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Posts Tagged ‘LLB’

Monday, May 15th, 2017

It’s National Law Week in Australia

National Law Week in Australia takes place throughout Australia in May each year. This year, it runs from May 15 – 19. Law Week provides Australians (and visitors) to get a closer look at how law and justice works in each Australian state. A range of exciting and interactive activities are being held around Australia celebrate Law Week, including courthouse tours, mock trials and student competitions.

It's National Law Week in Australia

Find out how you can study at an Australian law school (Photo: Bond University)

Law Week events in Australia are organized individually or by a group of organizations collaborating to share ideas and resources. Some examples of organizations who participate in and support Law Week include the Courts Administration Authority, law firms, Australian police departments, municipal libraries, community legal centres, legal aid, and the Attorney General’s Department. Usually, Law Week’s major highlight is Courts Open Day, which provides a chance to explore the rich heritage of the courts. Tours, mock trials, sentencing exercises and meet-the-judge sessions give visitors an insight into court operations and personalities.

Law Week events are aimed for the whole community to enjoy. These events provide opportunities for people from all walks of life to gain new perspectives on legal and justice issues. These events will be of interest to those who work in legal and justice agencies and students, especially students studying at Australian law schools.

Australian Law Schools are a popular option for Canadian students wishing to attain qualifications to practice law.

But how do you know which degree to take—the LLB or the JD? It’s a question we receive a lot here at the OzTREKK office. Just what is the difference between the Bachelor of Laws and the Juris Doctor? Although we’ve covered the topic before, with so many new applicants, we felt it was important to have another look and answer some other common questions we receive.

What is the difference between the LLB and the JD?

The Bachelor of Laws and the Juris Doctor are both professionally recognized degrees. Both LLB and JD programs educate students to practice law and allow them to apply for registration in Canada. The main difference is that the LLB is offered at the undergraduate level, and the JD is offered at the postgraduate level. LLB students can study the program directly from high school or after having completed post-secondary studies, while the JD or graduate-entry LLB requires a completed bachelor degree for admission.

At some Australian law schools, JD programs are fast-tracked, so that you can complete them in two calendar years, as opposed to a three-year, graduate-entry LLB. Entry requirements for JD programs can be more competitive, especially as they become more popular with North American students. At universities where both a Juris Doctor and a Bachelor of Laws are offered, students who have already completed an undergraduate degree normally apply for the postgraduate professional qualification (JD).

After I graduate, what do I have to do in order to be eligible to practice law in Canada?

An assessment based on your academic and professional profile is done before you may apply for admission to a law society in a Canadian common law jurisdiction. Once a file is assessed by the National Committee on Accreditation (NCA), you may be asked to complete one or more exams and/or attend and complete specific law school courses within a prescribed time frame. Upon successful completion of these requirements, the NCA issues a Certificate of Qualification. The certificate will state that you have education and training equivalent to that of a graduate from a Canadian law school.

How can I take the examinations in Canadian law?

There are two ways of taking these examinations if they have not been taken as part of an Australian Law School degree. Once an assessment is complete, you may either complete assigned subjects with NCA “challenge exams” or complete assigned subjects at law school.

The more popular route for Canadians is the challenge exams.

NCA assessments focus on the competence of applicants in core common law subjects, including four Canadian subjects which are mandatory for all applicants:

  • Principles of Canadian Administrative Law
  • Canadian Constitutional Law
  • Canadian Criminal Law and Procedure
  • Foundations of Canadian Law

A syllabus and sample exam are available for each subject.

How much difference is there between Australian and Canadian law?

The principles and methodology of Australian and Canadian law are similar. The details of statutory provisions and case-law obviously differ, but an Australian law degree provides a good basis for taking examinations in Canadian law and for legal practice in Canada.

Will I be able to practice law in Australia?

These are two separate issues: qualification as an Australian lawyer and possession of a visa entitling you to work in Australia. Admission to the legal profession in Australia requires—depending on the state—the completion of either articles or a six-month Practical Legal Training program. Australian immigration operates on a “points” system for working visas. Some points are awarded for having an Australian degree, but additional points are required. Some of OzTREKK’s Australian law school graduates have qualified and are working in Australia. For further information, you should contact the Australian Government Department of Immigration and Border Protection or an Australian consulate in Canada.

Which law programs do OzTREKK Australian Law Schools offer?

OzTREKK’s Australian Law Schools offer either a graduate-entry LLB or JD. Click on the links below to find out more about the university’s law program.

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For information about about law degrees offered in Australia, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Law Schools Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com or call (toll free in Canada) at 1-866-698-7355.

Friday, February 24th, 2017

University of Sydney Law School Juris Doctor FAQs

What is the difference between the Bachelor of Laws (LLB) and the Juris Doctor (JD) offered at the University of Sydney?

University of Sydney Law School Juris Doctor FAQs

Learn more about studying at Sydney Law School

Both the Bachelor of Laws (LLB) and the Juris Doctor (JD) are law degrees which upon their completion enable you to apply in your jurisdiction to practice as a lawyer. The main difference between the two law degrees is that the LLB is intended for those applicants who have not completed an undergraduate university degree. Their highest level of qualification is high school.

The JD is simply the graduate-entry version of the LLB. You must have completed an undergraduate degree before you can commence the JD. If you have not completed an undergraduate degree, then you apply to the LLB.

When can I commence my studies in the JD program at Sydney Uni?

The Juris Doctor  program commences in the first semester of each year, which is in late February/early March.

Do I need to sit the LSAT to apply to Sydney Law School?

No, the LSAT is not a requirement and is not assessed. Even if you have completed the LSAT, it will not be assessed as part of the application process.

Which electives do I study?

You will have a wide range of electives from which to choose. There will be a strong emphasis on international law and you may choose some units from the Sydney Law School‘s extensive postgraduate coursework units of study. You will complete 7 electives and will be able to choose from 3 tables of electives.

About the University of Sydney Law School Juris Doctor

The University of Sydney Law School is Australia’s first. Since its inception, it has been at the forefront of developments associated with both the teaching and research of law. Its strong sense of commitment to the fundamentals of law is combined with a commitment to innovation and the exploration of issues at the cutting edge.

The Sydney JD comprises the core legal subjects required throughout the world for professional accreditation coupled with the study of a wide range of elective subjects which allows advanced learning in both specialized fields and law in general. Teaching and learning methodology includes a wide range of formats to allow individual choice, a deep understanding of the law, independent research and the development of the skills and ethics inherent in modern professional practice.

Program: Juris Doctor (JD)
Location: Sydney, New South Wales
Duration: 3 years
Semester intake: March
Application deadline: Candidates are strongly encouraged to apply a minimum of three months prior to the program start date.

Apply now to Sydney Law School!

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Find out more about studying at Sydney Law School! Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Law Schools Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston for more information at shannon@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Monday, January 30th, 2017

Don’t miss the Australian Law School seminars

If you’re wondering what it’s like to study law in Australia and then practice in Canada, then don’t miss the upcoming OzTREKK Australian Law Schools Information Sessions!

Meet Australian law alumni who are successfully practicing in Canada, and chat with Australian law school representatives to learn more about your study and career options!

Don't miss the Australian Law School seminars

Don’t forget to RSVP Australian Law Schools Seminars Jan. 30 – Feb. 9, 2017

During the seminars, you will have the opportunity to speak with Australian law school graduates who are successfully practicing law in Canada. Learn more about how to get into law school, the accreditation process, program structures, and much more!

VANCOUVER
Date: January 30, 2017
Time: 5 p.m.
Location: University of British Columbia, Allard Hall, Fasken Martineau Room 122

MONTREAL
Date: February 6, 2017
Time: 6 p.m.
Location: Adams Auditorium

TORONTO
Date: February 8, 2017
Time: 5 p.m.
Location: University of Toronto, Social Work Building, SK 720

Don’t forget to RSVP for an OzTREKK Australian Law Schools Information Session!

OzTREKK represents nine Australian Law Schools:

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Don’t miss the upcoming OzTREKK Australian Law Schools Information Sessions! Contact OzTREKK Australian Law Schools Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com if you have any questions. We’re here to help!

Friday, January 20th, 2017

Wondering how you can get into law school?

Are you interested in studying law but unsure about your options? Would you like to hear from law graduates who have studied in Australia and are now practicing lawyers in Canada?

Get into law school?

RSVP for an OzTREKK Australian Law Schools seminar!

Then please join OzTREKK, Australian law school representatives, and law school alumni for the upcoming OzTREKK Australian Law Schools Information Sessions!

During the seminars, you will have the opportunity to speak with Australian law school graduates who are successfully practicing law in Canada. Learn more about how to get into law school, the accreditation process, program structures, and much more!

VANCOUVER
Date: January 30, 2017
Time: 5 p.m.
Location: University of British Columbia, Allard Hall, Fasken Martineau Room 122

MONTREAL
Date: February 6, 2017
Time: 6 p.m.
Location: Adams Auditorium

TORONTO
Date: February 8, 2017
Time: 5 p.m.
Location: University of Toronto, Social Work Building, SK 720

Don’t forget to RSVP for an OzTREKK Australian Law Schools Information Session!

OzTREKK represents nine Australian Law Schools:

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Don’t miss the upcoming OzTREKK Australian Law Schools Information Sessions! Contact OzTREKK Australian Law Schools Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com if you have any questions. We’re here to help!

Friday, November 25th, 2016

More flexibility in revamped JCU law degree

James Cook University has refreshed its JCU Bachelor of Laws degree, to provide JCU law graduates with a competitive edge in the ever-changing legal environment.

Flexibility, work-integrated learning and skill development are key features of the course.

Head of Law Mandy Shircore said the new JCU Law degree was designed for the lawyer of the future: contemporary, relevant and innovative.

More flexibility in revamped JCU law degree

Learn more about studying law at JCU

Ms Shircore said the award-winning first-year study program has been redesigned to include a new subject: Contemporary Practice: The New Lawyer.

“This subject focuses on the skills required for the contemporary lawyer, including interpersonal and communication proficiencies, emotional intelligence and the non-adversarial methods of dispute resolution,” she said.

“Aware of the emerging importance of technology and the impacts of artificial intelligence on traditional legal roles, our refreshed course looks at technology in law and will allow students to undertake a minor in Information Technology.”

JCU Law students also get the chance to choose one law elective from either Human Rights Law or Public International Law in their first year of study.

All final-year law students have the opportunity to undertake placements with a large range of legal firms and community legal services in JCU’s “super-clinic” clinical legal education program. They can also undertake an advocacy subject where they will obtain intensive one-on-one and small group advocacy training from local judges and barristers, or they can work with business students developing real life projects for JCU’s industry partners.

JCU Bachelor of Laws (LLB) Program

The Bachelor of Laws (LLB) (Graduate) degree, which is a three-year program. This law program is designed for students who already hold a bachelor degree in another field and wish to gain a qualification in law.

The Bachelor of Laws (Graduate) is an accredited degree that focuses strongly on learning outcomes that have professional relevance and practical application. This course is designed to challenge students, exposing them to contemporary issues, the latest research and new ideas across diverse areas of the practice and application of law. The program encourages students to develop independent thought and critical analysis of legal issues, as well as an interest in law reform and an understanding of community legal problems.

Program: Bachelor of Laws (graduate entry)
Location: Townsville, Queensland
Semester intakes: February or July
Duration: 3 years
Application deadline: There is no official application deadline. It is recommended that students apply at least three months prior to the program start date.

Apply now to the JCU Law School!

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Do you have any questions about JCU Law School? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Law Schools Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston for more information at shannon@oztrekk.com.

Wednesday, June 1st, 2016

Cream of Australia’s legal crop honoured at UQ

The future of Australia’s legal profession is bright, based on the sharp young minds honoured for academic achievements and contributions to Australia’s legal services industry at the University of Queensland recently.

Head of School and Academic Dean Sarah Derrington said UQ’s TC Beirne School of Law ranked in the top 50 in the world.

Cream of Australia’s legal crop honoured at UQ

Dan Rogers, Jordan English, Chief Justice Catherine Holmes, Professor Peter Høj (Photo credit: UQ)

“Our annual awards ceremony recognises students for achieving the highest marks in some of the most challenging subjects, achieving the highest marks across the entire school and making positive and meaningful contributions through pro bono legal work,” Professor Derrington said.

“Our world-renowned lecturers were also acknowledged for excellence in their profession and for inspiring students to learn.”

University of Queensland Vice-Chancellor and President Professor Peter Høj said the students and teachers presented with awards were the cream of the legal crop.

“To be singled out for an award tonight from such a select intake of students is an impressive achievement and one that augurs well for their future and the future of the profession,” he said.

“It’s not easy to get into most law schools, let alone UQ’s TC Beirne School of Law which ranks in the top 50 in the world.

“Since the start of 2015 we have been reducing our first-year intake to 250 of the best and brightest OP1 students.”

Guest speaker Chief Justice Catherine Holmes of the Supreme Court of Queensland acknowledged the excellent teaching at the School of Law and praised students’ accomplishments of academic excellence and their contributions to the community through pro bono legal work.

Award-winner and recent graduate Georgia Williams was recognised for achieving the highest grade point average of the women in her graduating class and the highest overall marks in law courses and the Bachelor of Laws program.

“Throughout my time at the TC Beirne School of Law I have had the great privilege of learning from outstanding lecturers, benefitting from the school’s mooting program and sharing the experience with many people who I hope will remain my friends and mentors in the future,” she said.

Fifth-year Law/Commerce student Jordan English, who won awards for academic achievements and contributions to pro bono legal work, said the awards were welcome recognition for hard work.

“A lot of the work you do as a law student isn’t seen,” he said. “It’s usually just us studying through the night, so these awards are a good way of recognising our hard work in a public way.

“The awards will also undoubtedly help with prospective employment and I suspect they will be a good asset for any future applications for postgraduate study.”

Professor Derrington said the annual awards were an important tradition.

“These awards acknowledge excellence—the excellence of our students, the excellence of our teaching staff, and the excellence of the contributions made by our students and staff to community service and Pro Bono activities,” she said.

She said the event was also an opportunity to thank the alumni and friends whose generous donations made scholarships and awards possible.

UQ’s Forgan Smith building, which houses the School of Law, is undergoing a dramatic $33-million refurbishment, and from 2017 will feature more connected and interactive spaces to encourage a collaborative style of work and ensure students are able to use the latest in mobile technology.

UQ Law School Bachelor of Laws program

Program: Graduate-entry Bachelor of Laws (LLB)
Location: Brisbane, Queensland
Semester intake: February
Duration: 3 years

Entry requirements

To be eligible to apply to the University of Queensland Bachelor of Laws (graduate entry) program, you must have

  • completed or be completing an undergraduate degree; and
  • achieved a minimum cumulative grade point average (cGPA) of 75%.

It is recommended that you apply if you have achieved a minimum cGPA of 75%, as above. Please note that this is a minimum average to be eligible to apply and that your application outcome will be determined by the university. Each applicant’s average is calculated over all years of university study.

The UQ Law School does not require the LSAT for entry.

Apply to the University of Queensland Law School!

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To find out more about UQ Law School, contact OzTREKKs Australian Law Schools Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Tuesday, May 17th, 2016

Celebrating National Law Week in Australia

National Law Week in Australia takes place throughout Australia in May each year. This year, it runs from May 16 – 20. Law Week provides Australians (and visitors) to get a closer look at how law and justice works in each Australian state. A range of exciting and interactive activities are being held around Australia celebrate Law Week, including courthouse tours, mock trials and student competitions.

Australian Law Schools in Australia

Bond University Law School Moot Court

Law Week events in Australia are organized individually or by a group of organizations collaborating to share ideas and resources. Some examples of organizations who participate in and support Law Week include the Courts Administration Authority, law firms, Australian police departments, municipal libraries, community legal centres, legal aid, and the Attorney General’s Department. Usually, Law Week‘s major highlight is Courts Open Day, which provides a chance to explore the rich heritage of the courts. Tours, mock trials, sentencing exercises and meet-the-judge sessions give visitors an insight into court operations and personalities.

Law Week events are aimed at the whole community. These events provide opportunities for people from all walks of life to gain new perspectives on legal and justice issues. These events will be of interest to those who work in legal and justice agencies and students, especially students studying at Australian Law Schools.

What is the difference between the LLB and the JD?

The Bachelor of Laws and the Juris Doctor are both professionally recognized degrees. Both LLB and JD programs educate students to practice law and allow them to apply for registration in Canada. The main difference is that the LLB is offered at the undergraduate level, and the JD is offered at the postgraduate level. Bachelor of Laws students can study the program directly from high school or after having completed post-secondary studies, while the JD or graduate-entry LLB requires a completed bachelor degree for admission.

At some Australian Law Schools, JD programs are fast-tracked, so that you can complete them in two calendar years, as opposed to a three-year, graduate-entry LLB. Entry requirements for JD programs can be more competitive, especially as they become more popular with North American students. At universities where both a Juris Doctor and a Bachelor of Laws are offered, students who have already completed an undergraduate degree normally apply for the postgraduate professional qualification (JD).

Which law programs do OzTREKK Australian Law Schools offer?

Australian Law Schools offer either a graduate-entry LLB or JD and most offer an undergraduate-entry LLB:

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Would you like more information about law schools in Australia? Contact OzTREKK Australian Law Schools Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Wednesday, December 9th, 2015

UQ landmark to undergo dramatic refurbishment

Queensland judicial leaders tried their hands as graffiti artists at the University of Queensland’s landmark Forgan Smith building recently to mark the beginning of a new chapter in the building’s history.

The building houses the TC Beirne School of Law, which is set for a dramatic refurbishment to begin in January.

University of Queensland Forgan Smith Building

UQ Forgan Smith building today

The graffiti—recording fun and fond memories of the school’s alumni and students—was a symbolic farewell to the walls that have contained the hopes and dreams of about 10,000 law students over the past 66 years.

UQ Vice-Chancellor and President Professor Peter Høj said the 12-month refurbishment would be an exciting rejuvenation of the historic building to bring it into line with the world’s best contemporary education facilities.

“The aim is to improve the student experience by creating a place of light, learning and collaboration, incorporating the latest technology and facilities,” he said.

“The rejuvenation will not affect the beautiful and historic sandstone façade, but will see a dramatic re-modelling of the internal space to create a state-of-the-art teaching and research facility befitting our law school’s ranking among the top 50 in the world.”

Historic features such as the magnificent red cedar-panelled Moot Court—previously Brisbane’s Supreme Court—would be preserved and re-installed in the remodelled facility.

Professor Høj said the significant cost of the work would be met by a combination of university capital works funding and philanthropic donations, much like the way the university and its alumni almost three decades ago came together to bring Customs House back to its rightful glory for the ongoing benefit of both the university and indeed Brisbane.

Head of School and Dean of Law Professor Sarah Derrington said the new space was designed to support a major refocusing of the UQ Law School and would provide a dynamic and inspiring environment for students and teachers.

“Teaching in today’s world is a stimulating, interactive and ever-evolving experience,” she said. “In addition, the legal workplace is changing, with more collaborative work practices between younger lawyers and their senior colleagues.

“The new space will include collaborative research spaces and break-out rooms, independent study areas, and facilities for mobile technology, innovative learning, research and academic facilities.”

University of Queensland

Artist’s impression of the Forgan Smith refurbishment (Image credit: UQ)

Professor Derrington said philanthropic support would also be sought to establish an endowed scholarship fund.

“As part of the school restructure, we are deliberately reducing our first-year intake to no more than 250 of the best and brightest students, and we are providing them with innovative programs, collaborative learning opportunities and excellent student-to-teacher ratios,” she said.

“One of the major hurdles for financially disadvantaged students is the cost of living while undertaking a full-time degree.

“An endowed scholarship fund will enable our school to offer students scholarships that alleviate the imperative to work to survive.”

The rejuvenation, which has been more than a year in the planning, has been designed by BVN Architecture under the guidance of heritage architect Andrew Ladlay.

University of Queensland Law School Bachelor of Laws program

Program: Graduate-entry Bachelor of Laws (LLB)
Location: Brisbane, Queensland
Semester intake: February
Duration: 3 years

Entry Requirements

To be eligible to apply to the Bachelor of Laws (graduate entry), you must have the following:

  • Completed or be completing an undergraduate degree
  • Achieved a minimum cumulative grade point average (cGPA) of 75%

It is recommended that you apply for the UQ Law School’s LLB program if you have achieved a minimum cGPA of 75%, as above. Please note that this is a minimum average to be eligible to apply and that your application outcome will be determined by the university. Each applicant’s average is calculated over all years of university study.

LSAT is not required for entry.

Apply to the University of Queensland Law School!

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To find out more about UQ Law School, contact OzTREKKs Australian Law Schools Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com.

Thursday, November 5th, 2015

ChangeMakers: The UQ Pro Bono Centre

Battling domestic violence, assisting the Supreme Court of Tonga and helping provide legal support to the Solomon Islands are all in a semester’s work for University of Queensland law students.

At the TC Beirne School of Law, students are treated to an initiative not available at any other law school in Australia: participating in pro bono legal services.

UQ Law School

UQ Pro Bono Centre offers law students a meaningful opportunity to gain experience in active legal matters before graduating (Photo credit: UQ)

Opened in 2009, the UQ Pro Bono Centre offers law students a meaningful opportunity to gain experience in active legal matters before graduating, and also highlights for students the importance of access to justice for all in the community.

UQ Law School is committed to developing a strong pro bono and public service ethos in our students,” UQ Pro Bono Centre Director, Monica Taylor said.

“Students have worked alongside organisations as diverse as the Supreme Court of Tonga, the Landowners Advocacy and Legal Support Unit in the Solomon Islands, frontline domestic violence services in Brisbane, a number of private barristers, law firms and many community legal centres,” she said.

“Through the UQ Pro Bono Centre, our students are able to apply their emerging skills to a range of areas such as community legal education, law reform and legal casework.

“In doing so, they are serving their community by responding to unmet legal need in our society.”

Demand for the service has skyrocketed since students worked on 33 pro bono activities in the centre’s first year of operation.

In 2014, 149 projects were taken on by the centre—a 451% increase since its 2009 launch.

Student May-Ann Chen said her pro bono experience with the Immigrant Women’s Support Service had led her to consider areas of law she had not previously thought about.

“I’ve been able to develop some very useful skills and it’s a fantastic way to supplement what you are learning in the classroom with what actually goes on in the outside world,” she said.

“There are some very interesting, unique areas that you can be involved in, such as migration law, Islamic law and family law.

“I feel like I’m making a real impact.”

UQ Law School

TC Beirne School of Law students (Photo credit: UQ)

In September, student William Lee traveled to Myanmar to attend the fourth Asia Pro Bono Conference and Legal Ethics Forum with fellow students and research partners, Balawyn Jones and Rebecca Morrison.

The team presented the findings of a six-month research project investigating various models for engaging law students in pro bono work.

“Even as a student, I’ve been able to achieve something positive in the community,” Lee  said.

The team’s trip—which was otherwise self-funded by the students—was supported by a donation from The Honourable Justice Glen Williams AO QC.

Fellow student, Verdi Guy suggests that as a student, working in the Pro Bono Centre is her way of giving back to the university and the community.

“Gaining practical legal experience where you can make a real difference to clients and the community is an invaluable experience,” she said.

UQ Law School Bachelor of Laws program

Program: Graduate-entry Bachelor of Laws (LLB)
Location: Brisbane, Queensland
Semester intake: February
Duration: 3 years

Entry Requirements for UQ Law School

To be eligible to apply to the University of Queensland Bachelor of Laws (graduate entry) program, you must have the following:

  • Completed or be completing an undergraduate degree
  • Achieved a minimum cumulative grade point average (cGPA) of 75%

It is recommended that you apply if you have achieved a minimum cGPA of 75%, as above. Please note that this is a minimum average to be eligible to apply and that your application outcome will be determined by the university. Each applicant’s average is calculated over all years of university study.

The UQ Law School does not require the LSAT for entry.

Apply to the University of Queensland Law School!

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To find out more about studying law in Australia and at the UQ Law School, contact OzTREKKs Australian Law Schools Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Friday, September 11th, 2015

UQ law graduate awarded international scholarship

A UQ Law School graduate with a passion for human rights has won Cambridge University’s coveted Whewell Scholarship in International Law.

Carindale resident Catherine Drummond, 27, capped off her First-Class Masters degree with the scholarship, considered one of the world’s most prestigious awards for postgraduate law students.

UQ Law School

Scholarship recipient Catherine Drummond will be teaching at UQ Law School (Photo credit: UQ)

Ms Drummond said she was proud to have been awarded the scholarship.

“A long list of very eminent international legal scholars have won the Whewell Scholarship, so it’s an honour to have been recognised in this way,” Ms Drummond said.

Winning the Whewell Scholarship places Ms Drummond among an elite group of international lawyers, including senior United Nations advisers and several judges of the International Court of Justice.

She said she hoped the award would help her pursue a career in international humanitarian and criminal law.

“I’m really interested in working in this area, because it aims to protect people who are most vulnerable,” she said.

“It’s also a fairly new area of international law, so there is much scope for development.”

A former competitive high jumper, Ms Drummond gave up the chance to compete at the London Olympics in 2012 to take up an internship with the United Nations International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR).

There she worked on the landmark Karemera and Ngirumpatse Judgment, which saw two high-ranking Rwandan politicians sentenced to life imprisonment for the mass rape, mutilation and sexual assault of thousands of women and girls during the Rwandan genocide.

“The Karemera and Ngirumpatse Judgment was the first time that senior leaders were held directly responsible for sexual crimes they did not physically take part in,” Ms Drummond said.

“Although, in the past, senior leaders could have been held responsible for ordering, aiding or failing to prevent the crimes, in this case they were treated as perpetrators, as if they had physically committed the crime themselves.

“The judgment was instrumental in establishing a legal regime to ensure high-ranking leaders cannot escape punishment for these sorts of crimes.”

As an undergraduate, Ms Drummond led a team that developed a high school education program highlighting the principles of international humanitarian law supported by the Australian Red Cross.

She also convened an Amnesty International group that aimed to identify Queensland legislation that had potential human rights impacts.

A former Moreton Bay College student, Ms Drummond has a long list of accomplishments to her name. She was Australian High Jump Champion in 2008; won the UQ Law Society Medal for Most Outstanding Graduate of the Year in 2012, the International Law Association (Australia) Prize in Public International Law in 2013, and a General Sir John Monash Scholarship in 2014; and was nominated for Australian of the Year in 2012. She also won the William Charnley Prize for the highest First Class Masters at her Cambridge College.

In late July, Ms Drummond will begin teaching Public International Law at the University of Queensland’s TC Beirne School of Law.

UQ Law School Bachelor of Laws program

Program: Graduate-entry Bachelor of Laws (LLB)
Location: Brisbane, Queensland
Semester intake: February
Duration: 3 years

Entry Requirements

To be eligible to apply to the University of Queensland Bachelor of Laws (graduate entry), you must have the following:

  • Completed or be completing an undergraduate degree
  • Achieved a minimum cumulative grade point average (cGPA) of 75%

It is recommended that you apply for the UQ Law School’s LLB program if you have achieved a minimum cGPA of 75%, as above. Please note that this is a minimum average to be eligible to apply and that your application outcome will be determined by the university. Each applicant’s average is calculated over all years of university study.

The UQ Law School does not require the LSAT for entry.

Apply to the University of Queensland Law School!

*

To find out more about studying law in Australia and at the University of Queensland Law School, contact OzTREKKs Australian Law Schools Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.