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Posts Tagged ‘JCU Medical School’

Friday, April 21st, 2017

JCU medical research finds new drug to ease C-section trauma

James Cook University researchers from the College of Medicine and Dentistry may have found a way to reduce trauma and prevent infections after Caesarean births.

JCU medical research finds new drug to ease C-section trauma

L to R: Lisa Davenport, Professor Geoffrey Dobson, Dr Hayley Letson (Photo: JCU)

Caesarean delivery rates are increasing worldwide and around a third of all mothers in Australia, USA and UK give birth surgically each year, but a C-section is not without risks.

Fourth-year JCU Medical School student Lisa Davenport joined Dr Hayley Letson and Professor Geoffrey Dobson from the Heart, Trauma and Sepsis Research Laboratory at JCU to research ways to reduce the stress response to the trauma of surgery.

Caesarean sections involve one or more incisions in a patient’s abdomen, known as a laparotomy, and are a common option for delivering babies.

But they have a raft of potential side-effects, including cutting the baby, post-surgery infection, fever, excessive blood loss or clotting, scar tissue formation and extended stays in hospital.

Dr Letson said a single laparotomy is a major injury.

“It can activate the brain’s stress response from the multiple ‘damage’ signals sent out from the original incision,” she said.

The JCU research showed that a laparotomy causes inflammation and an early activation of the immune system, which can then spiral out of control.

Ms Davenport examined whether an Adenosine, Lidocaine and Magnesium (ALM) drip could reduce the trauma of surgery when used by itself in experimental models. She discovered that adverse responses were reduced when the subject was infused with a small amount of the ALM drip.

“Low volume therapies may be important, because you want to avoid large fluid volumes that can shock the body a second time,” she said.

Professor Dobson said that precisely how tiny volumes of the ALM drip works is an active area of investigation in the Dobson Laboratory, but experiments have shown it protects against infection as well.

Dr Letson said the ALM therapy appears to be linked to improved brain control over whole body function at times of surgical stress. “It suppresses signals that activate immune cells and promote inflammation,” she said.

The work has applications to other major surgery and especially to rural and remote medicine. Professor Dobson said new frontline drugs are urgently required to make major surgery safer for the patient and more predictable for the surgeon, with the potential to reduce complications and massively reduce health care costs, and possibly reduce waiting times for elective surgery.

“The global surgical statistics are staggering. Of the 234 million major surgeries performed every year, every hour there are around 1,000 deaths and 4,000 major complications, and 50% may be preventable,” he said.

Ms Davenport has completed the study and is currently analysing the data and writing a paper for a high-profile surgical journal.

Her study parallels the Dobson Lab’s ongoing trauma work being supported by the US Military, and a new collaboration that started late 2016 with the National Institutes of Health in the United States.

The research team is also pursuing funding opportunities to investigate the use of ALM fluid as a potential treatment for post-partum haemorrhage. Of the 500,000 maternal deaths each year, approximately 25% are due to haemorrhage.

Study medicine at JCU Medical School

JCU Medical School offers an undergraduate-entry medical program that specializes in rural, remote and indigenous medicine and is located in north Queensland, Australia. Rather than having to earn a bachelor degree first, undergraduate-entry medical programs allow students to enter directly from high school. If you have completed high school studies or would like to apply to a medical school in Australia without using your MCAT score, you may wish to learn more about undergraduate-entry medical programs offered by Australian universities.

Program: Bachelor of Medicine Bachelor of Surgery
Location: Townsville, Queensland
Next semester intake: February 2018
Duration: 6 years
Application deadline: August 30, 2017

Apply now to James Cook University Medical School!

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Would you like more information about studying medicine at JCU Medical School? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com.

Friday, November 18th, 2016

JCU medical student: Australian snacks you need to try

Former OzTREKK student Helena Xiang is back, and she’s got some snacking tips for everyone headed to JCU Medical School in Townsville, Queensland… and for everyone else, too!

Confession: I am a habitual snacker. There are always food packages sprawled across my desk for my convenience when I study. That’s why I’m always on the hunt for new snacks I’ve never tried before. I’ll be talking about different foods to try while you’re here.

When you travel, eating the food from that country is a way to experience their culture. Although Australia is very similar in culture (and food) as Canada and the US, you can still find some foods that are iconic or only available in Australia.

JCU med student: Australian snacks you need to try

Have you tried a Tim Tam slam?

Tim Tams

One of the most iconic Australian snacks, Tim Tams consist of cream between two biscuits and covered in chocolate. There are so many different types of flavours, including the original, three bean, mango, etc. This is probably one of the first snacks to try.

Vegemite

It’s an acquired taste. Only a thin layer of it on bread is needed. Any more than that and the taste becomes too strong. I heard that it tastes best in a grilled cheese sandwich. (OzTREKK note: Vegemite is a yeast-based product. It is extremely salty and bitter and most people won’t like it right away… or ever!)

JCU med student: Australian snacks you need to try

Do you dare to try Vegemite?

Red Rock Deli chips

These are really good chips, but really expensive (for a poor student on a budget). They have a selection of cool flavours that aren’t available where I’m from, like Wagyu Beef and Wasabi Cream, and Creamy Saffron and Sage. (OzTREKK note: Director Jaime Notman’s favourite flavour is Green Chilli & Coriander!)

JCU med student: Australian snacks you need to try

Red Rock Deli chips—Green Chilli & Coriander!

There are many other snacks that are worth trying, including the selection of Arnott’s biscuits, and some chocolate and candies.

On a side note: Townsville is a small city, and there aren’t that many restaurants and stores close to campus. I talked to some people I know on campus, and realized that not many people know of nice Asian stores and restaurants. If you’re like me, and enjoy eating Asian foods or want to find certain oriental ingredients, the following are a couple places worth visiting.

For oriental foods and groceries, such as frozen dumplings, steam buns, spices, and instant noodles, it’s worth visiting Oriental Food Supplies. It’s close by (near Stockland), and the prices are reasonable.

Sun’s Chinese Dumplings

Great dumplings and fairly cheap as well! It’s a family business, and they have free delivery to select places on certain days. Worth a try! You can visit their Facebook page.

Hope you enjoyed it, and happy eating!

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Think you might be interested in studying at JCU Medical School? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com for more information about your options!

Friday, November 4th, 2016

Global award for JCU medical school professor and Townsville Hospital doctor

Townsville Hospital director of urogynaecology Professor Ajay Rane has been awarded a global humanitarian award, named in honour of India’s most revered statesman, for his work in gynaecological and obstetric care in some of the world’s poorest places.

Professor Ajay Rane is a JCU Medical School Professor of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, and works at the Townsville Hospital. He is a multi-award-winning academic who was last week announced as a recipient of a global humanitarian award.

Global award for JCU Professor and Townsville Hospital doctor

JCU Professor Ajay Rane with his medal, which is crafted with Mahatma Gandhi’s image. (Photo: Ian Hitchcock)

The James Cook University professor was awarded the Mahatma Gandhi Pravasi Award for Humanitarian Work in Women’s Health by the NRI (non-resident Indians) Welfare Society at Britain’s House of Lords last month.

The society recognises a number of non-resident Indians each year for their work benefitting the global community.

“I was absolutely delighted, of course, to be a recipient this year and, especially, because this is an award from India, my country of origin,” Professor Rane said.

“While it’s always a thrill to see your work recognised, it’s more important to me that this sort of recognition helps to highlight the plight of women in crisis worldwide.”

Professor Rane, who is a naturalised Australian, has spent almost two decades treating and operating on women with catastrophic childbirth injuries in countries that include India, Nepal, Borneo, Malaysia and Kuwait.

He has also trained hundreds of local doctors in the techniques to perform specialised gynaecological surgery including fistula repair.

A fistula is a hole that develops between the bladder or bowel and the vagina after a difficult childbirth and is a debilitating and devastating condition, especially if left untreated as it often is in the poorest parts of the world.

Earlier this year, Professor Rane was appointed appointed Chair of the Fistula Committee for the International Federation of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (FIGO) and is leading the charge for fistula education and prevention in the developing world.

Townsville Hospital and Health Service Executive Director Medical Services Dr Andrew Johnson congratulated Professor Rane on the prestigious award.

“Professor Rane continues to shine a light on the critical dilemma of women globally who suffer serious injuries from child birth,” he said.

“He is a leading academic and surgeon and we are very privileged and proud to benefit from his clinical and teaching acumen and expertise.”

Professor Rane’s award was presented by the Baroness Verma, former Parliamentary Under-Secretary for the Department for International Development.

Courtesy of the Townsville Hospital and Health Service

About JCU MBBS

Located in Townsville, JCU Medical School offers the MBBS medical degree and aims to produce graduates of the highest academic standards who can progress to medical practice and to further studies in medical specialties.

The James Cook University medical program leads positive change in health and medical care for communities of tropical Australia and beyond through socially accountable health education, discoveries, partnerships and advocacy that make a difference.

The program has a distinctive regional mission with a focus on the needs of rural, remote and underserved communities, tropical medicine and the health of Aboriginal peoples and Torres Strait Islanders.

Would you like more information about JCU Medical School? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com.

Thursday, October 20th, 2016

James Cook University helps see horror disease defeated

James Cook University scientists have played a part in a program that has seen lymphatic filariasis (LF)—also known as elephantiasis—eliminated from four countries.

After more than two decades of effort, Cambodia, The Cook Islands, Niue and Vanuatu have eliminated LF as a public health problem.

Two decades of work sees horror disease defeated

Elephantiasis sufferer, Papua New Guinea (Photo credit: Tom Burkot)

LF can lead to lymphoedema, elephantiasis and hydrocoele—huge swelling of the limbs and genitals of sufferers. It’s caused by parasitic worms transmitted between humans by mosquitoes, a process that has now been effectively interrupted.

Approximately 40 million people suffer from the disease, including 15 million who have full-blown lymphoedema (elephantiasis) and 25 million men who have urogenital swelling.

JCU scientists developed an efficient diagnostic test for the disease, enabling effective targeting and supported ongoing training and surveillance to prevent new infections.

JCU’s Professor Peter Leggat said LF is one of the most debilitating of the neglected tropical diseases.

“Elimination of LF is the result of the sustained efforts of many groups including the countries involved and international agencies including the WHO Collaborating Centre at James Cook University, established in 1996. These efforts provide inspiration to eliminate this disease from the world,” he said.

The four countries that have eliminated the disease join China and the Republic of Korea as the only countries in the WHO Western Pacific Region to eliminate LF as a public health problem.

During 2000–2012, more than 4.45 billion doses of medicine were delivered worldwide. It’s estimated that 96.71 million LF cases were prevented or cured during this period.

The overall economic benefit of the programme during 2000–2007 is conservatively estimated at US$ 24 billion.

WHO Collaborating Centre

James Cook University has been involved with supporting control of neglected tropical diseases since the initial designation of the World Health Organization Collaborating Centre (WHOCC) in 1996. It has through various re-designations and broadened its outreach from lymphatic filariasis alone to include soil-transmitted helminthiasis and then other neglected tropical diseases. It has been supported by the Anton Breinl Centre for Public Health and Tropical Medicine until 2012 and then by the School of Public Health, Tropical Medicine and Rehabilitation Sciences. In 2014, it was formally incorporated in the new College of Public Health, Medical and Veterinary Sciences at JCU.

Studying medicine at JCU

The Bachelor of Medicine, Bachelor of Surgery (MBBS) medical degree at JCU Medical School produces graduates who will be uniquely qualified in the fields of rural, remote and Indigenous health, and tropical medicine. The JCU MBBS degree aspires to what is described by the World Health Organization as “socially accountable medical education—a medical school accepting its obligation to direct education, research and service to priority health concerns of communities that it has a mandate to serve.”

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Would you like more information about studying tropical medicine at JCU Medical School? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com!

Tuesday, October 11th, 2016

JCU opens Australian Institute of Tropical Health and Medicine building

Study medicine at JCU, get brand-new facilities!

Australian research into tropical health and medicine has received a major boost with the opening of a $31M world-class infectious diseases research facility at James Cook University’s Townsville campus.

JCU opens Australian Institute of Tropical Health and Medicine building

JCU has officially opened the Australian Institute of Tropical Health and Medicine building (Credit: JCU)

On Oct. 7, the Queensland Premier, Annastacia Palaszczuk officially opened the Australian Institute of Tropical Health and Medicine’s (AITHM) new facilities.

AITHM Townsville will undertake research into tropical infectious diseases and will develop vaccines, diagnostic tools, and the identification of bacterial pathogens.

James Cook University Vice Chancellor, Professor Sandra Harding said AITHM is a crucial element of JCU’s goal to create a brighter future for people living in the tropics, and the opening of the Townsville facilities cements Australia’s position as a global leader in tropical health and medicine.

“JCU has a proud history of research and development relevant to the tropics, and the research AITHM undertakes will improve health in the tropics both within Australia and worldwide.

“There are extraordinary opportunities for Australian tropical medicine given Northern Australia’s proximity to the fast-growing nations of the Asia-Pacific region,” Professor Harding said.

AITHM’s Director, Professor Louis Schofield said research programs underway within AITHM include identification, prevention and better treatments for tuberculosis, development of malaria vaccines and peripheral artery disease.

“The Institute will build essential research programs in tropical health and medicine for Australia and the region, specifically building important biosecurity capacity for Northern Australia.

“Our tropical locations and capabilities make a significant contribution to Queensland’s competitive advantage in knowledge-based industries directly relevant to Asia and the Pacific in the areas of research, research training, and the transfer and commercialisation of research findings.”

The Townsville facility and research undertaken within it will

  • focus on re-emerging bacterial diseases for which tropical Queenslanders are at significant risk, including tuberculosis, meliodosis and Q fever, and on communicable disease diagnostics and control;
  • provide a bio-bank facility for clinical and epidemiological samples;
  • engage new high-quality biomedical research staff to join existing researchers;
  • host visiting experts (visitors and trainees will include participants from Australia and from neighbouring countries);
  • train and mentor young researchers and health professionals involved in translating innovation into practice; and
  • accommodate proof-of-concept work leading to commercialisation opportunities.

Facilities include world-class physical containment laboratories for the safe handling of hazardous microorganisms (PC2 and PC3 laboratories). The PC3 laboratory will be used to for research into tuberculosis.

The building also includes a Translational Research Facility, which will allow patients to undergo clinical trials of research findings, improving the delivery of health care for those living in tropical regions.

It will also provide space for researchers in key supporting disciplines, including biostatistics, epidemiology, bioinformatics and health economics.

The Queensland Government has invested $21.49M in AITHM Townsville and the Federal Government has provided funding of $8M, via the Australian Research Council’s Special Research Initiative Scheme.

Study medicine at JCU Medical School

JCU Medical School offers an undergraduate-entry medical program that specializes in rural, remote and indigenous medicine and is located in north Queensland, Australia. Rather than having to earn a bachelor degree first, undergraduate-entry medical programs allow students to enter directly from high school. If you have completed high school studies or would like to apply to a medical school in Australia without using your MCAT score, you may wish to learn more about undergraduate-entry medical programs offered by Australian universities.

Program: Bachelor of Medicine Bachelor of Surgery
Location: Townsville, Queensland
Next semester intake: February 2018
Duration: 6 years
Application deadline: Generally the end of August each year

Apply now to James Cook University Medical School!

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Would you like more information about studying medicine at JCU Medical School? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com.

Wednesday, September 28th, 2016

Meet JCU medical student Helena Xiang

Meet first-year JCU Medical School student Helena Xiang. OzTREKK first spoke with Helena in February 2014, when she inquired about studying medicine in Australia. Still in high school at the time, Helena was determined to stick to her plan of applying to an undergraduate medical degree and begin her studies.

And so she did.

Application process: The starting point

Application processes can get difficult and tedious when you don’t know what you’re doing. When I started my application, I didn’t really know where to begin. Not much information was available on Australian schools, and my high school counsellors sent me away to Google everything myself. If you’re a student who’s thinking of applying to JCU, the following might be worth a read:

Sydney Dental School

Study medicine at JCU

Apply through an agent

I applied to James Cook University through an agent. There are many agents out there that provide services to Canadian students, but the one I personally got in touch with was OzTREKK. These people were friendly, provided information sessions, and were quick to respond to conundrums and queries. They made the entire process that much easier for me. They saved me so much time and effort! I didn’t have to worry about sending my application all the way to Australia, or have to worry about the time zone differences when contacting for more information. Plus, all these services were free!

Check all requirements

I’m a high school grad who just entered university this year, so this was the first time I applied to a university. It was extremely confusing when I was looking at the course requirements. I kept thinking, “What in the world is Maths A, ATAR, OP?!”. Needless to say, I was looking at the wrong section. Make sure you check the requirements for your country. Don’t freak yourself out unnecessarily like I did. (This is where your agent comes in!)

Don’t be scared to apply

That was something I wished someone told me. I wasn’t confident when I was applying to my program at JCU. I didn’t think I would be able to get in as medicine is a very competitive program. But, you never know right? Don’t belittle yourself, and even if you lack that confidence, it never hurts to try.

First impressions

I actually knew very little about Australian universities before I applied to JCU Medical School. When I was looking at my options during university application season, the undergraduate program offered at JCU seemed really appealing to me. It was different from other universities. Not only was it because it was a program I could enter straight out of high school, but also because of its focus on rural, remote, and Indigenous health—these are the places and people that have inadequate access to health care.

I can’t compare really compare JCU’s teaching and facilities to other universities because I’ve never attended one, but it has everything we really need. The cohort size is smaller than other schools, and I really like how the university incorporates the clinical portion with the science. Right from first year, medical students get the opportunity to do short placements at different clinics with different doctors, and apply the science part in real-life practice. The amount of clinical exposure will gradually increase over the years as well. Years 4 to 6 are the “clinical years” where students are predominantly in the hospital, and attend the occasional lecture on the side.

Tips for future students

Things in Australia generally cost more—especially their imported goods. If you can buy medical equipment in Canada, I would recommend that you do. Stethoscopes are much cheaper back home and online. Get to know the people around you who are studying the same degree, both in your year and upper year levels as well. They can be a really good support network and great to study with to keep you on track. The library is also quite a nice place to study if you live somewhere with lots of noise.

Homesickness

I think the most difficult thing would probably be living so far away from home. This doesn’t just apply to med students, but to all students. The start of an adventure seems exciting at first, but feeling homesick will hit eventually. Bring some things that remind you of home, and be sure to call home when you start missing it!

JCU Medical School MBBS program

Located in Townsville, JCU Medical School offers the MBBS medical degree and aims to produce graduates of the highest academic standards who can progress to medical practice and to further studies in medical specialties. Graduates will be uniquely qualified in the fields of rural, remote and Indigenous health, and tropical medicine.

The James Cook University medical precinct is opposite the Townsville Hospital, the largest teaching hospital in regional or tropical Australia. In later years, students have a base at one of the James Cook University clinical schools that include Townsville, Cairns, Mackay or Darwin.

Program: Bachelor of Medicine Bachelor of Surgery
Location: Townsville, Queensland
Semester intake: February
Duration: 6 years
Application deadline: Generally the end of August each year

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Do you have questions about JCU Medical School? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com for more information.

Thursday, September 8th, 2016

JCU students set to strengthen skills abroad

More than 140 James Cook University students will have the opportunity to learn more about the Indo-Pacific region with the university receiving nearly $470,000 in New Colombo Plan (NCP) funding.

JCU students set to strengthen skills abroad

JCU students will be leaving the lecture theatre and practicing abroad with the NPC funding

JCU students will travel to Cambodia, Indonesia, Vanuatu, Singapore, India, Thailand and Fiji after $468,600 was announced recently in the 2017 round of funding.

Overall, for 2016–2019, JCU will receive $1.52 million.

The NCP is a Federal Government initiative in which Australian university students are sent abroad to learn, build friendships and strengthen ties with neighbouring Indo-Pacific countries.

Study options include semester-based learning, teaching practicums, research, field studies and clinical placements.

A group of JCU Nursing students will head to Indonesia—the first time nursing students have been able to undertake the overseas placements under this plan.

Of the funded projects for 2017, 15 nursing students will head to Indonesia next year, with another 20 to follow in 2018, and an additional 25 to travel there in 2019.

Dr Karen Yates, Senior Lecturer in Nursing, Midwifery and Nutrition, said it was an exciting opportunity for nursing students.

“This placement will allow them to work beside nursing and other health care staff, while contributing to a developing community in a meaningful and sustainable way,” Dr Yates said.

“Students will join with local nursing and medical services to deliver supervised nursing services, implement community health promotion strategies for disadvantaged populations in diverse settings.

“This experience will enable students to develop an overview of health care provision and their role as a global citizen.”

A total of 15 Education students will be off to Cambodia, 10 French language students to Vanuatu, 10 Social Work students to India, eight Archaeology students to Thailand, and the largest group—64 Medicine, Dentistry, Pharmacy and Physicians Assistant students—are off to Fiji.

In addition, 20 Tropical Planning students will travel to Singapore, to work with JCU’s Singapore campus and the National University of Singapore.

JCU’s Mobility Manager from the Division of Global Strategy and Engagement, Linda Rust, said the scheme provides fantastic opportunities for students.

“They will be immersed in the language and culture, and will develop new international networks while gaining valuable work experience,” she said.

Popular JCU Schools for Canadians

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Discover more about the tropical and rural studies at James Cook University! Contact OzTREKK at info@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Wednesday, August 24th, 2016

James Cook University Private Hospital powers ahead

We’ve got great news for future JCU MBBS students!

James Cook University is taking the next big step towards the construction of a private hospital on its Townsville campus. This develop means that students beginning the JCU medical program in 2017 will be able to do clinical training in brand new facilities!

JCU has shortlisted to three the number of proponents who would build and operate the University Private Hospital in the JCU and Townsville Health and Hospital Service medical precinct in Townsville.

James Cook University Private Hospital powers ahead

Study medicine at JCU

The three shortlisted proponents have now been invited to make a Request For Proposal (RFP) to build and operate the facility.

The proponents will prepare detailed plans for the development, including concept designs, and information about clinical training, research and the range of medical services to be provided by the private hospital.

Details of construction will be finalised with the successful proponent, but Stage 1 of the development is expected to offer about 100 beds, which would cost about $113 M to build.

It’s estimated Stage 1 would create more than 300 full-time construction jobs and more than 350 operations jobs.

The Deputy Vice Chancellor of the Division of Services and Resources Tricia Brand said it’s another exciting announcement for the project and another step towards bringing the project to fruition.

“We warmly welcome the strong interest we have received for the university private hospital, and we look forward to seeing the detail of the proposals.

“JCU is dedicated to improving the health of people in the Tropics. The private hospital will offer world-class medical facilities and improve the healthcare options for Townsville and beyond.

“It will be co-located with existing JCU world-class medical teaching and research infrastructure and the public hospital, providing a tremendous boost to medical services, clinical training and research.

“It will ensure the Douglas medical precinct is the regional epicentre of health services in northern Australia,” Ms Brand said.

The RFP closes in November with construction of the university private hospital expected to be completed in 2019.

JCU Medical School MBBS program

Located in Townsville, JCU Medical School offers the MBBS medical degree and aims to produce graduates of the highest academic standards who can progress to medical practice and to further studies in medical specialties. Graduates will be uniquely qualified in the fields of rural, remote and Indigenous health, and tropical medicine.

The James Cook University medical precinct is opposite the Townsville Hospital, the largest teaching hospital in regional or tropical Australia. In later years, students have a base at one of the James Cook University clinical schools that include Townsville, Cairns, Mackay or Darwin.

Program: Bachelor of Medicine Bachelor of Surgery
Location: Townsville, Queensland
Semester intake: February
Duration: 6 years
Application deadline: August 30, 2016

Apply to James Cook University Medical School!

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Do you have questions about JCU Medical School? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com for more information.

Thursday, July 28th, 2016

JCU professor assumes medical leadership role

James Cook University academic Professor Peter Leggat recently assumed the role of the 12th President of The Australasian College of Tropical Medicine (ACTM).

JCU professor assumes medical leadership role

Professor Leggat (Photo credit: JCU)

The ACTM is responsible for the development of the multidisciplinary specialty of tropical medicine in Australia and New Zealand. The ACTM also hosts Faculties of Travel Medicine and Expedition and Wilderness Medicine.

Tropical medicine is the branch of medicine that deals with health problems that occur uniquely, are more widespread, or prove more difficult to control in tropical and subtropical regions of the world.

The President of the ACTM provides leadership for the Council and members of the College, as well as fostering relations with other professional organisations. It is a two-year term of office.

Professor Leggat, who has worked in tropical medicine for nearly 30 years, is Professor and Deputy Dean of the College of Public Health, Medical and Veterinary Sciences at JCU.

“It is a particularly auspicious time to be the President, as the College celebrates its 25th anniversary this year as the pre-eminent professional organisation in tropical medicine in the region,” Professor Leggat said.

The ACTM was established on May 29, 1991 at a meeting in Townsville, and the secretariat is based at the Australian Medical Association Headquarters in Brisbane. The College includes health professionals from various fields such as medicine, nursing, medical sciences and veterinary sciences from Australia, New Zealand and more than 30 countries.

“The role of President will be a challenging one in terms of engaging with members in many countries and promoting tropical medicine throughout this region,” Professor Leggat said.

Professor Leggat helped to found the popular Master of Public Health and Tropical Medicine and Diploma of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene courses at JCU in 1992, which have emerged as key parts of one of the largest postgraduate public health programs in Australia.

Professor Leggat said that there were natural synergies between the missions of the ACTM and JCU and as President-Elect he was a strong supporter of the Inaugural International Day of the Tropics held on June 29, 2016.

Professor Leggat is a highly respected medical educator, who has been teaching medical and other health science students for over 30 years.

He was elected as a Foundation Fellow of the ACTM in 1991 and has previously served three terms as President. A former Fulbright Scholar, he was admitted as a Member of the Order of Australia in 2013 for significant contributions to medicine, in particular tropical and travel medicine.

JCU Medical School MBBS

Located in Townsville, JCU Medical School offers the MBBS medical degree and aims to produce graduates of the highest academic standards who can progress to medical practice and to further studies in medical specialties. Graduates will be uniquely qualified in the fields of rural, remote and Indigenous health, and tropical medicine.

Program: Bachelor of Medicine Bachelor of Surgery (MBBS)
Location: Townsville, Queensland
Semester intake: February
Duration: 6 years
Application deadline: August 30, 2016

Apply to James Cook University Medical School!

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Do you have questions about JCU Medical School? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com to find out more!

Thursday, July 14th, 2016

Which Australian Medical Schools are still accepting applications for 2017?

Are you interested in studying medicine in Australia?

While the application deadlines for Melbourne Medical School and Sydney Medical School have now passed, you still have the opportunity to apply to other Australian Medical Schools:

Australian Medical Schools in Australia

Study medicine at an Australian Medical School

University of Queensland Medical School

Program: Doctor of Medicine
Location: Brisbane, Queensland
Duration: 4 years
Semester intake: January 2017
Duration: 4 years
Application deadline: Applications are assessed on a rolling admissions (first come, first served) basis. It is recommended that candidates apply early to increase their chances of timely assessment.

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James Cook University Medical School

Program: Bachelor of Medicine Bachelor of Surgery
Location: Townsville, Queensland
Duration: 6 years
Semester intake: February
Duration: 6 years
Application deadline: August 30, 2016

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Monash University Medical School

Program: Bachelor of Medical Science Doctor of Medicine (graduate entry)
Location: Gippsland, Victoria (approx. 2 hours southeast of Melbourne)
Semester intake: February
Duration: 4 years
Application deadline: September 23, 2016

Program: Bachelor of Medical Science Doctor of Medicine (undergraduate entry)
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Semester intake: February
Duration: 5 years
Application deadline: September 23, 2016

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Griffith University Medical School

Program: Doctor of Medicine
Location: Gold Coast, Queensland
Duration: 4 years
Semester intake: January 2017
Application deadline: September 29, 2016

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What’s the Difference Between Undergraduate- and Graduate-entry Medical Programs?

Undergraduate Entry: Rather than having to earn a bachelor degree first, undergraduate-entry medical programs allow students to enter directly from high school.

Graduate Entry: Some Australian medical schools offer a graduate-entry medical program where you first have to complete an undergraduate degree, such as a Bachelor of Science, in order to apply to a four-year medical program.

Apply to an Australian Medical School!

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If you have any questions, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com.