+ OzTrekk Educational Services Home
 
 

Posts Tagged ‘Melbourne JD’

Monday, November 6th, 2017

University of Melbourne Law School in world’s top 10

The University of Melbourne Law School has been ranked seventh in the world and first in Australia in the Times Higher Education World University 2018 Subject Rankings for Law.

Melbourne Law School in world's top 10

Study at Melbourne Law School

It is the first time in which Law has been included in the Times Higher Education (THE) subject rankings, and Melbourne Law School is the only Australian institution represented in the top 20.

Melbourne Law School Dean Jenny Morgan said the position reflected the hard work and dedication of Melbourne Law School staff and students.

“The ranking is a testament to the outstanding research being conducted by colleagues across the law school, the teaching excellence in our Juris Doctor and Masters programs, and the international outlook fostered in our research and study partnerships,” Professor Morgan said.

Professor Morgan said Melbourne Law School was continuing to innovate and ensure its programs prepared graduates for the modern workforce.

“Our curriculum is evolving to meet the challenges of the digital world, balancing important elements of traditional legal study with new offerings that equip graduates with technical skills,” she said.

“The pace of change in the legal profession means that law schools must ensure our graduates are well placed to navigate the complex legal, ethical and social implications of new technologies.”

The Times Higher Education (THE) Subject Rankings for Law measure universities against a series of performance indicators across teaching, research, knowledge transfer and international outlook.

University of Melbourne Law School Juris Doctor program

Melbourne Law School’s JD is designed specifically for graduate students. The program is highly regarded both nationally and internationally. It leads to admission to the legal profession in all Australian jurisdictions and can also be used as a basis for seeking admission in many jurisdictions overseas. The curriculum for this law program allows students to build the core skills essential to a wide range of legal and professional careers, and gives them the opportunity to tailor their studies to areas of particular interest through elective subjects.

Program: Juris Doctor
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Semester intake: February
Duration: 3 years (standard course structure); 2 or 2.5 years (accelerated course structure)
Application Deadline: Melbourne Law School has a general application deadline of November 30 each year. It is recommended that you apply as early as possible.

Entry Requirements

Melbourne JD applicants must have

  • completed an undergraduate degree in any discipline; and
  • completed the Law School Admissions Test (LSAT).

Apply to Melbourne Law School!

*

Discover more about the Melbourne JD program! Email OzTREKK’s Australian Law Schools Admissions Officer Molly Mahon at molly@oztrekk.com!

Wednesday, July 26th, 2017

Melbourne Law School alumnus’ donation supports new Centre on Statelessness

One of the most significant gifts in the University of Melbourne Law School‘s history will establish the world’s only academic centre devoted to the problem of statelessness.

Peter and Ruth McMullin made the public announcement of their intended donation at a gala dinner to celebrate the 160th anniversary of teaching law at Melbourne. Mr McMullin is a Melbourne Law School alumnus.

Melbourne Law School alumnus' donation supports new Centre on Statelessness

Ruth and Peter McMullin (Photo: University of Melbourne)

“Ruth and I congratulate the Melbourne Law School on its global leadership in establishing the Centre and it is our pleasure to support it,” he said.

“In our opinion, policy solutions need to be found to address the mounting issue of statelessness around the world, and we look forward to them being developed through the work of the Centre.

“We all need to contribute where we can to strengthen valuable institutions like the University of Melbourne in the current global environment.”

University of Melbourne Chancellor (and fellow Melbourne Law School alumnus) Allan Myers said the Peter McMullin Centre on Statelessness was one of the most significant and visionary philanthropic initiatives in the history of the Melbourne Law School.

Mr Myers said the Centre on Statelessness would examine the causes and extent of statelessness around the world, particularly in the Asia-Pacific region.

“It will work with governments, the not-for-profit sector and the United Nations towards the elimination of statelessness and it will work to protect the rights of stateless people,” he said.

“The Centre will engage in research, teaching and training, supporting public policy and law reform, and raising public awareness and understanding of statelessness.”

Mr Myers said the Centre would begin in 2018 under the leadership of Professor Michelle Foster, a globally respected University of Melbourne scholar in refugee and human rights law.

“A child is born into statelessness every 10 minutes and stateless people are vulnerable to a wide range of legal disabilities in many countries which may limit their right to education, employment, travel and even marriage,” he said.

“The Melbourne Law School is proud to establish a centre that will play a critical role in worldwide efforts to eliminate statelessness and to protect the rights of stateless people.”

The donation was made through Believe – the Campaign for the University of Melbournewhich helps fund life-changing research, gives bright students the chance to excel and funds projects that improve communities.

University of Melbourne Law School Juris Doctor program

The University of Melbourne’s JD is designed specifically for graduate students. The program is highly regarded both nationally and internationally. It leads to admission to the legal profession in all Australian jurisdictions and can also be used as a basis for seeking admission in many jurisdictions overseas. The curriculum for this law program allows students to build the core skills essential to a wide range of legal and professional careers, and gives them the opportunity to tailor their studies to areas of particular interest through elective subjects.

Program: Juris Doctor
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Intake: February
Duration: 3 years (standard course structure); 2 or 2.5 years (accelerated course structure)
Application Deadline: Melbourne Law School has a general application deadline of November 30 each year. It is recommended that you apply as early as possible.

Entry Requirements

Applicants must have

  • completed an undergraduate degree in any discipline; and
  • completed the Law School Admissions Test (LSAT).

Apply to the University of Melbourne Law School!

*

Learn more about Melbourne Law School! Email OzTREKK’s Australian Law Schools Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston for more information at shannon@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Wednesday, January 25th, 2017

Meet Melbourne JD Professor Ian Malkin—a Canadian!

If you’re planning to attend Melbourne Law School, you’ll be meeting a Canadian.

Meet Melbourne JD Prof Ian Malkin—a Canadian!

Melbourne JD Prof Ian Malkin (Photo credit: University of Melbourne)

Juris Doctor program Professor Ian Malkin came to Australia from Winnipeg Canada in 1986 and currently teaches Legal Method and Reasoning and Torts. Prof Malkin was also one of the lecturers involved in designing the university breadth subject, Drugs That Shaped Society. He also coached several Jessup International Law Moot Court competition teams. Two of the teams he co-coached won the International competition in Washington.

Teaching excellence

In 2014, he was the second recipient of the University of Melbourne‘s Award for Outstanding Leadership of University Teaching. He also has been nominated for an Australian Award for University Teaching Excellence in 2014. In 2003, Prof Malkin was awarded the Barbara Falk Award for Teaching Excellence—one of the university’s inaugural teaching awards and the first recipient of the award in the Law, Arts and Music category. In 2007, he was awarded a “Citation for Outstanding Contributions to Student learning” in the Carrick Australian Awards for University Teaching. In 2001, 2003 and 2006, he was one of the University of Melbourne’s nominees for an Australian Award for University Teaching.

Prof Malkin is currently one of the directors of the Melbourne JD program. He was appointed the Law School’s first Director of the Office for Teaching and Learning in Law in 2007. He was the faculty’s Director of Teaching on several occasions and twice helped lead and facilitate the Australasian Law Teachers’ Association’s Teaching Workshop.

Ian has been actively involved in many faculty and university committees. He served as Associate Dean (Undergraduate) and chair of the Faculty’s Undergraduate Studies Committee, as has had appointments to the University’s Selection Procedures Committee, Special Entry Pathways Sub-Committee, Undergraduate Scholarships Sub-Committee and Curriculum Commission. He helped develop and implement the faculty’s new LLB curriculum and was instrumental in designing the framework for the Juris Doctor degree. Ian chaired and served on Access Melbourne Committees for many years as well as the Equal Opportunity Committee. He was often appointed as one of the faculty’s Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Intersex Liaison Officers. He was a member of the University’s Interim Board of Undergraduate Studies and the Faculty’s Executive and Budgets and Special Consideration Committees.

Ian holds a Bachelors of Law degree from the University of Manitoba and a Masters of Law degree from the University of London. His research interests include issues associated with legal education, as well as policy issues underlying the law relating to HIV (for example, harm minimisation in the context of providing supervised injecting facilities), prisoners’ rights, the provision and supply of alcohol and compensation law reform.

He co-authored, with Prof Martin Davies, the 4th, 5th and 6th editions of Focus – Torts, published in 2003, 2008 and 2012, respectively, by LexisNexis Butterworths. He and Martin are currently revising their book, with a view to publication in 2014-2015. He has co-authored a number of articles on pedagaogy, as well as research papers that directly inform his teaching in Torts.

Say hello to Prof Malkin for us!

Melbourne Law School Juris Doctor program

Program: Juris Doctor (JD)
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Semester intake: February
Duration: 3 years (2 or 2.5 years for accelerated program)
Application deadline: Melbourne Law School has a general application deadline of November 30 each year; however, late applications may be accepted.

Apply now to the University of Melbourne Law School!

*

Would you like more information about the Melbourne JD? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Law Schools Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com.

Wednesday, November 16th, 2016

Melbourne Law School graduate: it’s all about words

For 2015 Melbourne Law School graduate Nick Kotzman, the study and practice of law all comes down to one thing: words.

“I’ve always found it interesting that we use words as tools to convey meaning about important things such as the powers of government, and the types of conduct that we think should be met with punishment,” Nick says.

melbourne-law-graduate-its-all-about-words

MLS graduate Nick Kotzman (Photo: University of Melbourne)

In fact, it was his fascination with words and their meanings that first drew Nick to pursue a legal education and now, a career in commercial law.

“I find the process of trying to understand the meaning that is conveyed by the words that make up our law to be a challenging and rewarding exercise that draws on a range of problem-solving skills,” he says.

Stepping into a graduate role at commercial law firm Herbert Smith Freehills this year, he has worked on matters ranging from the approval process for the Melbourne Metro Tunnel to competition advice on various infrastructure assets. Nick says he uses the interpretive skills that he learned at law school on a daily basis.

“Whether it is in the context of trying to understand precisely what a judge is saying in that tricky penalties case or attempting to figure out how one section of a statute speaks to another section, going through that process of ascertaining the meaning (or meanings) of words is something I get to do all the time in my job.”

In fact, while law graduates have always been valued for their skills in understanding recent case law, he says that legal practices value the interpretive skills of young lawyers now more than ever.

“As statutes make up more and more of the law that clients have to navigate, law firms place a premium on graduates who have an ability to think laterally and interpret statutory provisions that have not been considered by courts or tribunals. And more often than not, it’s the junior’s research on interpreting those words that goes directly in the advice to the client.”

Looking back on his time at Melbourne Law School, Nick feels the ability to interpret case law or legislation was not something he learned in any one subject, but a general skill that all his professors tried to nurture.

“Even though they might not appear directly relevant, subjects like Criminal Law and Procedure and Evidence and Proof have taught me broad-based interpretive skills that have assisted me countless times during my time in commercial law.

“Equally, special lecture series like the ‘Joining the Dots’ series delivered by former High Court Justice Kenneth Hayne have also helped me to develop a body of skills to deploy when faced with research questions involving statutory interpretation.”

While there can be no doubting his passion for the law (and words!), his advice to law students eyeing off a career in commercial law is not to forget about their other interests or ambitions.

“Get involved early. In my experience, law firms look for students who do more than just their studies. This could be practical work experience in a law firm or a community legal centre; a part-time job in retail or hospitality; or getting involved in any of the great organisations at MLS such as the Law Review, the LSS or the student newspaper, De Minimis.”

Story by Blake Connell via University of Melbourne Law School

University of Melbourne Law School Juris Doctor program

The University of Melbourne’s JD is designed specifically for graduate students. The program is highly regarded both nationally and internationally. It leads to admission to the legal profession in all Australian jurisdictions and can also be used as a basis for seeking admission in many jurisdictions overseas. The curriculum for this law program allows students to build the core skills essential to a wide range of legal and professional careers, and gives them the opportunity to tailor their studies to areas of particular interest through elective subjects.

Program: Juris Doctor
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Semester intake: February
Duration: 3 years (standard course structure); 2 or 2.5 years (accelerated course structure)
Application Deadline: Melbourne Law School has a general application deadline of November 30 each year. It is recommended that you apply as early as possible.

Entry Requirements

Melbourne JD applicants must have

  • completed an undergraduate degree in any discipline; and
  • completed the Law School Admissions Test (LSAT).

Apply to Melbourne Law School!

*

Discover more about the Melbourne JD program! Email OzTREKK’s Australian Law Schools Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston for more information at shannon@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Thursday, July 7th, 2016

Melbourne Law School shows you how to get the most out of LinkedIn

LinkedIn is fast becoming a crucial means of communication and connectivity.

It is an online platform allowing professionals to connect with one another, as well as keep up to date with the latest news from companies, individuals or institutions. When used to full effect, LinkedIn is a valuable tool for both experienced professionals and recent law graduates.

Here are a few tips for Melbourne Law School Alumni on what you can get out of LinkedIn.

What do you want out of LinkedIn?

LinkedIn can be used for a number of professional purposes. It is important to identify what you want to use LinkedIn for so you cam tailor your profile and activity accordingly.

LinkedIn is also a valuable tool for engaging and collaborating with your professional network, including your colleagues, peers and clients.

Professor Tania Voon says she has “contacts coming through [her] LinkedIn profile,” seeking to engage and collaborate. For example, she says she has been invited through LinkedIn to give a presentation, and LinkedIn connections have offered to present at Melbourne Law School.

Former Australian parliamentarian and Commissioner to the Americas, Victor Perton (LLM, 1994), uses LinkedIn as a key tool for collaboration and making connections.

As Commissioner to the Americas, Mr Perton established “Victoria Connection,” a LinkedIn group connecting Australians living and working in the Americas, as well as Americans who had worked in Australia. The aim of this group was to develop “the strongest prospects for collaboration,” through “a lively conversation.”

Be clear with your aims on LinkedIn to ensure you know what you want to get out of it.

Sydney Dental School

Follow Melbourne Law School on LinkedIn for daily news, events and updates, and become part of an ever-growing network of your fellow alumni, MLS faculty and current students.

Article by Georgia Westbrook

University of Melbourne Law School Juris Doctor program

The University of Melbourne’s JD is designed specifically for graduate students. The program is highly regarded both nationally and internationally. It leads to admission to the legal profession in all Australian jurisdictions and can also be used as a basis for seeking admission in many jurisdictions overseas. The curriculum for this law program allows students to build the core skills essential to a wide range of legal and professional careers, and gives them the opportunity to tailor their studies to areas of particular interest through elective subjects.

Program: Juris Doctor
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Semester intake: February
Duration: 3 years (standard course structure); 2 or 2.5 years (accelerated course structure)
Application Deadline: Melbourne Law School has a general application deadline of November 30 each year. It is recommended that you apply as early as possible.

Entry Requirements

Melbourne JD applicants must have

  • completed an undergraduate degree in any discipline; and
  • completed the Law School Admissions Test (LSAT).

Apply to Melbourne Law School!

*

Learn more about Melbourne Law School! Email OzTREKK’s Australian Law Schools Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston for more information at shannon@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Thursday, June 16th, 2016

Technical know-how a first for Melbourne Law School

Melbourne Law School students are leading the way in providing innovative solutions to complex law issues through the use of new technologies. They have designed and built a range of legal help websites to provide the public with fast, accurate and cost-effective information about common legal problems including inaccurate credit reports, handling and managing fines, and assessing employment rights. The students compete for the right to have their ideas developed in the annual presentation called “The Bake-off.”

Technical know-how a first for Melbourne Law School

MLS students providing innovative solutions to complex legal issues (Photo credit: University of Melbourne)

While the competition can be valuable in generating new ideas, the real learning comes from students better understanding the interface between law and technology. MLS is the only university offering practical work in technology and the law. The legal expertise websites are designed to replicate the thought processes and actions of a lawyer and provide tailored legal information to non-lawyers and the not-for-profit sector as part of the Melbourne Law School’s Juris Doctor degree.

Students will compete for the title of ‘The Slater and Gordon Award for Law Apps” before a panel of judges, where their projects will be assessed on their usefulness, completeness, ambition and creativity, design and presentation. One of the sites from last year, designed to assist not-for-profits, is now live and will be demonstrated at the annual event.

Dean of Melbourne Law School Professor Carolyn Evans said that new technologies were providing innovative solutions in the law.

“The MLS is the leader in Australia in regards to technology in legal education. Melbourne is claiming the space of technology in legal education,” she said.

“MLS is producing law graduates of the future. The legal landscape is changing with much of it is moving to digital and online. Law graduates with these technology skills are more employable and more in a position to help clients.”

Subject teacher, Mr Gary Cazalet, said the subject offered at Melbourne Law School received support from Georgetown University, law firm Slater and Gordon and technology platform Neota Logic—a platform providing non-programmers with the tools to efficiently build, test, maintain, and deploy expert applications.

“During the development of their websites, students receive substantial and ongoing advice from Neota Logic’s experts both in Australia and the US, enabling students to create applications of the highest quality,” Mr Cazalet said.

“This results in the creation of fast, accurate and cost-effective answers to common legal problems.”

Julian Uebergang, Managing Director, Asia Pacific, Neota Logic, added “Neota Logic is proud to collaborate with MLS and Justice Connect to develop applications that perform important functions for not-for-profit organisations, particularly organisations that promote access-to-justice.”

Slater and Gordon Victorian General Manager of Personal Injury Dina Tutungi, who is one of the judges for the event, said it was important to encourage and support the next generation of lawyers to become innovators.

“Slater and Gordon is proud to be involved in an event that allows us to help future lawyers develop new and better ways to improve access to legal information, services and justice.”

Neota Logic is a global provider of intelligent software for the legal and compliance industries. Combining rules, reasoning, decision management and document automation, the company’s easy-to-develop smart applications enable business solutions that deliver process improvements, reduce risk and ensure compliance. Neota Logic applications are mobile-ready, can be embedded within portals and websites and integrate easily with other systems.

Melbourne Law School Juris Doctor program

Program: Juris Doctor (JD)
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Semester intake: February
Duration: 3 years (2 or 2.5 years for accelerated program)
Application deadline: Melbourne Law School has a general application deadline of November 30 each year; however, late applications may be accepted.

Entry Requirements

Applicants must have

  • completed an undergraduate degree in any discipline; and
  • completed the Law School Admissions Test (LSAT).

The Melbourne JD has three selection criteria:

  1. Academic results achieved in previous tertiary studies
  2. The LSAT score
  3. The applicant’s personal statement

A Melbourne Law School application must include a personal statement of up to 850 words. It should emphasize any aspect of your personal history that may enhance your application, including extracurricular activity, community involvement, work experience, caregiver responsibilities, relevant personal characteristics and any outstanding achievements. Statements should be typewritten; the pages should be numbered; and the applicant’s name and date of birth should appear on each page.

Students who have not yet completed an undergraduate degree may apply, as long as they will have graduated prior to commencing the Melbourne JD program.

Apply now to the University of Melbourne Law School!

*

Do you have any questions regarding Melbourne Law School and how to apply to the Juris Doctor program? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Law Schools Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com or call 1-866-698-7355.

Friday, May 27th, 2016

Damages and Human Rights: new book by Melbourne Law School associate professor

A new book by Melbourne Law School Associate Professor Jason N E Varuhas aims to fundamentally reshape thinking on how courts ought to approach the award of damages for breaches of basic rights.

Damages and Human Rights (Hart Publishing) is a major work on awards of damages for violations of human rights that will be of compelling interest to practitioners, judges and academics alike.

Melbourne Law School Damages and Human Rights

Damages and Human Rights, a new book by Melbourne Law School Associate Professor Jason N E Varuhas (Image credit: University of Melbourne)

Damages for breaches of bills of rights is emerging as a field of great practical significance, yet the rules and principles governing such awards and their theoretical foundations remain under-explored, while courts continue to struggle to articulate a coherent law of human rights damages. One of the key reasons the subject has proven a difficult one for courts is that it lies at the intersection of public law, private law, and international law, not being capable of neat compartmentalisation within any one field.

Professor David Feldman, Rouse Ball Professor of English Law, University of Cambridge, in the foreword to the book, says Damages and Human Rights “will quickly become the standard point of reference in its field.

“It is a pleasure to congratulate Dr Varuhas on this sustained, intellectually powerful and practically important piece of legal scholarship, and to commend it to the many readers, in many parts of the world, where it will, I hope, stimulate new approaches to the practice and theory of the subject.”

The book’s focus is English law, but it draws heavily on comparative material from a range of common law jurisdictions, as well as the jurisprudence of international courts.

It argues that in awarding damages in human rights cases the courts should adopt a vindicatory approach, modelled on those rules and principles applied in tort cases when basic rights are violated, and eschew prevailing approaches which are generally characterised by open-ended judicial discretion and a paucity of concrete rules and principles.

Other approaches are considered in detail, including the current “mirror” approach which ties the domestic approach to damages to the European Court of Human Rights’ approach to monetary compensation—an interest-balancing approach where the damages are dependent on a judicial balancing of individual and public interests—and approaches drawn from the law of state liability in EU law and United States constitutional law.

The analysis has important implications for our understanding of fundamental issues including the interrelationship between public law and private law, the theoretical and conceptual foundations of human rights law and the law of torts, the nature and functions of the damages remedy, the connection between rights and remedies, the intersection of domestic and international law, and the impact of damages liability on public funds and public administration.

A number of events were organised in different common law jurisdictions to mark the publication of this significant work, including Canada: Book panel at Université of Montreal Faculté de Droit, May 27, 2016. Speakers included Professor Brice Dickson, (Queen’s University Belfast), Mr James Lee (King’s College London), and Dr Paul Daly (Montreal).

Melbourne Law School Juris Doctor program

Program: Juris Doctor (JD)
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Semester intake: February
Duration: 3 years (2 or 2.5 years for accelerated program)
Application deadline: Melbourne Law School has a general application deadline of November 30 each year; however, late applications may be accepted.

Apply now to the University of Melbourne Law School!

*

Do you have any questions regarding Melbourne Law School and how to apply to the Juris Doctor program? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Law Schools Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com or call 1-866-698-7355.

Tuesday, May 17th, 2016

Melbourne JD student pursues her passion for international law

Melbourne Law School student Sarah Mercer has traversed the globe in pursuit of her passion for international law and human rights advocacy.

The JD student interned with the Australian Permanent Mission to the United Nations for the 28th Regular Session of the Human Rights Council in Geneva. She then went to The Hague to undertake a pro-bono role with the Ratko Mladic Defense Team at the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia.

Melbourne JD

Melbourne JD student Sarah Mercer (Photo credit: University of Melbourne)

Most recently she worked as a legal intern with the United Nations Office of Legal Affairs in New York.

Ms Mercer was originally inspired to study law after witnessing the institutional and social barriers faced by her sibling, who has a disability associated with a mental health condition.

“I wanted to become a strong advocate for my sibling who has a psychosocial disability, which is one of the reasons why I wanted to come to law school,” Ms Mercer says.

Ms Mercer says she chose the Melbourne JD as the launchpad for her legal career because of the public interest and global opportunities offered by Melbourne Law School.

In her second and third years, she undertook Institutions in International Law (IIL) and Global Lawyer (GL), two international subjects that give students the opportunity to meet and network with international practitioners in Geneva and New York.

“Those two cities are centres for international law and most lawyers who are practising in the field have spent time in either or both. These subjects give you a feel for what’s going on in those cities, which is essential if you ever do want to move there and practice,” Ms Mercer says.

Studying abroad with Melbourne Law School was a transformative experience for Ms Mercer, which inspired her to pursue a career in international law and empowered her with the knowledge to realise her ambitions. She credits the mentorship she received from Associate Professor Bruce Oswald and Professor Tania Voon—coordinators of the IIL and GL programs—as helping set her on her path.

“Having that kind of mentorship, as a young, aspiring international lawyer or human rights advocate is really important,” Ms Mercer says.

During her travels Ms Mercer also connected with the law school’s alumni community, which spans across the world – including at some of the highest echelons in international law.

“Many of the lawyers that I met at the UN, or other international institutions, are graduates of Melbourne Law School, so that was really great. There’s an extensive alumni network.”

Melbourne JD

The Global Lawyer 2015 Cohort in Washington, D.C., USA. (Photo credit: University of Melbourne)

Back in Melbourne, Ms Mercer also benefited from her experiences with the Public Interest Law Initiative at the law school.

Through this program she had the opportunity to undertake the Legal Internship subject with the Victorian Equal Opportunity and Human Rights Commission, as well as three clinical subjects: Sustainability Business Clinic (SBC), which is partnered with Ashurst LLP; Disability Human Rights Clinic (DHRC) where students engage in human rights advocacy focused on the rights violations experienced by persons with disabilities; and Public Interest Law Clinic (PILC) at Flemington & Kensington Community Legal Centre.

“I think studying at Melbourne Law School was the best decision that I made with my legal career. I wouldn’t have gotten these kinds of opportunities anywhere else, especially in Australia. I developed a great foundation from which to build.”

After she graduates Ms Mercer plans to pursue her ambition of becoming a human rights advocate and lawyer, wherever that takes her.

Ms Mercer says that finding your feet in international law can be challenging because it is a very broad field that lacks a single, well-trodden pathway for graduates. But she’s quick to note that this shouldn’t dissuade students, like herself, who aspire to practice law on the world stage.

“If you keep pursuing it, and you keep being passionate, then you can go anywhere. I’m looking forward to seeing where it will take me next.”

University of Melbourne Law School Juris Doctor program

The University of Melbourne’s JD is designed specifically for graduate students. The program is highly regarded both nationally and internationally. It leads to admission to the legal profession in all Australian jurisdictions and can also be used as a basis for seeking admission in many jurisdictions overseas. The curriculum for this law program allows students to build the core skills essential to a wide range of legal and professional careers, and gives them the opportunity to tailor their studies to areas of particular interest through elective subjects.

Program: Juris Doctor
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Semester intake: February
Duration: 3 years (standard course structure); 2 or 2.5 years (accelerated course structure)
Application Deadline: Melbourne Law School has a general application deadline of November 30 each year. It is recommended that you apply as early as possible.

Entry Requirements

Melbourne JD applicants must have

  • completed an undergraduate degree in any discipline; and
  • completed the Law School Admissions Test (LSAT).

Apply to Melbourne Law School!

*

Discover more about the Melbourne JD program! Email OzTREKK’s Australian Law Schools Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston for more information at shannon@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Tuesday, March 8th, 2016

Writing the LSAT?

As part of the application process for the Melbourne JD, applicants need to register for, and sit, the Law School Admission Test (LSAT). The LSAT is an independent, international test administered by the Law School Admission Council (LSAC).

University of Melbourne Law School

Melbourne Law School

All applicants for the Juris Doctor at Melbourne Law School must sit the LSAT prior to applying.

The LSAT comprises five multiple-choice sections of 35 minutes each and a 35-minute writing sample. The writing sample does not go toward the calculation of your LSAT score, although the university receives this sample and it forms part of your application.

The LSAT has three types of questions:

  1. Reading comprehension
  2. Analytical reasoning
  3. Logical reasoning

Go to About the LSAT on the LSAC website for a more detailed description of these three question types and what to expect in the LSAT.  Information on how the questions in the LSAT are relevant in testing an applicant’s aptitude to study law are also available. This document is an extract from The Official LSAT Handbook, a publication of the Law School Admissions Council.

How should you prepare?

The University of Melbourne strongly recommends that in order to perform to your true ability, you take the time to prepare for the LSAT. The LSAC website includes information on LSAT Preparation Materials, providing links to sample questions with explanations and a couple of sample LSAT tests. Many bookshops also stock LSAT prep books which can be ordered online. Students are also encouraged to download the sample LSAT test online and sit it under exam conditions to decide for yourself if further preparation is needed. Please remember that your LSAT score only forms part of your application, and is only one of the three criteria considered in assessing your application.

LSAT Date and Registration Deadlines

LSAT Sitting: June, 6, 2016
LSAT Registration: April 20, 2016
Non-published Test Center Registration: April 13, 2016
Late Registration—Published Test Centers: April 27, 2016

Score Release Dates

By Email (for online account holders only): June 30, 2016
By Mail (for those without an online account): July 7, 2016

LSAT scores are valid for five years and the LSAT can be sat three times in two years. Further information is available from the LSAT website.

*

Do you have any questions regarding Melbourne Law School and the Juris Doctor program? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Law Schools Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com for more information!

Monday, January 25th, 2016

Melbourne JD students prepare for Melbourne Law School Jessup Moot

Melbourne Law School’s Jessup Moot team knows there is still much hard work to be done between now and the national championship to be held in Canberra in February next year.

University of Melbourne Law School

Melbourne JD students are preparing for the Melbourne Law School Jessup Moot (Photo credit: University of Melbourne)

Without skipping a beat, the team consisting of Juris Doctor students Shane Chandra, Rachel Walters, Luke Chircop, Tess Kirkinis and Beau Paterson finished exams in November and immediately began preparing for the world’s largest mooting competition, the Philip C. Jessup International Law Moot Court Competition.

It involves long hours, six days a week, researching, consulting with academics and forming arguments to accompany their submission, which is due in January.

Recently, the team was given the opportunity to have lunch with former Deputy President of Supreme Court of the United Kingdom Lord David Hope, who was at MLS to deliver a public lecture.

Lord Hope examined a number of problematic UK legal cases with the students in a thought provoking and entertaining discussion, including cases involving assisted suicide and the introduction of closed material in court.

Second-year Melbourne JD student Luke Chircop says the experience of having an open discussion with Lord Hope was invaluable in their preparation for competition.

“We have heard from a range of amazing people such as Lord Hope, and to have their insight into the law and to hear of their knowledge and experience is so helpful,” he says.

The 2016 Jessup Moot focuses on issues such as mass surveillance and cyber attacks, issues Luke says “will be at the forefront of international law for the next twenty years or so.”

His teammate Tess Kirkinis says a highlight of the competition is having the opportunity to moot the most current and contentious areas of international law.

“Getting exposure to high quality advocacy is such a valuable experience,” she says. “Also, there is that practical element of learning that can’t be done through reading library books.”

The Australian championship is known as being one of the toughest qualifiers, with only two national teams progressing to the global competition in Washington.

Melbourne Law School has produced three international rounds-winning teams (1988, 1993, 2000), putting it third behind the National University of Singapore and the University of Sydney (four apiece) as most-capped champions in the world.

But the MLS team is not getting ahead of itself, with a focus firmly on its submission prior to mooting in February.

“There is a lot of hard work to do before then,” Luke says.

Story by Andy Walsh via University of Melbourne

Melbourne Law School Juris Doctor program

Program: Juris Doctor (JD)
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Semester intake: February
Duration: 3 years (2 or 2.5 years for accelerated program)
Application deadline: Melbourne Law School has a general application deadline of November 30 each year; however, late applications may be accepted.

Entry Requirements

Applicants must have

  • completed an undergraduate degree in any discipline; and
  • completed the Law School Admissions Test (LSAT).

The Melbourne JD has three selection criteria:

  1. Academic results achieved in previous tertiary studies
  2. The LSAT score
  3. The applicant’s personal statement

University of Melbourne’s JD application must include a personal statement of up to 850 words. It should emphasize any aspect of your personal history that may enhance your application, including extracurricular activity, community involvement, work experience, caregiver responsibilities, relevant personal characteristics and any outstanding achievements. Statements should be typewritten; the pages should be numbered; and the applicant’s name and date of birth should appear on each page.

Students who have not yet completed an undergraduate degree may apply, as long as they will have graduated prior to commencing the Melbourne JD program.

Apply now to the University of Melbourne Law School!

*

Do you have any questions regarding Melbourne Law School and how to apply to the Juris Doctor program? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Law Schools Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com or call 1-866-698-7355.