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Posts Tagged ‘Macquarie Audiology School’

Thursday, November 2nd, 2017

Macquarie University and Cochlear partner for hearing research and audiology education

Macquarie University and Cochlear have recently announced the establishment of the co-funded Cochlear Chair in Hearing and Healthy Ageing at Macquarie University, a role that will strengthen and formalise the strategic collaboration between the organisations.

Macquarie University and Cochlear partner for hearing research and audiology education

Macquarie’s Vice-Chancellor Professor S. Bruce Dowton (left) and Cochlear’s President Dig Howitt (Image credit: Jo Stephan, Macquarie University)

Cochlear is the global leader in implantable hearing solutions and focuses on technology innovations to treat a range of moderate to profound types of hearing loss. The company has long supported clinically focused hearing research, audiology education and advocacy in hearing health care.

The Cochlear Chair at Macquarie University will align this focus with the university’s own commitments in hearing research and education, as well as clinical practice and advocacy. The Chair will oversee the implementation of collaborative research and education strategies, with the long-term goal of developing a leading platform for further impactful research in hearing in Australia.

The announcement was made at Cochlear headquarters by Macquarie’s Vice-Chancellor Professor S Bruce Dowton, together with Cochlear’s President Dig Howitt, who was recently announced as Cochlear’s next Chief Executive Officer effective January 3 next year.

“Around 3.6 million Australians are affected by hearing loss, a number that will double by 2060 as the population ages. Macquarie University and Cochlear continue to commit ourselves to addressing that major health priority,” said Professor Dowton.

“Macquarie is home to the Macquarie Hearing Hub, and Cochlear continues to lead the market with innovative new hearing technologies—together we exemplify the strategic industry-academic engagement called for in the Australian Government’s National Innovation and Science Agenda, and we are in a good position for further impactful research in the hearing space.”

In addition to its commitment to the Cochlear Chair, Cochlear has also committed to provide financial support for the ongoing research activities of the university’s Professor of Hearing, Language & The Brain and Australian Laureate Fellow, Professor David McAlpine.

“Hearing loss is a major public health problem. There is increasing evidence of the importance of hearing to overall health, especially as people age. Developing evidence of the impact of untreated hearing loss on people’s health and the economy, and the effectiveness of treatments, is critical to ensuring hearing loss is treated appropriately. We are proud to sponsor the Cochlear Chair in Hearing and Healthy Ageing at Macquarie and to provide support to Professor McAlpine’s research. Professor McAlpine has already made significant contributions to the fields of audiology and hearing,” said Cochlear President Dig Howitt.

Cochlear moved its purpose-built global headquarters to Macquarie University’s North Ryde campus in 2010, allowing a strategic collaboration to grow in support of research, learning and teaching and advocacy around hearing health. This partnership has only increased in strength and benefit to the hearing health community, particularly with Macquarie’s establishment of the Australian Hearing Hub in 2013, which brings together a variety of research centres and hearing stakeholders.

Study Audiology at Macquarie University

The audiology program at Macquarie Audiology School is dedicated to preparing students to become professional audiologists. The university’s audiology program provides supervised clinical placements to hone its students’ professional skills. As well, numerous modules of scientific coursework allow students to learn the scientific fundamentals of audiology and understand the processes that contribute to congenital or acquired hearing loss and vestibular dysfunctions.

Program: Master of Clinical Audiology
Location: North Ryde, Sydney, New South Wales
Semester intake: February each year
Duration: 2 years

Apply to Macquarie University Audiology School!

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Find out more about studying audiology at Macquarie University. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Audiology Schools Admissions Officer Heather Brown at heather@oztrekk.com.

Monday, August 21st, 2017

Macquarie Audiology expert calls attention to noise in the workplace

During Hearing Awareness Week (August 20 – 26, 2017), researcher Associate Professor Catherine McMahon, Head of Audiology at Macquarie University’s Australian Hearing Hub, wants companies and employers to be aware that even a moderately noisy working environment, such as an office, could be impacting their employees’ well-being.

Macquarie Audiology expert calls attention to noise in the workplace

Associate Professor Catherine McMahon, Head of Audiology at Macquarie University’s Australian Hearing Hub (Photo: Macquarie)

“While excessive noise can cause hearing loss, moderate levels which may not be damaging to hearing can increase stress, decrease motivation and therefore reduce workplace productivity,” explains Associate Professor McMahon.

While excessive noise is a leading cause behind hearing loss, with a 2010 Access Economics Report attributing noise as the reason behind 37 per cent of hearing loss cases in Australia, the impact of moderate noise levels on well-being and physical health can also be quite severe.

“Stress increases cortisol levels which can affect our weight, increase the risk of cardiovascular disease, depression and lead to lower life expectancy. Noise can also reduce our ability to sleep, and due to the need for increased attention to what we are doing—listening to someone speak, reading or writing—we are generally more fatigued by the end of the day. Of course, this can also cause increased effort when thinking, frustration and anxiety,” explains Associate Professor McMahon.

Workplace areas such as open plan offices, while an innovative design, need to be acoustically well considered, says McMahon, otherwise these spaces could be impacting employees’ ability to do their work comfortably.

“Noise is a subjective parameter, therefore we need to assess how an individual reacts to sound and determine its effects on distractibility, stress and productivity. For example, it’s important to remember that speech is time varying and changes in level and informational content. Therefore, speech from an adjacent cubical can be considered annoying if it is distracting others from working, which is not simply a matter of the level of an individual’s voice.”

In addition to companies and employers taking into account office acoustic design, McMahon also suggests the use of noise-cancelling headphones in noisy areas.

“Noise-cancelling headphones may help to some extent in reducing the impact of noise on a worker, particularly if the office can’t be altered to reduce sound. However, it should be noted that these types of headphones are designed to reduce the levels of noise, which has a different spectral quality than speech.”

However, one of the biggest tips that McMahon offers workplaces is to support their employees in taking breaks in order to reduce the impact of a noisy workplace.

“Noise and stress are cumulative—everyone needs a break from noise. So taking a lunch break or going for a walk during the day is a great strategy and is good for your physical and mental health,” she concludes.

Study Audiology at Macquarie University

Communication is a vital aspect of what it means to be human and hearing is critical to communicating effectively. Audiologists experts in the non-medical management of hearing disorders play a key role in assisting those with hearing impairments to successfully engage with society. This course will provide you with the skills, knowledge and training you’ll need to practice as a qualified clinical audiologist. It will develop your skills in assessment strategies, rehabilitation and habilitation of the hearing impaired, as well as provide you with training in research design.

Program: Master of Clinical Audiology
Location: North Ryde, Sydney, New South Wales
Semester intake: February
Duration: 2 years
Application deadline: October 30 each year; however, candidates are encouraged to apply as early as possible.

Apply to Macquarie Audiology School!

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Would you like more information about degrees offered Macquarie Audiology School? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Audiology Schools Admissions Officer Heather Brown at heather@oztrekk.com.

Wednesday, March 12th, 2014

Macquarie University Department of Linguistics

The Department of Linguistics at Macquarie University is one of the largest and most diverse linguistics departments in Australia, and possibly one of the largest and most diverse departments internationally. The department hosts various research centres, clinical groups, and other research groups, which collaboratively foster a dynamic and interdisciplinary teaching and research environment. Teaching and research within the department extends across five distinct, yet interrelated, disciplinary areas:

The department is particularly proud to be home to a Macquarie University Research Centre, the Centre for Language Sciences (CLaS). Alongside the Macquarie Centre for Cognitive Science (MACCS), CLaS has members in the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Cognition and its Disorders. The Centre of Excellence is funded for 7 years from 2011, and is directed by Professor Stephen Crain. There are several other active research centres within the department, including the Centre for Language in Social Life (CLSL), the Applied Linguistics and Language in Education Research Centre (ALLERC) and the Centre for Translation and Interpreting Research (CTIR), which includes sign language interpreting. The department prides itself on being the world’s leading institution for research in Auslan, the Australian sign language.

A leading audiology section in the department has been crucial in ensuring Macquarie University’s central involvement as one of five core parties in the HEARing Co-operative Research Centre (CRC). Our two clinics, an audiology clinic and a speech and language pathology clinic, provide services to the community as well as placement opportunities for students.

Macquarie Audiology School

The Master of Clinical Audiology at Macquarie University is dedicated to preparing students to become professional audiologists. The university’s audiology program provides supervised clinical placements to hone its students’ professional skills. As well, numerous modules of scientific coursework allow students to learn the scientific fundamentals of audiology and understand the processes that contribute to congenital or acquired hearing loss and vestibular dysfunctions.

Macquarie Speech Pathology School

The Master of Speech and Language Pathology (MSLP) at Macquarie University began in 2001. It prepares graduates for the profession of speech pathology, enabling them to work clinically with individuals with developmental or acquired communication disorders. The program enables individuals who have completed a bachelor’s degree in a related field to qualify as speech pathologists in two years and obtain a master’s degree.

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Would you like more information about studying audiology or speech pathology at Macquarie University? Contact OzTREKK Admissions Officer Sarah Bridson at sarah@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Interested in linguistics? Email OzTREKK’s Australian Linguistics Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com.

Thursday, November 7th, 2013

World-first device at Macquarie offers new insight into life with a cochlear implant

A new imaging device was launched on Macquarie University’s campus recently, helping researchers in the ARC Centre of Excellence in Cognition and its Disorders (CCD) and HEARing Cooperative Research Centre (CRC) better understand how the human brain processes information from a cochlear implant.

For the first time, scientists can use a well-established brain imaging technique called MEG, or magnetoencephalography, to measure brain function in recipients of cochlear implants, including young children. The new device overcomes the electromagnetic restrictions of cochlear implants, enabling researchers to gain valuable insight into this established and effective solution for people with hearing loss.

Distinguished Professor Stephen Crain, Director of the CCD, says the cochlear implant (CI) MEG system opens fresh avenues for research into the effects of hearing loss, and restoration of hearing on brain development and function.

“We have a unique window into the brain through MEG technology,” he says. “For seven years, CCD researchers have used MEG to understand how the brain processes sensations and perceptions, language and emotions. Now, for the first time, we will be able to extend this knowledge to understand how the brain adapts to a cochlear implant, especially in children, whose neural development is at a crucial stage.”

The Macquarie University Distinguished professor added that they know that early intervention yields the best cognitive outcomes for children, because brain plasticity is optimal in the first few years of life. “Using the new MEG system, we plan to investigate how the brain is able to achieve so much more during this period using the same information. One of the first studies using the new MEG system will explore the effects of early intervention on auditory brain development in children with cochlear implants.”

The facilities in the CCD’s KIT-Macquarie Brain Research Laboratory have helped it become one of the world’s most advanced laboratories for brain research, with a suite of three MEG brain imaging systems—including, now, two world-first devices. The laboratory, based at the Macquarie University node of the CCD, also features a CSIRO-designed helium recovery system to support the MEG systems.

Significantly, the installation of the CI MEG device is also one of the first major outcomes of the Australian Hearing Hub, an initiative of Macquarie University that brings the country’s best hearing technology and research providers together with allied health organizations.

“This is a sensational example of what can be done through partnership,” says Associate Professor Jim Patrick, Chief Scientist at Cochlear Limited. “We saw the need for the next level of insight into our product, and were able to join with the expertise of the CCD, CSIRO, Kanazawa Institute of Technology and the HEARing CRC to make this happen. The recipients of our products benefit immeasurably from good quality, advanced research, and the potential impact for hearing health from this innovation worldwide is enormous.”

This innovative project was a joint venture by an interdisciplinary team of researchers in cochlear implant technology, hearing disorders, cognitive and language sciences, and brain imaging, to study the effects of hearing loss and cochlear implantation in the brain across the life span.

As a funding partner, the HEARing CRC’s Chief Executive Officer Associate Professor Bob Cowan is excited by the possibilities. “The CI MEG will for the first time provide clear insights into how the brain processes information from a cochlear implant. This knowledge will be invaluable in developing new cochlear implant speech coding strategies for tonal languages or music perception.”

The Australian Hearing Hub is an initiative of the Australian Government being conducted as part of the Higher Education Investment Fund and the Sydney Cochlear Implant Centre generously helped to share the Kecman family’s story.

Macquarie University Speech and Hearing Clinic

Formerly the Macquarie University Audiology Clinic, the Macquarie University Speech and Hearing Clinic  provides diagnostic and rehabilitative speech pathology and audiology services for people of all ages and is part of the Australian Hearing Hub. The clinic is a leader in speech pathology practice for all ages and clients receive the most effective services available for difficulties with speech, stuttering, language, literacy, voice, and accents.

The Macquarie University Speech and Hearing Clinic also offers best practice, independent hearing assessments and services including hearing aids, hearing rehabilitation and diagnosis and management of auditory processing disorders.

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Contact OzTREKK Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston for the latest information regarding Macquarie University Audiology School and other Australian Audiology Schools. Email Shannon at shannon@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1 866-698-7355 for more info about audiology program entry requirements, application deadlines, scholarships, and tuition fees.

Find out more about Australian universities and how OzTREKK can help you to study in Australia!

 

Tuesday, July 2nd, 2013

Macquarie participates in new summer institute for speech pathologists

The International Centre for Child Language Health (ICCLH) is holding a Summer Institute on “Training Courses for Speech Pathologists” in Beijing this month.

This institute, sponsored by the China Disabled Person’s Federation, will be the first of its kind in China, and held at ICCLH headquarters in the Beijing Haidian Special Education School from  July 7 – 23, 2013.

Macquarie Speech Pathology

Macquarie University Distinguished Professor Stephen Crain

“There is a growing cohort of speech pathologists in China,” says ICCLH Director, Distinguished Professor Stephen Crain of Macquarie University, “and it is very exciting to be involved in setting up this professional training.”

“The best part of my job is bringing talented people together, and organizing events like this Summer Institute, to benefit children across the world.”

The institute’s offerings will include

  • Introduction to Linguistics and Language Acquisition – Professor Stephen Crain and Dr Peng Zhou (Macquarie University),
  • Methodologies in the Practice of Speech-language Pathology – Ms Jennifer Brown (Macquarie University) and Professor Liqun Gao (Deputy Director of the ICCLH, Beijing Language and Culture University)
  • Introduction to Language Development and Its Disorders -Dr Liora Ballin (Macquarie University)

The International Centre for Child Language Health (ICCLH) was opened in September 2012 and initially conceived between the ARC Centre of Excellence in Cognition and its Disorders at Macquarie University, and the Centre for Studies of Chinese as a Second Language at the Beijing Language and Culture University. Several Macquarie University academic staff are members of the executive committee of the ICCLH, including Dr Peng Zhou (also Deputy Director of the ICCLH), Associate Professor Blake Johnson, Associate Professor Rosalind Thornton and Dr Elisabeth Harrison.

The centre brings together researchers, teachers, clinicians and medical practitioners from China and Australia to address the needs of Mandarin-speaking children who suffer from language impairments.

The institute’s location in the Beijing Haidian Special Education School enables ICCLH researchers to have immediate access to children with a variety of language disorders, and to facilitate individualized treatment plans for them, including parental involvement both in treatment plans and as members of the ICCLH advisory board. These features makes the ICCLH a truly unique centre for translating research into practice.

In the past two years, the International Centre for Child Language Health has grown considerably, and currently includes representatives from the following organizations:

  • Applied Electronics Laboratory, Kanazawa Institute of Technology, Japan
  • ARC Centre of Excellence in Cognition and its Disorders, Australia
  • Beijing Language and Culture University, China
  • Beijing Tongren Hospital of Capital Medical University, China
  • Beijing Haidian Special Education School, China
  • HEARing CRC, Australia
  • Institute of Psychology, Chinese Academy of Science
  • National Yang Ming University, Taiwan
  • The MARCS Institute, University of Western Sydney, Australia
  • The Chinese University of Hong Kong
  • Xuanwu Hospital of Capital Medical University, China

Master of Speech and Language Pathology (MSLP)

The Master of Speech and Language Pathology (MSLP) at Macquarie University began in 2001. It prepares graduates for the profession of speech pathology, enabling them to work clinically with individuals with developmental or acquired communication disorders. The program enables individuals who have completed a bachelor’s degree in a related field to qualify as speech pathologists in two years and obtain a master’s degree.

Macquarie University Speech and Hearing Clinic

Formerly the Macquarie University Audiology Clinic, the Macquarie University Speech and Hearing Clinic  provides diagnostic and rehabilitative speech pathology and audiology services for people of all ages and is part of the Australian Hearing Hub. The clinic is a leader in speech pathology practice for all ages and clients receive the most effective services available for difficulties with speech, stuttering, language, literacy, voice, and accents.

The Macquarie University Speech and Hearing Clinic also offers best practice, independent hearing assessments and services including hearing aids, hearing rehabilitation and diagnosis and management of auditory processing disorders.

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Would you like more information about studying audiology or speech pathology at Macquarie University?

Contact OzTREKK Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston for the latest information regarding Australian Audiology Schools and Australian Speech Pathology Schools. Email Shannon at shannon@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1 866-698-7355 and get up-to-date info about audiology and speech pathology program entry requirements, application deadlines, scholarships, and tuition fees.

 

Tuesday, July 2nd, 2013

Macquarie University wins security award

Last month, Macquarie University’s security team has received industry recognition, winning an Australian Security Industry Award for Excellence.

Organized by the Australian Security Industry Association Limited (ASIAL), the awards recognizes outstanding individuals and organizations within the security industry, and is Australia’s premier security awards program.

University Campus Security Manager John Durbridge accepted the award on behalf of the team at an event held in Melbourne recently.

The group won in the Technical Security Solution (projects below $250K) category, for the emergency alert system project that was introduced at Macquarie University last year.

In 2012, Macquarie became the first Australian university to adopt a comprehensive emergency alerts system across its campuses. The system—Alerts.mq.edu.au—advises students and staff of emergencies via email and SMS notifications to any mobile device such as a smartphone, tablet or laptop.

“Through careful and innovative development, alerts.mq.edu.au has enabled the university to better manage communications around critical incidents and emergencies, and improve the safety of its staff, students and community,” said Durbridge.

“It’s great to receive recognition from the industry for this project which has done a great deal to improve campus safety and security.”

About Macquarie University

For the second year in a row, Macquarie University was voted as Australia’s highest-ranking university in the QS Top 50 Under 50, an international comparison of the best universities in the world under the age of 50.

Established in 1964, Macquarie University in Sydney is ranked among the top 200 universities in the world. Set on 135 hectares of peaceful green parkland, Macquarie’s modern campus is just 30 minutes from Sydney’s city centre and features cutting-edge facilities for learning and research.

Macquarie is rated 5 stars for student diversity by the The Good Universities Guide and international students comprise a third of Macquarie’s student body. The university operates with a global perspective, encouraging its students to participate in cross-cultural exchange and global participation via unique programs such the Global Leadership Program and Participation and Community Engagement (PACE) initiative. Macquarie also has one of the most extensive international exchange programs of any Australian university, with student mobility funding giving everyone the opportunity to enhance their degree with international experience.

Well known for its prestigious business programs in accounting, actuarial studies and finance, the university is also a leader in fields such as science, engineering and linguistics. Within the Faculty of Human Sciences, Macquarie University offers a suite of allied health courses in audiology, speech pathology, clinical and neuropsychology. Speech pathology is a significant and valuable addition to the these services especially in light of the new Macquarie Hospital and Clinics and the establishment of the Australian School of Advanced Medicine.

Popular schools include the Macquarie Speech Pathology School, Macquarie Audiology School, Macquarie Physiotherapy School and the Macquarie Business School.

Find out more about what it’s like to study at Macquarie University. Learn more about Australian universities and how OzTREKK can help you to study in Australia!

 

 

Friday, June 28th, 2013

Macquarie University is Australia’s top modern university

Once, again, Macquarie University was voted as Australia’s highest-ranking university in the QS Top 50 Under 50, an international comparison of the best universities in the world under the age of 50.

Currently ranked 18th in the world, this is the second year in a row that Macquarie has been named Australia’s best modern university! The ranking is based on measures for research, teaching, innovation, graduate employability and international outlook.

In its relatively short history, Macquarie has seen substantial growth due in part to significant investment in areas of research excellence, facilities and infrastructure.

Macquarie University is home to the most technologically advanced hospital in the country; the Australian School of Advanced Medicine; a state-of-the-art library; and the Australian Hearing Hub which opened this year, bringing the nation’s leading hearing research and treatment agencies together on the campus.

In Excellence in Research for Australia (ERA) 2012, 85% of Macquarie’s research fields were rated at or above world standard. The Academic Ranking of World Universities places Macquarie in or close to the top 100 in the world in natural sciences, engineering, earth sciences and life sciences.

About Macquarie University

Established in 1964, Macquarie University in Sydney is ranked among the top 200 universities in the world. Set on 135 hectares of peaceful green parkland, Macquarie’s modern campus is just 30 minutes from Sydney’s city centre and features cutting-edge facilities for learning and research.

Well known for its prestigious business programs in accounting, actuarial studies and finance, the university is also a leader in fields such as science, engineering and linguistics. Within the Faculty of Human Sciences, Macquarie University offers a suite of allied health courses in audiology, speech pathology, clinical and neuropsychology. Speech pathology is a significant and valuable addition to the these services especially in light of the new Macquarie Hospital and Clinics and the establishment of the Australian School of Advanced Medicine.

Popular schools include the Macquarie Speech Pathology School, Macquarie Audiology School, Macquarie Physiotherapy School and the Macquarie Business School.

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Find out more about what it’s like to study at Macquarie University. Learn more about Australian universities and how OzTREKK can help you to study in Australia!