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Posts Tagged ‘James Cook University’

Wednesday, June 21st, 2017

Uni Reviews ranks JCU medicine as #1 in Australia

James Cook University is Australia’s Tropical University, and JCU medical graduates are be uniquely qualified in the fields of rural, remote and Indigenous health, and tropical medicine.

Uni Reviews ranks JCU medicine as #1 in Australia

RSVP to meet JCU in Toronto June 22!

Recently, Uni Reviews ranked the top Australian universities for medicine using a formula combining

  • medical school size (student numbers)
  • student and graduate satisfaction with medicine courses (% satisfied)
  • indicative graduate salaries (based on pay, study and unemployment rates).

Medicine includes General Medicine, Surgery, Psychiatry, Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Paediatrics, Anaesthesiology, Pathology, Radiology, Internal Medicine and General Practice.

Uni Reviews presents independent reviews, ratings and rankings of Australian universities. Site content is published by UniCurve for the benefit of students.

As listed by Uni Reviews, the top universities for medicine in Australia for 2017 are

  1. James Cook University
  2. University of Western Australia
  3. Monash University

James Cook University

JCU Medicine tops the subject rankings for Medicine in 2017. The program is relatively large (1,155 students), has the highest rate of satisfaction among student and graduates (92%) and produces solid job outcomes ($65,000 indicative graduate salary).

University of Western Australia

The University of Western Australian Medical School is ranked 2nd in Australia for Medicine. The faculty’s medical graduates enjoy the highest salaries in Australia ($68,130) and have a solid rate of course satisfaction (84%).

Monash University

Monash University Medical School is in the top 3 for Australia. The school is the largest in Australia (2,452 students) and is highly rated by students (85% satisfaction).

James Cook University Medicine & Dentistry Seminar

It’s no secret we are huge fans of JCU’s commitment to helping rural and under-served populations. If you are interested in a career in medicine or dentistry, but are looking for something more extraordinary, please join OzTREKK and JCU Deputy Vice-Chancellor Professor Ian Wronski for this upcoming seminar. Find out why JCU is interested in Canadian students, and how you can help bring better health to those in need.

Toronto
Venue: Pinnacle Room, Sheraton Centre Hotel, Toronto
Date: Thursday, June 22, 2017
Time: 6 – 9 p.m.

Make sure to RSVP to save your spot!

Study medicine at JCU Medical School

Program: Bachelor of Medicine Bachelor of Surgery
Location: Townsville, Queensland
Next semester intake: February 2018
Duration: 6 years
Application deadline: August 30, 2017

Apply now to James Cook University Medical School!

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Discover more about studying JCU Medicine. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com.

Tuesday, June 6th, 2017

New accommodation for JCU dentistry students coming right up!

If you’re hoping to attend JCU Dental School, we’ve got great news! JCU is adding an on-campus student accommodation option.

James Cook University is looking forward to welcoming the first students to occupy their brand new on-campus accommodation in Cairns for semester 1, 2018. The first stage of this purpose-built residence will house 300 students and there are plans to expand its capacity to 1,000 students in the future.

New accommodation for JCU dentistry students coming right up!

Artist’s impression of student accommodation being built at JCU’s Cairns campus (Image: JCU)

The seven-storey octagonal building offers a variety of apartment-style living options including en-suite studio apartments, six-bedroom apartments with individual en-suites, or six-bedroom apartments with shared bathroom facilities. All apartments are self-catering and are equipped with modern cooking facilities including cook-top, oven, microwave, and refrigerator. Each individual bedroom is lockable and includes air-conditioning and Wi-Fi.

The 42m-long internal grass courtyard features shared barbecue facilities and is the perfect place to relax. The facility will be fully managed by an on-site manager and administrative support team, with residential assistants available to provide pastoral care to students.

Applications for accommodation opened on June 5, 2017. Students interested in living on campus in Cairns for 2018 can register their interest at accommodation@jcu.edu.au prior to applications opening.

What’s at JCU Cairns?

JCU Dental School of course! The dental school was established in 2008 in response to the challenges presented by the oral health needs of northern Australia, and its foundation is part of the Faculty of Medicine, Health and Molecular Sciences’ strong commitment to the provision of professional health education in the area. JCU’s dentistry establishment was funded by a grant of $52.5M from the federal government and includes a new building on the Smithfield Campus of JCU with state-of-the-art facilities, including an 80-seat dental simulation laboratory, prosthodontics and science laboratories, and student home group rooms.

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Think you might like to study dentistry at JCU? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Dental Schools Admissions Officer Adam Smith at adam@oztrekk.com to find out how you can get started!

Tuesday, May 30th, 2017

JCU marine biology student explains how to get volunteer experience while studying in Australia

Remember JCU marine biology student Kessia? Well, she’s back with more great advice. This time, Kessia chats about gaining valuable volunteer experience while you are studying in Australia!

When I first started uni, all the lecturers encouraged us to get volunteering experience. Lots of emphasis was put on it and we were told how this was the way to get a job in the future. Volunteering allows you to put into practice what you have learned in your lectures to the real-world situations.

JCU marine biology student: How to get volunteer experience while studying

Volunteering with the Australian Marine Conservation Society on Magnetic Island (Photo: JCU)

I’ve put together a few tips on how to get volunteering, more specifically in the science field.

  1. Talk to your lecturers

This is the best way to get your first volunteering experience. If you are interested in a particular field, then talk to the lecturer and ask if they can point you in the right direction in terms of volunteering. You never know, they might have some opportunity for you. In first year, it is sometimes intimidating to go up and talk to the lecturer in a class of 100 students. But do not let the class size stop you. Most lecturers will appreciate your interest in their field of study and will be happy to give you advice.

  1. Join the volunteer list at JCU

There is a database for students willing to volunteer for PhD candidates who might need a hand. Once you join the email list, you will receive emails from students who are looking for a couple of hands to help collect data on the field or help with laboratory work and so on. Some of my friends have been able to go on trips such as collecting seagrass for dugong surveys, or collecting water samples from Ross River.  I have had the opportunity to deploy underwater cameras around Hinchinbrook Island. It was definitely a rewarding experience, one that I will do again if I get the chance.

  1. Join the Facebook group

Each college at JCU has a Facebook group. For example, for marine biologists and other environmental courses, the JCU College of Biological, Marine & Environmental Sciences (BioMES) has a Facebook page where students sometimes post about volunteering or job opportunities. You can find come precious information on this group about lots of things. I highly recommend joining the group related to your faculty.

  1. TropWater

The group offers internships to students for a semester in different fields, including aquaculture, mangrove habitats, wetlands, etc. TropWater applications are due a semester before. It offers hands-on experience and you get to work with people who are experts in their field.

  1. Research facilities

James Cook University has a several research facilities on campus including MACRO which works with macroalgae; MARFU, the aquarium complex; MBD, the microalgae site; or EGRU, Geology Research Centre among others. If you talk to the right people, you can get volunteering opportunities at those research centres which are right on campus. From feeding fish, to laboratory work, to cleaning tanks, there is a lot you can learn at those facilities. Even more so, you can volunteer at the Orpheus Island research centre and while helping with cleaning duties, you can spend the rest of your day snorkeling in the amazing protected marine park. You would be required to be on the island for a week or so but it is worth it. Don’t forget to get yourself an Orpheus shirt so you can brag about it to your friends.

  1. Other organisations

There are various other organisations you can volunteer with, including the Australian Marine Conservation Society, an amazing organisation that sensitizes the public on how human-induced impacts on the reef such as coal mining.

  • Australian Marine Conservation Society on Magnetic Island
  • Conservation Volunteers Australia
  • NQ Dry Tropics – helps with beach clean-ups
  • Reek Check Australia – they offer training programs on how to collect data on the reef
  • Australian Institute of Marine Science – A government organisation that runs several research experiments on the Great Barrier Reef. You would need a supervisor/lecturer willing to sponsor your volunteering there.
  • Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority
  • Reef HQ

From my own experience, I have found volunteering very rewarding and have learnt a lot in different fields. Talking to people in the field and seeing what it means to apply all I learnt in classes is eye-opening. Do not be discouraged if you find it hard to get any volunteering in the first few years. The more you talk to lecturers or other students, the easier you will find volunteering opportunities. Ask questions! Even if it is not related to your field of interest, having skills and experience in different fields can be beneficial for when you are applying for a job later. The more volunteering you do, the more experience and knowledge you will acquire. This is the hands-on stuff you will need for a job! So, go out there and take the opportunities given to you.

Read Kessia’s other blog, 5 reasons to study marine biology at James Cook University

Marine biology at JCU

Think you might be interested in marine biology? JCU’s location in the tropics allows students and research staff ready access to a wide variety of tropical marine systems including coral reefs, tropical estuaries, mangrove habitats and seagrass beds. Links between research and teaching programs ensure that students are at the cutting edge of marine research.

Program: Master of Science (Marine Biology and Ecology)
Location: Townsville, Queensland
Duration: 1.5 years
Semester intakes: July or February
Application deadline: June 29 and January 30 each year
Entry requirements: Completion of a recognised, appropriate undergraduate degree attaining a minimum of 65% or equivalent prior learning including appropriate professional experience.

Apply to the Master of Science at James Cook University!

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Are you interested in studying marine biology at James Cook University? Contact OzTREKK Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com for more information!

Friday, May 26th, 2017

James Cook University trains specialist doctors for regional and remote communities

James Cook University’s ability to train and keep GPs and medical specialists in regional and remote settings has been given a big boost.

As part of the Federal Government’s Rural Health Multidisciplinary Training program $54.4 million has been allocated over 2016–2017 to 2018–19 for new Regional Training Hubs and University Departments of Rural Health.

James Cook University trains specialist doctors for regional and remote communities

Prof Richard Murray (Photo: JCU)

JCU will operate three of the new Regional Training Hubs—in North, Western and Far North Queensland.

Professor Richard Murray, Dean of JCU’s College of Medicine and Dentistry, said the investment will allow JCU to be more involved in training the specialist doctors that regional and remote communities need.

“The number of graduating doctors in Australia has almost tripled over the past 15 years, yet what we have seen is graduates piling up in the cities, looking for city-based specialist training jobs. The regions are still left to rely on importing doctors from overseas. This announcement is a welcome first step towards a system that trains specialist doctors and GPs where they are most needed,” he said.

Professor Murray said it was time for Commonwealth, state and territory governments to commit to a revolution in the further training of medical graduates.

“We need a system that sees much more specialist training based in regional Australia, with a city rotation only as needed,” he said.

Professor Murray said JCU has long been a national leader and advocate of training medical graduates for work in regional Australia.

“This announcement shows that Assistant Minister for Health David Gillespie is listening to the arguments we have been making over the last decade,” he said.

Professor Sabina Knight, Director of JCU’s Mount Isa Centre for Rural & Remote Health, said the funding will enhance rural health.

“We do a lot of work encouraging students to stay and work in rural and remote areas, but if they can’t get an internship in a regional hospital such as Mount Isa, then they have to go to a city for training and often end up disappearing into metropolitan areas,” she said.

Professor Knight said the initiative fills in a crucial gap in the current system.

“This was the missing bit in the pipeline between having early year medical students and turning out medical specialists in a rural or remote area. We will have a better pathway now and a much better ability to follow through on their training,” she said.

Professor Murray welcomed the funding as a valuable first step, but said the program would be even more fruitful if states and territories now came on board with their support.

About the JCU Medical School MBBS Program

The 6-year, full-time MBBS degree at James Cook University is a comprehensive program with integrated instruction in biomedical sciences, professional practice and clinical medicine. Graduates will be uniquely qualified in the fields of rural, remote and Indigenous health, and tropical medicine.

Program: Bachelor of Medicine Bachelor of Surgery
Location: Townsville, Queensland
Semester intake: February
Duration: 6 years
Application deadline: August 30, 2017 (Note: early offers of admission may be made to high-achieving international applicants. It is recommended that students apply as early as possible and well before the August 30 deadline.)

As part of the MBBS application process, all candidates must participate in an interview with Prof Ian Wronksi. For the 2018 intake, JCU will hold interviews with eligible international applicants from Canada either

  • in person in Canada this June, or
  • via video-conferencing following the August 30th program application deadline.

In-person interviews in Canada (dates are subject to change)

June 22 – 23, 2017: Toronto
June 24, 2017: Edmonton
June 25 – 26, 2017: Vancouver

 

Apply to JCU Medical School!

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Would you like more information about studying medicine at Australia’s tropical university—James Cook University? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Thursday, May 11th, 2017

Why should Canadians consider studying at JCU Medical School in Australia?

There are many reasons that encourage people to study medicine. Among the most popular include the desire to help others. Sometimes that wish goes beyond the standard “I want to make a difference in my community” to “I want to make a difference in the world.”

Why should Canadians consider studying at JCU Medical School in Australia?

Prof Ian Wronski (Photo: JCU)

So what makes JCU stand out from other Australian universities? And how on earth can we compare Australia’s and Canada’s health care needs?

James Cook University may not be the largest university, or the most well-known, but JCU has something the others don’t: their riveted focus on Aboriginal health, rural medicine, public health, tropical medicine and the needs of under-served populations.

James Cook University Deputy Vice Chancellor Tropical Health and Medicine Professor Ian Wronski explains why JCU concentrates on rural, remote and tropical health care.

“JCU was established as Australia’s university for the tropics, and so we focus on programs that are particularly relevant to the tropical world,” Prof Wronski says.

“In the medicine, health, molecular science part of the university—that includes all the health professions and molecular biology and biomedicine, and the research institutes we have—we’ve particularly targeted issues relating to under-served populations, especially rural, remote, indigenous and tropical peoples.”

Tropical peoples? How can that relate to Canada you ask? When speaking about Canada, most people think frigid winters, not tropics.

But the connection between Australia and Canada is stronger than you may think.

In fact, in 2013, JCU Medical School Dean and Head of School Richard Murray travelled to Canada as a member of an Australian government delegation at a Canadian-Australian roundtable on recognition of professional credentials between the two countries.

Dean Murray made a case for why Canada and Australia should collaborate our shared interest in health care innovation to meet the needs of our geographically dispersed populations. Prof Murray said that the opportunities this creates for Australian and Canadian practitioners to gain experience in each other’s countries could only benefit the quality and depth of rural medical services.

“In medicine for rural areas, there are opportunities for movement and exchange for students, doctors in training as well as specialists in rural general practice and other generalist specialties. Innovation in areas such as telemedicine and socially accountable health professional education are shared interests,” Prof Murray wrote in an article he published in the JCU Medical School’s journal, A Taste of our own Medicine.

Prof Wronski said there are many countries in a similar position to Australia, including Canada. Like Australia, our population is concentrated on the fringes of the country, where the climate is most ideal and the land most usable. But where people live in rural and Northern Canada, away from the general population, finding health care can be more challenging—just like the people in remote and tropical locations of Australia.

So what kind of student does James Cook University wish to attract?

When asked why JCU likes Canadian students, Professor Wronski narrowed it down: “Canada has a good education system, and students come to us well educated and broad-minded. Also, many of them have that fire in their belly to put something toward the health services side of making life better for under-served populations. Canada, like Australia, has large areas, large rural and indigenous populations,” the JCU professor explains.

“We like Canadian students because we see ourselves as a global hub, and we want to attract students who are interested the tropical world and the health of under-served peoples.”

Does this sound like you? If you’re passionate about changing the world, particularly the lives of those who live in rural or remote areas, JCU wants to talk to you!

About the JCU Medical School Medical Program

The 6-year, full-time MBBS degree is a comprehensive program with integrated instruction in biomedical sciences, professional practice and clinical medicine. Graduates will be uniquely qualified in the fields of rural, remote and Indigenous health, and tropical medicine.

As part of the MBBS application process, all candidates must participate in an interview with Prof Ian Wronksi. For the 2018 intake, JCU will hold interviews with eligible international applicants from Canada either

  • in person in Canada this June, or
  • via video-conferencing following the August 30th program application deadline.

In-person interviews in Canada (dates are subject to change)

June 22 – 23, 2017: Toronto
June 24, 2017: Edmonton
June 25 – 26, 2017: Vancouver

Program: Bachelor of Medicine Bachelor of Surgery
Location: Townsville, Queensland
Semester intake: February
Duration: 6 years
Application deadline: August 30, 2017 (Note: Early offers of admission may be made to high-achieving international applicants! Candidates are encouraged to apply as early as possible and well before the August 30 deadline.)

Apply to JCU Medical School!

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Do you have questions about JCU Medical School? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com.

Monday, May 1st, 2017

James Cook University is No.1 in world for marine biology

James Cook University’s standing as a world leader in environmental sciences has been re-affirmed with JCU ranked No.1 in the world for marine biology, and No. 2 in the world for biodiversity conservation research.

Sydney Dental School

JCU is ranked No.1 in the world for marine biology (Photo: Mark Ziembecki)

The Centre for World University Rankings (CWUR) has released its inaugural subjects ranking, which compares more than 26,000 degree-granting institutions around the world.

CWUR ranked JCU as follows:

  • Marine & Freshwater Biology (World Rank: 1)
  • Biodiversity Conservation (World Rank: 2)
  • Overall, this ranks James Cook University #166 among global institutions with the most Top-10 placements.

Senior Deputy Vice Chancellor Professor Chris Cocklin said the ranking reflects JCU’s extremely strong research performance.

“To be ranked so highly in these subject areas is a great credit to our talented researchers. These results are consistent with our high standing in other global rankings for environmental and ecological sciences.

“JCU continues to deliver ground-breaking research, and we perform very strongly when compared to the world’s largest, most successful universities.”

The CWUR Rankings by Subject 2017 highlights the world’s elite universities in the sciences and the social sciences, based on the number and influence of research articles in top-tier journals.

Data is obtained from Clarivate Analytics (previously the Intellectual Property and Science business of Thomson Reuters).

JCU College of Marine and Environmental Sciences

As part of the Division of Tropical Environments and Societies, the College of Marine and Environmental Sciences promotes, fosters, supports and administers quality teaching and research at JCU in the areas of marine biology, environment, geography and sustainability, aquaculture and fisheries, and terrestrial ecosystems.

Marine science is the interdisciplinary study of the marine environment bringing together elements of marine biology, oceanography, marine geoscience and environmental management. Marine scientists explore the make-up and dynamics of the world’s oceans and use their skills to investigate and manage human impacts on the marine environment; understand and utilise ocean resources; and manage and protect our marine reserves.

JCU’s location in the tropics allows students and research staff ready access to a wide variety of tropical marine systems including coral reefs, tropical estuaries, mangrove habitats and seagrass beds. Links between research and teaching programs ensure that students are at the cutting edge of marine research.

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Are you interested in marine biology? Contact OzTREKK Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com for more information about environmental sciences degrees available at James Cook University!

Wednesday, April 26th, 2017

Can you work and study in Australia at the same time?

So you want a job while studying?

Meet Sydney Jones, a JCU marine science student, originally from Texas. As an international student in Australia, Sydney has invaluable insight about what it’s like to study—and work—in Australia. Here are some tips from Sydney:

Can you work and study in Australia at the same time?

JCU Marine Science student Sydney Jones (Photo: JCU)

Whether you just need a bit of extra spending money or want professional experience, getting and having a job in Townsville, while you’re studying, may be more difficult than you think. It is difficult because of a couple of reasons.

  • As you are a student studies come first and it makes you less available
  • More than likely you don’t have a car and on campus jobs are scarce
  • Since the minimum wage is high employers expect more from you, especially when it comes to prior experience

While getting a job is difficult, it is not impossible. When my parents allowed me to come to school here there were a couple of conditions. One condition was that I needed to get a job and the other condition was that I could never get a car. Well, after my first semester I realized that getting a job was going to be difficult without a form of transportation and I got a car and a job. Now I know people who don’t have cars and have lived here without one for years and held jobs, but it is just something you need to consider and be realistic about. Also, while I’m thinking about it, if you think you can come here and find a babysitting gig I am sorry to tell you that it is incredibly rare for opportunities like that to come up. There is not a culture here of babysitting like there is in other places.

Alright now onto the advice:

  1. Know your work rights based on the visa you have: This is so important. If you violate the terms, your visa can be canceled and you will have your butt on a plane home in no time.
  2. Have a resume and cover letter prepared to give to employers: Make sure you look at resources online as to what Australian employers expect from a cover letter and resume as it is not universal.
  3. Follow up with businesses where you have dropped your resume off: Even stopping in to say hey might make the difference. A lot of people I know have gotten their jobs because they made a connection with one of the employees. Businesses want to know that you can work well with the rest of the staff and is someone that is easy to get along with.
  4. If you are granted an interview know what the business does and be ready to talk about it: I was surprised when I had my first interview and I got asked specific questions about the restaurant, I still go the job but I was thrown off initially as I just accepted it as a student entry level job.
  5. Use websites as well as just walking into businesses: Websites such as indeed, seek, JCU’s Career hub and spotjobs are useful especially in finding jobs for events such as Groovin the Moo, V8s, the races or for Cowboys games.
  6. Check out the JCU career center: The Careers and Employment center is located at the JCU library and the website also has a lot of awesome resources for students to use.

Before you go on your job hunt and just in general cause it’s awesome check out insiderguides.com.au for some great articles written specifically for International students. Alright so one last piece of advice I can give is to just be realistic and willing to put in the work to get and have a job here, it is a very rewarding experience. Happy job hunting!

Work rights while studying in Australia

You are allowed, as part of your student visa, to work a maximum of 40 hours per fortnight (every 2 weeks) during semester, and unlimited work rights during semester break. These monies earned are not to be your only source of income for tuition or living expenses, and some students find it difficult to have time for a job due to the university course workload. Balance is everything!

Spouses or common-law partners (dependents) can either work part time or full time, depending on the type of student visa you have.

If you are a postgraduate research student, you can work a maximum of 40 hours per fortnight during any preliminary courses you undertake. If you have commenced your masters by research or doctoral degree in Australia, there is no limit on the number of hours you may work.

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Find out more about James Cook University and about how you can study in Australia!

Friday, April 21st, 2017

JCU medical research finds new drug to ease C-section trauma

James Cook University researchers from the College of Medicine and Dentistry may have found a way to reduce trauma and prevent infections after Caesarean births.

JCU medical research finds new drug to ease C-section trauma

L to R: Lisa Davenport, Professor Geoffrey Dobson, Dr Hayley Letson (Photo: JCU)

Caesarean delivery rates are increasing worldwide and around a third of all mothers in Australia, USA and UK give birth surgically each year, but a C-section is not without risks.

Fourth-year JCU Medical School student Lisa Davenport joined Dr Hayley Letson and Professor Geoffrey Dobson from the Heart, Trauma and Sepsis Research Laboratory at JCU to research ways to reduce the stress response to the trauma of surgery.

Caesarean sections involve one or more incisions in a patient’s abdomen, known as a laparotomy, and are a common option for delivering babies.

But they have a raft of potential side-effects, including cutting the baby, post-surgery infection, fever, excessive blood loss or clotting, scar tissue formation and extended stays in hospital.

Dr Letson said a single laparotomy is a major injury.

“It can activate the brain’s stress response from the multiple ‘damage’ signals sent out from the original incision,” she said.

The JCU research showed that a laparotomy causes inflammation and an early activation of the immune system, which can then spiral out of control.

Ms Davenport examined whether an Adenosine, Lidocaine and Magnesium (ALM) drip could reduce the trauma of surgery when used by itself in experimental models. She discovered that adverse responses were reduced when the subject was infused with a small amount of the ALM drip.

“Low volume therapies may be important, because you want to avoid large fluid volumes that can shock the body a second time,” she said.

Professor Dobson said that precisely how tiny volumes of the ALM drip works is an active area of investigation in the Dobson Laboratory, but experiments have shown it protects against infection as well.

Dr Letson said the ALM therapy appears to be linked to improved brain control over whole body function at times of surgical stress. “It suppresses signals that activate immune cells and promote inflammation,” she said.

The work has applications to other major surgery and especially to rural and remote medicine. Professor Dobson said new frontline drugs are urgently required to make major surgery safer for the patient and more predictable for the surgeon, with the potential to reduce complications and massively reduce health care costs, and possibly reduce waiting times for elective surgery.

“The global surgical statistics are staggering. Of the 234 million major surgeries performed every year, every hour there are around 1,000 deaths and 4,000 major complications, and 50% may be preventable,” he said.

Ms Davenport has completed the study and is currently analysing the data and writing a paper for a high-profile surgical journal.

Her study parallels the Dobson Lab’s ongoing trauma work being supported by the US Military, and a new collaboration that started late 2016 with the National Institutes of Health in the United States.

The research team is also pursuing funding opportunities to investigate the use of ALM fluid as a potential treatment for post-partum haemorrhage. Of the 500,000 maternal deaths each year, approximately 25% are due to haemorrhage.

Study medicine at JCU Medical School

JCU Medical School offers an undergraduate-entry medical program that specializes in rural, remote and indigenous medicine and is located in north Queensland, Australia. Rather than having to earn a bachelor degree first, undergraduate-entry medical programs allow students to enter directly from high school. If you have completed high school studies or would like to apply to a medical school in Australia without using your MCAT score, you may wish to learn more about undergraduate-entry medical programs offered by Australian universities.

Program: Bachelor of Medicine Bachelor of Surgery
Location: Townsville, Queensland
Next semester intake: February 2018
Duration: 6 years
Application deadline: August 30, 2017

Apply now to James Cook University Medical School!

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Would you like more information about studying medicine at JCU Medical School? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com.

Tuesday, April 4th, 2017

JCU lecturer publishes book about legendary Australian aviator

Creative and academic writing students at James Cook University have the real deal: a published author, JCU Arts Lecturer Chrystopher Spicer.

Spicer’s book The Flying Adventures of Jessie Keith “Chubbie” Miller was compiled after years of research and based on Jessie Miller’s own words and writing, this is the first book to focus on the flying career of this pioneer aviatrix, whose important place in aviation history has up until now been largely forgotten. Jessie flew into airspace where no woman and very few men had ever flown before, and so she left behind an important legacy as an international pioneer of flight. As the first aviatrix from the Southern hemisphere to become famous in the Northern hemisphere, she was the first woman to truly unite the world of flight.

Sydney Dental School

JCU Arts Lecturer Chrys Spicer (Photo credit: JCU)

Australian pioneer aviatrix Jessie Keith “Chubbie” Miller made a significant contribution to international aviation history. The first woman to travel from England to Australia in the air, with her close friend Bill Lancaster in 1928, Jessie Miller was also the first woman to fly more than 8000 miles (much further that Amelia Earhart at the time), to cross the equator in the air, to cross the South China and Timor Seas in the air, and to traverse the Australian continent by air from north to south.

In terms of how this book came about, Chrystopher describes it:

Well, it started many years ago when I was in Ohio doing some research on the actor Clark Gable for one of my books. I was having dinner with friends and someone asked me if I’d ever heard the story of an Australian aviatrix who had landed in a field outside of a small town called Xenia during an air race in 1929. I had no idea any Australian woman was flying in the US that early, and so I began to investigate the life of Jessie Keith “Chubbie” Miller, friend of Amelia Earhart, founding member of the Ninety Nines—the very first (and still existing) organisation for women pilots, and the first woman to travel from England to Australia in the air. In short, she was the first woman from the Southern hemisphere to break records and compete in air races in the Northern hemisphere.

I wrote about her in my earlier book, Great Australian World Firsts, but due to lack of interest from Australia publishers I’d given up on publishing an entire book about Jessie until I was asked by director Andrew Lancaster to become involved in the making of the film The Lost Aviator in 2014, about the mysterious disappearance of Jessie Miller’s friend Bill Lancaster. As a result of that work, I was able to take the project to an American publisher and now I’ve finally had the chance to give this remarkable woman her own voice in this new book, The Flying Adventures of Jessie Keith “Chubbie” Miller.

James Cook University lecturer Chrystopher J. Spicer has written extensively about Australian and American film and cultural history in such acclaimed books as Clark Gable: Biography (McFarland, 2002), and Great Australian World Firsts (Allen & Unwin, 2012). In 2015, he contributed to Andrew Lancaster’s film about Bill Lancaster and Jessie Miller, The Lost Aviator.

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Find out more about studying arts at James Cook University!

Friday, March 24th, 2017

JCU Dentistry engaging rural communities in oral health

James Cook University was established as Australia’s university for the tropics, and therefore focuses on programs that are particularly relevant to the tropical world. JCU Dentistry was established in 2008 in response to the challenges presented by the oral health needs of rural and remote northern Australia.

JCU Dentistry students are connected to the community

JCU researchers say children in rural Queensland are three times more likely to be admitted to hospital for dental problems than in other parts of the state. To help improve oral health education, JCU partners with communities in research to try to make services work better for people living and working in rural and remote areas.

The university sends its health professional students, including JCU Dentistry students, to remote and rural regions on placements, and to do outreach in schools, and encourages its graduates to return back to rural and remote areas to work after graduation.

Apply to JCU Dentistry directly from high school

If you’re interested in improving the health of people who live in tropical, rural, and remote places, then the Bachelor of Dental Surgery program at JCU might be for you. This five-year undergraduate degree provides students with the knowledge, skills and attitudes they need to become competent practitioners of dentistry. While it is a broad-based program including all aspects of dental practice, it also has a special focus on issues of special concern to the northern Australian region, particularly those relating to tropical, rural and Indigenous practice.

JCU Dentistry engaging rural communities in oral health

Learn more about JCU dentistry

JCU Dentistry accepts applications from high school graduates or from those who have completed university studies.

Program: Bachelor of Dental Surgery (BDS)
Location: Cairns, Queensland
Semester intake: February
Duration: 5 years
Application deadline: August 30, 2017

Apply now to JCU Dental School!

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Learn more about JCU Dentistry! For more BDS program information, contact OzTREKK’s Australian Dental Schools Admissions Officer Adam Smith at adam@oztrekk.com.