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Posts Tagged ‘environmental management’

Thursday, April 20th, 2017

UQ environmental sciences is number 1 in Australia in latest global rankings

Just in time for Earth Week….

The University of Queensland has cemented its place as the top university in Australia for environmental sciences and agriculture in the QS World University Rankings by Subject 2017.

Executive Dean of Science Professor Melissa Brown said UQ ranked at number one in Australia in these subjects and globally, UQ was ranked in the world’s top 20 universities in environmental sciences (12th) and agriculture and forestry (19th).

UQ environmental sciences is #1 in Australia according to latest global rankings

Study environmental sciences at UQ!

“This is the third year in a row that UQ has ranked in the top 20 globally in environmental sciences and agriculture in the QS subject rankings,” she said.

“These outstanding results are not achieved without listening to our markets, planning, hard work and expertise, and reflects the quality of our offerings. We congratulate everyone involved.

”UQ was also ranked at number two nationally in biological sciences and number three in veterinary science—a great result for the UQ Faculty of Science.”

Head of the new UQ School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Professor Jonathan Aitchison, said the the development of this new school mirrored UQ’s recognition of the global significance and institutional standing of this important area.

“The new school will provide innovative and exciting opportunities for involvement in research-led studies,” he said.

“Through interconnected teams, the School is delivering practical solutions to the complex issues affecting our physical environment.

“Our programs include Environmental Science and the related area of Environmental Management.”

Head of the School of Agriculture and Food Sciences, Professor Neal Menzies, said the School was attracting a growing number of students from the domestic market, a reflection of the very strong job market and increasing starting salaries in the agricultural sector.

“Internationally we are also attracting more students, and I attribute this partly to the strong UQ rankings, but also to the focus of UQ agriculture on the tropics. We can easily be seen as the world’s leading tropical agriculture university,” he said.

“Our standing as a high-quality science university that can rapidly translate research to improvements in the field is increasingly recognised.

“For the developed world this is reflected in increased research funding from the large corporates such as Monsanto and Bayer, while for the developing world it is reflected in increased research funding from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and from the Australian Government through ACIAR.”

In the past year, UQ has been confirmed as the top institute in Australia in the Nature Index 2016 Australia and New Zealand; placed 43rd globally and third in Australia in the Performance Ranking of Scientific Papers for World Universities; and jumped 22 places in the prestigious Academic Ranking of World Universities, to rank 55th globally and second in Australia.

Find out more about environmental sciences degrees offered by the University of Queensland! Contact OzTREKK Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com.

Thursday, February 23rd, 2017

Introducing the new UQ School of Earth and Environmental Sciences

Resources and energy, climate change, urbanisation, population growth, conservation and sustainability will be areas of focus for a new University of Queensland school.

Introducing the new UQ School of Earth and Environmental Sciences

Professor Aitchison is head of the new UQ School of Earth and Environmental Sciences (Photo: UQ)

The UQ School of Earth and Environmental Sciences came into being on Jan. 1 and now combines UQ’s School of Earth Sciences and the School of Geography, Planning and Environmental Management.

Professor Jonathan Aitchison, who will head the new school, said it would be an interdisciplinary powerhouse of academic expertise, developing practical solutions to big issues.

“The school will give greater breadth and depth to the study of earth and environmental sciences, greatly benefitting students, strengthening research capacity, and will provide greater disciplinary coherence and opportunity,” said Professor Aitchison, the Head of UQ’s School of Earth and Environmental Sciences.

“It makes sense to bring earth and environmental sciences together in the university.

“The new school is a recognition of the increasingly interdisciplinary nature of geological and geographical sciences, environmental management, coastal processes, urban planning and safety science.”

Professor Aitchison said UQ had a strong international reputation for excellence in earth and environmental sciences.

It ranks number 1 in Australia in life sciences in the Times Higher Education Ranking and number 12 globally, number 32 internationally in geography, and is in the world’s top 100 Earth and Marine Sciences institutions in the 2016 QS rankings by subject.

“The combined staff of the new school are recognised as experts in their fields,” Professor Aitchison said.

“They conduct pure and applied research with strong links to our industry, government and university partners who have provided excellent support over many years.

“In addition, our people have a strong reputation for quality teaching of undergraduate and postgraduate students in all discipline areas across the new school.”

Professor Aitchison said integrated teams of earth scientists, physical and social scientists, environmental management specialists, health and safety experts, and urban planners would work together to generate new knowledge and opportunities for further discovery.

Current collaborative research projects and consulting pieces would continue as usual and new projects would begin as funding and support becomes available.

“By providing a new academic structure for these related disciplines we will provide opportunities to improve end-to-end delivery of services and research outcomes,” he said.

“This benefits industries, government, university partners, and communities, and continues availability of state-of-the-art facilities for industry and research project work.”

Professor Aitchison is a geologist and an expert in plate tectonics, palaeontology and geo-microbiology.

University of Queensland Environmental Science Degrees

Master of Agribusiness
Master of Agricultural Science
Master of Conservation Biology
Master of Conservation Science
Master of Environmental Management
Master of Geographic Information Science
Master of Integrated Water Management
Master of Mineral Resources
Master of Responsible Resource Development (Environment)
Master of Rural Development
Master of Sustainable Energy

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Find out more about your study options at the new UQ School of Earth and Environmental Sciences. Contact OzTREKK Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com.

Wednesday, April 20th, 2016

Griffith in partnership on sustainable tourism

Griffith University Institute for Tourism (GIFT) has entered into a strategic partnership with EarthCheck, the world’s leading certification and business advisory group for sustainable tourism.

Griffith Business School

Professor Susanne Becken (Photo: Griffith University)

GIFT Director Professor Susanne Becken said the agreement will allow both parties to collaborate on research and development projects in the field of sustainable tourism and environmental management.

“EarthCheck holds the world’s most comprehensive database with environmental metrics collected from their international client network over more than 15 years of operation,” Professor Becken said.

“This will give our students practical experience in the most advanced measurement tools, and practical operational insights.”

Through its global strategic partnerships, GIFT’s structure and research programs are designed to ensure high industry and policy relevance. Following the triple bottom line concept, the key areas of impact of research undertaken at GIFT reflect economic, social and environmental dimensions.

During 2016, GIFT and EarthCheck will focus on three core research and consulting projects:

  1. Research into the relationship between water and energy use at major hotel groups
  2. Developing the tourism workforce of the future through labour and skills development, certification and mobility in the APEC region
  3. Development of a global sustainable travel and tourism indicator set

Professor Becken will present the latest findings on global greenhouse gas emissions and corporate social responsibility at the upcoming Inner Circle 2016 forum in April 2016, an annual think-tank hosted by EarthCheck for its members.

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Find out more about environmental management or business degrees available at Griffith University. Contact OzTREKK Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com.

Tuesday, March 1st, 2016

Worst emitters least affected by climate change

Global climate change resembles a room of secondhand smoke, new research has found, with countries emitting the least amount of gasses suffering the most.

The study by the University of Queensland and the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) shows a dramatic global mismatch, with the highest emitting countries—including Australia—the least vulnerable to climate change effects.

UQ Environmental Sciences

Industrial emissions (Photo credit: UQ)

Lead author Glenn Althor, a PhD student in the UQ School of Geography, Planning and Environmental Management (GPEM) said, in contrast, the countries emitting the least amount of greenhouse gases were the most vulnerable to effects such as increased frequency of natural disasters, changing habitats, human health impacts, and industry stress.

“There is an enormous global inequality in which those countries most responsible for causing climate change are the least vulnerable to its effects,” Mr Althor said.

“It is time that this persistent and worsening climate inequity is resolved, and for the countries with the greatest emissions to act,” he said.

Co-author Associate Professor James Watson of GPEM and WCS said the situation resembled secondhand smoking.

“This is like a non-smoker getting cancer from secondhand smoke, while the heavy smokers continue to puff away,” he said. “Essentially we are calling for the smokers to pay for the healthcare of the non-smokers they are directly harming.”

The researchers conducted a global analysis of the relationship between a nation’s carbon emissions and vulnerability to climate change.

They found that 20 of the 36 highest emitting countries—including the U.S. Canada, Australia, China, and much of Western Europe—were the least vulnerable to its impacts.

Eleven of the 17 countries with low to moderate emissions were most vulnerable to climate change. Most were found in sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia.

The authors said these countries were not only exposed to serious environmental change such as oceanic inundation or desertification, bu they were also generally the least developed nations, having few resources available to cope with these issues.

They said the mismatch between the culprits and the affected areas acted as a disincentive for high-emitting “free-rider” countries to mitigate their emissions.

The researchers predicted that the number of acutely vulnerable countries would worsen by 2030 as climate change-related pressures such as droughts, floods, biodiversity loss and disease mounted.

Associate Professor Richard Fuller of the UQ School of Biological Sciences said the researchers had quantified these inequities using publicly available data.

“The recent Paris agreement was a significant step forward in global climate negotiations,” he said.

“There now needs to be meaningful mobilisation of these policies, to achieve national emissions reductions while helping the most vulnerable countries adapt to climate change.

“The free rider countries need to do much more to ensure that they bear the burden of coping with climate change impacts.”

The study appears in the journal Scientific Reports.

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Find out more about environmental sciences programs at the University of Queensland! Contact OzTREKK Admissions Officer Shannon Tilston at shannon@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Friday, November 6th, 2015

University of Melbourne environmental scientist receives award

Dr Jane Elith has been awarded the 2015 Frank Fenner Prize for Life Scientist of the Year, one of the six awards in the annual Prime Minister’s Prizes for Science.

University of Melbourne Environmental Sciences

Dr Elith (Photo credit: University of Melbourne)

Dr Elith is an Australian Research Council Future Fellow at the University of Melbourne School of Biosciences and a member of the Centre of Excellence for Bioscecurity Risk Analysis (CEBRA).

The award recognises her contributions to environmental management worldwide including the development and assessment of methods for tracking and predicting invasive species that attack Australian crops and natural environments.

These species distribution models have been used by governments, land and catchment managers and conservationists around the world to help map the spread of cane toads, and compare the implications of development options in the Tiwi Islands for threatened plants and animals that have largely disappeared from the mainland.

Dr Elith says the field is is a niche that fits her well.

“I’ve ended up in an area which links my interest in nature and my liking for data and models,” she added.

“The Atlas of Living Australia database has 50 million species records. But we know that there are issues with that data. It wasn’t collected for modelling. Most of the records are close to roads and towns, for instance, or clustered in the favourite national parks of field biologists. The models need to deal with those sorts of biases.”

Dr Elith collaborates with the world’s foremost statisticians, computer scientists and ecologists to puzzle out how to extract useful information from data and combine and relate it to measurements and estimates of characteristics of the environment.

She then passes on what she has learned to environmental managers and decision makers in the form of guides and tools to using different techniques of modelling species distribution, and the suitability and drawbacks of each one.

Dr Elith explains she uses statistical models to describe the patterns of species we see, where and how frequently they occur in the environments they encounter.

Her guides are some of the most highly referenced environmental publications in the world. In nearly two-thirds of papers that cite her work, at least one of the scientists is from a government land management agency or private environmental consulting company.

Recognized as one of the most influential environmental scientists in the world, in the field of environment and ecology she is the 11th most cited author worldwide over the past 10 years, and is the only Australian woman on the highly cited list, according to the information company Thomson Reuters.

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Are you interested in environmental sciences? Find out more about studying at the University of Melbourne! Contact OzTREKK Australian Environmental Sciences Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com.

Friday, January 30th, 2015

UQ staff save cash and carbon with energy competition

University of Queensland staff have collectively prevented 77 tonnes of carbon emissions and saved $7600 in electricity costs during a three-week competition aimed at reducing energy consumption in laboratories.

The Shut Your Sash Competition, run by UQ’s Property and Facilities Division as part of the Green Labs program, required participating labs to better manage the use of fume cupboards, which are one of the most energy intensive types of equipment found in scientific laboratories.

UQ Environmental Sciences

Study environmental science at UQ

Sustainability Project Officer Christine McCallum, who coordinates the Green Labs program, said the competition provided a great opportunity for staff to improve their energy-saving habits in the lab.

“Ventilated fume cupboards provide a safety barrier for researchers working with chemicals that produce toxic fumes and vapours.

“Each cupboard has a moveable pane at the front called a sash that allows users to control the amount of air extracted from the cupboard to ensure a safe work environment.

“Keeping the fume cupboard sash low or closed is not only safer for users, but it also reduces the amount of conditioned air that is exhausted from the laboratory space, with considerable energy savings,” Ms McCallum said.

During the three-week trial, the five participating institutes reduced their total fume cupboard energy consumption by 40 per cent.

“If these labs were to keep this up over the entire year, they would save approximately $130,000 in energy costs while reducing emissions by more than 1,000 tonnes of carbon dioxide, the equivalent produced by roughly 130 average-sized homes,” Ms McCallum said.

Competition winners included the Translational Research Institute (TRI), which won an award for best ongoing operational practice, and the Centre for Advanced Imaging (CAI), which won the most improved lab award.

University of Queensland Property and Facilities Division Deputy Director Mr Geoff Dennis said supporting staff to promote sustainable behaviours was a key objective of the Green Labs program.

“UQ staff are enthusiastic about improving the sustainability of their workplace and helping to reduce energy and resource consumption.

“The Green Labs program provides the resources for staff to improve their understanding of environmental issues specific to laboratories and empowers them to promote sustainable practices in their labs,” Mr Dennis said.

Established in 2012, the Green Labs program now has 31 representatives across 20 UQ laboratories promoting environmentally friendly practices in their labs.

Master of Environmental Management at the University of Queensland

Environmental management is the planning and implementation of actions geared to improve the quality of the human environment. The postgraduate programs in environmental management at the University of Queensland are multidisciplinary programs designed to enhance the skills and technical expertise of graduates working in all facets of the environmental arena. The programs aim to produce managers able to address the many issues in the highly complex and changing area of environmental management. At Masters level the degree may be taken in a range of fields.

Studies may be undertaken in the following specialisations:

  • Conservation Biology
  • Conservation and Natural Resource Management
  • Resource and Environmental Economics
  • Sustainable development

What is Sustainable Development?

This plan is designed for students who wish to solve environmental problems. It emphasises the importance of a healthy environment as the basis of sustainable jobs and industries. Students gain the skills and knowledge to work towards sustainable development. Courses explore strategies ranging from cleaner production for individual industries, and better environment design, to regional and national environmental policies and plans.

Students acquire integrated knowledge across a broad spectrum of disciplines, including ecology, geography, economics, planning, law, environmental design and relevant social sciences. The final year focuses on environmental problem-solving and allows students to specialise in specific areas of sustainable environment management. Students also gain professional experience in applying social, economic, business and scientific principles to the management of natural, rural, and urban resources.

Program: Master of Environmental Management
Location: Brisbane, Queensland
Semester intakes: July 2015 and February 2016
Duration: 1.5 years

Entry requirements

Bachelor degree with a in environmental management, environmental science; environmental studies; geography; natural resources; biology; ecology; conservation; sustainable development/sustainability; environmental engineering; marine science; marine studies; or an approved discipline with a GPA of 4.5 on a 7 point scale.

Apply to the University of Queensland!

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Would you like more information about environmental science programs like sustainability at the University of Queensland? Contact OzTREKK Environmental Sciences Admissions Officer Rachel Brady for more information. Email Rachel at rachel@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Wednesday, January 7th, 2015

UQ environmental sciences offers new field of study

UQ environmental sciences will be offering a new field of study in the Master of Environmental Management program.

From 2015, the Master of Environmental Management offers the new field of study Environmental Management in Mining. This field of study will introduce students to the unique environmental challenges presented by mining environments and strategies for managing these environmental impacts.

UQ Environmental Sciences

Study at the University of Queensland

Studies may be undertaken in the following specialisations:

  • Conservation Biology
  • Conservation and Natural Resource Management
  • Environmental Management in Mining (new from 2015)
  • Resource and Environmental Economics
  • Sustainable Development

Environmental Management in Mining

Development of Australia’s mineral and energy resources involves extraction and processing activities, which create environmental impacts that must be managed and minimised. The wealth of mineral and energy resources in Australia ensures an ongoing demand for skilled professionals in environmental management in mining. This field of study will introduce students to the unique environmental challenges presented by mining environments and strategies for managing these environmental impacts.

Employment opportunities

Graduates will be well-equipped for careers in environmental management related to the mining industry in private organisations and government:

Industry

On-site management roles:

  • Land rehabilitation
  • Monitoring and management of water quality and quantity
  • Restoration of flora and fauna communities
  • Management of greenhouse gas and dust emissions
  • Development of site-specific management strategies

Consultancy

  • Development of management plans for industry
  • Monitoring and auditing of management plans
  • Identification of opportunities to go beyond `best practice’ management strategies

Government

  • Policy implementation: monitoring compliance with regulations
  • Policy development: formulation of environmental management regulations and guidelines for industry

Program: Master of Environmental Management
Location: Brisbane, Queensland
Semester intakes: February and July
Duration: 1.5 – 2 years

Entry requirements

Bachelor degree with a in environmental management, environmental science; environmental studies; geography; natural resources; biology; ecology; conservation; sustainable development/sustainability; environmental engineering; marine science; marine studies; or an approved discipline with a GPA of 4.5 on a 7 point scale.

Apply to the University of Queensland!

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Would you like more information about environmental science programs at the University of Queensland? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Environmental Sciences Admissions Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Tuesday, December 9th, 2014

Bond University sustainable development student wins Queensland Sports Star of the Year

Bond University‘s Mat Belcher has added two more trophies to his growing collection: Queensland Sports Star of the Year and ISAF Sailing World Cup Champion.

Bond University sustainable development

Study sustainable development at Bond University

The hugely successful sailor was crowned The Courier-Mail/Channel 7 Queensland Sports Star of the Year at last night’s 20th annual Queensland Sport Awards in Brisbane, with his brother accepting the award on his behalf as Mat took out another title—winning the ISAF Sailing World Cup alongside teammate Will Ryan in Abu Dhabi.

Mat was the first sailor ever to win the prestigious Queensland Sports Star of the Year award, ahead of fellow finalists Thomas Broich (football), Cate Campbell (swimming), Mirinda Carfrae (triathlon), Shannon Eckstein (surf life saving), Mick Fanning (surfing), Laura Geitz (netball), Mark Knowles (hockey), Will Power (motor racing), Johnathan Thurston (rugby league) and Ken Wallace (canoeing).

Mat is completing his master in sustainable development at Bond University, after graduating from a Bachelor of Commerce at the university in 2009, and is a member of the Bond Elite Sport Program (BESP).

Garry Nucifora, Director of Sport at Bond University, said the Olympic Gold Medallist was an impressive sporting talent, and an outstanding representative of the University.

“Mat is an exceptional example of achieving at the highest level, both academically and on the world sporting stage, and  Bond University is proud to be a part of his journey.

Study Sustainable Development at Bond University

With the majority of the world’s population now living in urban areas, there is considerable demand for graduates with expertise in sustainable living environments. Climate change, urban management and environmental impact are prominent concerns for both industry and government, creating high demand for environmental and urban professionals. Career prospects range from city and regional planning, construction, urban design, community infrastructure, valuation and real estate investment, property through to fisheries and agriculture, mining and energy and project management.

The Master of Sustainable Environments and Planning focuses on Environmental Management as well as Urban Design & Planning.

The Environmental Management component provides an in-depth examination of environmental management, including field work. The content is globally focused, providing qualifications that are in demand worldwide. Students may apply for a postgraduate industry internship in the final semester of the program. This includes the option of being involved in a client based environmental management capstone project or research dissertation.

The Urban Design and Planning curriculum equips graduates with the theoretical and practical skills required to undertake the design, appraisal and management of urban and regional developments. With this qualification, professionals from a built environment background will be able to undertake urban planning and development at a professional level.

Graduates of this program will be equipped with a comprehensive knowledge of sustainable environments, and will be able to seek work anywhere in Australia or around the world.

Program: Master of Sustainable Environments and Planning
Duration: 1 year, 4 months
Semester intakes: January, May, September

Entry Requirements

Successful completion of any undergraduate degree or relevant qualifications / professional experience deemed equivalent by the Dean.

Apply to the Bond Master of Sustainable Environments and Planning!

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Learn more about studying sustainable development and environmental management. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Environmental Sciences Admissions Officer Rachel Brady by emailing rachel@oztrekk.com or by calling toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Tuesday, June 17th, 2014

UQ researchers study sorghum sugar

A joint project between Queensland and Chinese researchers to derive sugars from sorghum could result in extraordinary social, economic and environmental benefits for future generations.

UQ School of Agriculture and Food Sciences

Study agricultural sciences at UQ

University of Queensland lead researcher Dr Luguang Wu said the project had the potential to revitalise the sugar industry, improve energy security, reduce greenhouse emissions and improve health outcomes by reducing tooth decay and assisting in diabetes management.

The collaborative research project between the UQ School of Agriculture and Food Sciences and the prestigious Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) has been awarded one of only two grants available from the Queensland-Chinese Academy of Sciences (Q-CAS) Collaborative Science fund.

Queensland Science, Information Technology, Innovation and the Arts Minister Mr Ian Walker presented the award to the researchers at a recent ceremony.

The project, Sweet sorghum for valuable sugars, aims to produce a high-value “healthy” sugar by using sweet sorghum as a biofactory.

“The healthy sugar, isosmaltulose (IM), has low glycaemic and insulin indices which means when added to food it releases energy for the body slowly over time,” Dr Wu said. “The slow release of energy may have a range of health benefits including preventing the onset of diabetes, reducing tooth decay, improving brain activity and reducing the incidence of obesity.”

Sweet sorghum is an energy-rich (biomass) plant adapted to the hot semi-arid tropics which can produce sugar levels equivalent to sugarcane but in a shorter time frame and with lower water usage.

In addition to the potential health benefits of the sugar in sweet sorghum, the higher yield with lower water usage could lead to more efficient farming and environmental management, with the crop generating 10-15 tonnes of sugar per hectare.

The collaborative research project aims to identify elite sweet sorghum lines with high and stable sugar production and develop them into plants which can be cultivated on a large scale.

The engineered plants will be tested under a wide range of cultivation areas of marginal land in Queensland and China.

By manufacturing more productive, globally competitive, high-quality, safe and sustainable sugar at a lower cost, the benefits of IM in functional foods can be extended to a far greater proportion of the population while protecting the environment.

The Queensland-Chinese Academy of Sciences (Q-CAS) Collaborative Science fund encourages important scientific and technical research collaborations that aim to deliver future economic, social and environmental benefits for Queensland and China.

The Q-CAS Fund helps Queensland and Chinese researchers to jointly undertake practical and applied science and research projects in the following priority areas:

  • agricultural biotechnology and food research, including food safety;
  • human health: immunology or neuroscience; and
  • energy.

UQ School of Agriculture and Food Sciences

UQ is ranked as the top Australian university and seventh internationally for studies in Agricultural Science, according to the 2013 QS World University Subject Rankings.

The UQ School of Agriculture and Food Sciences provides study and practical experience covering several disciplines. Students are encouraged to participate in scientific activities not only as a component of their formal studies but also as a cooperative contribution to the life of the university and its surrounding community. Disciplines that have an environmental focus include Agribusiness, Agricultural Science, and Rural Development.

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Would you like more information about agriculture and environmental science programs at the University of Queensland? Contact OzTREKK’s Environmental Sciences Admissions Officer Rachel Brady for more information about how you can study in Australia. Email Rachel at rachel@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Thursday, May 15th, 2014

UQ cuts carbon emissions and makes big savings

A major energy efficiency project at the University of Queensland is saving two tonnes of greenhouse gas emissions every day.

As part of UQ’s ongoing sustainability program, UQ’s Property and Facilities Division recently replaced all lighting in three buildings on the St Lucia campus with energy efficiently LEDs (light-emitting diodes).

University of Queensland Environmental Sciences Degrees

How do carbon emissions effect our cities?

The buildings are the two multi-storey carparks and Oval 6 Car Park 98C.

The change reduces energy consumption by 84 per cent, equating to $100,000 in annual energy costs.

The environmental savings are also considerable, with a reduction of 750 tonnes of greenhouse gas emissions annually from the three buildings—the equivalent of running 100 average-sized homes.

University of Queensland’s Property and Facilities Division Deputy Director Mr Geoff Dennis said the upgrade ticked all the right boxes.

“It saves energy, reduces the university’s carbon footprint and lowers operating costs, both in terms of electricity consumption and future maintenance,” he said. “LEDs have a much longer life span, so lighting maintenance will need to be performed less frequently.”

The Property and Facilities Division Energy Manager, Chris Collins said the amenity for building users was another positive result from the project.

“The quality of the LED light provides a better service to car park users, yet at the same time light spill outside the building is reduced to the benefit of our neighbours,” he said. “Security is increased because the excellent colour rendition of the LEDs enhances the performance of the buildings’ CCTV cameras.”

The project is the latest in the University of Queensland’s commitment to reducing its environmental impact in the built environment.

“While we’ve made it a priority to ensure all new buildings at UQ are designed to the highest sustainability standards, we also recognise that energy efficiency retrofits are critical to greening the university’s existing building stock,” Mr Dennis said. “The success of this project across all indicators reinforces the case for future investment in energy efficiency initiatives at the university.”

Master of Environmental Management at the University of Queensland

Environmental management is the planning and implementation of actions geared to improve the quality of the human environment. The postgraduate programs in environmental management at the University of Queensland are multidisciplinary programs designed to enhance the skills and technical expertise of graduates working in all facets of the environmental arena. The programs aim to produce managers able to address the many issues in the highly complex and changing area of environmental management. At Masters level the degree may be taken in a range of fields.

Studies may be undertaken in the following specialisations:

  • Conservation Biology
  • Conservation and Natural Resource Management
  • Resource and Environmental Economics
  • Sustainable Development

What is Sustainable Development?

This plan is designed for students who wish to solve environmental problems. It emphasises the importance of a healthy environment as the basis of sustainable jobs and industries. Students gain the skills and knowledge to work towards sustainable development. Courses explore strategies ranging from cleaner production for individual industries, and better environment design, to regional and national environmental policies and plans.

Students acquire integrated knowledge across a broad spectrum of disciplines, including ecology, geography, economics, planning, law, environmental design and relevant social sciences. The final year focuses on environmental problem-solving and allows students to specialise in specific areas of sustainable environment management. Students also gain professional experience in applying social, economic, business and scientific principles to the management of natural, rural, and urban resources.

Program: Master of Environmental Management
Location: Brisbane, Queensland
Semester intakes: July 2014 and February 2015
Duration: 1.5 years

Entry requirements

Bachelor degree with a in environmental management, environmental science; environmental studies; geography; natural resources; biology; ecology; conservation; sustainable development/sustainability; environmental engineering; marine science; marine studies; or an approved discipline with a GPA of 4.5 on a 7 point scale.

Apply to the University of Queensland!

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Would you like more information about environmental science programs like Environmental Management at the University of Queensland? Are you interested in studying sustainability in Australia? Contact OzTREKK Environmental Sciences Admissions Officer Rachel Brady for more information about how you can study in Australia. Email Rachel at rachel@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.