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Posts Tagged ‘medical school interview’

Friday, July 20th, 2018

How to prepare for your University of Sydney medicine or dentistry interview

It’s that time of year again!

This August, the University of Sydney medicine and dentistry applicants will be undertaking multi-mini interviews via Skype for admission into the DMD and MD programs for the 2019 intake.

Sydney Medical School and Sydney Dental School interviews

No stress. You got this!

As part of the application process, interviews are mandatory and are often a cause of unease with prospective students, but they don’t have to be! To help you out, we have compiled some interview tips from former OzTREKK students, and from our own little knowledge bank we’ve stocked over the years.

Multiple Mini Interview

International applicants who qualify for an interview will be interviewed via an online link using Skype. When making an interview booking, applicants will be required to enter their Skype user name and phone  number (including the country code and area code, in case that there is any problem during their interview).

The interview process is known as the Multiple Mini Interview (MMI). The actual MMI is expected to last approximately 45 minutes; however, the entire process including registrations may take up to 2 hours, although this is rare. They are looking for

  • good communication skills;
  • your sense of caring, empathy and sensitivity;
  • your ability to make effective decisions;
  • your ability to contribute as a member of a team;
  • your appreciation of the place of medicine/dentistry in the wider context of healing; and
  • your sense of vocation, motivation and commitment within the context of medicine/dentistry

Who are the interviewers?

All MMI interviewers are volunteers who have completed a training program and observed the MMI process. They will be friendly and professional and want to see you succeed. No one will try to trick you!

  • Academic, clinical academic, and staff of the university
  • Graduates from medicine and dentistry
  • Persons drawn from the wider community

Get ready

On the day of your interview, you must log into Skype and be ready at least 30 minutes prior to your scheduled interview time. If you can’t attend your interview at the specified time, you must contact the Admissions Office as a matter of urgency. The Admissions Office will make reasonable efforts to accommodate your needs, but cannot guarantee that an alternative interview time will be available.

What to expect

The multi-mini interview (MMI) is an assessment of applicants’ personal and professional attributes, designed to test your reasoning and problem-solving skills in a range of areas that the University of Sydney considers important in entry-level students, as well as your values and commitment.

The assessment is conducted through a range of different authentic scenarios that test specific characteristics. There are usually five stations of seven minutes each, with a turnaround time of two minutes. Each station samples different aspects of professionalism according to a carefully designed framework.

At the commencement of the interview, the first interviewer will appear on the screen. This is your chance to say hello! Once the bell rings, you will be sent the first scenario via instant message on Skype. Read the first sentence of the scenario aloud to the interviewer.

Former OzTREKK students’ tips… and things to get you thinking!

Now, we don’t guarantee that you’ll be asked about your shortcomings, but it is recommended to have an overall sense of “who you are” and a level of comfort with yourself and your knowledge before heading to an interview. Here is a list of tips from former OzTREKK students, and other things to get you thinking about the types of questions they may ask to help get you prepared:

Before your interview

  • Get ready for scenarios! Read and discuss. Read about what is happening around you and find someone to discuss it with. Present your views and listen to their views. This is a great way to actually hear different sides of the same story.
  • Practice formulating a position, practice speaking, and practice expressing your opinion! Avoid confrontation.
  • Stations may be loosely categorised into ethical-dilemma situations, teamwork-based situations, professionalism situations, differing-opinion situations, etc.
  • What makes a good or bad doctor?
  • If you are invited to ask questions, have some! Be prepared to speak about yourself and your interests outside of dentistry or medicine.
  • Do you have weaknesses? What are they? How are you working on them?
  • Know the profession—its past, its present, its future. This shows you would like to invest your life in the profession.
  • Think about alternative medicine and dentistry. Is it valuable? Is it comparable to Western medicine?
  • Where do you see yourself 5, 10, 20 years from now?

During your interview

  • Be yourself. Putting on an act to impress people is rarely successful, is usually transparent, and is most often a turnoff.
  • Dress appropriately.
  • There won’t be any breaks. Use the washroom beforehand. You may have a glass of water on hand should you need it.
  • The questions are not “black and white,” “right or wrong.” The interviewers are interested in your passion for medicine or dentistry, your thought processes, your communication skills, and your personality.
  • Figure out what kind of general situation you are in and then present not only how you view the situation, but also from the viewpoint of bystanders and/or the opposing party. Think outside the box, but tread lightly!
  • If an interviewer interrupts at any point, stop and listen carefully to what he/she has to say. They are doing this in your favour, as you are likely veering off course in your discussion.
  • Don’t lie. Answer questions as honestly as possible.

We know it’s difficult, but try not to stress. We often hear from OzTREKK students, “I didn’t need to be as stressed as I was.” The interviewers are people, just like you. They understand that you will be nervous and will factor that in when they interview you.

Best of luck!

*

If you have any questions regarding your Sydney Dental School or Sydney Medical School interview, please contact your OzTREKK admissions officer at kaylee@oztrekk.com or alexa@oztrekk.com.

Monday, May 28th, 2018

You can rock your medical school interview! Here’s how!

Are you ready for your medical school interview? We know that applying to an Australian medical school is a big deal, and one of the most stress-inducing parts of the process can be the interview portion!

Being prepared and having an idea of the types of questions you may be asked will certainly pay off and help you to feel more comfortable. During your medical school interview, you may encounter questions ranging from the basics like your work history and volunteer experience to more situational and behavioral questions. Here are some ways to help you rock your Australian medical school interview!

How to rock your Australian medical school interview

Are you ready for your medical school interview?

Preparation before the interview

First, what is a multi-mini interview (MMI)?
The MMI is an assessment of applicants’ personal and professional attributes. It is designed to test your reasoning and problem-solving skills in a range of areas that the school considers important in entry-level students, as well as your values and commitment. The assessment is conducted through a range of different authentic scenarios that test specific characteristics.

Set a calendar reminder
Your educational future is potentially riding on this interview! As soon as you receive the date and time for your interview, put it in your calendar and set a reminder.

#OzTREKKtip: Don’t ask them to reschedule unless it’s an emergency. Spots fill up extremely quickly and it can be difficult to juggle dozens of applicants. If you truly can’t attend your interview at the specified time, you must contact the university’s admissions office as soon as possible. They will make reasonable efforts to accommodate your needs, but cannot guarantee that an alternative interview time will be available.

Have reliable equipment and internet access
You should use the most reliable method of connection available for your interview (e.g., a wired computer connection, where possible.) Wireless connection can be used, provided that it is sufficiently reliable to complete the interview process. Imagine beginning your interview with shady internet connection—yikes!

Don’t have Skype (or the platform they will use)? Get it. Learn about it. Be prepared to know how it works. Especially learn the instant messaging button as this is where you will read the interview questions.

Practice
What is happening in the world? Find someone to discuss what is happening around you. Present your views and listen to their views. This is a great way to actually hear different sides of the same story. Practice formulating a position, practice speaking, and practice expressing your opinion! Try to avoid confrontation.

Do your homework
Familiarise yourself with the medical school. What is the school known for? Why is that a good fit for you? Are you interested in rural medicine? It’s a good idea to know the medical profession—its past, its present, its future. This shows you would like to invest your life in the field of medicine.

Questions, please
If you are invited to ask questions, have some! Be prepared to speak about yourself and your interests outside of medicine.

Who are you?
Do you have weaknesses? What are they? Are you working on them? Where do you see yourself 5, 10, 20 years from now? What makes you stand out from other applicants? (don’t brag!) Be prepared to talk about your undergrad degree.

During the interview

Be ready early
On the day of your interview, you must be ready at least 30 minutes prior to your scheduled interview time. Your interview will likely last at least 45 minutes; however, you should allow at least one hour in addition to this time in case there is a delay, or there is a need to clarify a matter. Also note that there won’t be any breaks. Use the washroom beforehand. You may have a glass of water handy should you need it.

For verification purposes, you must bring photographic identification (passport or driver’s license) to the interview. Have it ready to show at the beginning of your interview. Now is not the time to go fishing through your purse or digging in your wallet.

Quiet on the set!
The last thing you want during an interview is to be distracted. Choose distraction-free place where you will have excellent internet access. Turn. Your. Cellphone. Off.

Listen 
Sometimes it can be hard to concentrate when we’re stressed, and we often blurt out the first thing that pops into our heads. Do your best to really actively listen to what’s being asked so you can answer appropriately.

Try to remain calm and speak at a moderate pace
Take a deep breath. The interviewers are people, just like you. They understand that you will be nervous and will factor that in when they interview you. Don’t lie. Answer questions as honestly as possible. If you don’t know how to answer the question, a simple “I’m not sure” is far better than a long-winded lie.

Be yourself. Putting on an act to impress people is rarely successful, is usually transparent, and is most often a turnoff. If an interviewer has a bad first impression about you, the other aspects of that particular station will likely be graded poorly. Remember, the interviewers are people too, and they are likely volunteering in the MMI process. This is especially important if you consider an interviewer may not even be listening to a word you are saying. At the end of the station, the interviewer may look back at the past 7 or so minutes, and depending on how much verbal diarrhea you may have spewed out, they may only remember how calm, collected, and eloquently spoken you are.

Dress code
This is a no-brainer. Dress appropriately. No one wants to see you just out of bed, in a T-shirt, or wearing exercise gear. You are interviewing for a professional degree!

Express yourself
The questions are not “black and white,” “right or wrong.” The interviewers are interested in your passion for medicine, your thought processes, your communication skills, and your personality. Stations can be loosely categorised into ethical-dilemma situations, teamwork-based situations, professionalism situations, differing-opinion situations, etc. Figure out what kind of general situation you are in and then present not only how you view the situation, but also from the viewpoint of bystanders and/or the opposing party. Think outside the box, but tread lightly!

Generally speaking, the medical schools will be looking for the following skills and attributes from applicants:

  1. Knowledge relevant to the question and your ability to formulate an approach to address the topic
  2. The capacity to draw implications from your knowledge
  3. Insight into you own attitudes and views (and that of others) relevant to the issue

If an interviewer interrupts at any point, stop and listen carefully to what he/she has to say. They are doing this in your favour, as you are likely veering off course in your discussion.

Whether this is your first interview or your fiftieth, a little preparation and confidence can go a long way! Remember to keep these tips in mind and to just be yourself. And finally, don’t forget to thank the interviewers for taking the time to meet with you and for the opportunity to participate.

Best of luck!

*

If you have any questions regarding your Australian medical school interview, please contact OzTREKK’s Med Schools Admissions Officer Kaylee Templeton at kaylee@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355. We’re here to help!

Wednesday, July 26th, 2017

How to rock your Australian medical school interview

We know that applying to an Australian medical school is a big deal, and one of the most stress-inducing parts of the process can be the interview portion!

Being prepared and having an idea of the types of questions you may be asked will certainly pay off and help you to feel more comfortable. During your medical school interview, you may encounter questions ranging from the basics like your work history and volunteer experience to more situational and behavioral questions. Here are some ways to help you rock your Australian medical school interview!

How to rock your Australian medical school interview

Are you ready for your medical school interview?

Preparation before the interview

First, what is a multi-mini interview (MMI)?
The MMI is an assessment of applicants’ personal and professional attributes. It is designed to test your reasoning and problem-solving skills in a range of areas that the school considers important in entry-level students, as well as your values and commitment. The assessment is conducted through a range of different authentic scenarios that test specific characteristics.

Set a calendar reminder
Your educational future is potentially riding on this interview! As soon as you receive the date and time for your interview, put it in your calendar and set a reminder.

#OzTREKKtip: Don’t ask them to reschedule unless it’s an emergency. Spots fill up extremely quickly and it can be difficult to juggle dozens of applicants. If you truly can’t attend your interview at the specified time, you must contact the university’s admissions office as soon as possible. They will make reasonable efforts to accommodate your needs, but cannot guarantee that an alternative interview time will be available.

Have reliable equipment and internet access
You should use the most reliable method of connection available for your interview (e.g., a wired computer connection, where possible.) Wireless connection can be used, provided that it is sufficiently reliable to complete the interview process. Imagine beginning your interview with shady internet connection—yikes!

Don’t have Skype (or the platform they will use)? Get it. Learn about it. Be prepared to know how it works. Especially learn the instant messaging button as this is where you will read the interview questions.

Practice
What is happening in the world? Find someone to discuss what is happening around you. Present your views and listen to their views. This is a great way to actually hear different sides of the same story. Practice formulating a position, practice speaking, and practice expressing your opinion! Try to avoid confrontation.

Do your homework
Familiarise yourself with the medical school. What is the school known for? Why is that a good fit for you? Are you interested in rural medicine? It’s a good idea to know the medical profession—its past, its present, its future. This shows you would like to invest your life in the field of medicine.

Questions, please
If you are invited to ask questions, have some! Be prepared to speak about yourself and your interests outside of medicine.

Who are you?
Do you have weaknesses? What are they? Are you working on them? Where do you see yourself 5, 10, 20 years from now? What makes you stand out from other applicants? (don’t brag!) Be prepared to talk about your undergrad degree.

During the interview

Be ready early
On the day of your interview, you must be ready at least 30 minutes prior to your scheduled interview time. Your interview will likely last at least 45 minutes; however, you should allow at least one hour in addition to this time in case there is a delay, or there is a need to clarify a matter. Also note that there won’t be any breaks. Use the washroom beforehand. You may have a glass of water handy should you need it.

For verification purposes, you must bring photographic identification (passport or driver’s license) to the interview. Have it ready to show at the beginning of your interview. Now is not the time to go fishing through your purse or digging in your wallet.

Quiet on the set!
The last thing you want during an interview is to be distracted. Choose distraction-free place where you will have excellent internet access. Turn. Your. Cellphone. Off.

Listen 
Sometimes it can be hard to concentrate when we’re stressed, and we often blurt out the first thing that pops into our heads. Do your best to really actively listen to what’s being asked so you can answer appropriately.

Try to remain calm and speak at a moderate pace
Take a deep breath. The interviewers are people, just like you. They understand that you will be nervous and will factor that in when they interview you. Don’t lie. Answer questions as honestly as possible. If you don’t know how to answer the question, a simple “I’m not sure” is far better than a long-winded lie.

Be yourself. Putting on an act to impress people is rarely successful, is usually transparent, and is most often a turnoff. If an interviewer has a bad first impression about you, the other aspects of that particular station will likely be graded poorly. Remember, the interviewers are people too, and they are likely volunteering in the MMI process. This is especially important if you consider an interviewer may not even be listening to a word you are saying. At the end of the station, the interviewer may look back at the past 7 or so minutes, and depending on how much verbal diarrhea you may have spewed out, they may only remember how calm, collected, and eloquently spoken you are.

Dress code
This is a no-brainer. Dress appropriately. No one wants to see you just out of bed, in a T-shirt, or wearing exercise gear. You are interviewing for a professional degree!

Express yourself
The questions are not “black and white,” “right or wrong.” The interviewers are interested in your passion for medicine, your thought processes, your communication skills, and your personality. Stations can be loosely categorised into ethical-dilemma situations, teamwork-based situations, professionalism situations, differing-opinion situations, etc. Figure out what kind of general situation you are in and then present not only how you view the situation, but also from the viewpoint of bystanders and/or the opposing party. Think outside the box, but tread lightly!

Generally speaking, the medical schools will be looking for the following skills and attributes from applicants:

  1. Knowledge relevant to the question and your ability to formulate an approach to address the topic
  2. The capacity to draw implications from your knowledge
  3. Insight into you own attitudes and views (and that of others) relevant to the issue

If an interviewer interrupts at any point, stop and listen carefully to what he/she has to say. They are doing this in your favour, as you are likely veering off course in your discussion.

Whether this is your first interview or your fiftieth, a little preparation and confidence can go a long way! Remember to keep these tips in mind and to just be yourself. And finally, don’t forget to thank the interviewers for taking the time to meet with you and for the opportunity to participate.

Best of luck!

*

If you have any questions regarding your Australian medical school interview, please contact OzTREKK’s Med Schools Admissions Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com.

Thursday, June 23rd, 2016

Preparing for your University of Sydney interview

From August 1 – 10, 2016 Sydney Dental School and Sydney Medical School applicants will be undertaking multi-mini interviews via Skype for admission into the DMD and MD programs for the 2017 intake.

Sydney Dental School

Best of luck with your interview!

To help you out, we have compiled some interview tips—from former OzTREKK students, and from our own experiences! As part of the application process, interviews are mandatory and are often a cause of unease with prospective students. Like a job interview, it is best to exhibit a professional, competent, and likable personality—like we needed to tell you that!

Get ready

On the day of your interview, you must log into Skype and be ready at least 30 minutes prior to your scheduled interview time. Your interview will likely last at least 45 minutes; however, you should allow at least one hour in addition to this time in case there is a delay, or there is a need to clarify a matter. Internet and computer glitches often come at the most inopportune time!

You should use the most reliable method of connection available for your interview (e.g., a wired computer connection, where possible.)  Wireless connection can be used, provided that it is sufficiently reliable to complete the interview process. Imagine beginning your interview with shady internet connection—yikes!

Can’t attend your interview at the specified time? You must contact the Admissions Office as a matter of urgency. The Admissions Office will make reasonable efforts to accommodate your needs, but cannot guarantee that an alternative interview time will be available.

What to expect

The multi-mini interview (MMI) is an assessment of applicants’ personal and professional attributes. It is designed to test your reasoning and problem-solving skills in a range of areas that the University of Sydney considers important in entry-level students, as well as your values and commitment.

The assessment is conducted through a range of different authentic scenarios that test specific characteristics. There will be 5 stations of 7 minutes each, with a turnaround time of 2 minutes.  Each station samples different aspects of professionalism according to a carefully designed framework.

At the commencement of the interview, the first interviewer will appear on the screen. Say hello to him or her. Once the bell rings, you will be sent the first scenario via ‘Instant Message’ on Skype. Read the first sentence of the scenario aloud to the interviewer.

Former OzTREKK students’ tips… and things to get you thinking!

Now, we don’t guarantee that you’ll be asked about your shortcomings, but it is recommended to have an overall sense of “who you are” and a level of comfort with yourself and your knowledge before heading to an interview. Here is a list of tips from former OzTREKK students, and other things to get you thinking about the types of questions they may ask to help get you prepared:

Prepare

  • Don’t have Skype? Get it. Learn about it. Be prepared to know how it works. Especially learn the instant messaging button as this is where you will read the interview questions.
  • Read and discuss. Read about what is happening around you and find someone to discuss what is happening around you. Present your views and listen to their views. This is a great way to actually hear different sides of the same story. Practice formulating a position, practice speaking, and practice expressing your opinion! Avoid confrontation.
  • Familiarise yourself with the school. Find out who is in charge and understand the faculty structure. What is the  school known for? Why is that a good fit for you?
  • If you are invited to ask questions, have some! Be prepared to speak about yourself and your interests outside of dentistry and medicine.
  • Do you have weaknesses? What are they? Are you working on them?
  • Know the profession—its past, its present, its future. This shows you would like to invest your life in the profession.
  • Where do you see yourself 5, 10, 20 years from now?
  • Be prepared to talk about your undergrad degree.
  • What makes you stand out from other applicants? (But don’t brag!)
  • Lastly, there is a wealth of MMI resources out there on the internet! Do your homework!

During the interview

  • Take a deep breath. The interviewers are people, just like you. They understand that you will be nervous and will factor that in when they interview you.
  • Be yourself. Putting on an act to impress people is rarely successful, is usually transparent, and is most often a turnoff. If an interviewer has a bad first impression about you, the other aspects of that particular station will likely be graded poorly. Remember, the interviewers are people too, and they are likely volunteering in the MMI process. This is especially important if you consider an interviewer may not even be listening to a word you are saying. At the end of the station, the interviewer may look back at the past 7 or so minutes, and depending on how much verbal diarrhea you may have spewed out, they may only remember how calm, collected, and eloquently spoken you are.
  • Dress appropriately. No one wants to see you just out of bed, in a T-shirt, or wearing exercise gear. You are interviewing for a professional degree!
  • Turn. Your. Cellphone. Off.
  • There won’t be any breaks. Use the washroom beforehand. You may have a glass of water on hand should you need it.
  • No note-taking permitted!
  • The questions are not “black and white,” “right or wrong.” The interviewers are interested in your passion for medicine or dentistry, your thought processes, your communication skills, and your personality.
  • Stations can be loosely categorised into ethical-dilemma situations, teamwork-based situations, professionalism situations, differing-opinion situations, etc.
  • Figure out what kind of general situation you are in and then present not only how you view the situation, but also from the viewpoint of bystanders and/or the opposing party. Think outside the box, but tread lightly!
  • If an interviewer interrupts at any point, stop and listen carefully to what he/she has to say. They are doing this in your favour, as you are likely veering off course in your discussion.
  • Don’t lie. Answer questions as honestly as possible.

Best of luck!

*

If you have any questions regarding your Sydney Dental School or Sydney Medical School interview, please contact OzTREKK at info@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Wednesday, April 8th, 2015

James Cook University Medical School interviews in Canada

If you are interested in JCU Medical School, we are pleased to announce that interviews will be held in Canada this June by Professor Ian Wronski and Mrs. Sandra Hurlock from the Division of Tropical Health and Medicine at JCU.

With interviews being a part of the application process to the JCU Medical School MBBS program, students can complete this application prerequisite in Toronto, Calgary or Vancouver. For the 2016 intake, JCU will hold interviews with eligible international applicants from Canada either

JCU Medical School

Study medicine at JCU Medical School

  • in person in Canada this June; or
  • via videoconferencing following the August 31 program application deadline.

Interviews Schedule

Toronto: June 8 & 9, 2015
Calgary: June 10, 2015
Vancouver: June 11, 2015

About the Interviews

An interview is a necessary component of the admission process for entry into the JCU Medical School and it is strongly encouraged that you undertake the interviews earlier rather than later.

It is important to note that the majority of those that have been successful in gaining admission in to the MBBS at James Cook University have interviewed in person in Canada, with many receiving offers prior to the application deadline. It is recommended that you undertake and participate in the in-person interviews in Canada in June.

To Schedule an Interview

Please fill out a James Cook University Medical School meeting request form: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/JCUMBBS2015int

You do not need to submit a complete application at this stage to be considered for an interview; however, you will need to provide OzTREKK with a copy of your official transcript (or interim transcript) to verify your eligibility for an interview.

Entry Requirements for the JCU Medical Program

Entry into the JCU MBBS program is directly from high school. Students may also transfer into the program during their undergraduate degree or at the completion of their undergraduate degree.

  • Applicants may apply directly from high school, or after having partially or fully completed their university studies.
  • Prerequisite subjects include English, Maths B (Calculus and Vectors and Advanced Functions), and Chemistry at a minimum of the Grade 12 level
  • If applying directly from high school, applicants need a minimum GPA of 85% from their top 6 courses in Grade 12 (including prerequisite subjects)
  • If applying after having partially or fully completed post-secondary studies, applicants need to have a minimum of 80% cumulative GPA to be considered
  • Completion of Australian Medical Schools Application Form and JCU Program Specific Form
  • Interview: held in person or via video teleconference

Apply now to James Cook University Medical School!

*

Do you have questions about JCU Medical School or about the in-person interviews? Please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Sarah Bridson at sarah@oztrekk.com or call 1-866-698-7355 for more information.

Friday, May 23rd, 2014

JCU medical students run for cystic fibrosis

A team of second-year JCU Medical School will be breathing deeply for those who can’t by running in the 65 Roses Challenge for cystic fibrosis in Townsville this Sunday, May 25.

JCU Medical School

Study medicine at James Cook University

The students learned about cystic fibrosis in their respiratory medicine classes and were inspired to take up the cause.

Mallory Van Wensveen, Renee Guesnon, Eliza Billington, Madeleine Grace Storey and Elicia Tyerman will run 65 km (relay style) on treadmills at Zoo Health and Fitness, to raise not only funds, but also much-needed awareness of this debilitating condition.

Cystic fibrosis, or CF, is a serious genetic condition affecting the respiratory, digestive, and reproductive systems.

People with CF develop an abnormally large amount of excessively thick and sticky mucus within the lungs, the airways, and the digestive system. The mucus decreases the release and production of digestive enzymes from the pancreas and traps bacteria in the lungs resulting in recurrent infections which lead to irreversible damage.

Lung failure is the major cause of death for someone with CF.

CF is the most common recessive genetic condition, and affects 1 in 2500 Australian children born each year, and at present there is no cure.

There are 29 children affected by cystic fibrosis in the Townsville region.

To raise funds to support CF research, the JCU team held a breakfast barbecue on Wednesday, May 21.

The team is also encouraging everyone to wear red and make a gold coin donation. All funds raised support Cystic Fibrosis Australia.

Staff, students and members of the community are urged to come along and support this great cause.

Interested in JCU Medical School?

Ms Pamela Stronach, Faculty Executive Officer, and Mrs. Sandra Hurlock, Associate Faculty Registrar, will be visiting Canada to conduct interviews for those interested in gaining entry into the JCU Medical School.

With interviews being a part of the application process to the JCU Medical School program, students can complete this application prerequisite in Toronto, Calgary or Vancouver. For the 2015 intake, JCU will hold interviews with eligible international applicants from Canada either

  • in person in Canada this June; or
  • via videoconferencing following the August 29 program application deadline.

About the Interviews

An interview is a necessary component of the admission process for entry into the JCU Medical School and it is strongly encouraged that you undertake the interviews for the JCU medical program earlier rather than later.

It is important to note that the majority of those that have been successful in gaining admission in to the medical program at James Cook University have interviewed in person in Canada, with many receiving offers prior to the application deadline. It is recommended that you undertake and participate in the in-person interviews in Canada in June.

Interviews Schedule

Vancouver: Tuesday, June 17, 2014
Calgary: Wednesday, June 18, 2014
Toronto: Thursday, June 19 & Friday, June 20, 2014

To Schedule an Interview

Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Officer Broghan Dean at broghan@oztrekk.com.

You do not need to submit a complete application at this stage to be considered for an interview; however, you will need to provide OzTREKK with a copy of your official transcript (or interim transcript) to verify your eligibility for an interview.

Entry Requirements for the JCU Medical Program

Entry into the JCU MBBS program is directly from high school. Students may also transfer into the program during their undergraduate degree or at the completion of their undergraduate degree.

  • High school cumulative average necessary to be considered is a minimum of 85% in Grade 12 subjects, including prerequisite subject grades.
  • If you are applying to the program after you have partially or fully completed your post-secondary studies, you should have a Canadian GPA of 80% cumulative average across all university studies, but to have a competitive application, applicants should have achieved at least an 82% cumulative average.
  • Interview: held in-person and via video conference

Apply now to James Cook University Medical School!

*

Do you have questions about JCU Medical School or about the in-person interviews? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Officer Broghan Dean at broghan@oztrekk.com or call 1-866-698-7355 (toll free in Canada) for more information about how you can study in Australia!

Thursday, April 3rd, 2014

JCU Medical School interviews in Canada

Ms Pamela Stronach, Faculty Executive Officer, and Mrs. Sandra Hurlock, Associate Faculty Registrar, will be visiting Canada to conduct interviews for those interested in gaining entry into the JCU Medical School.

James Cook University Medical School

JCU Medical School interviews to be held in Canada this June

With interviews being a part of the application process to the JCU Medical School program, students can complete this application prerequisite in Toronto, Calgary or Vancouver. For the 2015 intake, JCU will hold interviews with eligible international applicants from Canada either

  • in person in Canada this June; or
  • via videoconferencing following the August 29 program application deadline.

Interviews Schedule

Vancouver: Tuesday, June 17, 2014

Calgary: Wednesday, June 18, 2014

Toronto: Thursday, June 19 & Friday, June 20, 2014

About the Interviews

An interview is a necessary component of the admission process for entry into the JCU Medical School and it is strongly encouraged that you undertake the interviews for the JCU medical program earlier rather than later.

It is important to note that the majority of those that have been successful in gaining admission in to the medical program at James Cook University have interviewed in person in Canada, with many receiving offers prior to the application deadline. It is recommended that you undertake and participate in the in-person interviews in Canada in June.

To Schedule an Interview

Please fill out a James Cook University Medical School meeting request form: http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/JCUMBBS2014int

You do not need to submit a complete application at this stage to be considered for an interview; however, you will need to provide OzTREKK with a copy of your official transcript (or interim transcript) to verify your eligibility for an interview.

Entry Requirements for the JCU Medical Program

Entry into the JCU MBBS program is directly from high school. Students may also transfer into the program during their undergraduate degree or at the completion of their undergraduate degree.

  • High school cumulative average necessary to be considered is a minimum of 85% in Grade 12 subjects, including prerequisite subject grades.
  • If you are applying to the program after you have partially or fully completed your post-secondary studies, you should have a Canadian GPA of 80% cumulative average across all university studies, but to have a competitive application, applicants should have achieved at least an 82% cumulative average.
  • Interview: held in-person and via video conference

Apply now to James Cook University Medical School!

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Do you have questions about JCU Medical School or about the in-person interviews? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Officer Broghan Dean at broghan@oztrekk.com or call 1-866-698-7355 (toll free in Canada) for more information about how you can study in Australia!

Friday, August 2nd, 2013

Melbourne Medical School interview offers granted

Exciting news, OzTREKKers!  interview offers have been released!

The Doctor of Medicine (MD) is four years full time, including one year of bioscience foundation learning, six months of full-time research and two and a half years of clinical training in university-affiliated hospitals, clinics and GP surgeries. A yearly student conference will be a distinguishing feature of the Melbourne MD and provide opportunities for broader disciplinary and inter-disciplinary learning. The teaching, student conference and assessment program is approximately 40 weeks per year.

University of Melbourne Medical School

Learn more about Melbourne Medical School

About the Multi-Mini Interview (MMI)

All international applicants residing in Australia at the time of application must be available to attend an interview in Melbourne in late September. International applicants residing outside of Australia may be interviewed via Skype technology.

The interview component will be an eight-station Multiple Mini Interview. Each station takes five minutes and has a single interviewer.

The MMI aims to assess non-academic qualities including cultural sensitivity, maturity, collaboration, reliability and communication skills.

The stations could include practical tasks, answering questions, commenting on short films, and explaining your thinking.

Interview offers released: August 1 – 2, 2013
Applicants not shortlisted for interview notified: August 5 – 6, 2013
Deadline to accept interview: August 8, 2013
Interviews (via Skype): August 19 – 23, 2013
Offers of admission begin to be issued: October 16 – 17, 2013
Deadline to accept offer of admission and pay deposit: October 31, 2013
Deadline to meet any conditions of offer: November 8, 2013
Enrollment deadline: January 24, 2014
First day of class: February 3, 2014

If you have any questions regarding the  interviews, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Broghan Dean. Email Broghan at broghan@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1 866-698-7355.

Tuesday, April 23rd, 2013

JCU Medical School interviews reminder

Have you applied to JCU Medical School? If you have, this is an important reminder that the medical school interviews will be held in Canada this April/May.

Apply to JCU Medical School

Apply to JCU Medical School!

Professor Ian Wronski, Pro-Vice Chancellor of the Faculty of Medicine, Health and Molecular Sciences, and Mrs. Sandra Hurlock, Associate Faculty Registrar, will be visiting Canada this April/May to conduct interviews for those interested in gaining entry into the JCU Medical School. This is a great opportunity for prospective medical school students to talk about how studying at the tropical James Cook University Medical School could be right for them.

With interviews being a part of the application process to the JCU Medical School program, students can complete this application prerequisite in Toronto, Calgary or Vancouver. For the 2014 intake, JCU will hold interviews with eligible international applicants from Canada either

  • in person in Canada this April-May; or
  • via videoconferencing in September/October, following the August 31 program application deadline.

About the Interviews

An interview is a necessary component of the admission process for entry into the JCU Medical School and it is strongly encouraged that you undertake the interviews for the JCU medical program earlier rather than later.

It is important to note that the majority of those that have been successful in gaining admission in to the medical program at James Cook University have interviewed in person in Canada, with many receiving offers prior to the application deadline has passed. Video conference interviews that are conducted after the application deadline has passed will occur in September and are quite costly as JCU has specific teleconferencing requirements. It is recommended that you undertake and participate in the in-person interviews in Canada in April/May.

It is in your best interest to be selected for an in-person interview in Canada, as early offers of admission will be made for this program in June and August, and fewer interview offers are issued for the interviews via video conference in September/October.

Interviews Schedule

April 29 – 30, 2013: Toronto
May 2, 2013: Calgary
May 34, 2013: Vancouver

To Schedule an Interview

Please fill out a James Cook University Medical School meeting request form: http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/JCUMBBS2013int

You do not need to submit a complete application at this stage to be considered for an interview; however, you will need to provide OzTREKK with a copy of your official transcript (or interim transcript) to verify your eligibility for an interview.

Please contact OzTREKKs Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Broghan Dean:

Email Broghan at broghan@oztrekk.com or call toll free 1 866-698-7355.

You can mail your original transcripts to

OzTREKK educational services
1 Sherbrooke Street East, Suite 301
Perth, Ontario K7H 1A1 Canada

Apply now to James Cook University Medical School!

*

Find out more about the JCU medical program and about James Cook University. To learn more about studying medicine in Australia, visit OzTREKK’s Australian medical schools webpage.

 

 

Thursday, March 28th, 2013

JCU Medical School interviews for the 2014 intake

JCU Medical School interviews will be held in Canada this April/May.

Professor Ian Wronski, Pro-Vice Chancellor of the Faculty of Medicine, Health and Molecular Sciences, and Mrs. Sandra Hurlock, Associate Faculty Registrar, will be visiting Canada this April/May to conduct interviews for those interested in gaining entry into the JCU Medical School. This is a great opportunity for prospective medical school students to talk about how studying at the tropical James Cook University Medical School could be right for them.

JCU Pro-Vice Chancellor Ian Wronski

 Pro-Vice Chancellor Ian Wronski will conduct JCU Medical School interviews in Canada this April/May

With interviews being a part of the application process to the JCU Medical School program, students can complete this application prerequisite in Toronto, Calgary or Vancouver. For the 2014 intake, JCU will hold interviews with eligible international applicants from Canada either

  • in person in Canada this April-May; or
  • via videoconferencing in September/October, following the August 31 program application deadline.

Interviews Schedule

April 29 – 30, 2013: Toronto
May 2, 2013: Calgary
May 34, 2013: Vancouver

About the Interviews

An interview is a necessary component of the admission process for entry into the JCU Medical School and it is strongly encouraged that you undertake the interviews for the JCU medical program earlier rather than later.

It is important to note that the majority of those that have been successful in gaining admission in to the medical program at James Cook University have interviewed in person in Canada, with many receiving offers prior to the application deadline has passed. Video conference interviews that are conducted after the application deadline has passed will occur in September and are quite costly as JCU has specific teleconferencing requirements. It is recommended that you undertake and participate in the in-person interviews in Canada in April.

It is in your best interest to be selected for an in-person interview in Canada, as early offers of admission will be made for this program in June and August, and fewer interview offers are issued for the interviews via video conference in September/October.

To Schedule an Interview

Please fill out a James Cook University Medical School meeting request form: http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/JCUMBBS2013int

You do not need to submit a complete application at this stage to be considered for an interview; however, you will need to provide OzTREKK with a copy of your official transcript (or interim transcript) to verify your eligibility for an interview.

Please contact OzTREKKs Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Broghan Dean:

Apply to JCU Medical School

Apply to JCU Medical School!

Email Broghan at broghan@oztrekk.com or call toll free 1 866-698-7355.

You can mail your original transcripts to

OzTREKK educational services
1 Sherbrooke Street East, Suite 301
Perth, Ontario K7H 1A1 Canada

Entry Requirements for the JCU Medical Program

  • Entry into the JCU MBBS program is directly from high school. Students may also transfer into the program during their undergraduate degree or at the completion of their undergraduate degree.
  • High school cumulative average necessary to be considered is a minimum of 85% in Grade 12 subjects, including prerequisite subject grades.
  • If you are applying to the program after you have partially or fully completed your post-secondary studies, you should have a Canadian GPA of 80% cumulative average across all university studies, but to have a competitive application, applicants should have achieved at least an 82% cumulative average.
  • Completion of JCU International Student Application Form and School of Medicine specific application form. See OzTREKK’s JCU Medical School How to Apply page for more information!
  • Interview: held in-person and via video conference

Apply now to James Cook University Medical School!

*

Learn more about the JCU medical program and about James Cook University.

To learn more about studying medicine in Australia, visit OzTREKK’s  Australian medical schools webpage.

Wishing you all the best with your application to the JCU Medical School!