti and Maddy Salinger.

“The moot is an event which truly highlights Monash’s high standing amongst the best internationally,” says Dr Spagnolo. “It is no exaggeration to say that we have one of the best reputations for intelligent, creative, prepared and unassailable arguments in the competition.”

The result caps off a successful world tour for the Monash University mooting team, having made the finals of the Vis (East) Moot in Hong Kong in March, where they picked up individual speaker prizes and placed 3rd for the Claimant Memorandum Prize.

The team worked hard over the 2015–16 summer, including taking part in a preparatory pre-moot in Budapest, Hungary, and all members of the team battled illness throughout the trip to achieve the impressive result in Vienna.

Dr Spagnolo says the work ethic of the 2016 team is consistent with the high standards Monash mooting teams continue to expect of themselves.

“Living up to this internal standard each year is tough on the students involved,” says Dr Spagnolo. “But it is also a great source of personal and professional growth and I am honoured and proud to have been part of that process.”

More than 3,000 people participated in the Vienna moot, including 1,993 students from 96 countries and over 1,000 arbitrators and coaches.

The team would like to thank the Monash Law School alumni and staff members who gave much of their time to assist in the team’s preparation, including Jeff Waincymer, Lauren Peacock, Calum Seargeant, Martin John, Ian Liu, Andrew Barraclough and Justin Malbon.

The team is grateful for the ongoing financial support it receives from the Law Faculty, the Law Foundation, CIArb (Australia) and Monash Abroad.

About Monash Law School Juris Doctor

The Faculty of Law at Monash University has one of the largest law libraries in Australia. It also has a moot court designed as a real courtroom for practicing trial work.

Monash Law School offers high-quality teaching by leading academics and practitioners who are experts in the teaching of law and legal practice. Additionally, the JD program offers an interactive learning environment, small class sizes and innovative teaching.

The Monash JD program is unique as it allows students to undertake up to six elective units from the extensive Monash Law master’s program once the compulsory units have been completed. This allows students to tailor their degree and choose units that complement their interests and professional aspirations while ensuring graduates are well-rounded professionals with the core skills required to follow a wide range of legal and professional career paths.

Program: Juris Doctor (JD)
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Semester intakes: January, May, September
Duration: 3 years (accelerated option: a minimum of 2.5 years)
Application deadline: Applications are generally assessed on a rolling admissions basis. The sooner you apply the better.

Apply now to Monash Law School!

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Would you like more information about Monash Law School and the Juris Doctor program? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Law School Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com.

Tuesday, March 22nd, 2016

Global Sports Law Moot at Bond University

As the problem of doping in sport continues to be widely debated, Bond University Law School students were prepared to tackle the issue head on in the annual Global Sports Law Moot, against law students from the prestigious Universite Paris 13, part of the Sorbonne University in Paris, France.

Bond Law School

Paralympic swimming gold medallist and Australian Olympic Committee (AOC) legal counsel Annabelle Williams (Photo: Bond University)

Paralympic swimming gold medallist and Australian Olympic Committee (AOC) legal counsel Annabelle Williams was one of three judges adjudicating the bilingual moot on March 16.

The multi-talented lawyer and sportswoman, who was born with a congenital limb deficiency leaving her without a lower left arm, graduated with a double degree in law and international relations from Bond University in 2013.

The international virtual mooting competition was held in Bond University’s Global Links Room, a state-of-the-art multimedia learning space featuring dual screen web and video conferencing facilities, enabling the Bond University team to compete with the Universite Paris 13 students, based in Paris, in real-time.

Professor Jim Corkery of the Bond Faculty of Law, said the Global Sports Law Moot was an intellectually demanding exercise designed to put students on the world stage through the most global of activities – sport.

“This is the only competition of its kind in the world. It is a prime example of the globalisation of education on the Gold Coast, particular here at Bond University,” said Professor Corkery.

“Students simulate the international Court of Arbitration for Sport and argue on the issue of doping in sport, which has recently gained much attention in relation to high-profile athletes Maria Sharapova and, before her, Lance Armstrong.

“To have such a sports star and role model like Annabelle Williams here to adjudicate the competition is a privilege and pleasure. As part of the global Olympic movement, Annie brings with her a wealth of knowledge and experience to the judging panel.”

Bond Law School Juris Doctor

Program: Juris Doctor (JD)
Location: Gold Coast, Queensland
Semester intakes: January, May, September
Duration: 2 years
Application deadline: There is no official application deadline. Students from Canada should apply early, particularly if they are seeking entry for a September intake.

Entry Requirements

  • Applicants must have completed an undergraduate degree in any discipline in order to apply to the Bond JD  program. Students who have not yet completed a bachelor degree may apply, as long as they will have graduated prior to commencing the program.
  • Two reference letters are required.
  • Applicants who have a cumulative average of 70% or above should apply to the program.

In common with most other Australian Law Schools, Bond does not use the LSAT as an entry criterion.

Apply now to Bond University Law School!

*

Find out more about studying at Bond Law School! Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Law Schools Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston for more information at shannon@oztrekk.com.

Monday, January 25th, 2016

Melbourne JD students prepare for Melbourne Law School Jessup Moot

Melbourne Law School’s Jessup Moot team knows there is still much hard work to be done between now and the national championship to be held in Canberra in February next year.

University of Melbourne Law School

Melbourne JD students are preparing for the Melbourne Law School Jessup Moot (Photo credit: University of Melbourne)

Without skipping a beat, the team consisting of Juris Doctor students Shane Chandra, Rachel Walters, Luke Chircop, Tess Kirkinis and Beau Paterson finished exams in November and immediately began preparing for the world’s largest mooting competition, the Philip C. Jessup International Law Moot Court Competition.

It involves long hours, six days a week, researching, consulting with academics and forming arguments to accompany their submission, which is due in January.

Recently, the team was given the opportunity to have lunch with former Deputy President of Supreme Court of the United Kingdom Lord David Hope, who was at MLS to deliver a public lecture.

Lord Hope examined a number of problematic UK legal cases with the students in a thought provoking and entertaining discussion, including cases involving assisted suicide and the introduction of closed material in court.

Second-year Melbourne JD student Luke Chircop says the experience of having an open discussion with Lord Hope was invaluable in their preparation for competition.

“We have heard from a range of amazing people such as Lord Hope, and to have their insight into the law and to hear of their knowledge and experience is so helpful,” he says.

The 2016 Jessup Moot focuses on issues such as mass surveillance and cyber attacks, issues Luke says “will be at the forefront of international law for the next twenty years or so.”

His teammate Tess Kirkinis says a highlight of the competition is having the opportunity to moot the most current and contentious areas of international law.

“Getting exposure to high quality advocacy is such a valuable experience,” she says. “Also, there is that practical element of learning that can’t be done through reading library books.”

The Australian championship is known as being one of the toughest qualifiers, with only two national teams progressing to the global competition in Washington.

Melbourne Law School has produced three international rounds-winning teams (1988, 1993, 2000), putting it third behind the National University of Singapore and the University of Sydney (four apiece) as most-capped champions in the world.

But the MLS team is not getting ahead of itself, with a focus firmly on its submission prior to mooting in February.

“There is a lot of hard work to do before then,” Luke says.

Story by Andy Walsh via University of Melbourne

Melbourne Law School Juris Doctor program

Program: Juris Doctor (JD)
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Semester intake: February
Duration: 3 years (2 or 2.5 years for accelerated program)
Application deadline: Melbourne Law School has a general application deadline of November 30 each year; however, late applications may be accepted.

Entry Requirements

Applicants must have

  • completed an undergraduate degree in any discipline; and
  • completed the Law School Admissions Test (LSAT).

The Melbourne JD has three selection criteria:

  1. Academic results achieved in previous tertiary studies
  2. The LSAT score
  3. The applicant’s personal statement

University of Melbourne’s JD application must include a personal statement of up to 850 words. It should emphasize any aspect of your personal history that may enhance your application, including extracurricular activity, community involvement, work experience, caregiver responsibilities, relevant personal characteristics and any outstanding achievements. Statements should be typewritten; the pages should be numbered; and the applicant’s name and date of birth should appear on each page.

Students who have not yet completed an undergraduate degree may apply, as long as they will have graduated prior to commencing the Melbourne JD program.

Apply now to the University of Melbourne Law School!

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Do you have any questions regarding Melbourne Law School and how to apply to the Juris Doctor program? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Law Schools Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com or call 1-866-698-7355.

Wednesday, December 2nd, 2015

Monash Law students participate in mooting competition

Monash Law School recently sent a team of three students to London to compete in the Global Round of the Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) International Arbitration Mooting Competition, hosted by Kings College.

Congratulations goes out to the team consisting of Michael Smyth, Anthony Hajiantoniou, Lynette Lee and Dr Emmanuel Laryea (coach). The students performed extremely well and came seventh for memorials and oral rounds. Individual rankings for the two oral presenters (Michael Smyth and Anthony Hajiantoniou) were ranked twentieth and twenty-fourth respectively and the team’s written submission (memorial) for the Claimant won third place and will be published in the Transnational Dispute Management Journal.

In preparation for the competition, the Monash Law students visited law firms in Paris and London and the International Chamber of Commerce (ICC) for mooting practice, discussions about the law and exposure to investment arbitration practice and institutions. They visited Lazareef Le Bars, for an insightful practice moot and general discussions about practice in the area investment arbitration.

Linklaters, London hosted a lunch with Monash law alumni Jack Naughton and Alex Fawke who kindly gave up their time to provide a practice moot and insights into practice.

The students agree that the experiences from participating in the mooting program and competition are invaluable. The core skills, engagement with firms and international networking are unique opportunities which arise from national and international mooting competitions.

Monash Law School Juris Doctor program

The Monash JD is a graduate law degree designed to teach the knowledge and skills required to practice law. This innovative law degree recognizes the needs of graduates who wish to study law, providing the transferable skills and knowledge only a law degree from one of Australia’s leading universities can provide.

Program: Juris Doctor (JD)
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Semester intakes: January, May, August
Duration: 3 years (accelerated option: a minimum of 2.5 years)
Application deadline: Applications are generally assessed on a rolling admissions basis.

Apply now to  the Monash Law School Juris Doctor program!

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Do you have any questions about Monash Law School and the Juris Doctor program? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Law School Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston by emailing shannon@oztrekk.com or calling (toll free in Canada) 1-866-698-7355.

Thursday, August 20th, 2015

Schools compete in national moot at Bond Law School

Students from 14 schools from around Australia argued their cases before some of Australia’s most respected legal figures recently, after making the grand finale of a prestigious national mooting competition.

Bond Law School

Study law at Bond University

The Honourable Justice Robert Gotterson AO of the Supreme Court of Queensland, retired District Court of Queensland Judge John Newton and Bond Law School’s Assistant Professor Louise Parsons, were among the judging panel for the Bond University High School Mooting Competition finals, held on the Gold Coast on Aug. 1, 2015.

The competition is the only one of its kind in Australia, with more than 120 schools from across the country entering their best and brightest Year 11 and 12 students.

The mooting competition introduces students to the courtroom environment and gives them insight into the workings of the Australian legal system, with two opposing teams conducting a legal argument involving the application of legal rules to factual situations similar to those dealt with by the courts every day.

Each member of the team who wins the national final, along with the three students judged to be the best individual advocates, will be offered a 40 per cent scholarship to undertake a Bachelor of Laws degree at Bond University, Australia’s leading private university.

Assistant Professor Louise Parsons said the competition continued to be popular among high school students, with a number of schools entering for the first time in 2015.

“The judges were very impressed by the high standard of advocacy skills displayed by the competitors,” she said.

“The competition challenges students to ‘think like a lawyer.’ The critical thinking and analytical skills students develop will stand them in good stead whenever they are faced with any complex problem, and provides an excellent opportunity to improve their oral communication and oral advocacy skills.

“Developing the ability to think quickly on your feet and provide a judge with a coherent and persuasive argument is one of the key benefits of participating in this competition.

“Although many of the students who participate in the High School Mooting Competition may not study law at university, and may not choose a career in the legal profession, the experience is still invaluable.”

Winners from eight regional areas across Australia competed in the finals, which was held at Bond University on Aug. 1, 2015.

Bond Law School Juris Doctor

Program: Juris Doctor (JD)
Location: Gold Coast, Queensland
Semester intakes: January, May, September
Duration: 2 years
Application deadline: There is no official application deadline. Students from Canada should apply early, particularly if they are seeking entry for a September intake.

Entry Requirements for the Bond University Juris Doctor Program

  • Applicants must have completed an undergraduate degree in any discipline in order to apply to the Bond JD  program. Students who have not yet completed a bachelor degree may apply, as long as they will have graduated prior to commencing the program.
  • Two reference letters are required.
  • Applicants who have a cumulative average of 70% or above should apply to the program.

In common with most other Australian Law Schools, Bond does not use the LSAT as an entry criterion.

Apply now to Bond University Law School!

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Find out more about studying at Bond University Law School! Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Law Schools Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston for more information about how to apply to the Bond JD program. Email Shannon at shannon@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.