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Posts Tagged ‘James Cook University Veterinary School’

Tuesday, April 17th, 2018

Australian veterinary school applications are officially open!

Are you interested in becoming a vet? Australian veterinary schools applications for the 2019 intake are officially open via OzTREKK! When you apply through OzTREKK, we will walk you through the entire process, step by step—from application to arrival—and you can apply to multiple vet schools at once!

Australian veterinary school applications are officially open!

It’s easy to apply to multiple veterinary schools at once!

World-class Education

OzTREKK represents 4 top-ranked Australian veterinary  schools, each offering state-of-the-art facilities and incredible practical placements that promote industry-ready graduates.

Practicing in Canada

Three Australian vet programs OzTREKK represents are accredited by the AVMA, so graduates are considered in the same category as graduates from Canadian vet schools when undertaking licensing examinations in North America.

Get #NashTips!

Introducing our new junior admissions officer, Nash (that’s him in the photos!), OzTREKK Veterinary Admissions Officer’s 3-year-old golden retriever. Nash will be your guide, sending you tips and tricks throughout the application process! 🐶

Nash is also here to answer some FAQs! When you apply through OzTREKK, we will keep you up to date throughout the entire process. You’ll receive regular #NashTips emails with all the info you need to apply, to accept, and to get ready to go to Australia! 🐴🦉🐮🐷🐰🐨 If Nash could speak he’d say, “Apply today!”

OzTREKK was amazing and I would not be here without them. They made my application process so much easier, making sure I had every document needed and helped take the stress away from the complicated process. They also prepared me for my transition to Australia and I felt like my journey has been so smooth due to the advice from OzTREKK. ~ Ashley S, Melbourne DVM student 

About studying vet med in Australia

Programs at Australian veterinary schools are suitable for students who wish to gain entry into a professional veterinary program directly from high school or after having completed undergraduate studies. Canadian students wishing to become a veterinarian have the option of applying to a Bachelor of Veterinary Science program directly from high school, or to a Doctor of Veterinary Medicine program after having completed science-based bachelor degree.

The following OzTREKK Australian universities offer vet programs:

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If you have any questions about your application, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Veterinary Schools Officer Meghan Strank at meghan@oztrekk.com or call 1-866-698-7355 (toll free in Canada).

Monday, April 27th, 2015

Apply to Australian Veterinary Schools for the 2016 intake

Do you love animals? Are you interested in becoming a vet? Applications for Australian Veterinary Schools for the 2016 intake are officially open via OzTREKK!

Australian Veterinary Schools in Australia

OzTREKK student Ashley is studying vet medicine in Australia!

Veterinary science programs at Australian Veterinary Schools are suitable for students who wish to gain entry into a veterinary professional program directly from high school or after having completed undergraduate studies. Canadian students wishing to become a veterinarian have the option of applying to the Bachelor of Veterinary Science (BVSc) program directly from high school or after having completed Bachelor of Science courses or a degree.

For professional degrees which train students to become veterinarians, students can study veterinary medicine/veterinary science in Australia as either

The DVM program is offered only to students who have already obtained an undergraduate science degree.

The following Australian universities offer veterinary medicine/veterinary science programs:

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If you have any questions, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Veterinary School Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or call 1-866-698-7355 (toll free in Canada).

Friday, September 6th, 2013

OzTREKK Funny Friday

Some Lesser-known Cat Laws

Law of Cat Inertia: A cat at rest will tend to remain at rest, unless acted upon by some outside force—such as the opening of cat food, or a nearby scurrying mouse.

Australian Veterinary Schools

An example of Cat Liquefaction

Law of Cat Motion: A cat will move in a straight line, unless there is a really good reason to change direction.

Law of Cat Magnetism: All blue blazers and black sweaters attract cat hair in direct proportion to the darkness of the fabric.

Law of Cat Allergens: All cats will immediately rub up against and crawl on those who are extremely allergic to them.

Law of Cat Liquefaction: A cat can take the form of whatever it happens to crawl into: bowl, box, basket…

Law of Cat Thermodynamics: Heat flows from a warmer to a cooler body, except in case of a cat, in which case all heat flows to the cat.

Law of Cat Stretching: A cat will stretch to a distance proportional to the length of the nap just taken.

Law of Cat Sleeping: All cats must sleep with people whenever possible, in a position as uncomfortable for the people involved, and as comfortable for the cat as possible.

Law of Cat Elongation: A cat can make its body long enough to reach any counter top that has anything remotely interesting on it.

Law of Cat Obstruction: A cat must lie on the floor in a position to obstruct the maximum amount of human foot traffic.

Law of Cat Regurgitation: A cat will only vomit on items/carpeting of great value.

Law of Cat Acceleration: A cat will accelerate at a constant rate, until he gets good and ready to stop.

About Australian Veterinary Schools

Veterinary science programs at Australian Veterinary Schools are suitable for students who wish to gain entry into a veterinary professional program directly from high school or after having completed undergraduate studies.

Canadian students wishing to become a veterinarian have the option of applying to the Bachelor of Veterinary Science (BVSc) program directly from high school or after having completed Bachelor of Science courses or a degree.

The Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM) program is offered only to students who have already obtained an undergraduate science degree.

Learn more about these Australian Veterinary Schools!

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Are you interested in becoming a veterinarian?

If you have any questions or would like veterinary school updates emailed to you, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Veterinary Schools Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or callt 1 866-698-7355 (toll free in Canada).

Contact OzTREKK for more information about studying in Australia and about veterinary programs at Australian universities.

Friday, July 19th, 2013

OzTREKK Funny Friday

A man rushes his limp dog to the veterinarian. The doctor pronounces the dog dead. The agitated man demands a second opinion.

The vet goes into the back room and comes out with a cat. The cat sniffs the body and meows. The vet says, “I’m sorry, but the cat thinks that your dog is dead, too.”

The man is still unwilling to accept that his dog is dead.

The vet brings in a black Labrador. The lab sniffs the body and barks. The vet says, “I’m sorry, but the lab thinks your dog is dead, too.”

The man finally resigns to the diagnosis and asks how much he owes. The veterinarian answers, “Six hundred and fifty dollars.”

Six hundred and fifty dollars to tell me my dog is dead?” exclaims the man.

“Well,” the vet replies, “I would only have charged you $50 for my initial diagnosis. The additional six hundred is for the cat scan and lab tests.”

Postgraduate Australian Veterinary Program

Duration: 4 years
Number of international places: approximately 50
Program commences: March intake each year
Offered at: University of Melbourne

Undergraduate Australian Veterinary Programs

Duration: 5 years
Number of international places: varies from 5 to 140
Program commences: February intake each year
Offered at: James Cook University, University of Queensland and University of Sydney

Learn more about these Australian Veterinary Schools!

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Are you interested in becoming a veterinarian?

For more information about Australian Veterinary School entry requirements, application deadlines, tuition fees, scholarships, please visit OzTREKK’s Australian Veterinary Schools page. If you have any questions or would like veterinary school updates emailed to you, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Veterinary Schools Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or phone Rachel at 1 866-698-7355 (toll free in Canada).

Contact OzTREKK for more information about studying in Australia and about veterinary programs at Australian universities.

 

Wednesday, June 5th, 2013

Australian vet school students discuss Animals Australia campaign

What happens when a major grocery store chain joins forces with animal activists? In Australia, apparently a little trouble.

Coles, a supermarket with origins that date back to 1914, is a leader in Australian food retailing, with more than 100,000 employees and over 11 million customer transactions a week.

Recently, Coles partnered with Animals Australia, a national animal protection organization that represents 40 member societies and thousands of individual supporters, including some well-known Aussie celebrities. According to their website, “Animals Australia has an unprecedented track record in investigating and exposing animal cruelty and for conducting world-first strategic public awareness campaigns for the promotion of better treatment for animals Down Under.”

Animals Australia recently ran a promotion with Coles against factory farming conditions by offering branded shopping bags with the words “Make it Possible” and an image of a little pink pig with wings—no doubt playing on the idiom “when pigs fly,” and tugging at the heartstrings of animal lovers across Australia.

The shopping bags, which were available in 500 stores, promoted animal welfare and asked consumers to help end factory farming. Animals Australia produced 15,000 bags and if all sold, the group would have raised $4,500. The shopping bags are also emblazoned with the slogan “we believe in a world without factory farming.”

Also running online, the Animals Australia’s “Make it Possible” campaign urges consumers to buy cage-free eggs, free-range chicken, and stall-free pork.

The National Farmers’ Federation (NFF) says it is extremely disappointed that Coles would partner with the group, but Coles has defended its short-term partnership with Animals Australia.

“We’re working with Animals Australia on welfare campaigns to improve the welfare of animals in the supply chain,” Coles spokesman Jon Church said.

The National Farmers’ Federation (NFF) met with Coles to express its disdain, and farmers across the country threatened to stop supplying Coles, saying that the campaign sent “all the wrong messages.” They also pointed out that the group has targeted animal agriculture in many ways across Australia and have had a “steep and deep effect on many farmers and producers across rural Australia.”

Animals Australia believes the message for shoppers is that farmers are opposed to an initiative that aims to improve the lives of animals produced for food, and says the campaign was not intended to be “anti-farmer,” but “pro-animal welfare.” The shopping bag campaign was created to help end cruel factory-farm practices.

In order to maintain the peace, Animals Australia has asked the food giant to end the Make it Possible promotion. Animals Australia Spokeswoman Lisa Chalk says a television campaign will begin next week instead.

“This has only just increased our determination to provide those animals with representation. We aren’t taking a backward step, we are simply changing direction and changing tack,” she said. “That’s why we are putting together a national television advertising campaign to air this week that will show consumers what the National Farmers Federation has fought so hard to hide and that is what happens to animals in these production systems.”

So how do Australian veterinary school students react to this news?

On many discussion boards, the consensus ranges from full Animals Australia support to mere shrugs of frustration—in defense of the farmers. Of course, animal welfare is of foremost importance; however, many veterinary students point out that the farmers are not the “bad guys” as they are sometimes portrayed, but are simply attempting to keep up with the demand—and trying to provide ethical treatment of their animals at the same time.

Many veterinary students are interested in the science of animal welfare and keeping up with the changing standards. While the thought of veterinary science studies most often conjures thoughts of kittens and puppies, spay and neuter, oftentimes it involves the study of ethical animal treatment and conduct and live animal export.

Australian Veterinary Schools are at the forefront of animal welfare study. They are world leaders in veterinary education, animal science and research, and are focused on the welfare and health of animals, including food livestock. Find out more about Australian Veterinary Schools in Australia:

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Are you interested in studying veterinary medicine at an Australian Veterinary School? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Veterinary Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady for more information about vet school entry requirements, application deadlines, and how you can study in Australia.

Email Rachel at rachel@oztrekk.com or call 1 866-698-7355 (toll free in Canada).

 

Friday, March 15th, 2013

OzTREKK Funny Friday

A veterinarian was feeling ill and went to see her doctor.

The doctor asked her all the usual questions, about her symptoms, how long had they been occurring, etc., when she interrupted him: “Hey, look. I’m a vet. I don’t need to ask my patients these kind of questions. I can tell what’s wrong just by looking. Why can’t you?”

The doctor nodded, looked her up and down, wrote out a prescription, and handed it to her and said, “There you are. Of course, if that doesn’t work, we’ll have to have you put down.”

About Australian Veterinary Schools

Veterinary science programs at Australian Veterinary Schools are suitable for students who wish to gain entry into a veterinary professional program directly from high school or after having completed undergraduate studies.

Canadian students wishing to become a veterinarian have the option of applying to the Bachelor of Veterinary Science (BVSc) program directly from high school or after having completed Bachelor of Science courses or a degree.

For professional degrees which train students to become veterinarians, students can study veterinary medicine/veterinary science in Australia as either

The Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM) program is offered only to students who have already obtained an undergraduate science degree.

The following Australian universities offer veterinary medicine/veterinary science programs:

James Cook University Veterinary School

University of Melbourne Veterinary School

University of Queensland Veterinary School

University of Sydney Veterinary School

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For more information about Australian Veterinary School entry requirements, application deadlines, tuition fees, scholarships, please visit OzTREKK’s Australian Veterinary Schools page.

If you have any questions, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Veterinary School Officer Rachel Brady:

Email Rachel at rachel@oztrekk.com or phone Rachel at 1 866-698-7355 (toll free in Canada).

Contact OzTREKK for more information about studying in Australia and about veterinary programs at Australian universities.


Monday, March 11th, 2013

Australian Veterinary School applications for the 2014 intake are now open

Do you love animals? Are you interested in becoming a vet? Applications for Australian Veterinary Schools for the 2014 intake are officially open via OzTREKK!

Veterinary science programs at Australian Veterinary Schools are suitable for students who wish to gain entry into a veterinary professional program directly from high school or after having completed undergraduate studies.

Canadian students wishing to become a veterinarian have the option of applying to the Bachelor of Veterinary Science (BVSc) program directly from high school or after having completed Bachelor of Science courses or a degree.

For professional degrees which train students to become veterinarians, students can study veterinary medicine/veterinary science in Australia as either

The Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM) program is offered only to students who have already obtained an undergraduate science degree.

The following Australian universities offer veterinary medicine/veterinary science programs:

James Cook University Veterinary School

University of Melbourne Veterinary School

University of Queensland Veterinary School

University of Sydney Veterinary School

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For more information about Australian Veterinary School entry requirements, application deadlines, tuition fees, scholarships, please visit OzTREKK’s Australian Veterinary Schools page.

If you have any questions, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Veterinary School Officer Rachel Brady:

Email Rachel at rachel@oztrekk.com

Phone Rachel at 1 866-698-7355 (toll free in Canada)

Contact OzTREKK for more information about studying in Australia and about veterinary programs at Australian universities.

Monday, June 18th, 2012

Program of the Month: Australian Veterinary Schools

Australian Veterinary Schools are OzTREKK‘s Program of the Month feature for June!

Veterinarians play a major role in the health care of pets, livestock, zoo animals, and sporting and laboratory animals. Some veterinarians work in livestock production and in research, broadening the scope of fundamental theoretical and applied knowledge. Others use their skills to protect humans against diseases carried by animals and conduct clinical research into human and animal health problems.

In Australia, professional degrees can be undertaken either straight from high school at the undergraduate level, or after one has completed a university degree, at the graduate-entry level. For professional degrees that train students to become veterinarians, students can study veterinary medicine/veterinary science in Australia as either:

  1. a Bachelor of Veterinary Science degree; or
  2. a Doctor of Veterinary Medicine degree.

The University of Melbourne‘s Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM) program is offered only to students who have already obtained an undergraduate science degree. Bachelor of Veterinary Science programs in Australia are suitable for students who wish to gain entry into a veterinary professional program directly from high school or after having completed undergraduate studies.

Canadian students have the option of applying to the Bachelor of Veterinary Science program directly from high school or after having completed Bachelor of Science courses or a degree. The following Australian Veterinary Schools offer veterinary medicine/veterinary science programs:

University: James Cook University Veterinary School
Course: Bachelor of Veterinary Science
Duration: 5 Years
Description: An important part of the James Cook University Veterinary School curriculum is the students’ exposure to a range of practical livestock production and veterinary practice experiences. The extramural practical work program exposes students to a broad variety of agriculture and animal production enterprises; enhances understanding of veterinary practice, animal health and welfare and disease control; integrates with and supports the academic program; and helps to prepare students for a range of employment opportunities available within the veterinary profession. In the first four years of the program, students complete three separate compulsory extramural practical work and veterinary clinical experience placements. The James Cook University Veterinary School program offers state-of-the-art teaching facilities in a new veterinary emergency and referral clinic on the Townsville campus and a specialist large animal treatment facility on the tablelands, which provide clinical experience and training for final-year students.

 

University: University of Melbourne Veterinary School
Course: Doctor of Veterinary Medicine
Duration: 4 Years
Description: The University of Melbourne Veterinary School four-year, graduate-entry DVM degree offers veterinary students the best possible preparation for twenty-first century careers in a rapidly changing and increasingly global workforce. Students can expect to learn the latest theory and practice, with plenty of practical hands-on experience, taught by a team of leading veterinarians. Through the University of Melbourne Veterinary School DVM, students will undertake integrated studies that encourage and facilitate learning. The first and second year of the DVM will be taught at Veterinary Pre-Clinical Campus on the university’s main Parkville campus in downtown Melbourne. The third and fourth years will be taught at the Werribee campus of the University of Melbourne and the university’s veterinary hospital, just outside Melbourne. The fourth year of the program will be devoted to workplace and experiential learning in the university’s busy veterinary hospital, in private practices and industry. There will also be the opportunity to undertake research during the final year

 

University: University of Queensland Veterinary School
Course: Bachelor of Veterinary Science
Duration: 5 Years
Description: The University of Queensland Veterinary School program is one of the most sought after in Australia, attracting the very best students and producing veterinarians who are in high demand, both domestically and internationally. The veterinary science program at the University of Queensland Veterinary School provides the broadest base in the biological sciences of any undergraduate course and provides a very wide range of career options as well as professional qualifications, enabling graduates to practise veterinary medicine and surgery. The Small Animal Clinic and Veterinary Teaching Hospital provide a learning environment for veterinary education. State-of-the-art medical and surgical services for the people of Queensland and for practicising veterinarians are provided through the University of Queensland Veterinary School’s clinic and hospital.

 

University: University of Sydney Veterinary School
Course: Bachelor of Veterinary Science
Duration: 5 Years
Description: The University of Sydney Veterinary School Bachelor of Veterinary Science program is an exciting and innovative course, which produces graduates who have the knowledge and practical skills to pursue many career options as veterinary scientists, participating in the care and welfare of animals. The University of Sydney Veterinary School‘s Faculty of Veterinary Science maintains teaching hospitals at Sydney and Camden, where students and veterinarians work together in a clinical teaching and learning environment. Referral and primary accession cases are seen at both sites, and the University Veterinary Teaching Hospital at Camden also provides veterinary services to farms in the region. A wide range of companion animals, farm animals, racing animals, exotic and native species are seen.

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Learn more about Australian Veterinary Schools!

Find out about the:

 

Friday, June 15th, 2012

4-1-1 on Australian Animals

OzTREKK student Manya Miller isn’t lying when she says Australia is world renowned for the sheer diversity of animals it hosts. As a student studying at veterinary school, she’s been exposed to working with a number of animals that we have here in Canada, but also working on animals that are found exclusively in Australia. Here’s the 4-1-1 on some Aussie animals that we would never spot in Canadian wildlife:

Bandicoot – Bandicoots are pointy-nosed marsupials from Australia and New Guinea. There are 19 different species of bandicoots that live in plains, forests, and deserts. The bandicoot’s pouch faces backward so that dirt doesn’t enter the pouch. These burrowing mammals are in danger of extinction.

Dingo – The Australian dingo is a free-roaming wild dog unique to the continent of Australia, mainly found in the outback. Living largely apart from people and other dogs, together with the demands of Australian ecology, has caused them to develop features and instincts that distinguish them from all other canines. Did You Know? The dingo is culturally famous for the story behind the 1979 disappearance of a nine-week-old baby, whose mother was accused and sentenced to jail, even though she said a dingo captured her baby on a camping trip?

Echidnas – Known as the spiny anteater, the echidnas are named after a monster in ancient Greek mythology. Their diet consists largely of ants and termites, but they are no more closely related to the true anteaters of the Americas than to any other placental mammal. They live in Australia and New Guinea.

Kangaroo – You’re picturing the boxing kangaroo from the Looney Tunes cartoons, aren’t you? The kangaroo is a national symbol of Australia: its emblem is used on the Australian coat of arms, on some of its currency, as well as by some of Australia’s well-known organizations, including the airline, Qantas. The kangaroo is important to both Australian culture and the national image and consequently there are numerous popular culture references.

Koala – Could these guys look any cuddlier (we’re sure that’s a word). We don’t think we need to say more about the koala, though the traditional name, the Koala Bear, is no longer used, as it was originally named a bear due to its resemblance. If you’re coming to Australia, ensure you drop the “bear.”

Kookaburra – Kookaburras, a type of kingfisher, are best known for their unmistakable call, which sounds uncannily like loud, echoing  human  laughter – a good-natured, but rather hysterical or maniacal screech. While they’re funny to hear, it’s even more fun to say their name.

Tasmanian devil – Okay, you’re back to the Looney Tunes cartoons, aren’t you? You’ll see the photo of the Tasmanian devil, and though he looks cute, when he opens his mouth, his teeth and jaw strength are forces to be reckoned with. We’ll stick with the road runner.

Wombat – This large, pudgy mammal is a marsupial, or pouched animal, found in Australia and on scattered islands nearby. Since 2005, there has been an unofficial holiday called Wombat Day observed on October 22, timed with the beginning of the traditional aboriginal spring planting season.

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Interested in Australian wildlife? Learn more about Australian Veterinary Schools in Australia

OzTREKK’s Australian Universities offer the following:

Wednesday, April 20th, 2011

James Cook University Hosts Interviews for Medical School and Dental School Admissions

James Cook University Medical School, Dental School, Pharmacy School and Veterinary School Interviews/One-on-one meetings in Canada, May 2011.

Professor Ian Wronski, Faculty Pro Vice-Chancellor, Faculty of Medicine, Health and Molecular Sciences, James Cook University, is visiting Vancouver, Calgary and Toronto, and hosting interviews for those interested in gaining entry in to the James Cook University Dental School and Medical School .

An interview is a necessary component of the admission process for entry in to the James Cook University Medical and Dental Schools.

If you are interested in applying to the Pharmacy, Veterinary, Public Health or another health related program at James Cook University, you can schedule a one-on-one meeting with Professor Wronski to learn more about the programs, admissions requirements, and also ask questions. An interview is not required for the Pharmacy, Veterinary, Public Health or other health related programs at James Cook University, outside of Medicine and Dentistry.

Interview Schedule

Toronto, Ontario
Date: Friday, May 6, 2011
Time: 9:00 a.m. – 3:30 p.m.
Venue: Richmond Room, Marriott Toronto Downtown, 525 Bay Street, Toronto, Ontario
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