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Posts Tagged ‘Human Rights Law’

Thursday, May 18th, 2017

Meet Newcastle Law School human rights professor Amy Maguire

Happy Law Week!

Meet Dr Maguire, a Senior Lecturer at Newcastle Law School. She is an expert in international human rights law and conducts research on the rights of Indigenous peoples and refugees, potential legal responses to climate change impacts, and capital punishment, among other areas. She is also an award-winning teacher who coordinates the subjects Public International Law, International Human Rights Law and Indigenous Peoples, Issues and the Law. She has a regular column in The Conversation and tweets as @DrAmyMaguire.

Meet Newcastle Law School human rights professor Amy Macguire

Prof Dr Amy Maguire (Photo: UON)

Dr Amy Maguire is becoming a well-known social commentator on contemporary human rights issues. This month she was interviewed on Channel 7’s Sunrise Program regarding the case of Australian woman Cassandra Sainsbury, who has been arrested in Colombia on drug charges. Dr Maguire developed her analysis of this case through an article in The Conversation, arguing that Ms Sainsbury should not be denied the presumption of innocence. Dr Maguire was also quoted in The New Daily, noting that the potentially very long delay before trial in Colombia places pressure on someone in Ms Sainsbury’s position to plead guilty, even if they believe themselves innocent.

Studying International Human Rights Law

International Human Rights Law is designed to expose students to the theory, law and practice of human rights protection. While it is primarily concerned with international law, students will have several opportunities to explore the interaction between international and domestic human rights protections, and consider the comparative positions of various states. This course begins with a consideration of human rights theory and the international human rights framework. It proceeds with investigation of how human rights can be protected and enforced, and related gaps in human rights protection. Students will have the opportunity to select special topics for further study, including the rights of Indigenous peoples, the rights of refugees, and the rights of women. The course will conclude with an exploration of the roles and responsibilities of lawyers in relation to human rights protection, and activities focused on human rights law reform.

University of Newcastle Law School Juris Doctor

Program: Juris Doctor
Location: Newcastle (Callaghan)
Duration: 3 years
Semester intake: February and July
Application deadline: June 9, 2017 for the July intake; however, candidates are encouraged to apply as early as possible.

Entry Requirements

Entry to the program is available to students that have successfully completed a 3-year bachelor degree in any discipline other than law, from a recognized institution; or other post-secondary qualification from a recognized institution assessed by the Faculty Pro Vice-Chancellor to be equivalent.

Apply to the University of Newcastle Law School!

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Do you have any questions about studying at Newcastle Law School? Email OzTREKK’s Australian Law Schools Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com.

Tuesday, May 17th, 2016

Melbourne JD student pursues her passion for international law

Melbourne Law School student Sarah Mercer has traversed the globe in pursuit of her passion for international law and human rights advocacy.

The JD student interned with the Australian Permanent Mission to the United Nations for the 28th Regular Session of the Human Rights Council in Geneva. She then went to The Hague to undertake a pro-bono role with the Ratko Mladic Defense Team at the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia.

Melbourne JD

Melbourne JD student Sarah Mercer (Photo credit: University of Melbourne)

Most recently she worked as a legal intern with the United Nations Office of Legal Affairs in New York.

Ms Mercer was originally inspired to study law after witnessing the institutional and social barriers faced by her sibling, who has a disability associated with a mental health condition.

“I wanted to become a strong advocate for my sibling who has a psychosocial disability, which is one of the reasons why I wanted to come to law school,” Ms Mercer says.

Ms Mercer says she chose the Melbourne JD as the launchpad for her legal career because of the public interest and global opportunities offered by Melbourne Law School.

In her second and third years, she undertook Institutions in International Law (IIL) and Global Lawyer (GL), two international subjects that give students the opportunity to meet and network with international practitioners in Geneva and New York.

“Those two cities are centres for international law and most lawyers who are practising in the field have spent time in either or both. These subjects give you a feel for what’s going on in those cities, which is essential if you ever do want to move there and practice,” Ms Mercer says.

Studying abroad with Melbourne Law School was a transformative experience for Ms Mercer, which inspired her to pursue a career in international law and empowered her with the knowledge to realise her ambitions. She credits the mentorship she received from Associate Professor Bruce Oswald and Professor Tania Voon—coordinators of the IIL and GL programs—as helping set her on her path.

“Having that kind of mentorship, as a young, aspiring international lawyer or human rights advocate is really important,” Ms Mercer says.

During her travels Ms Mercer also connected with the law school’s alumni community, which spans across the world – including at some of the highest echelons in international law.

“Many of the lawyers that I met at the UN, or other international institutions, are graduates of Melbourne Law School, so that was really great. There’s an extensive alumni network.”

Melbourne JD

The Global Lawyer 2015 Cohort in Washington, D.C., USA. (Photo credit: University of Melbourne)

Back in Melbourne, Ms Mercer also benefited from her experiences with the Public Interest Law Initiative at the law school.

Through this program she had the opportunity to undertake the Legal Internship subject with the Victorian Equal Opportunity and Human Rights Commission, as well as three clinical subjects: Sustainability Business Clinic (SBC), which is partnered with Ashurst LLP; Disability Human Rights Clinic (DHRC) where students engage in human rights advocacy focused on the rights violations experienced by persons with disabilities; and Public Interest Law Clinic (PILC) at Flemington & Kensington Community Legal Centre.

“I think studying at Melbourne Law School was the best decision that I made with my legal career. I wouldn’t have gotten these kinds of opportunities anywhere else, especially in Australia. I developed a great foundation from which to build.”

After she graduates Ms Mercer plans to pursue her ambition of becoming a human rights advocate and lawyer, wherever that takes her.

Ms Mercer says that finding your feet in international law can be challenging because it is a very broad field that lacks a single, well-trodden pathway for graduates. But she’s quick to note that this shouldn’t dissuade students, like herself, who aspire to practice law on the world stage.

“If you keep pursuing it, and you keep being passionate, then you can go anywhere. I’m looking forward to seeing where it will take me next.”

University of Melbourne Law School Juris Doctor program

The University of Melbourne’s JD is designed specifically for graduate students. The program is highly regarded both nationally and internationally. It leads to admission to the legal profession in all Australian jurisdictions and can also be used as a basis for seeking admission in many jurisdictions overseas. The curriculum for this law program allows students to build the core skills essential to a wide range of legal and professional careers, and gives them the opportunity to tailor their studies to areas of particular interest through elective subjects.

Program: Juris Doctor
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Semester intake: February
Duration: 3 years (standard course structure); 2 or 2.5 years (accelerated course structure)
Application Deadline: Melbourne Law School has a general application deadline of November 30 each year. It is recommended that you apply as early as possible.

Entry Requirements

Melbourne JD applicants must have

  • completed an undergraduate degree in any discipline; and
  • completed the Law School Admissions Test (LSAT).

Apply to Melbourne Law School!

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Discover more about the Melbourne JD program! Email OzTREKK’s Australian Law Schools Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston for more information at shannon@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Monday, March 14th, 2016

Griffith graduate lands UN leadership role

In the eyes of Chris Eigeland, studying at Griffith University presented the perfect platform to make his mark on the world.

His determination and his ambition were nurtured, supported, and ultimately accelerated by a university environment that gave him the impetus to bring change to the lives of the poor in Haiti, East Timor, and, more recently, South Africa through his groundbreaking Schoolbag initiative.

Griffith Law School

Griffith graduate Chris Eigeland has been named Australia’s Youth Representative to the United Nations for 2016 (Photo credit: Griffith University)

His relentless efforts and unflinching focus have now been recognised with his selection as Australia’s Youth Representative to the United Nations for 2016.

“Griffith has been the ideal place to study, allowing me to kick-start my career by pursuing my passion for human rights, education and the environment,” says Chris, who completed a double degree at the end of 2013.

The Australian Youth Representative is appointed by the United Nations in partnership with the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade, with the annual recipient dedicating 12 months to the job of unearthing the issues most important to young Australians.

Chris will deliver his findings in a report to national leaders at the end of his term, and will also address the UN General Assembly in New York as part of the Australian delegation.

“This is an incredible leadership opportunity which will put me in the same room as global leaders and international NGOs striving to bring about positive change in the world and improve human rights around the globe.

“My education experience and my university experience at Griffith combined to fill me with the confidence and knowledge to seize the opportunities that have led to this achievement.”

At the end of 2015, Chris completed an international associateship in the Constitutional Court of South Africa, the country’s highest court.

“This court embodies the transformation of South Africa with its focus on dignity and human rights,” says Chris who completed a Bachelor of Laws/Bachelor of Arts.

His role involved researching and advising on current trends in international law, particularly in the area of constitutional and human rights jurisprudence.

“This associateship has undoubtedly deepened my understanding of nations undergoing democratic transitions, and I now have an enhanced appreciation of the immense emotional and historical weight that accompanies such a shift.”

Bachelor of Laws / Bachelor of Arts

If you want to play a role in the influential media industry or the arts, this double degree will suit you. You will learn about contemporary culture and society, media and the arts, and languages and cultures. You will also develop the skills and knowledge needed for a career in law.

On graduation, you may choose to specialise in law, combine your skills to work as a specialist media or arts lawyer, or use your arts qualification to explore a wider spectrum.

Law component

Griffith Law School offers a professional legal curriculum that focuses on core areas of legal practice and the legal skills that lawyers must have. You will have the opportunity to choose law electives based on your interests, including clinical courses that emphasise practical legal skills, insights and experience.

You will make connections between law and ethics, legal theory, Indigenous issues, and internationalisation. You will also develop interdisciplinary understandings of law and legal work.

You will take courses such as Constitutional Law, Legal Theory, Law and the Modern State, Corporate Governance and Regulation, Criminal Law, and Property Law.

Arts component

You will have the option to choose a major and develop specialist expertise in contemporary fields such as Journalism, Public Relations, Islam-West Relations Security Studies or Criminal Justice. Or, you can study more traditional fields such as Sociology, History and Literary Studies.

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Would you like more information about studying at Griffith Law School? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Law Schools Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com.

Monday, November 16th, 2015

Death penalty for drug crimes denounced

Raising awareness of the use of the death penalty for drug offences globally was the focus of a special dinner held in recognition of the 13th World Day Against the Death Penalty in Brisbane recently.

The dinner, hosted by one of Brisbane’s leading human rights lawyers and friend of the Griffith Law School, Stephen Keim SC, featured guest speaker, Barrister Julian McMahon, who represented Andrew Chan and Myuran Sukumaran.

Griffith University Law School

(L-R) Ms Zoe Rathus, guest speaker Barrister Julian McMahon and Dr Olivera Simic

Chan and Sukumaran were both convicted of drug trafficking in Bali and were ultimately executed on the tiny prison island of Nusakambangan on April 29 this year.

Griffith Law School lecturers Dr Olivera Simic and Zoe Rathus attended the dinner.

Dr Simic says the two men reformed themselves and were contributing positively to the world in which they lived.

“Sadly, that was not enough to save them from execution,” Dr Simic says.

“In his presentation Julian outlined the devastatingly uncertain lead-up for the families as the news kept on changing about if and when the executions would occur.

“He also described the raw anguish after the event and reminded us that it was not just our citizens who died at the hands of a State that day. There were six other prisoners shot—citizens of Brazil, Nigeria, Spain and Indonesia.”

Julian’s first death row client was Van Tuong Nguyen who was convicted of drug trafficking in Singapore in the mid-2000s. Van was born in a Thailand refugee camp to Vietnamese parents and after his mother re-settled in Australia, suffered violent beatings from his stepfather.

Griffith Law School Lecturer Ms Zoe Rathus (AM) says according to Julian, it is the poor, the vulnerable, people of colour and the dispossessed who tend to face the death penalty, no matter where it is applied.

Also speaking at the dinner was the Hon Phillip Ruddock MP, who has been a long time campaigner against the death penalty.

He was first elected to the House of Representatives in 1973, which was only six years after the last of Australia’s judicially decreed executions – the hanging of Ronald Ryan.

Mr Ruddock MP says Ryan was also born into poverty, alcoholism and violence.

He explained that the group of countries whose citizens were recently executed with Chan and Sukumaran in Bali provided a basis for some multi-State action but emphasised the difficulties of working in this space while the USA still used capital punishment.

Photos and words by Griffith Law School’s Ms Zoe Rathus and Dr Olivera Simic

Griffith Law School

The Bachelor of Laws (graduate entry) at Griffith Law School offers a professional legal curriculum that focuses on core areas of legal practice and the legal skills that lawyers must have. You will have the opportunity to choose law electives based on your interests, including clinical courses that emphasise practical legal skills, insights and experience.

Program: Bachelor of Laws
Location: Gold Coast or Brisbane, Queensland
Semester intake: February
Duration: 3 years

Apply to Griffith University Law School!

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Find out more about studying at Griffith Law School. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Law Schools Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Friday, October 2nd, 2015

Melbourne Law School using human rights to fight disability discrimination

Melbourne Law School’s new subject, the Disability Human Rights Clinic (DHRC), addresses discrimination on the basis of disability head on.

Students of the latest PILI (Public Interest Law Initiative) subject both study the law as it relates to disability and human rights, as well as actively engaging in advocacy and litigation.

University of Melbourne Law School

Dr Anna Arstein-Kerslake, the designer and director for the DHRC (Photo credit: University of Melbourne)

Director of the clinic, Dr Anna Arstein-Kerslake, says the clinic is the first of its kind in Australia.

“While there are student clinics which offer social services support to clients with a disability, and others which engage in general human rights law advocacy, this is the first clinic to target the issues which arise at the intersection of human rights and disability.”

Classes in the clinic are structured like a typical day in an NGO. Students come together for a board meeting, before separating into their practice groups for meetings with clients and submission drafting. The teams engage in two types of work: strategic litigation as well as policy and legislative advocacy.

Current projects include workshops for the NDIS appeals tribunal, a joint project with Vic Legal Aid looking to reframe discrimination as a public health issue, and a submission to the UN on the interaction between cognitive disabilities and the legal concept of fitness to plead.

And just recently, the clinic’s first project came to fruition. Two students, Henry Macphillamy and Ashleigh Pinto, delivered a policy briefing on the right to educate to the student services board of the University of Divinity.

Many of the 19 students who are taking part have a personal connection to the issues that arise.

Juris Doctor student Henry Macphillamy says the clinic addresses issues that are very important to him.

“The Disability Human Rights Clinic has a unique place in my interests, as I have visual and hearing impairments. I know that the skills I learn in this subject will apply to each and every day that I practise law.”

Melbourne JD student Sarah Mercer finds the opportunity to combine study with real-life advocacy valuable.

“A member of my family lives with mental illness, so disability issues—particularly around those disabilities that aren’t visible—have been a key interest to me,” she says.

Dr Arstein-Kerslake, the designer of the programme, has a background in activism and academia. She has consulted with the UN, Amnesty and the Ministries of Justice in the UK and Ireland.

She believes the course structure, which combines clinical experience with cutting edge academic research, offers students the opportunity to get a profound understanding of the issues to do with disability and human rights.

At the same time, students can offer services that often exceed what is available in the market. This is because they can research the issues throughout the course of an academic semester, whereas a private provider is constrained by time and cost.

University of Melbourne Law School Juris Doctor program

The University of Melbourne’s JD is designed specifically for graduate students. The program is highly regarded both nationally and internationally. It leads to admission to the legal profession in all Australian jurisdictions and can also be used as a basis for seeking admission in many jurisdictions overseas.

The curriculum for this law program allows students to build the core skills essential to a wide range of legal and professional careers, and gives them the opportunity to tailor their studies to areas of particular interest through elective subjects.

Program: Juris Doctor (JD)
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Semester intake: February
Duration: 3 years (standard course structure); 2 or 2.5 years (accelerated course structure)
Application Deadline: Melbourne Law School has a general application deadline of November 30 each year. It is recommended that you apply as early as possible.

Entry Requirements

Melbourne JD applicants must have

  • completed an undergraduate degree in any discipline; and
  • completed the Law School Admissions Test (LSAT).

Apply to Melbourne Law School!

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Discover more about the Melbourne JD program! Email OzTREKK’s Australian Law Schools Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston for more information at shannon@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Thursday, November 6th, 2014

Monash University Castan Centre for Human Rights

The Monash University Castan Centre for Human Rights has released the first two episodes of its new series, Have You Got That Right?

Research shows that many people do not fully understand their rights and these short videos aim to empower people with knowledge in a quick, clear and engaging format.

The innovative project will be broken into a 10-episode series, each with a different theme. Series one blends comedy with serious academic content.

The first video, “What Are Human Rights?”, discusses basic human rights that many of us would be aware of, but asks what about the right to a healthy environment, marriage equality, or asylum? The video also discusses the limits to these rights.

The second video, “Marriage Equality”, discusses the fact that marriage equality is not yet recognised in international law. It showcases Associate Professor Paula Gerber, who argues that a right of marriage equality should exist as part of the right of non-discrimination.

Director of the Castan Centre Professor Sarah Joseph said the centre uses academic expertise to educate people—politicians and the general public—about human rights.

“As the centre has grown, we’ve become more and more creative in the ways we engage with people, hence our decision to undertake this project,” Professor Joseph said.

“These videos wouldn’t have been possible without the enormous support we’ve received from the Newman’s Own Foundation, the Victoria Law Foundation and the Nordia Foundation, who have all made significant contributions to the project. The pro bono support we’ve received from industry veterans as well as newcomers has also been imperative to the development of these videos. These videos are the result of teamwork and our human rights expertise.”

Castan Centre Manager Marius Smith said the centre had been exploring how to use technology to educate people about human rights for some time.

“We’ve been active on social media since 2009 and we use video extensively, so eventually this project seemed like an obvious next step,” Mr Smith said.

“When we started, we wanted to make something very different to the usual academic content. The videos had to be creative. They had to grab people’s attention, but they also had to answer questions simply and quickly. I hope we’ve succeeded.

“We hope that many people will get to the end of the videos and want to know more, so we’ve created a website with extra resources. There are links to great content for high school students as well as links to academic articles, case law and international treaties. Gradually we will build a library of human rights videos and resources that will be freely available for years to come for people with differing levels of knowledge about human rights law.”

By the end of this project, the aim is to have produced videos on as many internationally recognised human rights as possible. Anyone wishing to contribute to achieving that goal may review further information and consider a donation at the donors and supporters page.

Castan Centre for Human Rights Law

The Castan Centre for Human Rights Law seeks to promote and protect human rights through the generation and dissemination of public scholarship in international and domestic human rights law.

In pursuit of this mission, the Centre brings the work of human rights scholars, practitioners and advocates from a wide range of disciplines together in the Centre’s key activities of research, teaching, public education (lectures, seminars, conferences, speeches, media presentations, etc), applied research, advice work and consultancies.

The centre is named after Ron Castan AM QC (1939–1999), who was a passionate advocate for the recognition and protection of human rights and a distinguished member of the Victorian Bar.

About Monash Law School Juris Doctor

The Monash JD is a graduate law degree designed to teach the knowledge and skills required to practice law. This innovative law degree recognizes the needs of graduates who wish to study law, providing the transferable skills and knowledge only a law degree from one of Australia’s leading universities can provide.

Program: Juris Doctor (JD)
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Duration: 3 years (accelerated option: a minimum of 2.5 years)
Application deadline: Applications are generally assessed on a rolling admissions basis.

Starting semesters for the Monash University JD program:

  • January 2015
  • May 2015
  • August 2015

Apply now to Monash Law School!

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For more information about the Monash JD, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Law Schools Admissions Officer Sarah Bridson at sarah@oztrekk.com or call 1-866-698-7355 (toll free in Canada).

Tuesday, July 30th, 2013

Monash Law School trio appointed to Federal Court

Three Monash Law School alumni have received the honour of being appointed to the Federal Court of Australia.

Bachelor of Laws graduates The Honourable Justice Tony Pagone, The Honourable Justice Jennifer Davies and Ms Debbie Mortimer SC were recommended to the Attorney-General, Mark Dreyfus QC, as suitable for appointment to the Federal Court on June 13, 2013.

Monash University Law School

Find out more about studying law at Monash Law School

Graduating with a Bachelor of Arts, Diploma of Education and a Bachelor of Laws 1976, 1977 and 1979 respectively, Justice Pagone went on to become a member of staff at Monash University holding various teaching positions, including senior lecturer in law from 1980 to 1992. He was admitted to the Supreme Court of Victoria in 1980, practicing as a judge in 2007. His specialties include tax, commercial law, administrative law and civil rights, and he has also published several books and articles including Tax Avoidance in Australia.

Justice Davies graduated with a Bachelor of Jurisprudence and a Bachelor of Laws in 1978. She was admitted to the Supreme Court of Victoria as a barrister and solicitor in 1980, and was appointed as a judge in 2009. Nowadays, Justice Davies organizes the commercial law seminars for the legal profession, which are conducted by Monash University, the Supreme Court of Victoria, the Law Institute of Victoria and the Victorian Bar.

One of the few women with High Court practice, Ms Mortimer has undertaken a wide range of cases at the Bar, specializing in administrative and constitutional law, anti-discrimination and extradition. Graduating with a Bachelor of Jurisprudence and Bachelor of Laws (First Class Honours) in 1985 and 1987, Ms Mortimer was admitted to the Supreme Court of Victoria in 1988 and later taught torts, property law and evidence in the Monash University Faculty of Law . She is also the author of several publications, including co-authoring the student textbook Evidence.

Monash Law School

The Monash JD is a graduate law degree designed to teach the knowledge and skills required to practice law. This innovative law degree recognizes the needs of graduates who wish to study law, providing the transferable skills and knowledge only a law degree from one of Australia’s leading universities can provide.

Entry Requirements for the Monash Law School JD Program

  • JD applicants must have completed an undergraduate degree in any discipline.
  • Applicants with a minimum, cumulative average of 75% above in their university studies, as well as work/life experience, will be considered for admission. Please note that each applicant’s average is calculated over all years of university study. Monash University does not require the LSAT for entry in the Juris Doctor program.
  • Work experience is not required for admission.
  • OzTREKK also recommends that students submit a resume and/or a personal statement along with their application.
  • Interviews may be conducted if a candidate meets the academic requirements. If an interview is required, it will be held via teleconferencing by the JD assessment team.
  • Students who have not yet completed an undergraduate degree may apply, as long as they will have graduated prior to commencing the Monash JD program.

Apply now Monash Law School!

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For more information about Australian Law Schools entry requirements, application deadlines, tuition fees, and scholarships, please visit OzTREKK’s Law Schools in Australia page or contact OzTREKK’s Australian Law Schools Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston by emailing shannon@oztrekk.com or calling 1 866-698-7355 (toll free in Canada).

Contact OzTREKK for more information about how we help you to study in Australia and about law programs at Australian universities.

 

Wednesday, May 15th, 2013

Indigenous education advocate graduates from Monash Law School

Indigenous education advocate Inala Cooper has just recently graduated from Monash Law School with a Master of Human Rights Law.

Inala Cooper, daughter of Monash Distinguished Alumni, Indigenous advocate, lawyer and academic, Professor Mick Dodson AM, Monash University Faculty of Law’s first Aboriginal law graduate, graduated at a ceremony in Melbourne this past week.

Inala is currently the Senior Adviser, Indigenous Policy and Strategy at Monash University’s Yulendj Indigenous Engagement Unit. She is dedicated to the advancement of the rights of Indigenous Australians and is passionate about closing the gap in education.“I have no plans to embark on an academic career, despite my dad’s best efforts,” Inala said.

“I’m going to draw on my skills and talents to try and ensure that more Indigenous people have access to a quality education and that Monash continues to have a human rights focus in creating that access. I have had that opportunity and through my work at Monash I am helping create those opportunities for other Indigenous people.

“The person who discovers a cure for cancer, the next astronaut or the next person who sits at the UN could be an Indigenous person who has had the chance to excel in their chosen field. I know that by working to create those chances is where I can make the biggest difference to the lives of others.”

Inala is currently working with Monash University to increase access and support for Indigenous students, ensure retention and advancement of Indigenous staff and students, and maintain a culturally safe environment for Indigenous people at Monash.

Inala’s undergraduate degree was in Arts, majoring in Drama and Contemporary Dance and she first went to the United Nations in Geneva at the age of 14. It was after a trip to the United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues in New York in 2009, as assistant to her dad Mick, former Expert Member, that she realized embarking on postgraduate study in human rights would be the next stepping stone in her career.

Inala is a former employee of the Victorian Department of Planning and Community Development, working in the Ministerial Taskforce on Aboriginal Affairs. She is a member of the Yawuru peoples, the traditional Aboriginal owners of land and waters of Broome, Western Australia and was a finalist for the Institute of Public Administration Australia Young Indigenous Leader Award in 2009.

Distinguished Alumni Professor Mick Dodson completed a Bachelor of Jurisprudence in 1974 and a Bachelor of Laws at Monash University in 1978. He was Australia’s first Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Justice Commissioner with the Human Rights and Equal Opportunity Commission—serving as Commissioner from April 1993 to January 1998.

He was named Australian of the Year in 2009 in recognition of his lifetime commitment to improving the lives of Aboriginal people and promoting understanding between all Australians. In 2003 he became a Member of the Order of Australia for service to the Indigenous community and as a campaigner for native title rights.

Patrick Dodson, former Chairman of the Council for Aboriginal Reconciliation (now Reconciliation Australia), former Commissioner into Aboriginal Deaths in Custody and uncle to Inala was also present to witness her graduation.

About Monash Law School

Monash Law School is one of the largest and most prestigious law schools in Australia and is currently ranked 13th in the QS World University rankings. The school provides legal education and training to more than 3,000 undergraduate and postgraduate students. Monash Law School offers a Bachelor of Laws (LLB) degree (with a graduate-entry option), a Juris Doctor (JD) program and a number of postgraduate legal degrees, including a Doctor of Judicial Sciences, Doctor of Laws, Master of Laws by Research, and several postgraduate master by coursework programs.

Entry Requirements for the Monash Law School LLB Program

To be eligible to apply, you must have the following:

  • Completed a high school diploma
  • Achieved a minimum 85% average based on your best six Grade 12 subjects

OzTREKK recommends that you apply for this law program if you have achieved a minimum average of 85% or above in your Grade 12 studies. Please note that this is a minimum average to be eligible to apply and that your application outcome will be determined by the Monash Law School. If you have completed some university studies, you will need to submit your undergraduate transcripts for assessment as well, and may be eligible to receive credit for your previous studies.

OzTREKK also recommends that students submit a resume and/or personal statement along with their application. The LSAT is not required for entry to the LLB program at Monash University.

Starting semesters for the LLB program:

  • 2013 July
  • 2014 February

Apply now to the Monash Law School Bachelor of Laws program!

The Monash JD is a graduate law degree designed to teach the knowledge and skills required to practice law. This innovative law degree recognizes the needs of graduates who wish to study law, providing the transferable skills and knowledge only a law degree from one of Australia’s leading universities can provide.

Entry Requirements for the Monash Law School JD Program

  • JD applicants must have completed an undergraduate degree in any discipline.
  • Applicants with a minimum, cumulative average of 75% above in their university studies, as well as work/life experience, will be considered for admission. Please note that each applicant’s average is calculated over all years of university study. Monash University does not require the LSAT for entry in the Juris Doctor program.
  • Work experience is not required for admission.
  • OzTREKK also recommends that students submit a resume and/or a personal statement along with their application.
  • Interviews may be conducted if a candidate meets the academic requirements. If an interview is required, it will be held via teleconferencing by the JD assessment team.
  • Students who have not yet completed an undergraduate degree may apply, as long as they will have graduated prior to commencing the Monash JD program.

Starting semesters for the Monash University JD program:

  • 2013 May
  • 2013 August
  • 2014 January

Apply now to  the Monash Law School Juris Doctor program!

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For more information about law school entry requirements, application deadlines, tuition fees, scholarships, please visit OzTREKK’s Law Schools in Australia page or contact OzTREKK Australian Law School Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston by emailing shannon@oztrekk.com or calling 1 866-698-7355 (toll free in Canada).

Contact OzTREKK for more information about studying in Australia and about law programs at Australian universities.