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Posts Tagged ‘Melbourne DPT’

Friday, October 6th, 2017

University of Melbourne physiotherapy students use augmented reality

From Pokémon GO to the classroom—how a collaboration between the University of Melbourne and Microsoft in AR is taking students under the skin of their patients.

Story by Andrew Trounson, University of Melbourne

Pokémon GO pushed augmented reality, or AR, into the mainstream, sending 500 million people around the world chasing cartoon characters on their phones. But now, in a unique multi-disciplinary collaboration, it’s making the leap from entertainment to education.

A new fusion of augmented reality, gaming technology, and anatomy is giving physiotherapy students at the University of Melbourne access to cutting-edge technology to take a look inside the human body by projecting different layers of muscles and bones over the top of a volunteer “patient.” It provides an inside view of how the body works as it moves in real time.

Melbourne physiotherapy students use augmented reality

Learn more about the Melbourne physiotherapy program

The technology, called the Augmented Studio, is designed to radically enhance the teaching of physiotherapy where students currently use their knowledge of anatomy to understand how muscles work beneath the skin of a patient because they can’t see through them. But the Augmented Studio, developed by researchers at the University of Melbourne, bridges the gap between that theory and practice.

By using tracking sensors mounted on a scaffold it projects images of our muscles and skeleton directly onto a volunteer. The images automatically follow the shape and movement of the body, giving students in the studio space an interactive all-round view of how our bodies work. It can even allow them and their teachers to “draw” on the projected image to make information and action more explicit.

“What we are doing is overlaying virtual models of what we look like underneath our skin and synchronising that with real human action,” says Dr Thuong Hoang, who is a Research Fellow at the Microsoft Research Centre for Social Natural Users Interfaces at the University of Melbourne.

The Augmented Studio was built by Dr Hoang, computer engineer Zaher Joukhadar and Phd student Martin Reinoso, who adapted Microsoft’s Kinect body sensing and tracking device as well as “RoomAlive” projection technology, both of which were originally designed for computer gaming. Once a person steps into the projection space and forms a T-shape with their arms outstretched, the trackers lock on to them and the projected image conforms to their shape and movement.

At the moment the projected overlay doesn’t show how our muscles actually move when we contract and relax our muscles. Instead, it tracks the body and movement at the joints. But eventually Dr Hoang wants to add in animation that can show the actual movement of muscles as the model moves.

University of Melbourne Physiotherapy lecturer Dr David Kelly says the students quickly embraced the technology during pilot sessions in 2016, which are continuing in 2017. He says the combination of live movement and interaction, in which students could actually move and feel the model’s limbs, helps them to grasp the relationship between their learned anatomy and how it works dynamically.

“For first-year students it can be really hard to bring together anatomical knowledge with how the body actually works because it can be difficult to visualise. But when they see a real person who they can interact with, while also seeing the muscles and skeleton projected over the top, combined with the ability to draw and write on the body, it all becomes much easier for the students to learn about how the body moves,” says Dr Kelly, from the Melbourne School of Health Sciences.

The Augmented Studio also provides a more visual and intuitive way of learning that Dr Kelly says will benefit those students who naturally learn more easily by direct visualisation, rather than through reading and listening. “There has always been a group of students that struggle because the limited ways in which we have to teach may not conform to how they learn best,” he says.

Developments in AR, which seeks to use technology to enhance what we can already see, hear and feel in the real world, are far ahead of chasing GPS tracked Pokémon. There are viewing devices such as glasses that can overlay what we see with three-dimensional graphics, video and holograms, and we can generate projections like games that people manipulate by moving our hands.

The big advantage of the Augmented Studio over advances like 3D holograms is that the students can actually touch and move the body, making it a much more interactive experience. They also don’t have to wear headgear, which means it could potentially be used in bigger settings with larger numbers of students.

“It has always been hard to capture the dynamic side of how our anatomy works, so the difference here is the high level of interaction you can achieve. The student can, for example, ask the model to kick and they can then look at variations from different angles at what is happening as someone kicks,” Dr Kelly says.

The Augmented Studio is still in early-stage development and Dr Kelly would love to see it migrate to using muscle animations. Dr Hoang is also working to develop a system for the student interaction with the model to be automatically recorded onto their tablets so they can have a permanent record of what they were learning.

Another challenge is to find a way to make the studio more transportable and quicker to set up. At the moment the studio can work very effectively in a dedicated tutorial space where it could be permanently set up, but Dr Kelly says a more portable set up would increase its flexibility for teaching.

The Augmented Studio is an extension of Dr Hoang’s earlier work exploring how virtual reality and body tracking could be used to help guide body movement for dance and marital arts students. Arising from a collaboration between the physiotherapy department’s Teaching and Learning director, Associate Professor Louisa Remedios and Professor Frank Vetere, Director of Microsoft Social NUI, Dr Hoang started working with the physiotherapy department on developing a teaching aid. He then realised that virtual reality, in which you are immersed in an entirely created world, wasn’t suited to teaching physiotherapy that is very hands on.

“When we got into the class rooms we had to change our thinking. VR just wouldn’t work in the tactile environment in which they learn and practice,” Dr Hoang says. It was when he noticed that students kept referring back to anatomy charts when they were practicing on each other that he started thinking of using augmented reality to put the virtual muscles on the body

Dr Hoang is now working on extending the tracked projection technology to various health and fitness areas, and even in performance art. He says that using tracking sensors with projections it is possible to create guides that show people how to position their bodies for practicing fitness, sport and dance.

Using virtual reality headsets he and PhD student Martin Reinoso have already developed a prototype that allows a martial arts teacher to remotely instruct students on the right position to hold. By using body tracking and linked headsets student can match their movement to align with those of their teacher. There is also scope to project information on our own body’s performance, such as heart rate and breathing, so it is visible either on our projected selves or on a nearby surface.

“The innovation we have created isn’t just limited to the fixed information that we have been projecting so far. If can be used to project dynamic information onto yourself or any surface around you,” Dr Hoang says. “All of what I’m dreaming of is very possible.”

About the Melbourne Doctor of Physiotherapy

Eligible University of Melbourne Physiotherapy candidates for admission will have completed undergraduate studies in human anatomy and human physiology at the university level. Other subjects which may be helpful for physiotherapy applicants include psychology, physics, biomechanics, research methods, evidence-based practice, statistics, biochemistry, and additional units of anatomy.

Program: Doctor of Physiotherapy (DPT)
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Next available intake: February 2019
Duration: 3 years
Application deadline: TBA. For the 2018 intake, the application rounds closed June 1 and July 27, 2017.

Apply to the Melbourne Doctor of Physiotherapy Program!

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Would you like to learn more about the University of Melbourne Physiotherapy program ? Please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Physiotherapy Schools Admissions Officer Krista McVeigh at krista@oztrekk.com.

Thursday, November 3rd, 2016

What’s it like to move to Melbourne? OzTREKK student shares his tips and tricks (Part 2)

International students have a lot to do in order to prepare for study in Australia: getting a student visa, booking a flight, transferring money, finding accommodation, registering for classes, mentally preparing… the list goes on! Luckily, we are here for you every step of the way. From application to arrival, OzTREKK will be there.

Former OzTREKK students are there for you, too.

Remember OzTREKK student, Eric Leckie? We recently ran a blog about his journey as an international student. His detailed story outlining the tips and tricks of the Melbourne physiotherapy program got a ton of hits on Facebook, and now he’s back to give us the skinny on moving to Melbourne!

Take it away, Eric!

I love living in a big city such as Melbourne. There is always something to do on the weekends to keep you busy when you have some down time from uni. For example, there certainly isn’t a shortage of restaurants to go try out. Whether you’re looking for Italian, Thai, Indian, Korean, Greek… Melbourne has it all and the best part is, if you decide to live in the city, all these restaurants are all walking distance away. Another great aspect about Melbourne is that it’s extremely culturally diverse. I find the general culture and attitude of Australia to be very similar to that of Canada. Everyone is very nice and accepting here, which makes you feel like you’re at home.

Aside from Melbourne itself, I really enjoy exploring different parts of Australia. This past Easter break I went to Byron Bay (personal favourite) and Surfers Paradise with a friend of mine and it was absolutely amazing. Australia has so much to offer and domestic flights are really cheap so there’s really no excuse to not get out and explore as much as you can!

What's it like to move to Melbourne? OzTREKK student shares his tips (Part 2)

Weekend trip to the Grampians National park with friends

Accommodation options

I’ve talked to a lot of my international friends that are in the program with me and we all agree that finding housing is definitely the most stressful part about preparing to study here in Australia. To be honest, there’s not much OzTREKK can do to help us with this part of the process, apart from pointing us in the right direction and offering suggestions.

For myself and many others, we had to find accommodation ourselves, which was a little sketchy because I almost got caught in an online scam when I was searching for places to live while still in Canada. I found that there are a lot of people out there preying on international students looking to find accommodation here in Australia. In my case, this landlord tried to get me to pay first and last months’ rent up front before I even moved here to Australia, just so he could “hold” the apartment for me. This landlord ended up not even owning this property and it was, in fact, a scam. So just be very cautious when looking for apartments and places to live online before actually moving here.

I am currently living in the Student Village here on the University of Melbourne campus. Like most of you, I ended up in a stressful situation where I had to secure accommodation fast before moving here. I am currently paying $308 a week for a single bedroom inside a 4-person share room. On top of that, WiFi is in extra $40–$80 a month, depending on how much you’re going to use. I’m pretty sure $40 gets you around 30,000 MB which isn’t much at all. Laundry is $3 for washing and $5 for drying, I believe.

This is strictly my personal opinion, but I wouldn’t recommend anyone studying a post-grad degree to live here. If you’re into partying, then the Student Village is definitely the place for you, as the majority of residents are all studying undergraduate degrees.

What's it like to move to Melbourne? OzTREKK student shares his tips (Part 2)

Cliff jumping at Mt. Martha pillars with my good friend Justin

If I were to do it over again knowing what I know now, I would log onto flatmatefinders.com.au and search for share houses that way, from Canada. The way the website works is that you create a profile and you are able to view different living accommodations in the area that you choose. You can set up Skype video calls with the landlords and residents to make sure you’re going to be a good fit. A lot of my friends ended up going this route when they got here and it’s worked out well for all of them. For the most part, the places you’ll find on Flatmate Finders are apartments or houses that have extra rooms available for rent, living with other students for a lot cheaper than what I’m currently paying. OzTREKK has a ton of accommodation suggestions on their Boarding Pass website—use it!

Getting your finances in order

I think the biggest thing to do before you move over here is to establish a really good support team back home. As you’re probably already aware or coming to find out through research, it costs a lot of money to live over here. Everything is much more expensive than it is in Canada and the United States, such as groceries, eating at restaurants, going to bars, public transportation, gym memberships, etc.

OzTREKK does pre-departure webinars and in-person seminars before you guys leave to fly over here and they will tell you to have at least $1000 in cash on hand when you arrive. Please take them seriously; they aren’t kidding. You’re going to need cash for living expenses until you’re able to set up an Australian bank account and transfer all your money over. I’m currently with Commonwealth bank and I was actually able to set up my bank account from back home in Canada before I came over, which made it really easy once I arrived here in Australia.

Make sure you have all your loans set up and ready to go, and make sure you plan out how you’re going to access that money. I’m with Scotiabank back home, so I have all my loans funneled into my Scotia account because here in Australia there’s a bank called Westpac that allows Scotiabank members to make withdrawals free of charge at any of their ATMs in the city.

The point I’m trying to get across is to make sure you have everything set up and ready to go before you arrive. If you’re a Canadian and haven’t looked into student loans yet, I highly suggest it! The more money you have at hand the better because you truly can’t predict how much you’re going to be spending once you get here and it’s better to have it available just in case.

What's it like to move to Melbourne? OzTREKK student shares his tips (Part 2)

The balconies at Grampians National Park

Join OzTREKK student groups

Furthermore, take full advantage of the student groups set up by OzTREKK for all the internationals enrolled in the same program. I say this because everyone will be arriving here in Melbourne well before classes start in order to get settled in. It gets really lonely after about the first day you arrive here when the adrenaline wears off and jet lag sets in and you realize that you don’t actually have friends here in Australia. So use the Facebook group and get everyone together for drinks or out for dinner as soon as possible before you get too homesick. For me personally, that student group really helped me out a lot. I was able to make quite a few new friends with the other international students within the first couple days of moving here. Everyone is in the same boat, so reach out right away when you get here and start enjoying Australia!

Best decision I’ve ever made

Moving here to Australia was the first time I’ve ever left home. I did my undergrad at the university in my home city, so moving here was a big change for me. With that being said, it was the best decision I’ve ever made. I’m very fortunate to have this opportunity to move halfway around the world to study a program that I’m very passionate about. The independence is amazing and the opportunities are endless!

So in conclusion, yes, I’d highly recommend studying here in Australia! If any of you have any further questions about my personal experiences here or if you have any further questions about the school and curriculum itself, please feel free to contact OzTREKK and they will give you my e-mail and we can set up a Skype or FaceTime call. I’m happy to help!

For more information about Melbourne DPT—entry requirements, application deadlines, and tuition fees, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Physiotherapy Schools Admissions Officer Krista McVeigh at 1-866-698-7355 or email krista@oztrekk.com.

Wednesday, October 26th, 2016

OzTREKK student gives us the inside scoop about the Melbourne physiotherapy program

We’ve got lots of program spoilers in this OzTREKK student blog! So if you’re a future Melbourne DPT student, heads up!

Meet current Melbourne Physiotherapy School student, Eric Leckie. He began his studies in semester 1, 2016, and he has a ton of helpful tips for everyone getting ready to study the Doctor of Physiotherapy at Melbourne. What should you know before you start your program? Is there a learning curve? How intense is the program?

If you’d like the answers to the above questions—and a whole lot more—read on!

Why physio?

My decision to study physiotherapy came from a couple of directions. I think that the main reason for me choosing physiotherapy came from my experiences with my dad. When I was in Grade 8 my dad was diagnosed with a pretty serious disease that caused him to deteriorate over three years and then spend an additional 80 days in the hospital to receive an organ transplant. As you can imagine, after spending 80 days in the hospital, his body deteriorated quickly.

OzTREKK student gives us the inside scoop about the Melbourne physiotherapy program

First day of clinics at the Royal Melbourne Hospital

After the transplant I was able to watch the physiotherapists work with my dad to help him get his strength back, restore his confidence, and basically teach him how to walk again. It was truly incredible! It was a long rehabilitation journey but they never gave up on my dad and that resulted in a very successful rehabilitation. Furthermore, the impact that these health professionals had on me can’t even be put into words.

All I knew from that point on was that I want to impact patients and patients’ families in the same way that the team of healthcare professionals impacted me and my family. I was truly inspired and I immediately started choosing my classes in high school to meet the prerequisites to apply to the Bachelor of Human Kinetics program at the University of Windsor, to start the process of studying to become a physiotherapist.

Choosing where to study

I chose the University of Melbourne for multiple reasons. Firstly, I did a lot of research into Australian physiotherapy schools and the University of Melbourne definitely had one of the best reputations for their Doctor of Physiotherapy degree compared to other universities in Australia. Not only is the university consistently ranked among the leading universities in the world (33rd), it is also ranked the #1 university in Australia.

Considering the fact that I’m studying here in Australia for three years, I wanted to make sure that I was moving to a cool city that has lots going on socially. After living here for the past eight months, it’s easy to see why Melbourne has won the “world’s most livable city award” six years in a row. There are plenty of events and festivals going on year round, the city is extremely easy to find your way around using public transport, and it’s very culturally diverse. This city has a huge professional sporting scene, thousands of amazing restaurants and bars, multiple beaches… the list goes on. Melbourne truly has something for everyone and aside from the unpredictable weather, I absolutely love living here!

A warm welcome

I am really enjoying my program. Since the start of classes this past year, the entire faculty has worked really hard to make sure that everyone feels welcome and at home. There is a good mix of international students in the physiotherapy cohort which is nice because we’re all in the same boat together. I can honestly say that every professor I have encountered in my first year of study here has made it their top priority to make sure that everyone is on the same page. This is important because I, along with other international students, found the teaching and marking styles here in Australia to be completely different compared to those in Canada which made for quite the learning curve in first semester. Furthermore, professors here at Melbourne Uni all have open-door policies and encourage you to go and see them for any issues you might have. They also understand that it’s a tough transition for international students who have just left home and moved across the world to study here in their country, and will offer plenty of tips and advice to ensure everyone has a smooth transition.

OzTREKK student gives us the inside scoop about the Melbourne physiotherapy program

Royal Exhibition building in Melbourne

The learning curve

Coming into the Doctor of Physiotherapy, I knew it was going to be pretty full on, as expected of any post-grad degree. For myself, first semester was very much a learning curve and adjustment semester. It was tough because first semester is also very intense academically. In this program, professors waste no time in diving right into material. But like anything new that you’re faced with in life, you adapt and it eventually gets easier.

The classes are very challenging and the professors do expect a lot out of you. I find this to be a good thing though because you’re not in undergrad anymore. In the physiotherapy post-grad program, professors work you really hard because they want to produce the best physiotherapists possible, and for that I actually really appreciate all the work they make you do. You can expect full days of classes and then an extra of 1–2 hours of extra studying each night so that you don’t fall behind. Readings for each class are expected to be completed before each practical and each lecture for the following day.

Making friends

To be honest, don’t expect to have much of a social life if you enrol in this program. If you’re used to hanging out with your friends most nights, going to bars every weekend, and watching Netflix instead of studying every night, you’re going to be in for a big change! This all comes with the transition and you’ll find that you adapt really fast. For myself, I didn’t mind the change in my social life because I knew I was paying a lot of money to study here and learn at a reputable university.

Making friends is very easy in this program. Everyone has the same classes together each day so it’s quite easy to become acquainted with everyone if you make the effort! OzTREKK puts together a Facebook group with all the international students enrolled in the same course at each university and this made it really easy to make friends with other Canadians and Americans as soon as I arrived here in Melbourne.

OzTREKK student gives us the inside scoop about the Melbourne physiotherapy program

Eric and good friend Justin at a North Melbourne Kangaroos vs Western Bulldogs AFL game

Study preparations

Honestly, there’s not a whole lot you can do to prepare yourself for studying here in Australia. Professors recognize that everyone is coming from different academic backgrounds and they do a really good job in the first couple of months making sure that everyone is up to speed and meeting their academic expectations and level of knowledge. I myself wish I would have reviewed my anatomy more before coming into this course because first-semester foundations was just a killer. In my undergrad I competed two anatomy courses and multiple physiology courses (as most of you have in order to meet the prerequisites requirements to apply to this school), but this was by no means enough to prepare me for foundations class.

Coming into the first week of classes, professors expect you to know your anatomy like the back of your hand. I’m talking about every single bone, every muscle and its origin, insertion, and action. Of course they brush over these anatomy concepts in lectures, but they definitely expect you to know your stuff well. I thought I was prepared going in—I wasn’t. I had to spend hours each night reviewing my anatomy just so that I didn’t fall behind in lectures and, most importantly, in practical classes where you learn physiotherapy techniques first semester.

Advice? Know your anatomy

In the first week of class you’ll start practicals and you can expect to be singled out in your practical class to name the origins and insertions of specific muscles as this is the time in the semester where professors go over muscle palpation. Let me tell you, there is nothing more embarrassing than not knowing your anatomy and drawing a blank when getting singled out in front of your fellow classmates that you literally just met.

My advice for anyone starting the Melbourne physiotherapy program would be to immediately check the university’s website to see which anatomy textbook they recommend, go and buy it at the book store and start studying it every night before you begin classes. Like I said above, although the course is very intense right from the beginning, you’ll come to appreciate this because it forces you to know your anatomy concepts very well, and since you’re in physiotherapy, you’re going to need to know them like the back of your hand anyways.

Lastly, at the end of each semester you will have objective structured clinical examinations (OSCE). These are practical exams where you perform palpations, and various other tests and techniques you learned in practical classes, in front of professors who grade you. The best advice I can give to prepare for these OSC exams would be to practice all the practical skills you learn in pracs at least once a week. Yes, you’re going to be bogged down with your other classes, but you’ll be glad you practiced regularly once exam time comes around.

OzTREKK student gives us the inside scoop about the Melbourne physiotherapy program

Great Ocean Road, Victoria

Other than that, my advice to you would be to go into each lecture focused and ready to learn. Looking back, the amount you learn in first semester is truly incredible. Find a good group to study with right from the beginning, make it a habit to study and review every night, and you’ll be just fine.

A peek inside the school

At the University of Melbourne, both nursing students and physiotherapy students share a building. The building has three floors and it’s quite nice. It’s equipped with one large lecture theatre with enough seats to sit everyone in your cohort with double projector screens. There are multiple practical rooms on the middle and top levels of the building that are used for your pracs. These rooms are always kept really clean and have lots of physiotherapy beds for you to practice on. The Melbourne physiotherapy department leaves these rooms unlocked until 8 or 9 every night, which is nice because it allows you to to practice after class in preparation for OSC exams.

In this program you will have classes in different buildings across campus. The nice thing about the University of Melbourne is that all university buildings are located in one central campus. It takes maybe 10 to 15 minutes to walk from the physiotherapy building across campus to different lecture theatres.

The university has a large workout facility on campus with plenty of equipment (an entire level for cardio machines, at least 7 power racks on the main floor, a pool, full size track, tennis courts, footy field, futsal and soccer fields, etc. Unfortunately, you have to pay to use this facility but compared to the gym membership prices at other facilities in Melbourne, it’s quite cheap! There are also plenty of libraries, computer centres, and cafes on campus for you to study in as well.

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Stay tuned for Eric’s next blog installment where he discusses moving to Melbourne, how he found accommodation, and how he prepared for his big move!

Friday, May 27th, 2016

Melbourne DPT application deadline next week

Don’t forget! If you’re interested in studying physiotherapy at Melbourne Physiotherapy School, the first-round application deadline is next Thursday, June 2.

University of Melbourne Physiotherapy School

Learn more about studying physio at Melbourne

Why is the Melbourne DPT 3 years in length?

The Melbourne DPT commenced in 2011 and is the first three-year physiotherapy graduate-entry master’s-level program, providing a benchmark for physiotherapy education in Australia. In addition to core hands-on practical physiotherapy skills, key program features include advanced theoretical knowledge in areas such as pharmacology, radiology, leadership and management, sports physiotherapy and inter-professional education, including a faculty student conference.

Students will be well prepared for the changing roles of the physiotherapist in areas such as acute care, chronic disease management, health promotion, emergency medicine, private practice and sports medicine. The course provides a vertically integrated community group health promotion project that culminates in a presentation and possible publication at the end of three years of study. The clinical program builds progressively to independent practice, with approximately 37 weeks of clinical practice. There is also the potential for an overseas clinical experience to add depth of understanding in global health care.

Program: Doctor of Physiotherapy (DPT)
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Semester intake: February
Duration: 3 years
Application deadline: June 2, 2016 (first round); July 28, 2016 (second round)

Apply to the University of Melbourne Physiotherapy School!

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For more information about Melbourne DPT—entry requirements, application deadlines, and tuition fees, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Physiotherapy Schools Admissions Officer Krista McVeigh at 1-866-698-7355 or email krista@oztrekk.com.

Monday, April 18th, 2016

When to apply to the University of Melbourne Doctor of Physiotherapy

Have you applied to the Melbourne Doctor of Physiotherapy? Don’t forget that the first round application deadline is approaching (June 2)! If you’d like your prerequisite subjects assessed, you must send in your forms to the university by May 5, 2016.

University of Melbourne Doctor of Physiotherapy

Learn more about University of Melbourne Doctor of Physiotherapy

Did you know that there are approximately 15 – 20 places for international students in the Melbourne DPT? For the 2016 intake, 19 international student offers were awarded to OzTREKK students!

2017 Intake Application Timeline

Melbourne DPT First Round Applications for the 2017 Intake
Deadline for prerequisite assessment forms: May 5, 2016
Deadline for first round applicants: June 2, 2016
Offers for first round Skype MMI interviews released: June 17, 2016
First round Skype MMI interviews conducted: June 27 – July 1, 2016
Applicants not shortlisted for interview notified: July 1, 2016
Offers for first round released: July 29, 2016

Melbourne DPT Second Round Applications for the 2017 Intake
Deadline for second round applicants: July 28, 2016
Offers for second round Skype MMI Interviews released: August 12, 2016
Second round Skype MMI interviews conducted: August 22 – 26, 2016
Applicants not shortlisted for interview notified: September 2, 2016
Offers for second round released: October 14, 2016
Deadline for final results and other offer conditions to be met by applicants: December 15, 2016
Mandatory DPT Orientation: February 3, 2017
DPT Classes commence: February 6, 2017

Doctor of Physiotherapy

The Melbourne Doctor of Physiotherapy is Australia’s first three-year entry to practice graduate master’s-level program. Graduates will have the opportunity to pursue a career in a range of health settings, including hospitals, private practice, sporting and rehabilitation facilities, community organizations or as an advisor to government or industry bodies. This degree provides opportunities for pursuing employment globally.

Program: Doctor of Physiotherapy (DPT)
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Semester intake: February
Duration: 3 years
Application Deadline: First round – June 2, 2016; Second round – July 28, 2016

Apply to the Melbourne Doctor of Physiotherapy Program!

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Find out more about the Doctor of Physiotherapy program at the University of Melbourne. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Physiotherapy Schools Admissions Officer Krista McVeigh at krista@oztrekk.com.

Monday, March 21st, 2016

Melbourne Doctor of Physiotherapy prerequisites

The Doctor of Physiotherapy (DPT) requires prerequisite subjects in human anatomy and in human physiology (one subject of each), with prerequisite subjects to have completed within 10 years of commencing the Doctor of Physiotherapy. For example, if applying for the 2017 intake then prerequisite subjects must have been completed from 2007 onward.

University of Melbourne Physiotherapy School

Learn more about the University of Melbourne

If Melbourne has previously assessed your course as equivalent to their prerequisite requirements, it will be listed on the Melbourne International Prerequisites page. If you do not see your courses on this list, you will have to submit your course outlines to the university.

You may check the courses you have taken to date by clicking on the “International” link under the heading “List of assessed subjects and courses” on the Melbourne International Prerequisites page.

What information does Melbourne need to assess your subjects?

The minimum amount of information the University of Melbourne requires to assess your subjects:

  • Subject / course name and code
  • Institution / university where it is taught
  • Specific lecture content/breakdown (for the relevant year studied)
  • Assessment criteria
  • Credit value of subject / course
  • Contact hours of lectures, tutorials and labs
  • Length of subject / course
  • Reading list
  • Lab descriptions, including details of resources used – for Anatomy, please state whether human cadaveric material was used

Must I have my subjects assessed before applying for a course?

If your subjects have not been previously assessed, it is strongly recommended that your subjects be assessed well in advance of applying. Prospective applicants for the Doctor of Physiotherapy should submit documentation through the Melbourne webform for assessment by May 5, 2016 if you wish to apply to the 2017 intake. This will ensure you are advised of the outcome before the closing date for applications.

About the Melbourne Doctor of Physiotherapy

The Melbourne Doctor of Physiotherapy is Australia’s first three-year entry to practice graduate master’s-level program. Physiotherapy graduates will have the opportunity to pursue a career in a range of health settings, including hospitals, private practice, sporting and rehabilitation facilities, community organizations or as an advisor to government or industry bodies. This degree provides opportunities for pursuing employment globally.

Program: Doctor of Physiotherapy (DPT)
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Semester intake: February
Duration: 3 years
Application deadline: June 2, 2016 (first round); July 28, 2016 (second round)

Apply to the University of Melbourne Doctor of Physiotherapy!

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If you are not sure if your subjects qualify, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Physiotherapy Schools Admissions Officer Krista McVeigh at 1-866-698-7355 or email krista@oztrekk.com.

Tuesday, January 26th, 2016

Jaime’s adventures in Oz: Melbourne

Hi, everyone!

I have heard it’s crazy busy in the office but that you’re all staying afloat! I hope you’re doing well, though, and are able to share a little in the excitement of the 2016’ers!

Anyway, I wanted to provide a little update on the last few days for you. I kind of imagined that I was going to be able to write detailed emails about each day but a few days I’ve been absolutely pooped and just basically do emails and give up. In exciting news, though, I am sleeping like an absolute champion. I think I am probably awake for 90 seconds before I’m out. Then I wake up around 5:30 (which is pretty usual for me) feeling just grand. And, Julie knows very well that does not happen back at home. I’ve become a terrible sleeper. In any case….

So, where did I leave off?

Well, late Monday I arrived in Melbourne and basically went to bed (I think I got in around 11 p.m.). I woke up and wanted to drive around to make myself more comfy with the whole signal thing before I have a group of students staring at me. The first place I drove was to the Apple Store where the “Geniuses” happily swapped my iPhone with apologies and away I went. By “away I went” I really mean “I put my name in a queue and then waiting for TWO AND A HALF HOURS to get the text to return to the store. I did also get a bank account, too, which was quite painless. I pick up my card when I’m back in Melbourne in a couple of weeks. Then I drove around the CBD, kind of orienting myself. I think it’s because I love Melbourne so much that I find it pretty easy (also the fact that the town is a giant grid) and it didn’t take too long to become pretty comfortable with the suburbs and where I was.

University of Melbourne Dental School

OzTREKKers enjoying the classic OzTREKK Welcome meal!

Wednesday was the first “big” group. Nearly all of our Melbourne Dental School students seemed to be there (I didn’t get to do the sign-in sheet because staff thought they were garbage and pitched them while I wasn’t looking!). We also had four med students from last year; they were great! Even though the programs were not the same, the conversation flowed as people grilled them about Melbourne tips and tricks. It was great to see the Melbourne DPT students (there were about six there, I think), too. After breakfast we got a campus tour from two absolutely adorable Aussie students. The funniest part was when one of them was explaining what’s in the student centre. He mentions that you can get your hair cut for cheap in there. The irony is, I swear, that his haircut was nearly identical to this: http://images.dailystar.co.uk/dynamic/1/photos/913000/1913.jpg. I loved it!

I spoke with a few students who were glad to be able to get a card of an actual person (Aileen) and to speak with previous students so that was good. If schedules align next year, I’d love some DDS students. Because their program starts in a few weeks, the students I checked with weren’t in country yet. Aileen was really happy to see students that she had spoken with earlier. She invited them to come by her office for tea any time they wanted.

Oh, I also had Suzanne from Semester in Australia with me at this stop to help me navigate and offer assistance on housing. Most students had housing by this point but she was a great tour guide, giving everyone really great tips about things like a great library that’s nearly always free and has a great coffee shop at the top of a building with some the best views in Melbourne (which I noted!). Plus, it probably saved me from getting a ticket for phoning and driving. 🙂 She was also really great for those students who didn’t have places and were asking about certain buildings.

We shuttled people back and forth to IKEA and Kmart for the rest of the day, and did a few other stops to pick up other random items and that was about it. Pretty simple! Everyone was really great and everyone seemed in good spirits. It didn’t seem (to me at least) that anyone was concerned with anything. So, hats off to Sarah and Adam for that! We probably wrapped up around 7 p.m., give or take. All the dentistry students were going to Lygon Street for dinner together so they were excited and really buzzing. Oh, and one of the trips to IKEA I had a pretty full group in the car and I turned on the windshield wipers instead of the turn signal and they died. It started as a little rumbling and ended in full-on hysterics. It was so funny! It’s been a long time since I’ve been at the root of such mockery and it was quite amusing. I’m sure my face was red as I surely tried to play it cool.

Wednesday: no one needed the van so I took it back around noon. I emailed the Melbourne MD students and waited to hear if anyone needed it; everyone seemed to have their stuff, which was good (and DDS started that day). After taking back the van, I wandered over to the Australian Open (by wandered I mean that I looked at my watch and thought “I’m not in a rush; I’ll walk.” After an hour, I had visions of Adam’s walk home from Tullamarine and decided to hop on a tram). I just got a grounds ticket, which gets me access to all matches except for the ones in the big arenas. I don’t know anything about tennis so I just went over to a big venue that didn’t have a line. I watched some girls (a girl in pink and a girl in yellow) play tennis. I didn’t think they were that good. Their serves didn’t look strong (they were around 150 kph) and I kind of thought I could do that. So I left. Plus my flip flops were sticking to the floor and I was really concerned that they were going to break and that I’d have to walk around without shoes.

University of Melbourne Physiotherapy School

OzTREKK students getting a tour from a current Melbourne student during orientation

So… then I wandered over to the Raonic match and literally happened to walk into an entry without a line. It was actually weird. I asked the lady “Like, can I go?” because all other gates had huge lines. It’s a one-in-one-out kind of deal. So I walk in and I see some seats. In the front row. Beside the Canadians with a flag draped over the railing. For reals. So I sat down with two guys from Vancouver and another guy with a Canadian tie but who spoke with a pretty good Aussie accent. I assumed he skied in Whistler. My new neighbour warned me, “We’re on TV back home so don’t pick your nose.” He kept getting calls and texts from friends in Vancouver saying that they saw him on TV. It was amazing! First of all, Milos’ serves were regularly over 220 kph. You could feel them, you know? It was pretty impressive. The game was quite long and I felt like they really earned every point. Milos won and was a fan favourite as he threw out all his gear into the audience—like sweat bands and arm covers. After four hours in the sweltering sun, you could not pay me to take them. The crowd loved it, though. I also found it comical that he teased the audience with each of his rackets (like he was going to toss them). They also loved it. I was on to his little tricks by racket #2. I think he used about four or five rackets through the game.

Now. The sun. So it’s pretty intense. When I started my walk from Thrifty it was cold and I was questioning my clothing attire (shorts and tee). By midway through the Raonic game, I was furiously applying and re-applying sunscreen. I felt that my skin was going to bake right off. I kept having to remind myself that the sunscreen will protect me (rather, hope that it would protect me). I was really questioning buying Life brand. At that moment, I wanted the expensive brand-name stuff. Immediately after the game, I found some shade and just sat. And re-applied (again). Classic Melbourne weather: four seasons in one day! I woke up today and was pleasantly surprised to see no burns. I was really terrified that I’d show up in Sydney like, well, a Canadian who just arrived in Australia.

Thankfully, I’m still as pasty-white as I was, but a week ago.

Phew. I write a lot.

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Stay tuned for Jaime’s next blog: Sydney!

Tuesday, July 21st, 2015

Melbourne physiotherapy application deadline

Have you applied to Melbourne Physiotherapy School? Don’t forget that the application deadline is coming up! You are encouraged to have your application documents in by Thursday, July 30 in order for your complete application to be submitted to the University of Melbourne on time.

University of Melbourne Physiotherapy School

Learn more about studying physio at Melbourne

Melbourne DPT Second Round Applications for the 2016 Intake
Deadline for second round applicants: July 31, 2015 (Australia time)
Offers for second round Skype MMI Interviews released: August 14, 2015
Second round Skype MMI interviews conducted: August 24 – 28, 2015
Applicants not shortlisted for interview notified: September 4, 2015
Offers for second round released: October 16, 2015
Deadline for final results and other offer conditions to be met by applicants: December 18, 2015
Mandatory DPT Orientation: February 5, 2016
DPT Classes commence: February 8, 2016

About the Melbourne Doctor of Physiotherapy

The Melbourne Doctor of Physiotherapy is Australia’s first three-year entry to practice graduate master’s-level program. Physiotherapy graduates will have the opportunity to pursue a career in a range of health settings, including hospitals, private practice, sporting and rehabilitation facilities, community organizations or as an advisor to government or industry bodies. This degree provides opportunities for pursuing employment globally.

Program: Doctor of Physiotherapy (DPT)
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Semester intake: February 2016
Duration: 3 years

Apply to the Melbourne Doctor of Physiotherapy Program!

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Find out more about the Melbourne Doctor of Physiotherapy program. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Physiotherapy Schools Admissions Officer Sarah Bridson at sarah@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Monday, July 6th, 2015

Melbourne Physiotherapy helps develop exercise video to help prevent DVT

Qantas has become the first airline in the world to launch an exercise video on all its international flights to help prevent deep vein thrombosis (DVT).

The four-minute exercise video was developed by academics at the University of Melbourne in a partnership with Physitrack, a global health-tech provider, and Sports Medicine Australia’s official exercise technology partner. Sports Medicine Australia has endorsed the exercise video.

Qantas started rolling out the exercise video on international flights this month. The video can also be viewed on Qantas’ YouTube channel.

The video was developed by Professor Kim Bennell at the Melbourne Physiotherapy School.

“These inflight exercises are designed to provide a safe way to stretch and enjoy movement in certain muscle groups that can become stiff as a result of long periods of sitting. They may be effective at increasing the body’s blood circulation and massaging the muscles,” Professor Bennell said.

“It came as a bit of a surprise international airlines hadn’t already introduced these exercise videos given what we know about DVT and long-haul travel. Hopefully, access to these videos will become standard on all international flights,” she said.

Physitrack co-founder Nathan Skwortsow said Qantas were quick to embrace the concept.

“Shot in high definition from different angles, each clip shows the correct exercise technique to motivate Qantas’ five million annual international travellers to keep moving during their flight,” he said. “In addition to being one of the safest airlines in the world, it is also great to see Qantas embracing exercise technology, even at 38,000 feet.”

Sports Medicine Australia CEO Nello Marino said sitting still for long periods of time in cramped conditions, such as on an airplane, can lead to swollen ankles and occasionally DVT.

“Whilst the risk of DVT is extremely low, it is always important to take preventive measures as the threat is always there,” he said. “Through simple, regular stretching, mobility exercises, and walking around the cabin mid-flight your risk of DVT is dramatically reduced.”

Melbourne Doctor of Physiotherapy program

Program: Doctor of Physiotherapy (DPT)
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Semester intake: February each year
Duration: 3 years
Application deadline: Second round – July 31, 2015

Entry Requirements for Melbourne’s Physiotherapy Program

The physio program at the University of Melbourne is available only to those applicants who have successfully completed an undergraduate degree in the last 10 years or are in the final year of completing an undergraduate degree.

1. To be considered for admission into the program, a Canadian applicant must have completed an undergraduate degree and prerequisite subjects. Prerequisite subjects include one semester of human anatomy and one semester of human physiology.

2. As well, the applicant must participate in a multi-mini interview. Selected applicants will be shortlisted to participate in a multi-mini interview (MMI) to assess interest in and motivation for undertaking the program, likely capacity for establishing and maintaining rapport with patients in a clinical setting, communication skills, and aptitude for collaboration and decision making. The university  has advised that international applicants will likely complete a MMI via video conferencing or phone.

Selection will be based on academic record (grade point average—GPA) from a completed three- or four-year university degree. The Selection Committee will also conduct interviews. To be competitive, it is anticipated that applicants will have achieved a standard of at least 70% or higher GPA in their undergraduate degree.

Apply to the University of Melbourne Doctor of Physiotherapy

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Find out more about the University of Melbourne’s Doctor of Physiotherapy program. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Physiotherapy Schools Admissions Officer Jaime Notman at jaime@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Monday, May 25th, 2015

Melbourne DPT application deadline is approaching

This is just a reminder for all students interested in studying physiotherapy at the Melbourne Physiotherapy School: the deadline for first round applicants is next Friday, June 5. All applicants who wish to be considered as a first-round applicant are encouraged to submit their complete application documents to the OzTREKK office by Thursday, June 4 at noon in order for their application to be submitted to the university on time.

University of Melbourne Physiotherapy School

Learn more about studying physio at Melbourne

Why is the Melbourne Doctor of Physiotherapy 3 years in length?

The Melbourne DPT commenced in 2011 and is the first three-year physiotherapy graduate-entry master’s-level program, providing a benchmark for physiotherapy education in Australia. In addition to core hands-on practical physiotherapy skills, key program features include advanced theoretical knowledge in areas such as pharmacology, radiology, leadership and management, sports physiotherapy and inter-professional education, including a faculty student conference.

Students will be well prepared for the changing roles of the physiotherapist in areas such as acute care, chronic disease management, health promotion, emergency medicine, private practice and sports medicine. The course provides a vertically integrated community group health promotion project that culminates in a presentation and possible publication at the end of three years of study. The clinical program builds progressively to independent practice, with approximately 37 weeks of clinical practice. There is also the potential for an overseas clinical experience to add depth of understanding in global health care.

Apply to the University of Melbourne Physiotherapy School!

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For more information about physiotherapy school entry requirements, application deadlines, and tuition fees, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Physiotherapy Schools Admissions Officer Jaime Notman by emailing jaime@oztrekk.com or by calling (toll free in Canada) for more information about how you can study in Australia!