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Posts Tagged ‘Master of Exercise Physiology’

Wednesday, March 8th, 2017

Sydney Health Sciences asks, which sport and fitness course is right for you?

Are you interested in health sciences? You’ve got a wonderful selection of study areas to choose from: physiotherapy, occupational therapy, speech pathology…. But have you considered exercise and sports science?

Sydney Health Sciences is known for world-leading health sciences education and research. The discipline of exercise and sport science focuses on the integration of exercise and physical activity into health care, sports performance, disease prevention and rehabilitation.

Graduates have the opportunity to utilise principles such as biomechanics, musculoskeletal rehabilitation and gait analysis to evaluate and improve the performance of a diverse range of athletes.

The career paths followed by graduates are many and varied and depend mostly on the specific interests and aspirations of the individual. Broadly defined, the areas of employment entered by recent graduates include the sport industry, fitness industry, health industry, occupational health and safety, public health, rehabilitation, research and technology, education and medical insurance.

University of Sydney Master of Exercise Physiology

Sydney Health Sciences asks, which sport and fitness course is right for you?

Dr Ollie Jay is the Director of the Thermal Ergonomics Laboratory and a Senior Lecturer in Thermoregulatory Physiology at the Faculty of Health Sciences. (Photo: University of Sydney)

The Master of Exercise Physiology is designed to produce graduates who possess the knowledge, competencies and clinical experience required for safe and effective clinical exercise practice.

Students will explore metabolism and physiology, human motor learning and control, the principles of exercise programming, nutrition, and musculoskeletal principles of exercise. Integrated clinical practice instruction, practicums, and case studies will provide the advanced skills and experience essential for professional practice.

Clinical placements are undertaken in both the public and private sectors. Students will have the opportunity to develop an understanding of the career path they have chosen, and its place in the contemporary health system.

Program: Master of Exercise Physiology
Location: Sydney, New South Wales
Semester intake: March
Duration: 2 years
Application deadline: TBA

Apply to the University of Sydney Faculty of Health Sciences!

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Find out more about studying the Master of Exercise Physiology at the University of Sydney. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Health Sciences Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com.

Tuesday, May 26th, 2015

Sydney Health Sciences receives Australia Awards Fellowship funding

Twelve research Australia Awards Fellows from South East Asia will come to the Sydney Faculty of Health Sciences this October to learn how to apply physical activity, exercise and sports participation as a tool to improve health in their home countries.

Bringing the emerging career researchers to the faculty has been made possible due to the receipt of an Australia Awards Fellowships overseen by the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade (DFAT).

University of Sydney Health Sciences

Learn more about Sydney Health Sciences

This is the first time the Sydney Faculty of Health Sciences has received a training grant from DFAT to train researchers in the university’s core values of physical activity promotion and sports participation for healthy ageing within the cultural context of Southeast Asia.

The award of just over $100,000 will be used to bring researchers to Sydney from four universities in Vietnam, the Philippines and Malaysia. The research will focus on low physical activity uptake in those countries and the real barriers to adults in undertaking physical activity for better health.

The researchers will work with under the supervision of senior professors and alongside PhD students to help them focus their research and give them practical training to use when they return home. After their return, their faculty mentors will continue with the established collaborations is assisting their research activities at their SE Asian universities.

Professors Glen Davis and Patrick Brennan are the chief investigators of the research project.

The group will stay for two weeks of intensive training “to amplify their particular research interests when they go back to their home country” said Professor Davis.

“This is our way of building research bridges with emerging career researchers with their supervisors and mentors from the countries they’re coming from.”

University of Sydney Master of Exercise Physiology

The Master of Exercise Physiology is designed to produce graduates who possess the knowledge, competencies and clinical experience required for safe and effective clinical exercise practice.

Students will explore metabolism and physiology, human motor learning and control, the principles of exercise programming, nutrition and pharmacology, and musculoskeletal principles of exercise. Integrated clinical practice instruction, practicums, and case studies will provide the advanced skills and experience essential for professional practice.

Clinical placements are undertaken in both the public and private sectors. Students will have the opportunity to develop an understanding of the career path they have chosen, and its place in the contemporary health system.

Program: Master of Exercise Physiology
Location: Lidcombe, (suburb of Sydney), New South Wales
Semester intake: March
Duration: 2 years
Application deadline: October 1, 2015

Apply to the University of Sydney Faculty of Health Sciences!

*

Find out more about studying the Master of Exercise Physiology and other health sciences at the University of Sydney. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Health Sciences Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Thursday, July 10th, 2014

Sydney health sciences student studies soccer kicking technique

New research from the  Sydney Faculty of Health Sciences claims that it is possible to teach the perfect strike if coaches properly understand the science behind soccer kicking technique.

As millions of young boys and girls worldwide dream of one day playing in the World Cup after watching the Socceroos in action in Brazil, the findings could influence the way children are taught ball skills to help them realise their dreams.

University of Sydney Health Sciences

Studying the science behind the soccer kick

Honours student Denny Noor, a keen soccer player since the age of 5, is carrying out research to uncover the technical attributes that define elite soccer kicking technique.

“Soccer is a sport in which the primary skill is to be able to kick the ball with speed and accuracy. If we can break down the science and describe how it is done, then kicking the ball well becomes a learnable skill,” he said.

Noor presented his preliminary research at the World Conference on Soccer and Science recently held in the United States and was awarded second place in the Young Investigator’s Award.

He uses 3D motion analysis of elite players to examine how changes in the direction and movement of the body at different stages results in different types of kicks, in terms of the speed, accuracy and swerve of the ball.

The project is innovative as previous research has focused either on specific portions of the kicking sequence or the type of ball flight produced from a kick. His study examines the entire kicking process from the approach, to the length of the last stride, and combined this with ball flight characteristics.

“Too often soccer kicking is taught at young ages by simple repetitive practice without correct instruction. I think this work could have huge potential in helping coaches develop young players rather than just scouting for natural talent,” said Noor. “At advanced levels it can be used to direct players on controlling the spin they put on a soccer ball by altering their kicking motion.

“Although I admit the unpredictable spin that someone like Cristiano Ronaldo puts on a ball would be a very hard skill to teach, and took Ronaldo years of practice to master.”

The Sydney Health Sciences student is currently completing his Bachelor of Exercise and Sport Science (Honours) degree at the University of Sydney under the supervision of Dr. Rene Ferdinands, and plans to continue onto a PhD to further his research.

In the meantime he has been glued to the screen watching some of the world’s best strikers in action at the 2014 World Cup.

Master of Exercise Physiology

The Master of Exercise Physiology is designed to produce graduates who possess the knowledge, competencies and clinical experience required for safe and effective clinical exercise practice.

Students will explore metabolism and physiology, human motor learning and control, the principles of exercise programming, nutrition and pharmacology, and musculoskeletal principles of exercise. Integrated clinical practice instruction, practicums, and case studies will provide the advanced skills and experience essential for professional practice.

Clinical placements are undertaken in both the public and private sectors. Students will have the opportunity to develop an understanding of the career path they have chosen, and its place in the contemporary health system.

Program: Master of Exercise Physiology
Location: Cumberland campus (in Lidcombe, a suburb of Sydney), New South Wales
Semester intake: March 2015
Duration: 2 years
Application deadline: October 1, 2014

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Find out more about studying the Master of Exercise Physiology and other health sciences at the University of Sydney. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Health Sciences Admissions Officer Rachel Brady for more information about how you can study in Australia! Email Rachel at rachel@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Thursday, June 19th, 2014

Abs hold the secret to sweating it out says Sydney Health Sciences

A University of Sydney Health Sciences study has uncovered new temperature sensors in the abdominal area of the body that are responsible for independently altering our sweat output.

The discovery was made as part a larger program of research investigating the impact of ingesting hot versus cold fluids when exercising.

Sydney Dental School

Study health sciences at the University of Sydney

“We were able to prove that cold drinks don’t always have the cooling effect that people anticipate when exercising in a hot environment and in doing so also uncovered new internal sensors within the body which were responding to the temperature of the ingested fluid,” said Dr Ollie Jay from the Sydney Faculty of Health Sciences.

Known as thermoreceptors, these internal sensors which are stimulated by changes in temperature, appear to be located not in the mouth or throat as many originally thought, but further along the gastrointestinal tract.

While previous studies had suggested that cold and warm fluid ingestion had an impact on whole body sweat loss, no previous research could pinpoint the timing, or specific skin or body location of such changes.

Dr Jay’s study design allowed this discovery by comparing the results of those who consumed the hot and cold fluids orally, swirling it around in their mouth only, and those who had it injected directly into their stomach via a nasogastric tube while exercising.

The results showed large decreases in sweating when the cold fluid was injected directly into the stomach, but no such changes were seen when mouth-swilling cold water.

These findings suggest that the sensors responsible are located in the abdominal area. It also showed that when exercising in the heat a cold drink causes an immediate suspension of sweating—the key way in which our bodies cool down.

“The heat that our body loses to warm up the cold drink after it is ingested in countered by the fact that the body decreases the heat that we lose through sweating,” Dr Jay said. “So you may feel cooler for having had a cold drink, but in reality the body’s core and skin temperatures are the same as when ingesting a body temperature drink.”

About the Faculty of Health Sciences at the University of Sydney

The Sydney Faculty of Health Sciences is a world leader in health research, sciences and education. The faculty achieves this through encouraging international collaboration across all research endeavours, and through strategic partnerships that are global in their reach.

The faculty strives constantly for excellence in intellectual enquiry, academic freedom and integrity. To support these goals, they provide an engaging and stimulating student-centred learning and teaching environment, attracting some of the best students and researchers in Australia.

Master of Exercise Physiology

The Master of Exercise Physiology is designed to produce graduates who possess the knowledge, competencies and clinical experience required for safe and effective clinical exercise practice.

Students will explore metabolism and physiology, human motor learning and control, the principles of exercise programming, nutrition and pharmacology, and musculoskeletal principles of exercise. Integrated clinical practice instruction, practicums, and case studies will provide the advanced skills and experience essential for professional practice.

Clinical placements are undertaken in both the public and private sectors. Students will have the opportunity to develop an understanding of the career path they have chosen, and its place in the contemporary health system.

Program: Master of Exercise Physiology
Location: Cumberland campus (in Lidcombe, a suburb of Sydney), New South Wales
Semester intake: March 2015
Duration: 2 years
Application deadline: October 1, 2014

*

Find out more about studying the Master of Exercise Physiology and other health sciences at the University of Sydney. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Health Sciences Admissions Officer Rachel Brady for more information about how you can study in Australia! Email Rachel at rachel@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.