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Posts Tagged ‘Monash Engineering School’

Friday, July 14th, 2017

Monash University is the no. 1 engineering school in Australia

Are you creative, imaginative, analytical and technical? Do you want to extend yourself and help build the future? Engineers are in demand both in Australia and internationally—and an engineering qualification might just be for you.

Did you know Australia is a signatory to the Washington Accord, which means Monash Engineering graduates can work in any other signatory country, without the need to re-qualify. Just imagine where an internationally recognised engineering qualification could take you (Canada and USA!).

Monash University is the no. 1 engineering school in Australia

Study at the no. 1 engineering school in Australia—Monash University

Who are engineers?

They’re creative…

They’re imaginative, analytical and technical, with excellent teamwork skills. As an engineer, you get to apply science and mathematics in a practical way, to develop new technologies and improve existing ones.

They’re problem solvers...

They figure out how things work, and they create solutions to problems. They are key to the development of society and solving the challenges the world currently faces such as climate change, natural resource depletion, food shortages and increased demands on energy.

And they’re in demand

Engineers possess a rare combination of skills and qualities that place them in demand in many different industries. An engineer’s career is diverse, interesting and can be anywhere in the world. As a qualified engineer you’ll be equipped to work in many areas outside of engineering, such as management, banking and consulting.

Some engineers go on to become CEOs of major corporations. Almost 20 per cent of CEOs of ASX100 companies are engineers. Problem solving and planning skills, combined with a focus on the future and continuous improvement, make engineers competent business leaders.

Where does Monash Engineering stand?

Well, Monash University ranks as the best faculty in Australia for engineering (Times Higher Education, 2016–2017), and is one of the largest in the country. Monash is renowned world-wide for the quality of their teaching and research and the calibre of their graduates.

Master of Advanced Engineering

Did you know that Monash offers the widest choice of engineering courses than any other Australian university? Monash offers the Master of Advanced Engineering—the only kind in its field—that ensures that students grow into transformational, global, and socially-responsible leaders and engineers.

Delivered at the Clayton campus, the Master of Advanced Engineering is designed to extend your knowledge in your specialisation area and advance your leadership and complex-problem-solving skills. Specialisation options:

  1. Chemical engineering
  2. Civil engineering (Water)
  3. Civil engineering (Transport)
  4. Civil engineering (Infrastructure Systems)
  5. Electrical engineering
  6. Energy and sustainability (Malaysia campus only)
  7. Materials engineering
  8. Mechanical engineering
  9. Medical engineering
  10. Renewable and sustainable energy engineering

Apply to Monash University Engineering School!

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Find out more about studying at the no. 1 engineering school in Australia—Monash University. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Engineering Schools Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com.

Monday, February 22nd, 2016

Materials Science and Engineering at Monash University

The ability to understand and manipulate materials and their properties is a key factor in any industrial process or technology, new or old. Increasingly nanotechnology, sustainable materials and biomaterials are becoming important areas of endeavor. Because of the enabling aspect of Materials Science and Engineering, and the multidisciplinary nature of the skills learned, Monash Engineering School graduates are much in demand in many industrial organisations. Many also go into research, be it in academia, industrial laboratories or government research organisations.

Materials engineers make a unique contribution to the design of new devices, products or components, and they make existing ones work better by improving or altering the properties of the materials involved.

Materials engineers also work as metallurgists, plastics engineers, ceramists, adhesive scientists, process and quality control engineers and corrosion or fracture engineers. They work in a range of industrial activities, including manufacturing, processing and recycling, and select and design materials for

  • aerospace vehicles;
  • ground transportation systems;
  • automotive industry;
  • solar energy and battery devices;
  • biomedical implants and opthalmic devices;
  • tissue engineering and drug delivery;
  • information and communication systems;
  • electronic and magnetic devices; and
  • optical and opto-electronic components.

The ability to actually engineer, or create, materials to meet specific needs is only just being realised. Improved processing and characterisation equipment such as the Australian synchrotron, mean the possibilities are endless, and key to almost all advances in aspects of manufacturing and engineering.

Careers in materials science and engineering

The expertise of materials engineers is required in many areas:

  • Conservation of energy and recycling
  • New biomaterials to image disease and heal the body
  • Novel electro-optic polymers that allow greater amounts of information storage
  • Lightweight metal alloys in cars to conserve energy
  • New magnetic materials
  • Materials for energy storage such as fuel cells
  • Functional materials made on the nano scale to reduce costly corrosion

The result for materials engineering graduates is overwhelmingly positive as unprecedented job opportunities continue to outstrip supply.

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Want to learn more about materials engineering programs at Monash University? Contact OzTREKK Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com, or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Monday, December 7th, 2015

Monash engineering researchers co-discover ultralight magnesium alloy

Professor Nick Birbilis, Head of Materials Science and Engineering Department at Monash Engineering School, said that the new magnesium-lithium alloy weighs about half as much as already lightweight aluminum, and could potentially be used across a broad range of manufacturing to reduce the weight of motor vehicles and other items such as laptops by up to 40 per cent.

Monash Engineering School

Dr Nick Birbilis (Photo credit: Monash University)

Professor Birbilis, who is part of a research team that includes Professor Michael Ferry and key researcher Dr Wanqiang Xu from University of New South Wales, came across the discovery by chance when they noticed that a piece of the magnesium alloy had been resting in a beaker of water for quite some time without corroding.

“Normally for magnesium alloys, you walk away and a day later you come back and there’s very little left. This particular alloy stunned everyone in that it looked pristine after very lengthy periods of exposure in saltwater conditions,” he said.

The findings, published in the current edition of Nature Materials, describe how the alloy forms a protective layer of carbonate-rich film upon atmospheric exposure, making it immune to corrosion when tested in laboratory settings.

Even when scratched, the metal is able to reform a protective surface film, making it similar to stainless steel, but at a fraction of the weight. In fact, this magnesium alloy could be the world’s lightest and strongest metal.

This discovery is particularly relevant to the transport industry, where a reduction in the weight of cars, trucks and airoplanes could improve fuel efficiency and greatly reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

“These panels will make many vehicles and consumer products much lighter and, eventually, just as durable as today’s corrosion-resistant materials, another example of how advanced manufacturing is unlocking the potential of materials that have been under investigation—in too narrow a manner—for centuries,” said Professor Birbilis.

The international team working on this project including researchers from Monash University and UNSW, Nanjing University of Technology and Chinese aluminum-production giant, CHALCO, also used facilities at the Australian Synchrotron to study the molecular composition of the alloy and carbonate-rich film.

Prof Birbilis said they hope to better understand how the corrosion process is averted and are working toward imparting the ‘stainless’ effect to a wider range of alloys. This is being further assisted by an ARC Discovery Project awarded this year.

Department of Materials Science and Engineering

The ability to understand and manipulate materials and their properties is a key factor in any industrial process or technology, new or old. Increasingly nanotechnology, sustainable materials and biomaterials are becoming important areas of endeavor. Because of the enabling aspect of Materials Science and Engineering, and the multidisciplinary nature of the skills learned, Monash Engineering graduates are much in demand in many industrial organisations. Many also go into research, be it in academia, industrial laboratories or government research organisations.

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Want to learn more about Monash Engineering School? Contact OzTREKK’ s Australian Engineering Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com.

Tuesday, October 6th, 2015

Monash helps work on next generation of electronics

A world of transparent, printable, more flexible and cheaper everyday electronics is a step closer after researchers from Monash University and the Australian Synchrotron helped produce the most effective and highest frequency organic transistor in the world.

The new approach to printing large-scale semiconductor sheets using the groundbreaking polymer P(NDI20D-T2), revealed in Nature Communications by Italian researchers from the Center for Nano Science and Technology in Milan, could hasten the development of subtle electronic products such as ID badges woven into clothing, translucent solar panels on windows and virtually invisible electronic sensors and monitors.

Monash Engineering School

Study engineering at Monash (Photo credit: Monash University)

Associate Professor Chris McNeill, from the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at Monash University, said the discovery that molecules in the polymer must be precisely aligned informed the new bar-coating technique.

“Many research teams have attempted roll-out printing of the polymer into sheets, much like a mound of dough is rolled flat by a rolling pin, but this has led to lackluster transistor performance,” Associate Professor McNeill said.

“Tightly wrapping a wire around the ‘rolling pin’ bar creates a coat of microscopic grooves 50 microns wide—one twentieth of a millimetre—forcing the molecules of the polymer into an organised pattern during printing, for much greater conductivity.”

Associate Professor McNeill said researchers from Monash University and the Australian Synchrotron provided crucial molecular analysis as the technique was developed.

“Working at the Synchrotron’s Soft X-ray Spectroscopy (SXR) beamline we defined the optimal molecular structure of the polymer, enabling our Italian research partners to print an organic transistor that is not only eight times larger than any predecessor, but boasts a commercially competitive frequency of 3.3 megahertz,” Associate Professor McNeill said.

“We believe the upscaling of organic transistors will enable faster development of next-generation electronics that are pliable, malleable and more affordable, beyond the limitations of bulky silicon-based transistors.”

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Find out more about engineering degrees at Monash University. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Engineering Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or 1-866-698-7355.

Friday, August 7th, 2015

Monash University’s energy technology miniaturisation

The prospects of your smartphone not needing a recharge before the day’s end are one step closer following recently published research from Monash University on supercapacitor miniaturisation.

Monash University Engineering School

Associate Professor Mainak Majumder (Photo credit: Monash University)

The collaboration between Monash’s Nanoscale Engineering Laboratory and their industry partner, Ionic Industries, addresses several important performance limitations of current batteries. The miniaturisation of supercapacitors will enable devices to hold much more energy in the same or lesser volume, have higher peak power, be fully recharged in minutes and last much longer than current battery technologies.

The market for supercapacitors (estimated at US$5bn with 20 per cent growth per annum) is predominantly in consumer electronics but with increasing applications in transport, construction, medicine, food, defence and other sectors meaning that this groundbreaking research has the potential to transform markets across a broad range of applications.

Associate Professor Mainak Majumder of Monash University’s Nanoscale Science and Engineering Laboratory linked the research to Moore’s law:

“Fifty years ago, Moore wrote that every two years transistor density in circuits would double. Today we see a world ever more reliant on electronics shrinking in size and increasing in power.

“Traditionally, supercapacitor efficiency was limited by the large distance ions have to travel between sheets of porous carbon. By using microtechnology we have placed the positive and negative electrodes in one plane separated by a much smaller distance. Here we have shown that when the size of the electrodes becomes smaller, the amount of energy and power these supercapacitors can deliver per unit volume becomes exceedingly large,” Professor Majumder said.

Dr Parama Chakraborty-Banerjee, the lead electrochemist behind the studies said, “The unprecedented performance of these micro-supercapacitors has strengthened our theoretical understanding and comprehensively proved that miniaturisation of supercapacitors whereby edge effects are maximised represents the most promising evolution of this technology.”

Mr. Derrek Lobo, the graduate student who fabricated the devices added, “We are able to fabricate supercapacitors smaller than the diameter of human hair, with exceptionally high energy and power densities. We undertook relentless experiments for over two years in the face of doubts raised by established groups.”

The Monash research, published in Advanced Energy Materials (Impact Factor 16), was made possible by an ARC Linkage grant allowing Monash to work with Ionic Industries in paving the way for Australian ‘smart manufacturing’ and intellectual property utilising graphene—hailed as a “wonder material” with extraordinary properties. Ionic Industries is a spin-off from Strategic Energy Resources (ASX: SER).

“This vindicates our decision to back Monash on this exciting research and our confidence that the research will have real-world commercial applications,” said Ionic Industries CEO Mark Muzzin. “We are now planning to accelerate our efforts to produce prototype devices for demonstrating this technology.”

About the Monash Nanoscale Engineering Laboratory

The laboratory is dedicated to the science and technology at the nanoscale, and invoke the principles of materials chemistry, electrochemistry, colloidal science, micro- and nano-fabrication to develop innovative solutions to some of the problems facing the humanity. More specifically, they are interested in rational design and engineering of materials at the nanoscale—often borrowing from highly evolved functioning biological structures—to impact technologies involved in fluidics, solar energy conversion, water purification, and drug-delivery. At the same time, the lab seeks to understand fundamental issues related to molecular transport phenomena in the confines of nanoscale or during the assembly of nanomaterials into useful structures, typically at the macroscale.

The aim of this laboratory is to train scientists with a wide-array of skill-sets as well as infuse critical thinking so that they can tackle fundamental scientific and technological problems which transcend the traditional boundaries of disciplines.
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Would you like more information about studying engineering at Monash University? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Engineering Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or 1-866-698-7355.

Tuesday, August 12th, 2014

New Master of Advanced Engineering at Monash University

What about engineering? We often talk about medicine, dentistry, and law, but let’s take a moment to talk about engineering, shall we?

How about if we say “All students who commence Monash’s new Master of Advanced Engineering program in 2015 will receive a $6,000 scholarship?

Now we’ve got your attention!

Joking aside, if you’ve got a Bachelor of Engineering, further postgraduate study can be the foundation to a great career, and can turn an existing career into something brilliant, help you change careers, or aid in pursuing your passion. Did you know that Monash Engineering School offers the widest choice of engineering courses than any other Australian university?

Monash Engineering School is offering a new Master of Advanced Engineering commencing in 2015.

Delivered at the Clayton campus, the Master of Advanced Engineering is a one-year qualification. The course is designed to extend your knowledge in your specialisation area and advance your leadership and complex-problem-solving skills.

Specialisation options for 2015 include

  1. Chemical engineering
  2. Civil engineering (Water)
  3. Civil engineering (Transport)
  4. Electrical engineering
  5. Materials engineering
  6. Mechanical engineering

Structures and Geotechnical specialisations planned to commence in 2016.

Scholarship for ALL commencing 2015 Master of Advanced Engineering students

To celebrate the launch of the new program, all students commencing the Master of Advanced Engineering program in Semester 1, 2015 will receive a $6,000 scholarship! Questions about this scholarship? Email OzTREKK’s Australian Engineering Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com.

Do a double Master

Take your career even further by combining your postgraduate engineering qualification with another one-year Master degree. Combine with

  • Master of Business
  • Master of Business Information Systems
  • Master of Information Technology

Entry requirements

To apply for the Master of Advanced Engineering, you must have the equivalent of a four-year Australian Bachelor of Engineering in the relevant discipline with a minimum 70% average.

Apply to the Monash Engineering School!

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Learn more about the Master of Advanced Engineering and other engineering degrees at Monash University. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Engineering Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com, or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355. Find out how you can study in Australia!

Wednesday, March 19th, 2014

Formula 1 comes to Monash University

Engineering students were given a glimpse of what it takes to develop and maintain a Formula 1 car when key members of the Red Bull Racing team visited Monash University.

Monash University Engineering School

Monash Motorsport is ranked #2 in the world

Ahead of the weekend’s Grand Prix at Albert Park, Chief Engineer – Car Engineering at Red Bull Racing, Paul Monaghan and Australian driver Daniel Ricciardo provided the students, including members of the university’s Motorsport team, with insights into the behind-the-scenes processes that keep the top F1 cars on the track.

Monash Motorsport Supervisor Dr Scott Wordley said the visit was a perfect opportunity for students interested in a career in motor racing to gain a glimpse into the roles of engineers in the world of Grand Prix racing.

“The students are really enthusiastic about their involvement in Formula Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) and the visit gave them a better understanding of what is required of the engineers who work within Formula One,” Dr Wordley said.

“The Monash Motorsport team gives our students the opportunity to develop the skills they will need to make an impact at the highest levels of world motorsport.  Our graduates are already well represented in the ranks of F1, Le Mans Prototype (LMP) and the local V8 touring car series.”

During the visit Mr Monaghan launched the Infiniti Performance Engineering Academy program which will see three engineering graduates selected from universities around the world undertake a 12-month internship with the Red Bull Racing team.

The Monash Motorsport team also had the opportunity to show off their latest car—the M13 which the students are currently preparing to race at Silverstone in the UK and the Hockenheimring in Germany later this year.

Dr Wordley said Monash University already had strong connections with Infiniti Red Bull Racing. Sam Lister, who completed his Monash engineering degree in 2009, is a communications engineer with the team.

“With the help of the Infiniti Performance Engineering Academy program, we hope to make these opportunities available to more of our graduates,” Dr Wordley said.

Monash Motorsport

Monash Motorsport is a student run racing team that represents Monash University locally and internationally in the Formula SAE competition. Each year the team, comprising of students mainly from the Engineering, Information Technology and Business and Economics faculties, designs, builds and races a formula style race car against other teams from around the world. The Monash team is currently ranked second in the world, out of more than 500 universities.

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Would you like more information about engineering at Monash University? Email OzTREKK’s Australian Engineering Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com, or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355. Find out how you can study in Australia!

Friday, December 20th, 2013

Monash University burns rubber

The latest racing car from Monash Motorsport was be unveiled at a gala event recently.

Monash Engineering and Information Technology

Study engineering and IT at Monash

Each year Monash Motorsport, a student-run racing team, develops a small formula-style race car which competes both locally and internationally in Formula Society of Automotive Engineer (F-SAE) competitions.

This year’s incarnation, the M13, made its racing debut at the Australian F-SAE competition from December 12 – 15 at the Victoria University Werribee Campus.

Students from the Engineering, Information Technology and Business and Economics faculties at Monash University design and build the prototype race car each year. It is then evaluated for its potential as a production item that targets the non-professional weekend autocross racer. This is done through various different static and dynamic events.

Team Leader Hamish McCredie said the team believed this year’s car had improved on previous designs.

“The new design is more suited to the faster European tracks,” Hamish said. “We should be very competitive when we travel to Europe for competitions next year. We are currently ranked number two in the world and I believe the innovations to this year’s design will continue to help us achieve our goal of being the most respected team in the world.”

Monash Motorsport have won the last four Australian competitions, and last year came third at the UK competition (out of 100 teams) and fourth at Formula Student Germany (out of 70, but regarded as the premier combustion event).

Also competing in this year’s Australian F-SAE-A competition will be the team from Warwick University in their racing car WR3. Warwick Racing is the only British team to race at this year’s competition, which attracts teams from the whole of Australasia.

The run-up to the competition has seen the two sides share expertise as part of the Monash-Warwick Alliance, which has helped to fund the trip for the English team.

“It has been great to work with the Warwick team and we hope to develop the collaboration further in the future,” Hamish said.

Warwick Racing Project Manager, Hannah Sugrue said the Warwick Racing team was really excited about racing in Australia.

“It’s the first time the car has been in an international competition,” Hannah said.

“It’s a fantastic opportunity to get involved in motorsport and advanced engineering, and also the chance to work with, and race against, the Monash team gives us a great international perspective.”

Monash Motorsport

Monash Motorsport is a FSAE team from Monash University, Melbourne. The team started with humble beginnings in 2000, where the current Academic Advisor, Dr Scott Wordley, helped organize the first Australasian competition. With approximately 25 senior members, and 25 recruits every year, the team comprises of business, information technology, industrial design, science and engineering students across a multitude of majors and disciplines.

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Would you like more information about information technology and engineering at Monash University and about other Australian universities? Contact OzTREKK at info@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355. Find out how you can study in Australia!

Friday, August 16th, 2013

Monash University opens New Horizons Centre

A new state-of-the-art facility located at Monash University’s Clayton campus will transform manufacturing in areas such as biomedicine, transport, aerospace engineering and mineral processing.

 Monash University Engineering and IT

Find out more about Monash University Engineering and IT programs

The New Horizons Centre, located within the Clayton Innovation Precinct, was officially opened by the Federal Minister for Innovation, Industry, Science and Research, Minister for Higher Education, Senator the Hon Kim Carr on Tuesday, July 30.

New Horizons Centre will co-locate and integrate more than 400 staff from Monash University and the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), supported by platforms for global research and teaching collaboration through state-of-the-art information communications technology and will facilitate greater linkages with business and the community.

Monash University’s Vice-Chancellor and President Professor Ed Byrne said the opening of the centre would reinforce the university’s position as a world leader in research.

“The high-quality work being undertaken in New Horizons is structured around research and development of national and international importance,” Professor Byrne said.

“By bringing together scientists and engineers from Monash University and CSIRO, and building on the two organizations’ existing research strengths, the facility will have a positive and lasting influence in fields such as manufacturing, biological engineering, renewable energy, and modeling and simulation.

“The addition of New Horizons will establish the Clayton Innovation Precinct as the most significant technology hub in the southern hemisphere.”

Dean of the Faculty of Engineering and the Faculty of Information Technology, Professor Frieder Seible said the idea behind the facility was to accommodate the meeting of engineering, IT, and other sciences, allowing for exciting and impactful research across departmental, faculty, and institutional boundaries.

“It’s a different academic approach that will lead to a different research approach, and this is what we will see at the New Horizons Centre. Its wide range of state-of-the-art equipment and core facilities will support the highest quality research, research training and collaboration in science, engineering and technology,” Professor Seible said.

“New Horizons will change the research paradigm with world-class researchers from different and diverse backgrounds tackling some of the emerging areas of research, such as new sustainable means of generating energy, bringing the design and synthesis skills of engineers into the realm of biology and medicine, and developing new materials for drug delivery and regenerative medicine.”

Co-funded by the Commonwealth Government, Monash and the CSIRO, New Horizons will also enable the more efficient use of major facilities already in the Clayton Innovation Precinct, including the Monash Centre for Electron Microscopy, the Melbourne Centre for Nanofabrication, the Australian Synchrotron, the Victorian Organic Solar Cell Consortium and the Australian Regenerative Medicine Institute.

The head office of the Australian Manufacturing Innovation Precincts (AMIP) will also be located at New Horizons. The AMIP will be the first of up to 10 such precincts to be established under A Plan for Australian Jobs – the Australian Government’s Industry and Innovation Statement.

Apply to Monash University Engineering School!

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Want to learn more about Monash University and the Faculty of Engineering? Contact OzTREKK for more information about engineering programs at Australian Engineering Schools.

Email OzTREKK‘s Australian Engineering Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com, or call toll free in Canada at 1 866-698-7355. Find out how you can study in Australia!


Wednesday, April 24th, 2013

Monash building receives six-star design rating

The New Horizons building at the Clayton campus of Monash University has received the honour of being the first Monash building to be awarded a six-star design rating under the Green Building Council Australia Green Star (GBCA) system of holistic environmental ratings.

Green Star is a comprehensive, national, voluntary environmental rating system that evaluates the environmental design and construction of buildings and communities. Under this system, nominated buildings are eligible for an award of up to six stars, representing world leadership in design.

Manager of Environmental Sustainability at Monash University Brett Walters said the Six-star Design rating for the New Horizons project further demonstrates Monash University’s commitment to delivering sustainability in the built environment through the use of the GBCA’s Green Star Suite of building rating tools.

“Our aim is to deliver buildings that achieve Five-star Design and As-built certification as a minimum standard. As-built certification is critical to ensure that good design is reflected in practical reality, and not simply a good intent but a good outcome,” Mr Walter said.

“No building can be rated higher than Six-star under the scheme; New Horizons is the only true lab building in Victoria and only the second in Australia to achieve this level of certification,” the Monash manager added. “We hope that it will ultimately achieve the Six-star As-built rating to complete this stellar achievement sometime during this year.”

New Horizons’ laboratory spaces will be shared by Monash and the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), Australia’s largest publicly funded research organization.

Co-funded by the Government, Monash and the CSIRO, it will enable the efficient use of major facilities already in the Clayton Innovation Precinct including the Monash Centre for Electron Microscopy, the Melbourne Centre for Nanofabrication, the Australian Synchrotron and the Australian Regenerative Medicine Institute.

New Horizons will affirm the Clayton Innovation Precinct as the most significant technology hub in the southern hemisphere.

Monash University has achieved already received a Five-star As-built rating for the Briggs and Jackomos Halls of Residences, as well as a Five-star Design (and is expecting a Five-star As-built) rating for the Monash Peninsula Activity and Recreation Centre.

Apply to Monash University Engineering School!

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Want to learn more about Monash University and the Faculty of Engineering? Contact OzTREKK for more information about engineering programs at Australian Engineering Schools.

Email OzTREKK‘s Australian Engineering Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com, or call toll free in Canada at 1 866-698-7355. Find out how you can study in Australia!