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Posts Tagged ‘Melbourne Dental School’

Monday, April 23rd, 2018

Join the University of Melbourne virtual fair April 25

Are you wondering what it’s like to study at the prestigious University of Melbourne? Not many of us in North America can hop on a plane to visit Melbourne’s beautiful campus to find out more about their programs, so they are bringing the information to you!

University of Melbourne virtual fair April 25

Learn more about studying at the University of Melbourne

Prospective international students and their parents are invited to join the university for an exciting online event to learn more about the University of Melbourne and their courses.

University of Melbourne Virtual Fair

Wednesday, April 25, 2018

  • 8 – 11 p.m. (EDT)
  • 7 – 10 p.m. (MDT)
  • 6 – 9 p.m. (PDT)

Chat with staff and students from faculties and graduate schools across the university and explore your study options. You’ll have the opportunity to find out about scholarships, admissions information, accommodation, and study pathways.

This is a great opportunity to find out more about Melbourne’s popular schools:

Register your interest at https://unimelb.6connex.com/event/recruitmentcenter/register and then log on to the Virtual Fair. Find out more about the Melbourne experience!

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Do you have questions regarding the University of Melbourne Virtual Fair for International Students? Please contact OzTREKK at info@oztrekk.com. Find out more about the University of Melbourne and about how you can study in Australia!

Tuesday, September 13th, 2016

Join the next Melbourne Virtual Fair for International Students

Are you wondering what it’s like to study at the prestigious University of Melbourne? Not many of us in North America can hop on a plane to visit Melbourne’s beautiful campus to find out more about their programs, so they are bringing the information to you!

Prospective international students (and their parents and friends) are invited to join Melbourne for an exciting online event to learn more about the university.

Join the next Melbourne Virtual Fair for International Students

Don’t miss the Melbourne Virtual Fair Sept. 27!

Event Details

Date: Tuesday, September 27, 2016
Time: 7 p.m. (EST)

The Virtual Fair is an excellent opportunity to learn more about Australia’s number one university*. You’ll have the chance to chat online with Melbourne‘s friendly staff and students and find out all you need to know about courses, entry requirements and how to apply.

Register your interest and then log on to the Virtual Fair on Sept. 27 and find out more about the Melbourne experience!

How do I register?

Prospective students and their parents can register now at http://tiny.cc/melbourneVF.

What’s it all about?

The Virtual Fair is just like attending an expo on your computer! Registered participants will be able to

  • get information about the University of Melbourne, their courses and admission requirements;
  • get information about Melbourne—the world’s most liveable city—as well as accommodation options, and student support;
  • chat online with Melbourne staff and current international students to really get an understanding of what it’s like to study in Melbourne; and
  • see and hear video presentations from leading academics and current international students.

This is a great opportunity to find out more about Melbourne‘s popular schools:

*Academic Ranking of World Universities (ARWU) 2016

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Do you have questions regarding the University of Melbourne Virtual Fair for International Students? Please contact OzTREKK at info@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Thursday, March 17th, 2016

University of Melbourne medicine and dentistry prerequisites

What are University of Melbourne medicine and dentistry prerequisites?

A prerequisite subject is a subject or sequence of subjects which must be completed before entering a course of study. Many programs at the University of Melbourne have prerequisite subjects that must be completed in order to be eligible to apply. The selection requirements for the course you are interested in will normally specify these requirements.

University of Melbourne medicine and dentistry prerequisites

Study at the University of Melbourne

The Doctor of Medicine and Doctor of Dental Surgery require prerequisite subjects in anatomy, biochemistry and physiology taught at the second-year level, or equivalent, with prerequisite subjects to have completed within 10 years of commencing the Doctor of Medicine and Doctor of Dental Surgery. For example, if applying for the 2017 intake then prerequisite subjects must have been completed from 2007 onward.

The university has assessed a large number of subjects from international and Australian universities. If the subjects you have studied are not included in the Melbourne prerequisite list, you will need to submit detailed course outlines to Melbourne to be assessed. The university will also assess combinations of subjects if you feel that you have covered the required content.

If Melbourne has previously assessed your course as equivalent to their prerequisite requirements, it will be listed on the Melbourne International Prerequisites page. If you do not see your courses on this list, you will have to submit your course outlines to the university.

You may check the courses you have taken to date by clicking on the “International” link under the heading “List of assessed subjects and courses” on the Melbourne International Prerequisites page.

What information does Melbourne need to assess your subjects?

The minimum amount of information the University of Melbourne requires to assess your subjects:

  • Subject / course name and code
  • Institution / university where it is taught
  • Specific lecture content/breakdown (for the relevant year studied)
  • Assessment criteria
  • Credit value of subject / course
  • Contact hours of lectures, tutorials and labs
  • Length of subject / course
  • Reading list
  • Lab descriptions, including details of resources used – for Anatomy, please state whether human cadaveric material was used

Must I have my subjects assessed before applying for a course?

If your subjects have not been previously assessed, it is strongly recommended that your subjects be assessed well in advance of applying. Prospective applicants for the MD or DDS  should submit documentation through the Melbourne webform for assessment by May 5, 2016 if you wish to apply to the 2017 intake. This will ensure you are advised of the outcome before the closing date for applications.

Note: Submissions received after this date will be processed but applicants will not receive advice about the outcome of the request until after the closing date for applications.

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OzTREKK is here to help. If you are not sure if your subjects qualify, please contact OzTREKK at or email info@oztrekk.com. Find out more about Melbourne Medical School and Melbourne Dental School!

Wednesday, March 9th, 2016

Melbourne dental students prove healthy teeth are not out of reach

The Healthy Kids, Healthy Teeth campaign is part of the the Poche Indigenous Health Network—an initiative across five universities focusing on particular aspects of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health.

Melbourne Dental School

Professor David Manton, the Elsdon Storey Chair of Child Dental Health, accompanied the students (Photo credit: University of Melbourne)

The campaign, which was run in partnership with the University of Sydney, used a high-tech dental van and a mobile lab to reach very remote communities and provide much-needed dental care.

Doctor of Clinical Dentistry students are already qualified dentists undertaking a specialisation. Jamie Tham, who is working towards a paediatric specialisation, spent some time in rural NSW with Poche Sydney.

“I expected to see just the minimum facilities and to have to do more hands-on clinical work,” he said. “But the team was fantastic and the facilities very impressive.”

Because Jamie is already a qualified, practicing dentist, he was able to take on a supervisory role for the Sydney-based student dentists also volunteering with Poche, and work on patients independently.

Joy Ya-Li Huang, also studying the DCD observed the high treatment needs of her patients. “Home care, diet and lifestyle make a big impact on these children. It was interesting to try and problem-solve and prioritise treatment for these cases,”she said.

Professor David Manton, the Elsdon Storey Chair of Child Dental Health, accompanied the students.

“I think it is imperative that our training dentists and specialists are made aware of the disparity in oral health outcomes between urban and rural populations,” he said. “Especially Indigenous populations. And realise that they can do something towards decreasing this gap.”

Head of Melbourne Dental School Professor Mike Morgan said the program is a win-win: “These activities provide our graduate students, our staff and our alumni with experience in providing care to groups that might otherwise not readily access oral health services. We benefit and so too do the rural communities.”

Poche Melbourne Director Professor Shaun Ewen is very keen for students, clinicians and researchers across the universities to get behind the program. “It is great to see the fantastic work and response from the Melbourne Dental School and their growing partnership with Poche Sydney on this program.”

Many Melbourne Dental School alumni already generously give up their time to help train the next generation of clinicians. Initiatives such as the Healthy Teeth program offers another opportunity for alumni, staff and students to contribute to improved access to oral and dental health. Interested students of dentistry or oral health, and qualified dentists, are invited to contact Kim Szerdahely.

About University of Melbourne Dental School Doctor of Dental Surgery

The Melbourne Dental School offers the Doctor of Dental Surgery program which incorporates all aspects related to the provision of advanced general dental care to patients as well as teaches students to prepare, develop, execute and write for publication a small research project.

Program: Doctor of Dental Surgery (DDS)
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Semester intake: February
Duration: 4 years
Application deadline: TBA. For the 2016 intake, the application deadline was July 30, 2015.

Entry Requirements for the Melbourne Dentistry Program:

To be eligible to apply for the Melbourne DDS program, eligible applicants must have

  • successfully completed an undergraduate degree in any discipline at a recognized international university within the past 10 years;
  • completed prerequisite second-year subjects (one semester each) in human anatomy, human physiology and biochemistry (approved by Melbourne);
  • completed an entrance examination: either the Canadian DAT or US DAT. Please note that the carving portion of the Canadian DAT is not required for Melbourne Dental School; however, if you have completed the carving section of the test, this score will be considered. Test scores will not be considered if the exam results are more than 2 years old. There is no minimum cutoff GPA or DAT score for this program; however, a high level of academic standard is required for entry.

Apply to Melbourne Dental School!

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Contact OzTREKK Australian Dental Schools Admissions Officer Adam Smith to assist you with your application, or to answer any questions you may have regarding dental school in Australia. Email Adam at adam@oztrekk.com.

Tuesday, January 26th, 2016

Jaime’s adventures in Oz: Melbourne

Hi, everyone!

I have heard it’s crazy busy in the office but that you’re all staying afloat! I hope you’re doing well, though, and are able to share a little in the excitement of the 2016’ers!

Anyway, I wanted to provide a little update on the last few days for you. I kind of imagined that I was going to be able to write detailed emails about each day but a few days I’ve been absolutely pooped and just basically do emails and give up. In exciting news, though, I am sleeping like an absolute champion. I think I am probably awake for 90 seconds before I’m out. Then I wake up around 5:30 (which is pretty usual for me) feeling just grand. And, Julie knows very well that does not happen back at home. I’ve become a terrible sleeper. In any case….

So, where did I leave off?

Well, late Monday I arrived in Melbourne and basically went to bed (I think I got in around 11 p.m.). I woke up and wanted to drive around to make myself more comfy with the whole signal thing before I have a group of students staring at me. The first place I drove was to the Apple Store where the “Geniuses” happily swapped my iPhone with apologies and away I went. By “away I went” I really mean “I put my name in a queue and then waiting for TWO AND A HALF HOURS to get the text to return to the store. I did also get a bank account, too, which was quite painless. I pick up my card when I’m back in Melbourne in a couple of weeks. Then I drove around the CBD, kind of orienting myself. I think it’s because I love Melbourne so much that I find it pretty easy (also the fact that the town is a giant grid) and it didn’t take too long to become pretty comfortable with the suburbs and where I was.

University of Melbourne Dental School

OzTREKKers enjoying the classic OzTREKK Welcome meal!

Wednesday was the first “big” group. Nearly all of our Melbourne Dental School students seemed to be there (I didn’t get to do the sign-in sheet because staff thought they were garbage and pitched them while I wasn’t looking!). We also had four med students from last year; they were great! Even though the programs were not the same, the conversation flowed as people grilled them about Melbourne tips and tricks. It was great to see the Melbourne DPT students (there were about six there, I think), too. After breakfast we got a campus tour from two absolutely adorable Aussie students. The funniest part was when one of them was explaining what’s in the student centre. He mentions that you can get your hair cut for cheap in there. The irony is, I swear, that his haircut was nearly identical to this: http://images.dailystar.co.uk/dynamic/1/photos/913000/1913.jpg. I loved it!

I spoke with a few students who were glad to be able to get a card of an actual person (Aileen) and to speak with previous students so that was good. If schedules align next year, I’d love some DDS students. Because their program starts in a few weeks, the students I checked with weren’t in country yet. Aileen was really happy to see students that she had spoken with earlier. She invited them to come by her office for tea any time they wanted.

Oh, I also had Suzanne from Semester in Australia with me at this stop to help me navigate and offer assistance on housing. Most students had housing by this point but she was a great tour guide, giving everyone really great tips about things like a great library that’s nearly always free and has a great coffee shop at the top of a building with some the best views in Melbourne (which I noted!). Plus, it probably saved me from getting a ticket for phoning and driving. 🙂 She was also really great for those students who didn’t have places and were asking about certain buildings.

We shuttled people back and forth to IKEA and Kmart for the rest of the day, and did a few other stops to pick up other random items and that was about it. Pretty simple! Everyone was really great and everyone seemed in good spirits. It didn’t seem (to me at least) that anyone was concerned with anything. So, hats off to Sarah and Adam for that! We probably wrapped up around 7 p.m., give or take. All the dentistry students were going to Lygon Street for dinner together so they were excited and really buzzing. Oh, and one of the trips to IKEA I had a pretty full group in the car and I turned on the windshield wipers instead of the turn signal and they died. It started as a little rumbling and ended in full-on hysterics. It was so funny! It’s been a long time since I’ve been at the root of such mockery and it was quite amusing. I’m sure my face was red as I surely tried to play it cool.

Wednesday: no one needed the van so I took it back around noon. I emailed the Melbourne MD students and waited to hear if anyone needed it; everyone seemed to have their stuff, which was good (and DDS started that day). After taking back the van, I wandered over to the Australian Open (by wandered I mean that I looked at my watch and thought “I’m not in a rush; I’ll walk.” After an hour, I had visions of Adam’s walk home from Tullamarine and decided to hop on a tram). I just got a grounds ticket, which gets me access to all matches except for the ones in the big arenas. I don’t know anything about tennis so I just went over to a big venue that didn’t have a line. I watched some girls (a girl in pink and a girl in yellow) play tennis. I didn’t think they were that good. Their serves didn’t look strong (they were around 150 kph) and I kind of thought I could do that. So I left. Plus my flip flops were sticking to the floor and I was really concerned that they were going to break and that I’d have to walk around without shoes.

University of Melbourne Physiotherapy School

OzTREKK students getting a tour from a current Melbourne student during orientation

So… then I wandered over to the Raonic match and literally happened to walk into an entry without a line. It was actually weird. I asked the lady “Like, can I go?” because all other gates had huge lines. It’s a one-in-one-out kind of deal. So I walk in and I see some seats. In the front row. Beside the Canadians with a flag draped over the railing. For reals. So I sat down with two guys from Vancouver and another guy with a Canadian tie but who spoke with a pretty good Aussie accent. I assumed he skied in Whistler. My new neighbour warned me, “We’re on TV back home so don’t pick your nose.” He kept getting calls and texts from friends in Vancouver saying that they saw him on TV. It was amazing! First of all, Milos’ serves were regularly over 220 kph. You could feel them, you know? It was pretty impressive. The game was quite long and I felt like they really earned every point. Milos won and was a fan favourite as he threw out all his gear into the audience—like sweat bands and arm covers. After four hours in the sweltering sun, you could not pay me to take them. The crowd loved it, though. I also found it comical that he teased the audience with each of his rackets (like he was going to toss them). They also loved it. I was on to his little tricks by racket #2. I think he used about four or five rackets through the game.

Now. The sun. So it’s pretty intense. When I started my walk from Thrifty it was cold and I was questioning my clothing attire (shorts and tee). By midway through the Raonic game, I was furiously applying and re-applying sunscreen. I felt that my skin was going to bake right off. I kept having to remind myself that the sunscreen will protect me (rather, hope that it would protect me). I was really questioning buying Life brand. At that moment, I wanted the expensive brand-name stuff. Immediately after the game, I found some shade and just sat. And re-applied (again). Classic Melbourne weather: four seasons in one day! I woke up today and was pleasantly surprised to see no burns. I was really terrified that I’d show up in Sydney like, well, a Canadian who just arrived in Australia.

Thankfully, I’m still as pasty-white as I was, but a week ago.

Phew. I write a lot.

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Stay tuned for Jaime’s next blog: Sydney!

Thursday, November 26th, 2015

Sugar-free drinks and candies are bad news for teeth say dentists

Scientists at the University of Melbourne’s Oral Health Cooperative Research Centre have warned about the damage sugar-free drinks can do to tooth enamel.

Researchers in the centre tested 23 different types of drink, including soft drinks and sports drinks, and found drinks that contain acidic additives and with low pH levels cause measurable damage to dental enamel, even if the drink is sugar-free.

Melbourne Dental School

Sugar-free candies and drinks as bad as the rest

“Many people are not aware that while reducing your sugar intake does reduce your risk of dental decay, the chemical mix of acids in some foods and drinks can cause the equally damaging condition of dental erosion,” Melbourne Laureate Professor Eric Reynolds, CEO of the Oral Health CRC, said.

“Dental erosion occurs when acid dissolves the hard tissues of the tooth. In its early stages erosion strips away the surface layers of tooth enamel. If it progresses to an advanced stage it can expose the soft pulp inside the tooth.”

Early dental erosion can usually be reversed by oral health professionals with treatments to replace lost minerals.  In more advanced cases, the lost surface of a tooth may need a filling or crown.

Studies in the Oral Health CRC measured dental enamel softening and tooth surface loss following exposure to a range of drinks.

Significant findings:

  • The majority of soft drinks and sports drinks caused softening of dental enamel by 30%–50%.
  • Both sugar-containing and sugar-free soft drinks (including flavoured mineral waters) produced  measurable loss of the tooth surface, with no significant difference between the two groups of drinks.
  • Of 8 sports drinks tested, all but 2 (those with higher calcium content) were found to cause loss of dental enamel.

The Oral Health CRC has this week released a briefing paper outlining the findings of its dental erosion studies and is recommending better consumer information and product labelling to help people consider their oral health when selecting food and drink products.

Professor Reynolds says ‘sugar-free’ labelling does not necessarily mean a product is safe for teeth.

“We have even found sugar-free confectionery products that are labelled ‘Toothfriendly’ and which when tested were found to be erosive.”

Preventing dental erosion:

  • Check ingredients for acidic additives, especially citric acid (ingredient number 330) and phosphoric acid (ingredient number 338).
  • Drink more water (preferably fluoridated) and limit soft drinks and sports drinks.
  • After eating or drinking acidic products, don’t brush your teeth straight away as this can remove the softened tooth layer. Instead, rinse your mouth with water and wait one hour before brushing.
  • Have regular check-ups with your oral health professional.

About the Oral Health CRC

The Oral Health CRC is a consortium of university and industry partners based at the University of Melbourne and supported by the Australian Government’s Department of Industry, Innovation and Science.  The centre carries out world-class scientific and clinical research to advance the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of oral diseases.

About University of Melbourne Dental School Doctor of Dental Surgery

The Melbourne Dental School offers the Doctor of Dental Surgery program which incorporates all aspects related to the provision of advanced general dental care to patients as well as teaches students to prepare, develop, execute and write for publication a small research project.

Program: Doctor of Dental Surgery (DDS)
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Next available intake: February 2017
Duration: 4 years

Entry Requirements

To be eligible to apply for the Melbourne DDS program, eligible applicants must have

  • successfully completed an undergraduate degree in any discipline at a recognized international university within the past 10 years;
  • completed prerequisite second-year subjects (one semester each) in human anatomy, human physiology and biochemistry (approved by Melbourne);
  • completed an entrance examination: either the Canadian DAT or US DAT. Please note that the carving portion of the Canadian DAT is not required for Melbourne Dental School; however, if you have completed the carving section of the test, this score will be considered. Test scores will not be considered if the exam results are more than 2 years old. There is no minimum cutoff GPA or DAT score for this program; however, a high level of academic standard is required for entry.

Apply to Melbourne Dental School!

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Do you have questions about Melbourne Dental School? Contact OzTREKK Australian Dental Schools Admissions Officer Adam Smith at adam@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Wednesday, April 15th, 2015

University of Melbourne prerequisites submission deadline

Are you considering applying to the University of Melbourne’s Doctor of Medicine, Doctor of Dental Surgery, or Doctor of Physiotherapy? Then you should know that each of these programs require prerequisite subjects to be completed in order to be eligible to apply for the course.

University of Melbourne Medical School

Don’t forget to submit your course outlines before April 30!

But how can you be sure that you’ve covered the right subjects in your undergrad?

The University of Melbourne have assessed a large number of subjects from international and Australian universities. If the subjects you have studied are not included in the Melbourne prerequisite list, you will need to submit detailed course outlines to Melbourne to be assessed. The university will also assess combinations of subjects if you feel that you have covered the required content.

If the university has previously assessed your course as equivalent to their prerequisite requirements, it will be listed on the Melbourne International Prerequisites page. If you do not see your courses on this list, you will have to submit your course outlines to the university.

You may check the courses you have taken to date by clicking on the “International” link under the heading “Have you already assessed my subjects?” on the Melbourne International Prerequisites page.

Prospective applicants for the MD, DDS or DPT should submit documentation through the Melbourne webform for assessment by April 30, 2015 if you wish to apply to the 2016 intake. Applicants who submit complete documentation by April 30 will be advised of the subject equivalent before the closing date for applications.

Note: Submissions received after this date will be processed but applicants will not receive advice about the outcome of the request until after the closing date for applications.

What information does Melbourne need to assess your subjects?

The minimum amount of information the University of Melbourne requires to assess your subjects:

  • Subject name and code
  • Specific lecture content/breakdown (for the relevant year when studied)
  • Assessment criteria
  • Credit value of subject and the credit value
  • Contact hours of lectures, tutorials and labs
  • Length of subject
  • Reading list
  • Lab descriptions, including details of the resources used (please state whether human cadaveric material was used)

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OzTREKK is here to help. If you are not sure if your subjects qualify, please contact OzTREKK at 1-866-698-7355 or email info@oztrekk.com. Find out more about Melbourne Medical School, Melbourne Dental School, and Melbourne Physiotherapy School!

Wednesday, February 25th, 2015

University of Melbourne welcomes Parkville station commitment

Victoria State government plans to commence work on a new multi-billion-dollar underground rail line, with a stop in Parkville, have been warmly welcomed by the University of Melbourne.

Premier Daniel Andrews this week announced the establishment of the Melbourne Metro Rail Authority, paving the way for construction of the Melbourne Metro rail tunnel.

University of Melbourne, Parkville

Learn more about the University of Melbourne

The largest rail project in the state since the City Loop, the line would have five stations in total and run underneath Swanston Street. Parkville will be joined on the line by new underground stations at Arden, CBD North, CBD South and Domain.

University of Melbourne acting Vice-Chancellor Professor Margaret Sheil congratulated the government on moving quickly to implement an election promise, which will provide a huge boost to the university and its partners.

“The university is at the heart of the largest biomedical precinct in the Southern Hemisphere that includes 10,000 staff in major teaching hospitals, medical research institutes and biotechnology companies.

“And with last year’s official opening of the Peter Doherty Institute, and the forthcoming completion of the Victorian Comprehensive Cancer Centre, the area is only growing in importance.

“We are looking forward to working with the State government to enhance access for students and the Victorian community to this growing precinct which is important to Melbourne’s future,” concluded Professor Sheil.

Parkville
Parkville is the University of Melbourne’s main campus. The Parkville campus offers a variety of unique cultural, architectural and landscape features which play an important part in the history of the City of Melbourne and the story of Victoria.

Curious about the University of Melbourne? Find out more about these popular schools:

Learn more about studying at the University of Melbourne. Contact OzTREKK for more information!

Friday, February 20th, 2015

Apply to Melbourne Dental School for the 2016 intake

Applications to the Melbourne Dental School are now open for the 2016 intake via OzTREKK! The Melbourne Dental School offers a four-year, graduate-entry, Doctor of Dental Surgery program, which leads to the professional designation of dentist upon the completion of the program.

About University of Melbourne Dental School Doctor of Dental Surgery

University of Melbourne Dental School

Part of the Melbourne Dental School facilities

The Melbourne Dental School offers the Doctor of Dental Surgery (DDS) program which incorporates all aspects related to the provision of advanced general dental care to patients as well as teaches students to prepare, develop, execute and write for publication a small research project.

Program: Doctor of Dental Surgery (DDS)
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Semester intake: February
Duration: 4 years
Application deadline: TBC. For the 2015 intake, the application deadline was June 23, 2014.

Entry Requirements for the Melbourne Dentistry Program:

To be eligible to apply for the Melbourne DDS program, eligible applicants must have

  • successfully completed an undergraduate degree in any discipline at a recognized international university within the past 10 years;
  • completed prerequisite second-year subjects (one semester each) in human anatomy, human physiology and biochemistry (approved by Melbourne);
  • completed an entrance examination: either the Canadian DAT or US DAT. Please note that the carving portion of the Canadian DAT is not required for Melbourne Dental School; however, if you have completed the carving section of the test, this score will be considered. Test scores will not be considered if the exam results are more than 2 years old. There is no minimum cutoff GPA or DAT score for this program; however, a high level of academic standard is required for entry.

Apply to Melbourne Dental School!

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OzTREKK is here to help! Contact OzTREKK Australian Dental Schools Admissions Officer Adam Smith to assist you with your Melbourne Dental School application, or to answer any questions you may have regarding dental school in Australia. Email Adam at adam@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355!

Friday, October 24th, 2014

Melbourne project looking at the oral health of children from migrant backgrounds

A project looking at the oral health of children from migrant backgrounds found there are many significant barriers for parents accessing mainstream dental services and oral health information.

Teeth Tales is a community-based child oral health project for Australian families from migrant backgrounds.

The families who benefited from this project had children under four years old, from Iraqi, Lebanese or Pakistani backgrounds living in metropolitan Melbourne.

Maryanne Tadic, Manager of the Population Health Unit for lead partner Merri Community Health Services said it is important to develop alternative options for children from migrant families who may have difficulty accessing information and services.

“We know from previous research conducted in Moreland and Hume from 2006 to 2009, that there are different traditions and beliefs about taking care of teeth,” she said.

Lead researcher, Associate Professor Lisa Gibbs from the Melbourne School of Population and Global Health said the aim of the project was to develop more accessible services promoting child oral health that can be reproduced in other culturally diverse local government areas in Australia.

“International research shows that people from migrant backgrounds are at risk of poor oral health. This raised concerns for the oral health of local children from refugee and migrant backgrounds,” she said.

More than 650 children from these communities received dental screenings. One hundred fifty-one families also attended a local oral health education course led by a trained leader from their cultural group. The course consisted of six hours of oral health education over two weeks, and a site visit to the local community health dental service the following week.

Ms Tadic said that working in partnership with established cultural organisations is critical to health promotion initiatives for families with migrant and refugee backgrounds.

The discussion of traditional oral health practices needs to be incorporated into oral health promotion initiatives.

“Study designs need to include the spread of cultural networks. ‘Teeth Tales’ findings are now directly informing Dental Health Services Victoria (DHSV) child oral health clinical guidelines,” Associate Professor Gibbs said.

Early results indicate the “Teeth Tales” intervention is promising in terms of increasing tooth brushing frequency and some measures of parental oral health knowledge.

University of Melbourne School of Population and Global Health

The Melbourne School of Population and Global Health aims to strengthen the understanding, capacity and services of society to meet population health needs and to improve the quality and equity of health care.

The population health approach recognizes that health is a capacity or resource rather than a state, a definition which corresponds more to the notion of being able to pursue one’s goals, to acquire skills and education, and to grow.

This broader notion of health recognizes the range of social, economic and physical environmental factors that contribute to health (Public Health Agency of Canada).

Program: Master of Public Health
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Semester intake: February/March
Duration: 1.5 – 2 years (depending on background of candidate)
Application deadline: While there is no set application deadline for this public health program, applicants are strongly encouraged by the University of Melbourne to submit their applications a minimum of three months prior to the program’s start date.

Entry Requirements: To be eligible to apply, you must have an undergraduate degree in any discipline; or at least 200 points of tertiary study (equal to two full-time years of study) in any discipline and at least five years of documented relevant health-related experience.

Apply to the University of Melbourne Public Health School!

Find out more about public health degrees available at the University of Melbourne. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Public Health Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady by emailing rachel@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

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Dentistry at the University of Melbourne Dental School

Interested in dentistry? The Melbourne Dental School offers the Doctor of Dental Surgery (DDS), which incorporates all aspects related to the provision of advanced general dental care to patients as well as teaches students to prepare, develop, execute and write for publication a small research project.

This dentistry course commences with the introduction of specialized oral health subjects to allow students to enter the clinic as quickly as possible to maximize the experience in all aspects and phases of clinical treatment.

The final year of the dental course is comprised of one year-long subject in which the students will spend 40 weeks in clinical settings including the planned University of Melbourne private dental clinic, community health centres and rural community clinics which will include provision of oral health care to the aboriginal community. In addition, students will learn how to run a private dental practice based on a small-business model.

Would you like more information about the Melbourne DDS and about studying dentistry in Australia? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Dental Schools Admissions Officer Adam Smith to answer any questions you may have regarding dentistry school in Australia. Email Adam at adam@oztrekk.com or call 1-866-698-7355.