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Posts Tagged ‘DVM’

Tuesday, April 17th, 2018

Australian veterinary school applications are officially open!

Are you interested in becoming a vet? Australian veterinary schools applications for the 2019 intake are officially open via OzTREKK! When you apply through OzTREKK, we will walk you through the entire process, step by step—from application to arrival—and you can apply to multiple vet schools at once!

Australian veterinary school applications are officially open!

It’s easy to apply to multiple veterinary schools at once!

World-class Education

OzTREKK represents 4 top-ranked Australian veterinary  schools, each offering state-of-the-art facilities and incredible practical placements that promote industry-ready graduates.

Practicing in Canada

Three Australian vet programs OzTREKK represents are accredited by the AVMA, so graduates are considered in the same category as graduates from Canadian vet schools when undertaking licensing examinations in North America.

Get #NashTips!

Introducing our new junior admissions officer, Nash (that’s him in the photos!), OzTREKK Veterinary Admissions Officer’s 3-year-old golden retriever. Nash will be your guide, sending you tips and tricks throughout the application process! 🐶

Nash is also here to answer some FAQs! When you apply through OzTREKK, we will keep you up to date throughout the entire process. You’ll receive regular #NashTips emails with all the info you need to apply, to accept, and to get ready to go to Australia! 🐴🦉🐮🐷🐰🐨 If Nash could speak he’d say, “Apply today!”

OzTREKK was amazing and I would not be here without them. They made my application process so much easier, making sure I had every document needed and helped take the stress away from the complicated process. They also prepared me for my transition to Australia and I felt like my journey has been so smooth due to the advice from OzTREKK. ~ Ashley S, Melbourne DVM student 

About studying vet med in Australia

Programs at Australian veterinary schools are suitable for students who wish to gain entry into a professional veterinary program directly from high school or after having completed undergraduate studies. Canadian students wishing to become a veterinarian have the option of applying to a Bachelor of Veterinary Science program directly from high school, or to a Doctor of Veterinary Medicine program after having completed science-based bachelor degree.

The following OzTREKK Australian universities offer vet programs:

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If you have any questions about your application, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Veterinary Schools Officer Meghan Strank at meghan@oztrekk.com or call 1-866-698-7355 (toll free in Canada).

Friday, November 13th, 2015

Quit horsing around! Vet school application deadlines approaching

Calling all vet school peeps! We wanted to make sure ewe know about the Australian Veterinary Schools‘ application deadlines coming up. And we’re not lion!

Australian veterinary schools in Australia

Who wouldn’t want to take care of a face like this?

UQ Bachelor of Veterinary Science

The veterinary science program at the UQ Veterinary School is one of the most sought after in Australia, attracting the very best students and producing veterinarians that are in high demand, both domestically and internationally. UQ’s vet program provides the broadest base in the biological sciences of any undergraduate course and provides a very wide range of career options as well as its professional qualifications, enabling graduates to practice veterinary medicine and surgery.

Program: Bachelor of Veterinary Science (Honours)
Location: Brisbane, Queensland
Semester intake: February
Program duration: 5 years
Application deadline: All application documents must be in by Friday, Nov. 27 at noon.

Melbourne Doctor of Veterinary Medicine

Melbourne Veterinary School’s DVM program is a four-year, graduate-entry degree that offers veterinary students the best possible preparation for twenty-first century careers in a rapidly changing and increasingly global workforce. Students can expect to learn the latest theory and practice, with plenty of practical hands-on experience, taught by a team of leading veterinarians.

Program title: Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM)
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Semester intake: Late February/early March
Program duration: 4 years
Application deadline: All application documents must be in by Thursday, Dec. 17 at noon.

Sydney Doctor of Veterinary Medicine

The Sydney Veterinary School’s DVM program encourages enrolment of students from diverse backgrounds and aims to help them achieve their goals to become veterinary medical professionals in the global community. Teaching is research-driven to ensure Sydney veterinary students will learn from the latest developments and advances in evidence-based practice, veterinary science research, animal behaviour and welfare science and veterinary public health.

Program title: Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM)
Location: Sydney, New South Wales
Semester intake: March
Program duration: 4 years
Application deadline: All application documents must be in by Tuesday, Dec. 22 at noon.

So, if you want your pony to be entered into the race, please be sure to have your completed application into the OzTREKK office by the above deadlines to ensure your application is considered!

Whether you’re looking to help these or these or these, we don’t want you to miss the deadline. You should gopher it!  We know how busy the holiday season can get, and it would be un-bear-able to miss a deadline! A cat-astrophe!

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Wondering about the koala-fications you need to complete your application? Then contact OzTREKK’s Australian Veterinary Schools Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or 1-866-698-7355.

Monday, April 27th, 2015

Apply to Australian Veterinary Schools for the 2016 intake

Do you love animals? Are you interested in becoming a vet? Applications for Australian Veterinary Schools for the 2016 intake are officially open via OzTREKK!

Australian Veterinary Schools in Australia

OzTREKK student Ashley is studying vet medicine in Australia!

Veterinary science programs at Australian Veterinary Schools are suitable for students who wish to gain entry into a veterinary professional program directly from high school or after having completed undergraduate studies. Canadian students wishing to become a veterinarian have the option of applying to the Bachelor of Veterinary Science (BVSc) program directly from high school or after having completed Bachelor of Science courses or a degree.

For professional degrees which train students to become veterinarians, students can study veterinary medicine/veterinary science in Australia as either

The DVM program is offered only to students who have already obtained an undergraduate science degree.

The following Australian universities offer veterinary medicine/veterinary science programs:

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If you have any questions, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Veterinary School Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or call 1-866-698-7355 (toll free in Canada).

Friday, September 19th, 2014

Tour the University of Melbourne Veterinary Hospital

The University of Melbourne Veterinary Hospital is one of Australia’s leading veterinary hospital facilities, based in Werribee, Victoria and offers modern state-of-the-art facilities and services to clients and their pets.

University of Melbourne Veterinary School

Study veterinary medicine at the Melbourne Veterinary School

The veterinary hospital is fully computerised, so each pet has its own comprehensive lifelong medical record, ensuring that all veterinarians at the hospital will have full details of each animal’s illness, and a complete record of treatments received.

The University of Melbourne Veterinary Hospital has both medical and surgical specialists on site, and they are available to supervise and attend to the care of pets if appropriate.

The veterinary hospital also has fully operational radiology and anaesthesia sections, which have the latest equipment and specialised staff. The hospital ensures that it has the latest types of equipment and procedures available to veterinary medicine and surgery. The Melbourne veterinarians and nurses regularly attend continuing education seminars and courses.

Most important, the Melbourne Veterinary Hospital is also a teaching hospital and research facility, where they are committed to educating the veterinarians of today and tomorrow, including Doctor of Veterinary Medicine students.

The University of Melbourne Veterinary Hospital video tour takes you behind the scenes

About the University of Melbourne’s Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM) program

Program title: Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM)
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Semester intake: Late February/early March 2015
Program duration: 4 years
Application deadline: December 23, 2014. It is recommended that students apply at least three months prior to the program start date.

Entry Requirements

Eligible applicants must have completed

  • an undergraduate science degree (minimum three-year degree with majors in Agriculture, Animal Science, Biochemistry, Biomedicine, Physiology or Zoology); and
  • prerequisite subjects including at least one semester of study in each of cell biology or general biology, and biochemistry.

Selection into the University of Melbourne’s Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM) program will be primarily based on academic achievement. Selection will be based on results (grades) obtained in your final year undergraduate science subjects as well as your second last year (penultimate) undergraduate science subjects, weighted 75:25 toward the final year subjects. Applicants with a 75% average or above should apply.

The University of Melbourne may conduct interviews in order to clarify aspects of an applicant’s application, and students may be asked to provide references or evidence to demonstrate their interest in a veterinary career.

Apply to Melbourne Veterinary School!

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Do you have questions about Melbourne Veterinary School and the DVM program? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Veterinary Schools Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or call 1-866-698-7355 (toll free in Canada) and find out how you can study in Australia.

Tuesday, June 24th, 2014

Sydney Faculty of Veterinary Science rewards cats

The Sydney Faculty of Veterinary Science wants to do the best for all animals, but sometimes there are special furry friends who need a little extra. Thanks to some hard work, dedication and passion, five very important cats can now enjoy luxury day accommodation and a greatly improved quality of life.

University of Sydney Veterinary School

Learn more about Sydney Faculty of Veterinary Science

Louise McGregor, a nurse at the Veterinary Teaching Hospital, Sydney, wanted to enrich the lives of these cats, who are blood donors in our clinic. Blood donor cats play a vital role in saving the lives of seriously sick or injured feline patients at the clinic. The donor cats spend three years in residence at the clinic, after which they are given to specially selected homes to live the rest of their lives as pets. Louise saw that although these five boys were much loved and extremely well cared for by the staff, they were housed indoors. She could see that more could be done to enhance the lives of these beautiful cats; it just needed a little planning.

There were two stages in bringing her plans to fruition:

    1. In stage one of the project, Louise and the clinic staff organised a bake sale and raised $700 to provide environmental enrichment for the five cats. With a matching donation by the clinic, a selection of scratch poles, cat gymnasiums and toys were purchased for their indoor accommodation. Still seeing more that could be done, Louise approached the UVTHS Veterinary Director A/Professor Vanessa Barrs, the curator of the blood donor program Dr Sanaa Zaki, and Hospital Manager Mr Keith Merchant with her ideas, and together a plan was hatched to go ahead with stage two.
    2. With the enthusiastic involvement of the hospital and the Development Office of the faculty, money was raised through a variety of avenues: some generous donations from clients of our clinic, a checkerboard cake bake-off and a naming competition for one of the new blood donors. The students also contributed via VetSoc, the Veterinary Student Society. Due to this great combined effort, the necessary $9,000 was raised in one year, and in December 2013 the enclosure was built.

The result is a spacious indoor-outdoor cat space with grass, tree branches, a tower where cats can sit up high and observe, and an indoor space for their beds. Once introduced to their new day home, the cats showed their approval; they quickly found the sunny and grassy patches and began exploring their surroundings. Their first experience with rain was a delight—after initial hesitation, the boys ran through the rain to feel the new sensation on their backs.

The donors are in residence on a day on/day off basis, enjoying daily visits and interaction from staff members and students who wander past. The new accommodation is working well for both cats and humans, as people love spending relaxing time out in the company of these cats, and the cats get extra cuddles and play opportunities.

All five have come alive with the stimulus of the new cat hotel. “Anchovy,” previously a shy boy, has really come out of his shell and revels in the increased human interactions in the “day spa.” But even the longer-term residents have demonstrated brighter eyes and more spirit; they are thriving.

The next stage is a campaign to raise money to provide some heat lamps for winter.

About the Sydney Veterinary School

The Sydney Faculty of Veterinary Science has a strong commitment to provide students with an exceptional learning environment. This ensures the very best start to a fulfilling, diverse and successful veterinary career.

Sydney Veterinary School’s aim is to ensure students are able to view issues from a population health framework, with a strong animal welfare consciousness, and provide influence and expertise at a local, national and global level.

To achieve this, the Doctor of Veterinary Medicine program is designed with five broad competency themes:

  1. Veterinary Sciences
  2. Individual Animal Health and Welfare
  3. Population Health, Welfare and Production
  4. Professional Practice
  5. Research

Program title: Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM)
Location: Sydney, New South Wales
Semester intake: March 2015
Program duration: 4 years
Application deadline: TBC by the faculty. In previous years, the application deadline for the vet science program was October 31.

Apply to the Sydney Veterinary School!

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Find out more about the Sydney Veterinary School and the new Doctor of Veterinary Medicine for the 2015 intake? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Veterinary Schools Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or 1-866-698-7355.

Tuesday, June 3rd, 2014

Melbourne veterinary student working and networking in Nepal

Dr Sarah Hall never imagined she would become a vet, so how did she find herself in Nepal at the forefront of animal disease management?

Animal disease management is a specialist area becoming increasingly important in the 21st Century. Globalisation has brought the world closer together, making travel, communication and trade between nations and countries easier and faster—but it has also increased the risk of disease travelling rapidly across continents.

University of Melbourne Veterinary School

Learn more about Melbourne Veterinary School

Australia has been free of foot-and-mouth disease for over 100 years, but local governments and farmers around the country have been vigilant in preparing for an outbreak.

Dr Sarah Hall, a Masters of Veterinary Public Health (Emergency Disease Management) student at the University of Melbourne Veterinary School, has recently returned from foot-and-mouth control training in Nepal.

She says there is a constant threat of an outbreak in Australia but preparedness training is the key.

“Every day there is a risk of foot-and-mouth disease coming into the country, you simply have to bring home a ham sandwich, or accidentally step in some cow droppings in a country like Nepal or India and then catch a plane back to Australia.”

Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a highly contagious viral disease that affects cloven-hooved animals such as cattle and sheep. While not often fatal it is debilitating and it has the potential to quickly cause widespread illness.

“Foot-and-mouth disease is the biggest, most economically damaging threat to Australia’s livestock industries,” Dr Hall says. “Our quarantine system is highly effective but even a small outbreak in Australia could have devastating consequences to our communities in lost production, trade and tourism; we could even face global trade restrictions.”

In response to the risk the Commonwealth Federal Department of Agriculture Fisheries and Forestry (DAFF) convened and funded a FMD training program for veterinarians in Nepal. Dr Hall was nominated for a place and supported in her travel by the Melbourne Faculty of Veterinary Science.

Twenty vets from Australia took part in the training program, visiting communities in Nepal with active foot-and-mouth outbreaks.

Dr Hall says they worked in epidemiological and clinical teams, took samples and used the local reference laboratories and ‘penside tests’ to confirm the disease.

“We also asked farmers questions about livestock movements to understand how the disease spreads in Nepal.

“The idea was, if there was an outbreak in Australia the vets involved in the program would be our front-line response team, with real experience in identifying foot-and-mouth disease, in implementing biosecurity strategies and in conducting initial disease investigations.”

As well as preparing Australian vets for the management of an outbreak, Dr Hall says the trip was also an incredible networking opportunity.

“My current boss was one of the private practice vets invited to go to Nepal. We got talking about our careers and got to know each other quite well and after returning to Australia he offered me a job.”

Dr Hall moved to Bendigo to work in a mixed practice clinic after finishing her veterinary science degree at the University of Melbourne in 2009.

“While I enjoyed my job I started to realise my real passion was in trying to solve the mystery of disease outbreaks.

“As the local vet you are first on the scene when a local farmer calls saying he has five dead cows.

“The farmer is worried about his livelihood and his animals’ welfare so it’s rewarding to play Sherlock Holmes and get to figure out the cause of the disease. That was what gave me that kick, that thrill, and doing vaccinations all day and removing grass-seeds from cats and dogs just wasn’t for me in the long-term.

“I was interested in epidemiology and emergency animal disease so I looked at the courses available and the Master’s degree at the Faculty of Veterinary Science fitted my interest and had the flexibility I needed to be able to continue working.”

Dr Hall says she never imagined she would become a vet, let alone find herself in advanced training in Nepal; a cancelled work experience placement in Year 10 was the twist of fate that led her to pursue a career as a veterinarian.

“The Royal Children’s Hospital cancelled on me because they had overbooked, so my careers coordinator suggested that if I wanted to be a doctor I should go to a vet clinic because I’d get to see surgery.

“So I ended up at an equine practice for work experience with Dr Charlie El-Hage, who is now a lecturer in Veterinary Clinical Studies with the Faculty.

“I remember being a quiet little Year 10 student trying not to get in the way when Charlie took me under his wing. He told me all about the best vet schools in the world and by the end of the week I was convinced I was going to be a vet even though I’d walked in upset I couldn’t get into the Royal Children’s Hospital.”

Dr Hall now follows in Dr El-Hage’s footsteps, having recently taken up a position with the Department of Environment and Primary Industries as a District Veterinary Officer in Geelong.

(Original story by Clemmie Wetherall from University of Melbourne VOICE)

University of Melbourne’s Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM) program

Program title: Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM)
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Semester intake: Late February/early March
Program duration: 4 years
Application deadline: December 23, 2014. Note: If you are interested in the Melbourne DVM program for the 2015 intake, it is advised that you apply as soon as possible in order to allow yourself time for the pre-departure process should you receive an offer.

Apply to Melbourne Veterinary School!

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Do you have questions about Melbourne Veterinary School and the Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM) program? Would you like more information about studying veterinary programs at Australian universities? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Veterinary Schools Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or call 1 866-698-7355 (toll free in Canada).

Monday, May 26th, 2014

About the Sydney Centre for Veterinary Education

The Post Graduate Committee in Veterinary Science was formed in 1961 by a group of forward-thinking veterinarians—university lecturers, professional association members and those from associated industries who recognised during the 1950s the growing need for continuing veterinary education.

Sydney Veterinary School

Study veterinary science at Sydney

This led in 1965 to the formation of the Post Graduate Foundation in Veterinary Science (PGF) at the University of Sydney, which was established under the authority of the university’s Senate and governed by a Council elected by its members. Its aim of funding continuing education for the profession led to the expansion many more services.

These initiatives of 40 years ago established the world’s first and leading organisation dedicated to postgraduate veterinary education. The first activity was organizing the delivery of regular refresher courses of two to five days’ duration. In the first year, two courses were held and by 1996 there were 68. In 1997 this grew to 94, and by 1998, 102 courses were held. There has been comparable growth in our other activities covering publishing, technical information search and dissemination, distance and online education.

From its inception the PGF enjoyed the support and participation of our New Zealand colleagues. Veterinarians from many other countries around the world also use our resources and attend our courses. With the expansion of veterinary practice and new communications technology we are looking forward to increasing involvement in fulfilling the continuing education requirements of veterinarians everywhere.

On August 4, 2008 the Post Graduate Foundation in Veterinary Science officially became the Centre for Veterinary Education.

Sydney Centre for Veterinary Education

As an established and recognized leader in continuing veterinary education, the Centre for Veterinary Education has been a worldwide provider of continuing professional development to the veterinary community for over 40 years. Formerly the Post Graduate Foundation in Veterinary Science (PGF), we officially became the Centre for Veterinary Education (CVE) on August 4, 2008.

The centre provides up-to-date education and information to veterinarians, vet nurses, technicians, carers, support staff and all those involved in the care of animals, and are committed to helping improve the health, well-being and welfare of all animals.

Education and information streams include a variety of innovative educational deliveries, from distance education and online courses to events and publications.

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Learn more about the Sydney Veterinary School and about Australian Veterinary Schools.

Do you have questions about Sydney Veterinary School and about studying veterinary programs at Australian universities? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Veterinary Schools Officer Rachel Brady by emailing rachel@oztrekk.com or by calling 1 866-698-7355 (toll free in Canada).

Thursday, May 15th, 2014

Wildlife health at the Sydney Faculty of Veterinary Science

The Sydney Faculty of Veterinary Science has a long and productive history in the area of wildlife health. Several research groups in the faculty provide a range of postgraduate and collaborative opportunities in studies of a wide range of native and exotic, mammal, reptile, avian and fish species. Reflecting the complex nature of wildlife disease, this research is multidisciplinary, with collaborations among pathologists, immunologists, microbiologists, parasitologists, geneticists, epidemiologists, pharmacologists, ecologists and clinicians.

University of Sydney Veterinary School

Sydney Veterinary School looks after wildlife health

These research programs also provide a rich environment for learning about wildlife disease in several undergraduate and postgraduate coursework degrees. These are designed to equip graduates to make a significant contribution to conservation and biosecurity worldwide, through an understanding of wildlife disease ecology, investigation, and management, and one-health approaches.

The clinical, management and research expertise in the Sydney Faculty of Veterinary Science makes a valuable applied contribution to wildlife health through the University of Sydney’s Wildlife Health and Conservation Clinic at Camden. They  also support zoological institutions and wildlife care groups by providing wildlife-specific clinical expertise and high-quality and accessible wildlife diagnostics, through the Koala Health Hub and Veterinary Pathology Diagnostic Services (VPDS).

Sydney Veterinary School

The Sydney Faculty of Veterinary Science has a strong commitment to provide students with an exceptional learning environment. This ensures the very best start to a fulfilling, diverse and successful veterinary career.

Sydney Veterinary School’s aim is to ensure students are able to view issues from a population health framework, with a strong animal welfare consciousness, and provide influence and expertise at a local, national and global level.

To achieve this, the Doctor of Veterinary Medicine program is designed with five broad competency themes:

  1. Veterinary Sciences
  2. Individual Animal Health and Welfare
  3. Population Health, Welfare and Production
  4. Professional Practice
  5. Research

Program title: Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM)
Location: Sydney, New South Wales
Semester intake: March 2015
Program duration: 4 years
Application deadline: TBC by the faculty. In previous years, the application deadline for the vet science program was October 31.

Apply to the Sydney Veterinary School!

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Do you have questions about Sydney Veterinary School and the new Doctor of Veterinary Medicine for the 2015 intake? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Veterinary Schools Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or 1-866-698-7355.

Tuesday, May 6th, 2014

Melbourne Veterinary Science and Hospital Open Day through my eyes as an OzTREKK student – Part 3

This story is a continuation of Melbourne Veterinary Science and Hospital Open Day through my eyes as an OzTREKK student – Part 2, a blog written by OzTREKK and Melbourne DVM student Ashley Saunders.

University of Melbourne Veterinary School

Visiting the radiology room

After I had my horse fill, we moved on to the exciting part of the campus, the radiology room! This room really excites me as there are so many machines and neat technology.

Across the hall from these two rooms is a padded recovery room for large animals. This is for when they are recovering from anesthesia, they have a safe place to wake up. It is padded all the way around so if they stumble to their feet and fall, they are protected by a soft landing. There was a Melbourne Veterinary School student volunteering to explain how this room works.

University of Melbourne Veterinary School

Incubator for newborn animals

They also had a display of x-rays for the public to see, and professors there to show the different bones in the pictures. They also had lead aprons for people to try on to see how heavy they actually are.

There was also an atom infant incubator set up for people to see how newborn animals are incubated if born with problems.

Open Day was very interactive for the public, children and future students to be involved. They had a station set up to learn how to administer IV fluids as well as learn how to bandage paws.

We started to get hungry so we ventured out to the lawn for barbecued sausage from the Veterinary Students Society of Victoria (VSSV) barbecue. The weather had once again changed and now it was about 25 degrees and sunny! While we were eating lunch, Edgar’s Mission Group had one of their pigs for show. We got to enjoy “Polly” the pig beg for treats and make little kids laugh.

University of Melbourne Veterinary School

Holding “Angus,” the python

Another special appreciation group of the University of Melbourne had a booth set up. This was the Wildlife Appreciation group. Trent had his python “Angus” there for people to see and touch. I was brave enough to get up close and personal with “Angus.”

After our lunch and a few minutes in the nice sunshine, we headed back inside to complete our campus tour. Our next stop was the Anesthesia room, where final-year Melbourne DVM and OzTREKK student Jenah Drew was showing the public how to anesthetize an animal and how the machines work to monitor their heart rate.

They also had an endoscope demonstration. This was a really interactive demonstration as they had a cardboard dog with candy in his stomach, and the public was able to use the endoscope to find the candy that they wanted that was in the stomach. The little kids really enjoyed learning about endoscopy!

After we got to view the Daily Procedures room. Then we headed to the Consult rooms.

University of Melbourne Veterinary School

With fellow OzTREKK student Amanda (right)

On the way out of the small-animal hospital, the lobby had a booth of PR assistant dogs. I was so happy to see so many happy dogs. I got a nice snuggle with “Tigger.”

Our next stop was the Reptile Education of Victoria exhibit.

Here they had a brown snake for the public to see. They discussed to importance of not handling these snakes as they are extremely poisonous. This snake had no venom and they explained to children that many movies/shows etc. show people handling these non-venomous snakes and that the ones in the wild are extremely dangerous.

We went inside to check out the snakes and crocodiles. I had to admit—I didn’t like this exhibit much!

We then headed to the Student Welfare Appreciation Group’s exhibit, which was a petting zoo. I was extremely happy because I cannot get enough of animal snuggles!

University of Melbourne Veterinary School

Heading back to Melbourne, Rachel at the wheel

We also got so see some chickens—but they were very hard to get pictures with. My favourite part was holding the baby rabbit. He was so soft and cute!

We Melbourne DVM students were in our glory with all the animals around! We sure did pick the right profession to be in!

The day was coming to an end and the open house had a great turnout! I got to meet lots of new people and some OzTREKK upper-year students.

University of Melbourne Veterinary School

Sally Mujaj, myself, Amanda Mamo

Anna, Amanda, Sally and I decided to head back to Melbourne. We were going to take the train back when a fourth-year student overheard our conversation. She so kindly volunteered to drive us back to the city. It is so nice to be a part of a school where all the students are so friendly and help each other out! Rachel drove us home and I thought I would document the steering wheel on the opposite side. (See photo on right.)

Overall, I couldn’t have picked a better school to do my Doctor of Veterinary Medicine!  Even though the weather changes a million times a day, I have made the most amazing friends ever! The city is so clean and so multicultural that you can find almost anything you need! I say “almost” because I am missing my Tim Hortons! Ha ha!

OzTREKK prepared me for everything I needed to adapt to my new home in Melbourne. I am so thankful for their company and all of their hard work helping me along the way. I would be pleased to help anyone interested in applying to the Melbourne DVM! You can ask OzTREKK Admissions Officer Rachel Brady or anyone else at OzTREKK for my email address if you have any questions about the program, the city, or how I am coping living so far away from home!

Cheers,
Ashley Saunders
OzTREKK Student DVM year 1, from Wasaga Beach, Ontario

University of Melbourne Veterinary School

Jenah shows how to anesthetize

University of Melbourne Veterinary School

Cuddling with sweet “Tigger”

University of Melbourne Veterinary School

How to administer IV fluids

University of Melbourne Veterinary School

Pretty “Polly” made kids laugh

University of Melbourne Veterinary School

Reptile exhibit, yay!

University of Melbourne Veterinary School

Padded recovery room

About the University of Melbourne’s Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM) program

Program title: Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM)
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Semester intake: Late February/early March 2015
Program duration: 4 years
Application deadline: December 20, 2014. It is strongly recommended that students apply at least three months prior to the program start date.

Entry Requirements

Eligible applicants must have completed

  • an undergraduate science degree (minimum three-year degree with majors in Agriculture, Animal Science, Biochemistry, Biomedicine, Physiology or Zoology); and
  • prerequisite subjects including at least one semester of study in each of cell biology or general biology, and biochemistry.

Selection into the University of Melbourne’s Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM) program will be primarily based on academic achievement. Selection will be based on results (grades) obtained in your final year undergraduate science subjects as well as your second last year (penultimate) undergraduate science subjects, weighted 75:25 toward the final year subjects. Applicants with a 75% average or above should apply.

Apply to Melbourne Veterinary School!

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Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Veterinary Schools Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or call 1-866-698-7355 (toll free in Canada) to find out how you can study in Australia! Learn more about studying veterinary medicine at Melbourne Veterinary School.

Wednesday, April 30th, 2014

Animals in Need fund at the Sydney Veterinary School

The Animals in Need fund at the Sydney Faculty of Veterinary Science is helping cover the cost of much-needed veterinary care for pets from disadvantaged families, or stray and neglected animals and wildlife.

University of Sydney Veterinary School

Study veterinary medicine at Sydney Uni

Patsy, an Australian kelpie, has been a wonderful companion to Ms Alja Brown, who adopted her at three months. But life hasn’t always been easy for Patsy. In 2013, she suffered a chronic Achilles tendon rupture, which resulted in an inability to bear weight on the affected leg.

Surgery was clearly the solution, but this was likely to result in substantial costs that Alja could ill afford on her pension.

Friend and neighbour, Dr Peter Snowdon, stepped in to help.

He drove them to the University Veterinary Teaching Hospital, Sydney (UVTHS) where Patsy received treatment. It was here that Alja became aware of the financial support available through the Animals in Need Fund, which paid for Patsy’s surgery and recovery.

The Animals in Need fund was launched by the Sydney Faculty of Veterinary Science in 2012. It was established to help cover the cost of much-needed veterinary care for pets from disadvantaged families, or stray and neglected animals and wildlife.

It covers a range of services such as desexing, vaccinations, and surgery to treat trauma or cancer. This support is helping to improve, and in many cases, save the lives of animals in need.

Since launch, more than 570 donors have contributed upward of $32,000 to the fund.

About the Sydney Veterinary School

Sydney Veterinary School has planned to offer a 4-year, graduate-entry Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM) for the March 2015 intake.  This DVM program will be a stand-alone, graduate-entry degree, aimed at students who have already attained a bachelor degree and who are accustomed to the challenge of university studies.

The program encourages enrollment of students from diverse backgrounds and aims to help them achieve their goals to become veterinary medical professionals in the global community. Teaching is research-driven to ensure students will learn from the latest developments and advances in evidence-based practice, veterinary science research, animal behaviour and welfare science and veterinary public health. Students will benefit from a fully integrated learning curriculum with clinical exposure, clinical skills training and animal handling commencing in the first semester and throughout the course. Studies will take place in the one health framework, ensuring students understand the linkages between veterinary health, human medicine and the environment at local, national and global levels. The program culminates in a capstone experience year where students will be placed as an intern in veterinary clinics of all varieties and in a wide range of locations, including rotations in the university teaching hospitals at Sydney and Camden.

Students can apply for a position into the DVM after completing any kind of bachelor’s degree at a recognized university, as long as program prerequisite units of study have been met.

Applicants must have completed the following prerequisite units of study at bachelor’s degree level to be eligible for entry:

  • General chemistry (physical and inorganic)
  • Organic chemistry
  • Biology
  • Biochemistry

The minimum GPA for entry is a credit average (minimum 65% overall GPA); however, places are limited and there is a strict quota for this course. Entry is highly competitive so students who have achieved the minimum GPA (and other admission requirements) are then ranked on academic performance. The higher your GPA, the better your chances of receiving an offer.

Apply to the Sydney Veterinary School!

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Do you have questions about Sydney Veterinary School and the new Doctor of Veterinary Medicine for the 2015 intake? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Veterinary Schools Officer Rachel Brady at rachel@oztrekk.com or 1-866-698-7355.