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Posts Tagged ‘JCU medicine’

Tuesday, March 20th, 2018

First-year JCU medicine students: what kind of doctor do you want to be?

What kind of doctor do you want to be?

First-year JCU medicine students: what kind of doctor do you want to be?

JCU medicine at the beautiful tropical campus of Townsville!

While some can’t yet answer this question, most students who chose to study at JCU Medical School already know they want to specialise in rural medicine, assisting with the healthcare needs of underserved populations. After all, the Bachelor of Medicine, Bachelor of Surgery (MBBS) medical degree at James Cook University is well-known for producing graduates who will be uniquely qualified in the fields of rural, remote and Indigenous health, and tropical medicine.

The JCU Medical School’s combination of integrated instruction in biomedical sciences, professional practice and clinical medicine incorporates the best aspects of student-centred, problem-based learning combined with systematic instruction. Clinical experience, particularly in the rural and remote context, starts at an early stage and science remains integrated across later years.

First-year JCU Medicine students recently had their first class on how to be socially accountable doctors. At the end of the session, they were asked what type of doctor they wanted to be. Hear from former OzTREKK Student Daniel Dickson!

JCU Medical School MBBS

Do you think studying rural, remote, and tropical medicine sounds like something you would be interested in? How on earth can Canada have tropical medicine?  Like Australia, our population is concentrated on the fringes of the country, where the climate is most ideal and the land most usable. But where people live in rural and Northern Canada, away from the general population, finding health care can be more challenging—just like the people in remote and tropical locations of Australia. When you study medicine at JCU, you will be uniquely qualified to practice medicine in remote Canada!

Program: Bachelor of Medicine Bachelor of Surgery
Location: Townsville, Queensland
Semester intake: February
Duration: 6 years
Application deadline: August 30, 2018

Apply to JCU Medical School!

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JCU medicine applications are open! Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Kaylee Templeton at kaylee@oztrekk.com if you have any questions about your med school application.

Wednesday, November 22nd, 2017

JCU offering Health Sciences Toolkit to help students brush up in biology

James Cook University has announced they are offering a four-day intensive course to students who will be entering in to health science degrees in 2018!

JCU offering Health Sciences Toolkit to help students brush up in biology

Think you might need a biology refresher?

The JCU “Health Sciences Toolkit” is designed to help students prepare for further studies leading into the health science degree programs. It is particularly helpful for those who have a limited or no background in biology, and for those who have not studied biology for a long time.

The course is introductory in nature and it is assumed that those participating may have never studied biology before. Please note it does not meet any of JCU’s prerequisites for admission to university and is not credit bearing for JCU subjects. Rather, it is designed to give students a head start if their university degree requires some knowledge of biology; however, if you have studied some biology and wish to brush up your skills, the course will be a beneficial refresher!

The Health Sciences Toolkit will be especially helpful for students intending to study any of the following degree programs at JCU: Biomedicine, Dentistry, Exercise Physiology (Clinical), Medical Laboratory Science, Midwifery, Nursing, Occupational Therapy, Pharmacy, Physiotherapy, Speech Pathology, or Sport and Exercise Science.

This program is a four-day intensive course that will be held on both Townsville (Douglas) and Cairns (Smithfield) campuses and involve approximately 28 contact hours spread over both large group lectures, and small group tutorial/workshop sessions. The topics covered will include the following:

  • Laboratory Safety and Introduction to the Human body
  • The hierarchy of cells, tissues and systems
  • The basic elements of life
  • Water Biology
  • The cell membrane
  • The genetics of life
  • The essential compounds of life
  • The essential reactions of life
  • Communication in the body
  • The food we eat and the air we breathe

The course will be held Feb. 6–9, 2018.

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Are you interested in studying at JCU and the Health Sciences Toolkit program? Please email us at info@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Wednesday, August 30th, 2017

JCU medicine professor’s remarkable health care career recognised

James Cook University’s Professor Maxine Whittaker has been awarded the Royal Australasian College of Physicians International Medal for 2017.

The prestigious medal, which was presented at a ceremony in Melbourne recently, acknowledges the significant contribution Professor Whittaker has made to health care in low- and middle-income countries over many years.

JCU medicine professor’s remarkable health care career recognised

Dean, Public Health, Medical and Veterinary Sciences Prof Maxine Whittaker (Photo credit: JCU)

Professor Whittaker is Dean, Public Health, Medical and Veterinary Sciences in the College of Public Health, Medical & Vet Sciences and the Deputy Director of the Australian Institute of Tropical Health and Medicine (AITHM) at James Cook University.

Professor Whittaker said she was “surprised, honoured and humbled” by the award.

“I didn’t know that I had been nominated, and to have been so by my peers, who are also international in their careers, is an honour,” she said.

“Humble, because so many people have contributed to my receiving this award—my family, my teachers and mentors, the people with whom I have worked at field, policy, service, management and community levels, and those who have and continue to inspire me.

“I have been raised to believe in equity and human rights, and always saw health as being critical in that package. I knew at high school that I wanted to work on the ‘big picture’ causes and solutions of health problems and inequities, but didn’t know at that time that was called public health nor that there was a career in that.”

Professor Whittaker has lived and worked in Bangladesh, Zambia, Zimbabwe and PNG and has worked extensively in China, Fiji, Indonesia, Kenya, Philippines, Samoa, Solomon Islands, Tanzania, Thailand, Tonga, Vanuatu, and Vietnam, and other Pacific Island countries and territories.  She has extensive experience in project and program design in health and development, especially in infectious diseases (including malaria) and reproductive health and health system reform for a variety of national governments, international development partners and NGO organisations.

Professor Whittaker said her inspiration for her work took hold early in her university studies.

“I studied medicine and remember the day that a Professor Schofield (JCU’s Professor Louis Schofield’s father) taught us public health—and I went home to my parents and said—‘I can do what I want to do—there is a career that lets me do this’.”

Professor Whittaker has developed local research teams in Papua New Guinea, the Philippines, Solomon Islands, Tonga, Northern Queensland remote communities, and Vanuatu, and participated in the development of training materials and activities.

She is a member of faculty for the Science of Malaria Eradication course, part of a consortium of IS Global, Harvard School of Public Health and Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute. It is an intensive week-long leadership course that provides participants from around the world with tools to approach malaria elimination and eradication.

Professor Whittaker was educated at the University of Queensland, and the Harvard School of Public Health.

She has won numerous awards, including the Dr Jerusha Jhirad Oration Award, University of Queensland Short Fellowship, and is a Life Member of the International Federation of Medical Students Association and an Honorary Life Member of the Australian Medical Students Association.

Professor Whittaker said there were two major highlights of her career.

“I have seen the professional growth and success of my students, mentees and colleagues and this also inspires me. Seeing the sustainability of reforms in which I have been one of the players in developing. For example, changes in health legislation, scaling up of family planning choices in a country. Improved policy approaches to quality of services is another highlight.”

Professor Whittaker said she plans to continue her work at JCU.

“I will continue to strengthen the One Health Approach to address the sustainable development goals, growing the health system’s research capacity at JCU and in our partner networks in the tropical regions, and to work with my JCU colleagues to continue to address the strategic intent of the university.”

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Would you like more information about JCU medicine or public health? Contact OzTREKK at info@oztrekk.com!

Wednesday, June 21st, 2017

Uni Reviews ranks JCU medicine as #1 in Australia

James Cook University is Australia’s Tropical University, and JCU medical graduates are be uniquely qualified in the fields of rural, remote and Indigenous health, and tropical medicine.

Uni Reviews ranks JCU medicine as #1 in Australia

RSVP to meet JCU in Toronto June 22!

Recently, Uni Reviews ranked the top Australian universities for medicine using a formula combining

  • medical school size (student numbers)
  • student and graduate satisfaction with medicine courses (% satisfied)
  • indicative graduate salaries (based on pay, study and unemployment rates).

Medicine includes General Medicine, Surgery, Psychiatry, Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Paediatrics, Anaesthesiology, Pathology, Radiology, Internal Medicine and General Practice.

Uni Reviews presents independent reviews, ratings and rankings of Australian universities. Site content is published by UniCurve for the benefit of students.

As listed by Uni Reviews, the top universities for medicine in Australia for 2017 are

  1. James Cook University
  2. University of Western Australia
  3. Monash University

James Cook University

JCU Medicine tops the subject rankings for Medicine in 2017. The program is relatively large (1,155 students), has the highest rate of satisfaction among student and graduates (92%) and produces solid job outcomes ($65,000 indicative graduate salary).

University of Western Australia

The University of Western Australian Medical School is ranked 2nd in Australia for Medicine. The faculty’s medical graduates enjoy the highest salaries in Australia ($68,130) and have a solid rate of course satisfaction (84%).

Monash University

Monash University Medical School is in the top 3 for Australia. The school is the largest in Australia (2,452 students) and is highly rated by students (85% satisfaction).

James Cook University Medicine & Dentistry Seminar

It’s no secret we are huge fans of JCU’s commitment to helping rural and under-served populations. If you are interested in a career in medicine or dentistry, but are looking for something more extraordinary, please join OzTREKK and JCU Deputy Vice-Chancellor Professor Ian Wronski for this upcoming seminar. Find out why JCU is interested in Canadian students, and how you can help bring better health to those in need.

Toronto
Venue: Pinnacle Room, Sheraton Centre Hotel, Toronto
Date: Thursday, June 22, 2017
Time: 6 – 9 p.m.

Make sure to RSVP to save your spot!

Study medicine at JCU Medical School

Program: Bachelor of Medicine Bachelor of Surgery
Location: Townsville, Queensland
Next semester intake: February 2018
Duration: 6 years
Application deadline: August 30, 2017

Apply now to James Cook University Medical School!

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Discover more about studying JCU Medicine. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com.

Thursday, October 20th, 2016

James Cook University helps see horror disease defeated

James Cook University scientists have played a part in a program that has seen lymphatic filariasis (LF)—also known as elephantiasis—eliminated from four countries.

After more than two decades of effort, Cambodia, The Cook Islands, Niue and Vanuatu have eliminated LF as a public health problem.

Two decades of work sees horror disease defeated

Elephantiasis sufferer, Papua New Guinea (Photo credit: Tom Burkot)

LF can lead to lymphoedema, elephantiasis and hydrocoele—huge swelling of the limbs and genitals of sufferers. It’s caused by parasitic worms transmitted between humans by mosquitoes, a process that has now been effectively interrupted.

Approximately 40 million people suffer from the disease, including 15 million who have full-blown lymphoedema (elephantiasis) and 25 million men who have urogenital swelling.

JCU scientists developed an efficient diagnostic test for the disease, enabling effective targeting and supported ongoing training and surveillance to prevent new infections.

JCU’s Professor Peter Leggat said LF is one of the most debilitating of the neglected tropical diseases.

“Elimination of LF is the result of the sustained efforts of many groups including the countries involved and international agencies including the WHO Collaborating Centre at James Cook University, established in 1996. These efforts provide inspiration to eliminate this disease from the world,” he said.

The four countries that have eliminated the disease join China and the Republic of Korea as the only countries in the WHO Western Pacific Region to eliminate LF as a public health problem.

During 2000–2012, more than 4.45 billion doses of medicine were delivered worldwide. It’s estimated that 96.71 million LF cases were prevented or cured during this period.

The overall economic benefit of the programme during 2000–2007 is conservatively estimated at US$ 24 billion.

WHO Collaborating Centre

James Cook University has been involved with supporting control of neglected tropical diseases since the initial designation of the World Health Organization Collaborating Centre (WHOCC) in 1996. It has through various re-designations and broadened its outreach from lymphatic filariasis alone to include soil-transmitted helminthiasis and then other neglected tropical diseases. It has been supported by the Anton Breinl Centre for Public Health and Tropical Medicine until 2012 and then by the School of Public Health, Tropical Medicine and Rehabilitation Sciences. In 2014, it was formally incorporated in the new College of Public Health, Medical and Veterinary Sciences at JCU.

Studying medicine at JCU

The Bachelor of Medicine, Bachelor of Surgery (MBBS) medical degree at JCU Medical School produces graduates who will be uniquely qualified in the fields of rural, remote and Indigenous health, and tropical medicine. The JCU MBBS degree aspires to what is described by the World Health Organization as “socially accountable medical education—a medical school accepting its obligation to direct education, research and service to priority health concerns of communities that it has a mandate to serve.”

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Would you like more information about studying tropical medicine at JCU Medical School? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com!

Wednesday, September 9th, 2015

JCU students to get overseas experience

More than 400 James Cook University students will have the opportunity to learn more about the Asia-Pacific region with the university receiving nearly $1.5 million in New Colombo Plan (NCP) funding.

The NCP is a Federal Government initiative designed to lift knowledge of our neighbouring countries by supporting Australian undergraduates’ study in the region.

JCU Medical School

JCU NCP students at an archaeological dig in Laos (Photo credit: JCU)

JCU students will travel to Cambodia, Sri Lanka, Malaysia, and another eight destinations after the latest round of funding was announced—a $1.45 million tranche over the 2016–18 period.

The biggest single grant will see 102 fifth- and sixth-year medicine and dentistry students from JCU complete clinical placements in health facilities across Sri Lanka as part of their training.

JCU Mobility Manager from the Division of Global Strategy and Engagement, Linda Rust, said the scheme provides fantastic opportunities for students.

“They will be immersed in the language and culture, and will develop new international networks while gaining valuable work experience,” she said.

Funding is also included for 90 biology students to study in Malaysia’s Borneo jungle, and for 10 JCU Law School students to work with NGOs dispensing free legal advice in Cambodia.

James Cook University’s Professor Simon Robson from the Centre for Tropical Biodiversity & Climate Change and the Terrestrial Ecosystems group will coordinate the biology students’ overseas study. He said it can be a life-changing event for students, many of whom have never been outside of Australia before.

“We are leveraging the students’ interest in biology to give them a much broader view of what it means to live in the tropics. They go to look at orangutans, for instance, but very quickly find they have to also start considering deforestation, palm oil production and mobile phone use.”

Professor Robson said the university would continue to grow links with people and institutions in the region, as it had for a number of years.

“It fits very nicely with JCU’s goal of improving life for people in the tropics,” he said.

The placements will begin in January 2016.

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Get more information about Australia’s tropical university—James Cook University!