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Posts Tagged ‘JCU’

Tuesday, September 26th, 2017

James Cook University’s seven in a row for graduate jobs

James Cook University has been awarded top marks for graduate employment for the seventh year in a row—and JCU is the only Queensland university to achieve the distinction for the past seven years.

James Cook University's seven in a row for graduate jobs

The Good Universities Guide confirms JCU graduates continue to be in high demand (Image via: JCU)

The authoritative tertiary education guide, the Good Universities Guide, confirms JCU graduates continue to be in high demand, with the university receiving 5 out of 5 stars for its graduates’ job prospects.

Only three Australian universities achieved the rating over the past seven years.

The rating means JCU is in the top 20% of universities whose graduates were employed full-time within four months of graduation.

74.9% of undergraduates from James Cook University find full-time employment within four months of graduating, higher than the national average (69.5%).

JCU Vice Chancellor Professor Sandra Harding said the ratings underline the university’s strong performance in teaching and research.

“Our graduates continue to be in demand and are finding employment quickly.

“We know that our graduates are highly sought after, and to receive a five-star rating for graduate employment seven years in a row confirms JCU is providing its students with a high-quality education and very strong career prospects,” said Professor Harding.

“It’s a great achievement for James Cook University to be awarded five stars for graduate employment for seven consecutive years,” said Chris Lester, the CEO of the Good Education Group, which publishes the guide.

“It’s promising to see regional universities providing students with a great student experience, backed by strong graduate outcomes,” Mr Lester said.

The university again scored top marks (five stars) for “Learner Engagement”—the proportion of students who positively rated their engagement with learning at their university.

And for the first time, the guide also includes an in-depth breakdown of university ratings at a field of study level.

JCU has achieved 5 stars in a range of categories across 14 fields of study.

The Good Universities Guide has highlighted JCU’s key strengths in fields of study including medicine, dentistry, pharmacy, and veterinary science:

  • Pharmacy students are more satisfied with key measures of student experience than at any other university.
  • Dentistry graduates from James Cook University are better employed than from any other university.
  • Medicine graduates have a 100% employment rate.
  • Veterinary science students are more satisfied with Skills Development than at any other university and graduates and have the highest employment rates in the country.

Find out more

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Find out more about studying at James Cook University.

Thursday, January 5th, 2017

Top 5 tips for international students starting at JCU

Heading to JCU Medical School or JCU Dental School? As a new international student, there are several things that you should know to make the most of your experience at James Cook University.

5 tips for international students starting at JCU

Make the most of your time at JCU!

1. Get connected!

Sign up to news updates via the university website. Join your host campus Facebook page or faculty group and connect with other students who are studying or planning to study in your program. When you arrive, you will find that you already have friends to help you settle in.

2. Plan your study: Prioritize!

With all the welcome distractions of university life, it is easy to lose sight of your academic goals. Planning your study can help to organise your time and priorities. The teaching style and academic standard may be different from what you are accustomed to, so be prepared for a change in study routine and teaching methods. Keeping on top of your studies will free you up to enjoy what your new environment has to offer.

3. Join in!

Moving to a different country gives you the opportunity to meet students of different backgrounds and cultures as well as learn about life in Australia. When you first arrive it is important to explore the community and meet people.

The groups and events on offer at JCU give you an opportunity to mingle and make friends with the local students as well as other international students. As an international student, know that you are not alone. There are currently more than 6,000 international students from more than 100 different countries enrolled at JCU. You may find others who share interests, beliefs and classes with you. Make the most of the opportunities to meet new people. Whether you are interested in playing football, speaking Spanish or cycling, there are many clubs you can be a part of. With the help and support of your fellow students, staff and International Student Support team you will fit in and make life-long friends.

4. Explore your host country!

Don’t return home with regrets. Make a list of all the attractions and locations that you would like to see and plan to make it happen! The best thing about traveling is discovering and experiencing new and exciting places. You will see extraordinary things, meet great people and create life-long memories. Make the most of it!

5. The support team is there to help!

Keep in mind that the International Student Support team at JCU here to help you. The support team acts as your first point of contact once arriving in Australia to study. They will support you and ensure your smooth transition to life and study at JCU.

JCU student services

Student services provide a variety of on-campus student support services which you can access at any point of your studies to assist you. Arriving early will allow more time to adjust to the culture and ensure the transition is a smooth experience. After arriving on campus either in Cairns or Townsville, please visit the Student Centre as soon as possible so that they can provide you with details of the JCU Orientation program.

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Do you have questions about getting started at James Cook University. Contact us at info@oztrekk.com!

Tuesday, June 28th, 2016

JCU will celebrate the International Day of the Tropics

James Cook University is defined by the tropics, unique among Australian universities, woven into the intellectual, economic and social fabric of its tropical location and set amid irreplaceable ecosystems and cultures.
JCU has warmly welcomed the United Nations’ recent decision to create an International Day of the Tropics.

The UN has decided that the International Day of the Tropics will be celebrated every year on the 29th of June. The date is the anniversary of the launch of the inaugural State of the Tropics 2014 report, the first major output of the State of the Tropics project, which is convened by JCU and draws on the expertise of leading institutions from around the world.

JCU will celebrate the International Day of the Tropics

Harding says Tropical regions of the world will play a greater part in world affairs (Photo: JCU)

JCU Vice Chancellor Professor Sandra Harding has worked with the Australian Government to build international support for the campaign.

“This is wonderful news. The Tropics is a crucial region and deserves to be recognised with an International Day of its own. The annual celebration will quite rightly focus attention on the sustainable development of the region and the tremendous potential the Tropics holds for the world,” Professor Harding said.

The ground breaking State of the Tropics 2014 report confirmed the great demographic, environmental and geopolitical significance of the region. The report revealed the Tropics is home to 40% of the world’s population, and it hosts about 80% of its terrestrial biodiversity. By 2050, more than two-thirds of the world’s children under 15 years of age will be living in the Tropics.

The JCU Vice Chancellor said the focus on the Tropics would also deliver great benefits for northern Australia.

“We have so much knowledge to share with the rest of the Tropics. This ‘tropical expertise’ promises new export industries to meet the infrastructure and other needs of the growing Tropics.

“Australia is a developed country with the largest tropical land mass and we have the experience, skills, and knowledge to share to the benefit of this region. The focus on similar geographies and climates, health, environment and the sustainable economic development challenges of the tropical world offer opportunities for northern Australia.”

The inaugural International Day of the Tropics will be held on June 29, 2016.

In September 2015 the Australian Government announced it would lead efforts to establish the International Day of the Tropics.

Nobel Laureate, Aung San Suu Kyi, launched the State of the Tropics’ inaugural report in Yangon, Myanmar on June 29, 2014.

Defined by the Tropics

James Cook University is dedicated to creating a brighter future for life in the tropics worldwide, through graduates and discoveries that make a difference. The university conducts nationally significant and internationally recognised research in areas such as marine sciences, biodiversity, tropical ecology and environments, global warming, tourism, and tropical medicine and public health care in under-served populations.

JCU teaching and research focuses on four themes:

  • Tropical Ecosystems and Environment
  • Industries and Economies in the Tropics
  • Peoples and Societies in the Tropics
  • Tropical Health, Medicine and Biosecurity.
Wednesday, May 18th, 2016

JCU welcomes QLD Govt Ideas Market co-investment

James Cook University has welcomed the Queensland Government’s announcement that it will co-invest in JCU’s Ideas Market through Economic Development Queensland’s Catalyst Infrastructure Program.

The Ideas Market is a pivotal element of JCU’s Discovery Rise project—an exciting, innovative $1.7-billion development master plan for its Douglas campus. Discovery Rise will include knowledge-based commerce, student, hotel and residential accommodation, as well as a University Private Hospital and aged care.

James Cook University

The Ideas Market (Image credit: JCU)

The Ideas Market will be the central hub for commerce, health, living, and learning at Discovery Rise. Its purpose is to draw in the community of Townsville, bringing students, staff and the wider community together in a central meeting space.

Deputy Vice Chancellor of the Division of Services and Resources Tricia Brand has warmly welcomed the Queensland Government’s support for the project.

“Discovery Rise is such an exciting development for Townsville and the wider region. The Ideas Market is a crucial part of the overall development, and will provide a catalyst for others to invest in the project.

“Discovery Rise and its Ideas Market will bring significant and sustained job creation to the benefit of Townsville and the region. It will be a focal point for the Douglas campus and a meeting place for the community,” Ms Brand said.

The Ideas Market aims to promote innovation: it will be a place to exchange ideas between all of the major disciplines of JCU, and also between the university and the community, and between institutions and commercial tenants.

It will feature cafes, restaurants, free Wi-Fi spaces, entertainment and events, markets, and will host lectures and presentations. There will also be small-scale retail outlets that could include a bike shop, travel agent, bakery, and bookshop.

One of the drawcards of the market will be a large, engaging interactive screen that will display a vast array of content including university-wide addresses, movies, and occasional lectures. It will also exhibit work by creative arts students.

Construction of the Ideas Market will proceed in tandem with other projects including the Verandah Walk project. It’s expected that construction of the Ideas Market will begin in late 2016 with building to be completed by the end of 2017.

About James Cook University

James Cook University is the second oldest university in Queensland, and Australia’s leading university in the tropics.

Offering excellence in teaching and research, JCU is a vibrant, multi-campus university with its main sites in the tropical Queensland cities of Townsville and Cairns, and modern city campuses in Singapore and Brisbane. Total student enrollments are more than 17,000 and growing, including more than 4,000 international students from 100 countries. There are more 300 programs available to international students to study at JCU.

Popular schools at JCU for Canadian students include

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Find out more about James Cook University and other Australian universities!

Tuesday, May 10th, 2016

JCU in the top 50 of the world’s universities under 50 years

James Cook University’s achievements and potential have been recognised with a respected global rankings organisation, Times Higher Education (THE), placing JCU in the top 50 universities under 50 years old.

James Cook University Vice Chancellor Professor Sandra Harding said JCU’s inclusion is very pleasing.

James Cook University

Learn more about JCU

“As the THE explains, the ranking provides a glimpse into the future, showcasing not those institutions with centuries of history, but the rising stars of the university sector that show great potential,” Prof Harding said.

According to the THE, the ranking applies performance indicators across five broad areas of teaching, research, citations, international outlook, and industry income, with the results calibrated to reflect the special characteristics of younger universities.

“JCU became a university in 1970, and since then we have become one of the world’s leading institutions focused on the tropics. We have built a strong, global reputation as a research-intensive university that is making a difference for the communities we serve,” Prof Harding said.

Times Higher Education rankings’ editor, Phil Baty said “The 150 Under 50 ranking is led by young, exciting and dynamic institutions.”

The THE is one of the best known global rankings, along with the prestigious Academic Ranking of World Universities (ARWU).

For the past six years, ARWU has ranked JCU in the 301–400 group of universities. Over that time, JCU has improved its position, while the number of recognised higher education institutions has increased from 10,000 to more than 18,000, placing JCU in the top 2% of universities worldwide.

About James Cook University

James Cook University is the second oldest university in Queensland, and Australia’s leading university in the tropics.

Offering excellence in teaching and research, JCU is a vibrant, multi-campus university with its main sites in the tropical Queensland cities of Townsville and Cairns, and modern city campuses in Singapore and Brisbane. Total student enrollments are more than 17,000 and growing, including more than 4,000 international students from 100 countries. There are more 300 programs available to international students to study at JCU.

Popular schools at JCU for Canadian students include

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Find out more about James Cook University and other Australian universities!

Thursday, April 21st, 2016

JCU scientists develop the first pharmalogical tourniquet

Imagine the following scenario: You are leading your team on patrol in pursuit of enemy insurgents and trigger a booby-trap. The explosion is massive. You hit the ground hard with both legs blown off. After the dust and smoke clears, help arrives. The medic sees your body rapidly bleeding out as you go into shock and notices a gaping hole in your abdomen. The new enemy is time.

JCU Medical School

Geoff Dobson and Hayley Letson (Photo credit: JCU)

Tourniquets in Iraq and Afghanistan have saved thousands of lives by stopping major bleeding from extremities such as arms or legs. However, there are few options when it comes to preventing abdominal blood loss caused by penetrating foreign objects, gunshots or explosive fragments.

In those conflicts it’s estimated more than 1,100 deaths were deemed potentially survivable, and the majority were from internal blood loss and occurred within the first hour of injury. In addition, there are many thousands of innocent lives lost from terrorist attacks and urban warfare due to internal hemorrhage.

JCU scientists Prof Geoffrey Dobson and Hayley Letson of the College of Medicine & Dentistry and Australian Institute of Health and Tropical Medicine (AITHM) have teamed up with the US military to solve this major problem. US Special Operations Command (SOCOM) has granted the project US $532,349 so the pair can continue their work.

The latest tests show the scientists have developed a potentially revolutionary drug therapy that treats shock and acts like a “pharmacological tourniquet” by dramatically reducing internal blood loss by up to 60%, which has the potential to save countless lives.

The stabilisation fluid, consisting of adenosine, lidocaine and magnesium, is known as ALM. The JCU team have shown a single small IV bolus of ALM over 60 minutes followed by a four-hour stabilisation ‘drip’ resulted in a 60% reduction of internal blood loss and increased survival.

“The ALM fluid is administered intravenously and circulates around the body, kick-starts the heart, gently raises blood pressure, protects the heart, brain and organs, and slows bleeding by plugging up the leaks,” Dr Dobson said.

“It is not a foam or synthetic compound like that those used to plug a flat tire, it is a therapeutic drug that protects the body and stops the blood from thinning, allowing it to rapidly form a viable clot and reduce bleeding.”

Currently, many combatants die before they reach a medical facility.

“The uniqueness of our ALM fluid is its small-volume and ability to protect the whole body at the point of injury, as part of a knife-edge balancing act between life and death.

“It resuscitates the body after hemorrhagic shock, plugs the holes, reduces inflammation, protects the vital organs, including the brain, and reduces infection. It is all about providing the combat medic with a new way to buy time on the battlefield,” he said.

The James Cook University innovation also has extensive civilian pre-hospital applications in tropical, rural, and remote environments, retrieval medicine, low-income countries (trauma, post-partum hemorrhage), mass casualty incidents and terrorist attacks.  Translational studies are being planned.

“Only time will tell if we have raised the bar high enough to improve survivability in these austere environments where currently no effective treatment exists,” Dr Dobson said.

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Do you have questions about JCU Medical School? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com.

Would you like more information about studying at pharmacy at JCU? Email OzTREKK’s Australian Pharmacy Schools Officer Krista McVeigh at krista@oztrekk.com.

Tuesday, April 19th, 2016

Push for International Day of Tropics gathers speed

James Cook University Vice Chancellor Professor Sandra Harding has travelled to the United Nations in New York to participate in the launch of the public campaign for the creation of an International Day of the Tropics, which would deliver benefits for Northern Queensland and beyond.

In September, the Australian Government announced it would lead efforts to establish the 29th of June as the International Day of the Tropics. The proposal was be formally launched at the UN last week.

James Cook University Australia

Aerial shot of JCU Cairns campus

Professor Harding said she strongly supports the Australian Government’s push to recognise the global significance of the Tropics.

“An International Day of the Tropics will call into account the development of the tropical world. Australia is a developed country with the largest tropical land mass and we have the experience, skills, and knowledge to share to the benefit of this region,” Prof Harding said.

Professor Harding said an International Day of the Tropics would be very important step forward for Northern Queensland.

“We know how to do business, build cities and prosper in tropical conditions. The things we do here each day are going to be in high demand throughout the tropical world.”

Prof Harding said the North is standing on the cusp of an enormous growth in export earnings.

“Jobs growth, innovation—all of that can come out of this particular focus on similar geographies and climates, health, environment and the economic development challenges of the tropical world. We can advance a new set of exporting industries that tap into our ‘tropical expertise’ and provide the infrastructure and other needs of the growing Tropics.”

The 29th of June is the anniversary of the launch of the inaugural State of the Tropics report. Nobel Laureate, Aung San Suu Kyi, launched the project’s first major report in Yangon, Myanmar in 2014. State of the Tropics is convened by James Cook University and draws on the expertise of leading institutions from around the world.

The ground-breaking State of the Tropics report confirms the great demographic, environmental and geopolitical significance of the region, describes the grand challenges facing the world’s tropical regions, and provides a baseline for a more sustainable global future.

The Tropics is home to 40% of the world’s population, and it hosts about 80% of its terrestrial biodiversity. By 2050, more than two-thirds of the world’s children under 15 years of age will be living in the Tropics.

James Cook University

As a leading research university, JCU provides excellent facilities for teaching and learning. JCU teaching staff are highly qualified and dedicated, and many JCU academics are considered to be leaders in their fields. The unique location of James Cook University allows nationally significant and internationally-recognized research to be conducted by both staff and students. Much research focus is based on the industries and environments of northern Australia including marine biology, biodiversity, tropical environmental studies, earth sciences/geology, engineering, tropical health and tourism. JCU is a member of the prestigious national alliance, Innovative Research Universities and has as its vision to be one of the world’s leading research universities in the tropics.

Wednesday, March 16th, 2016

Top Indigenous scholar joins JCU

One of Australia’s top Indigenous scholars will lead James Cook University’s new Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Centre.

Prof Martin Nakata has been appointed Pro Vice Chancellor of the Centre and will take up the position in early May.

James Cook University

Professor Martin Nakata (Photo: JCU Media)

Prof Nakata was one of JCU’s inaugural Outstanding Alumni. He was also the first Torres Strait Islander in Australia to graduate with a PhD, and this was completed at JCU.

He grew up in the Torres Strait and undertook his schooling on Thursday Island, and has strong ties to these and many other communities across the northern and far northern areas of Queensland.

Prof Nakata is also internationally recognised as an outstanding scholar in his own right—both in terms of learning and teaching, and research. His work has challenged the established ways of understanding the contemporary position and possibilities for Indigenous Australians.

Prof Nakata said, “It is a real privilege for me to return to JCU after almost twenty years at other universities, to assist the effort to provide pathways into higher education for Indigenous people in our region.”

He comes to JCU from the University of New South Wales and brings extensive research, management and strategic experience to James Cook University.

“I have achieved much on the back of support from my communities and JCU, and I am excited to now be in a position to give back some of what I have gained.

“The Indigenous Centre has also achieved much over the past decades, but I think it is now in a position to do much, much more. I have been appointed to do just that,” Prof Nakata said.

JCU’s Senior Deputy Vice Chancellor, Professor Chris Cocklin said he is absolutely delighted that Professor Nakata will be joining James Cook University.

“He is widely acknowledged for his work in promoting the successful participation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders in higher education.”

“Professor Nakata was the first Torres Strait Islander to be awarded a PhD degree and he earned that degree from James Cook University. It is wonderful that he is now returning to JCU to provide leadership to the university’s activities in regard to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders.

“JCU is very fortunate indeed to have him take up the leadership of our new Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Centre,” Prof Cocklin said.

The Centre was established last year and will deliver improved educational outcomes for Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students and builds on the university’s excellence in teaching and research related to Indigenous issues.

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Would you like more information about Australia’s tropical university? Learn more about studying at JCU!

Wednesday, December 9th, 2015

JCU scientist finds marine debris travels far

Rubbish dumped at sea off Townsville will end up on the popular Mission Beach holiday spot, while Cairns’ marine trash goes straight to the exclusive Port Douglas resort—according to new computer modelling by a James Cook University scientist.

JCU environmental sciences

Marine debris recovered during a beach clean-up (Photo credit: JCU)

JCU’s Kay Critchell fed local wind and tide data into the state-of-the-art SLIM modelling system. She then tracked drift patterns for an average-sized plastic water bottle that found its way into Townsville’s Ross River or Cairns’ Trinity Inlet, or was dumped at sea along the Great Barrier Reef.

Rubbish from the Ross River washed ashore in the northern beachside suburb of Pallarenda, while plastic from Trinity Inlet headed for Port Douglas. The model showed plastic debris from a shipping lane off Townsville’s Magnetic Island would land on the popular Mission Beach, about halfway between Cairns and Townsville.

Ms Critchell said the findings were consistent: “For floating plastic the big driver was the wind. The main collection points were south or southeast facing beaches and those in close proximity to a river mouth.”

She said with limited resources available to beach clean-up crews, it’s important their activities are targeted. “According to this study, the best use of their time would be to patrol beaches facing south or southeast after a big high tide or storm.”

She said there were major differences between the respective ranges of waste that entered the ocean from rivers and that which came from shipping lanes. “The average distance travelled from a river mouth is 18.8 kilometres, from shipping sources it’s 225 kilometres.”

Ms Critchell said while the Ross River was not the Ganges, it isn’t a terribly good environment either.

“I spent Friday with a group on the river bank along the shallows and we filled a truck with rubbish from the river in five hours. And there was plenty we couldn’t get.”

She said the main thing to remember was that environments can be restored.

“We can use things like rubbish collection booms in the shallows that trap rubbish but have a low impact on marine life, we can use waterwheels that scoop plastic waste out of the rivers, but these things take effort and are expensive.

“What is most important is that the rubbish not get into the environment in the first place. It really comes down to personal responsibility—people disposing of their rubbish properly. It’s a huge and growing issue, but it’s not hopeless.”

The next phase of the study will examine what happens to debris when it’s washed out to sea again from its original destination beach.

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Want to learn more about studying environmental sciences programs at JCU? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Environmental Sciences Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Thursday, October 22nd, 2015

JCU Daintree Rainforest Observatory

James Cook University is Australia’s leading tropical research university and among the top five tropical universities of the world for research in the university’s areas of research excellence (viz. ecology/environment, plant and animal science, geosciences, coral reef science and tourism). JCU was the only university in Australia that received the highest ranking of 5 (well above world standard) in the category Environmental Science and Management in the Australian government’s Excellence in Research Assessment exercise in 2010.

JCU environmental sciences

The rainforest is part of JCU’s unique location

The JCU Centre for Tropical Environmental & Sustainable Science (TESS) represents a cluster of world-class researchers and research students with common interests in the environment and sustainability, with emphasis on the tropics. There are many opportunities to learn with TESS researchers at undergraduate level and study for post-graduate coursework and research degrees at Masters and PhD levels as part of TESS. Students come from all over the world to take advantage of the opportunities provided by JCU’s unique location—in the tropics, in Australia, between reef and rainforest.

The mission of TESS is to promote cutting-edge ecological and environmental research in the tropics, and the wise management, conservation and sustainable use of tropical terrestrial and coastal ecosystems, in Australia and internationally.

Students come from all over the world to study with world leading researchers in this unique location situated between the tropical rainforest and Great Barrier Reef. Nowhere else is it possible to visit reef, rainforest and savannah in a single day and return to world-class laboratory facilities in a vibrant and attractive tropical city. And TESS researchers are truly international—they work in more than 40 tropical nations around the world!

TESS Facilities

  • Daintree Rainforest Observatory
  • Orpheus Island Research Station
  • Fletcherview Research Station
  • Cloncurry Research Station
  • Terrestrial Ecosystem Research Network FNQ Supersite
  • Australian Tropical Herbarium

The JCU Daintree Rainforest Observatory, or DRO, is a premier ecological monitoring site located in lowland rainforest around 140km north of Cairns in northern Queensland, Australia. The Daintree rainforest has the highest biodiversity anywhere in Australia and offers unique Gondwanan flora. The observatory welcomes educators, students and researchers who want to visit and explore the rainforest and surrounds via the observatory’s canopy crane and other facilities.

Tropical Australia is resource-rich, ecologically fragile and infrastructure-poor, and is undergoing unprecedented growth and development. It is a national priority to develop growth strategies that are ecologically, socially and economically sustainable. TESS is taking a leading role in developing, implementing and exporting solutions for the environmental and sustainability issues faced by Australia and the rapidly developing tropical world.

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Learn more about the interesting and challenging environmental sciences programs available at James Cook University. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Environmental Sciences Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com.