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Posts Tagged ‘Doctor of Medicine’

Thursday, June 15th, 2017

Sydney Medical School boosting economies and rural medical education

Sydney Medical School’s long history of training students in rural NSW is boosting local economies and the number of graduates who want to work as rural doctors.

“Rural training experience increases the likelihood that doctors will commit to working in rural locations long term,” said Professor Conigrave. “This is why we have had a longstanding commitment to the training of rural doctors for more than 20 years.”

Sydney Medical School boosting economies and rural medical education

Learn more about Sydney Medical School

The University of Sydney has a School of Rural Health in Dubbo and Orange and Departments of Rural Health in Broken Hill and Lismore.

“By the end of 2017, almost 1,000 of our medical students will have undertaken extended training placements in these four centres,” said Professor Conigrave.

“At graduation, these students are telling us that they would prefer to work in rural areas. The government’s new funding for the rural doctor training ‘pipeline’ will help these students to achieve their ambitions and their talents for rural health and medicine.”

However, Professor Conigrave said that there were not enough medical training positions to convert students’ intentions into medical careers in rural areas.

“We’re doing very well in priming the pipeline for the training of rural doctors—many more new medical graduates are now trying to get jobs in rural hospitals as interns. In fact, there are now significantly more applicants for these critical rural junior hospital training jobs than there are jobs available.”

Underlining the university’s contribution to rural economies, Professor Conigrave said, “We have a track record of excellence in rural medical education and we are making significant contributions to local economies.”

“At Dubbo and Orange, for example, the University of Sydney School of Rural Health contributes close to $7 million each year in direct local expenditures.

“This provide jobs for more than 50 people in central western NSW, all of whom live locally—they make up almost 30 full-time equivalents. Many of them are highly skilled, and might otherwise have been obliged to look elsewhere for work,” said Professor Conigrave.

“Then, of course, there are also indirect economic benefits. The 64 students that take extended rural placements each year bring business to local shops, sporting facilities and food outlets, and contribute to community life and projects of all sorts.

“In addition, the School of Rural Health requires many local services: motor vehicles, IT, transport services, plumbing, the maintenance of grounds and even the paint on the walls.

“But most importantly, the University of Sydney School of Rural Health in Dubbo and Orange and Departments of Rural in Broken Hill and Lismore are helping to lift access to quality healthcare among Australians in rural and remote areas,” added Professor Conigrave.

In April, the University of Sydney won $3 million in federal funds to establish Rural Training Hubs in Broken Hill, Dubbo and Lismore to boost rural-based training and career pathways for trainee doctors.

Commenting on the award of funding Professor Conigrave said, “We’re very pleased that the Federal Government has recognised the need to create this training pipeline.

“The funding will enable junior doctors with ambitions in rural medicine to undertake specialist training in rural rather than metropolitan centres, developing into fully fledged experts who can provide rural communities with specialist healthcare in all major fields of medicine, including general practice and rural and remote medicine and surgery.”

Study medicine at the #1 medical school in Australia

Did you know the University of Sydney Medical School is ranked #15 in the world and #1 in Australia (QS World University Rankings by Subject 2017)? It’s true!

Sydney offers the very popular MD program, a four-year professional postgraduate-entry course with three primary aims for graduates: excellent clinical skills and preparedness for practice; experience in research; and experience and awareness of health in an international setting. It includes weekly clinical experience in leading hospitals from the very first weeks, regular PBL (problem-based learning) exercises in small groups, traditional lectures with expert practitioners, and ongoing opportunities to participate in research.

Program: Doctor of Medicine (MD)
Location: Sydney, New South Wales (Camperdown/Darlington campus)
Semester intake: January 2018
Duration: 4 years
Application deadline: June 20, 2017
Deadline to submit all documents: Monday, June 26, 2017
Skype interview invitations sent: mid-July
Skype interviews: July 31 – August 11, 2017
First-round offers made: from late August (and may continue to be made until December 2017)

Apply now to Sydney Medical School!

If you have any questions about Sydney Medical School, please contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com.

Wednesday, June 7th, 2017

Monash University medical student joins Antarctica expedition to inspire environmental change

A desire to drive sustainable energy use, and love of solving challenging problems has won a Monash University student a prestigious Boston Consulting Group (BCG) scholarship. One of only two scholarships awarded annually in Australia and New Zealand, Daniel D’Hotman will now embark on a trip to Antarctica early next year.

Daniel’s $15,000 scholarship means he joins the last 60 miles (96.6 km) of the 600-mile (966 km) South Pole Energy Challenge (SPEC). Conducted on foot, it’s the first polar expedition to rely completely on renewable energy, and is renowned explorer Robert Swan’s last South Pole voyage.

Monash University medical student joins Antarctica expedition to inspire environmental change

A Monash Medical School student will be embarking on an Antarctic expedition

A fourth-year Monash University Medical School student, Daniel said the South Pole expedition was an amazing opportunity to inspire change in the way we use energy.

“I believe the risk of catastrophic climate change poses a major existential threat to current and future generations—no matter what field you’re in—and I wanted to be part of something that would have a global impact,” Daniel said.

Using this expedition as a platform for engagement, the group wants to challenge and inspire people to make measurable changes to how they use energy in their businesses, communities, and lifestyles. Daniel also plans to work with sponsors, such as Shell and Patagonia, to launch a social impact fund that will drive change in the way we use energy.

“On a personal level,” he said, “I revel in a challenge, and the prospect of walking in the most hostile environment on earth is very exciting.”

This once-in-a-lifetime adventure is only one part of the prize. Daniel will also have the opportunity to work with BCG after graduation.

It’s a prestigious honour, and one that came about after a rigorous selection process involving three rounds of interviews, where BCG sought out high-performing students with strong leadership qualities and a love of “solving challenging problems.”

As a medical student at Monash, Daniel is passionate about mobilising groups of individuals to promote collaboration and engineer societal change. Earlier this year, he led the launch of the philanthropic movement Effective Altruism in Australia, and the charity has raised more than $800,000 for public health interventions in its first year.

While Daniel enjoys clinical medicine and clearly has a passion for the environment, he hopes to pursue a future in public policy to ensure the future equity and sustainability of Australia’s health system.

“My Monash placements in rural Victoria offered insight into the stark contrast in health outcomes between these areas and inner-city Melbourne,” he said. “This prompted my interest in health equity; a person’s health should not be dictated by their postcode.”

After his second year of Monash University Medical School, Daniel completed his Bachelor of Medical Science (Hons) at the University of Oxford, working with philosophers including Monash Professor Julian Savulescu. This experience introduced him to the world of bioethics and policy.

“Oxford really opened my eyes to power of public policy, and inspired me to pursue a career in the field,” he said.

Daniel believes that rising costs of healthcare and an ageing population may threaten the viability of Australia’s health system this century. However, he said that technology could offer powerful solutions.

“Australia is uniquely positioned to take advantage of advances in artificial intelligence, big data, and biotechnology to guarantee the quality of our health system into the future. I’m excited to expand my knowledge of these areas through working at BCG.”

Study Medicine at Monash University

The Bachelor of Medical Science and Doctor of Medicine at Monash University has been designed in close consultation with doctors, health care professionals and leaders in the health and research sectors to give students the scientific background and clinical expertise to ensure that graduates are prepared for their future as a doctor.

Program: Bachelor of Medical Science Doctor of Medicine (graduate entry)
Location: Gippsland Campus, Churchill, Victoria (approx. 2 hours southeast of Melbourne)
Semester intake: February 2018
Duration: 4 years
Application deadline: July 21, 2017

Apply to the Monash University medical program!

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Would you like more information about studying at Monash University Medical School? Contact Admissions Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com or 1-866-698-7355.

Monday, May 15th, 2017

UQ to provide major boost to regional health

Regional communities and future health professionals studying through The University of Queensland are big winners from a multi-pronged $54.4 million Federal Government initiative.

In Queensland, UQ will lead the establishment of a University Department of Rural Health (UDRH), providing a major boost to education, training and research in rural south Queensland for nurses, midwives and allied health workers.

UQ to provide major boost to regional health

UQ will lead the establishment of a University Department of Rural Health (Photo credit: UQ)

Three new medical training hubs under UQ control will also be established in Central Queensland, Wide Bay and South West Queensland, operating with an aim of retaining doctors in regional areas.

Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences Executive Dean Professor Bruce Abernethy said research indicated students who experienced rural practice were far more likely to return to work rurally once qualified.

“For the local communities, this is part of a long-term strategy to address maldistribution of the health workforce,” Professor Abernethy said.

“Rural and remote regions of Queensland and Australia often face challenges in attracting and retaining qualified health professionals.

“Students on rural placement will discover the diverse range of professional opportunities available in regional areas, thus enhancing the sustainability and viability of rural health care services.”

UQ joined with the University of Southern Queensland and the Hospital and Health Services of Darling Downs and South West in the successful bid to establish the Southern Queensland Rural Health UDRH.

The UDRH will help provide rural experience to student nurses, midwives, physiotherapists, pharmacists, psychologists, social workers, occupational therapists, speech pathologists, dieticians, and exercise physiologists.

Commonwealth funding has also been awarded to provide additional clinical, academic and administration staff at UQ’s three regional medical training hubs:

  • Central Queensland: located at Rockhampton, with sub-units at Gladstone and Emerald
  • Southern Queensland: located at Toowoomba, with sub-units at Charleville in south-west Queensland
  • Wide Bay: located at Bundaberg, with sub units at Hervey Bay and Theodore.

UQ Faculty of Medicine Acting Executive Dean Professor Robyn Ward said the hubs would offer doctors rural opportunities at all stages of their medical training.

“This will facilitate postgraduate training opportunities, including specialties, so doctors can stay in regional communities for training and not have to return to the city,” Professor Ward said.

“The Department of Rural Health and the training hubs will build on the high quality education and training experiences already offered by UQ’s Rural Clinical School.”

Announcing the funding, Assistant Minister for Health Dr David Gillespie said regional and rural health training not only addressed workforce shortages and service expectations, but was also essential to regional economic growth.

UQ Rural Clinical School

UQ Rural Clinical School is funded through the Australian Government’s Rural Clinical Training Support (RCTS) Program to address health workforce shortages in rural and regional Queensland. To achieve this mandate, UQRCS aims to lead and direct the rural health agenda through the highest quality education, training, research and community service.

Now in its second decade of operation, UQRCS is able to demonstrate a positive impact on the medical workforce in the region and elsewhere.  Studies demonstrate that a student who has experienced the Rural Advantage with UQRCS is 2.5 times more likely to work in a rural area when compared with other UQ medical graduates.

About the UQ Medical Program

The UQ Faculty of Medicine conducts a four-year, graduate-entry medical program, the Doctor of Medicine (MD). The faculty is a leading provider of medical education and research in Australia, and with the country’s largest medical degree program, they are the major single contributor to Queensland’s junior medical workforce.

Program: Doctor of Medicine
Location: Brisbane, Queensland
Semester intake: January
Duration: 4 years
Application deadline: Applications are assessed on a rolling admissions (first come, first served) basis. It is recommended that applicants apply as early as possible to increase their chances of timely assessment. This program can fill quickly!

Apply to the UQ Doctor of Medicine!

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Find out more about UQ Medicine. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com, or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Friday, May 5th, 2017

Hugh Jackman and the UQ Med Revue

Are you planning to study medicine at the University of Queensland? If so, let us introduce you to the UQ Medical Society (UQMS) and their shenanigans (which we hope you plan to be a part of next year!).

The UQ Med Revue is a medical student variety show at the University of Queensland, put on by the UQMS, that normally has in the order of 250 students involved. Students from all four years of med come together to create a hilarious comedy that is jam-packed with puns, parodies, and Professor Parker’s pecs.

UQ medical students act, sing, dance, write, direct, play instruments, make props, design costumes, do hair and make-up and most of the tech for the show making it a truly home-grown production! As the biggest event on the UQMS calendar, the show runs three sold-out nights. In 2017, the dates will be August 13–15th, so mark it in your calendar!

Last year’s Med Revue took them on an adventure “Inside Gout,” with the help of Mr. Hugh Jackman.

Hugh Jackman and the UQ Med Revue

2017 UQ Med Revue Convenors (L-R): Joel Russell, Ailsa Lee, Will Saunders, Jessica Monteiro and Chris Strom (Photo credit: UQ)

About the UQ Medical Program

The UQ Medicine conducts a four-year, graduate-entry medical program, the Doctor of Medicine (MD). The UQ Faculty of Medicine is a leading provider of medical education and research in Australia, and with the country’s largest medical degree program, they are the major single contributor to Queensland’s junior medical workforce.

Program: Doctor of Medicine (MD)
Location: Brisbane, Queensland
Semester intake: January
Duration: 4 years
Application deadline: Applications are assessed on a rolling admissions (first come, first served) basis. It is recommended that applicants apply as early as possible to increase their chances of timely assessment. This program can fill quickly!

Apply to the Doctor of Medicine program at UQ!

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Would you like more information about studying at UQ Medicine? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com.

Tuesday, April 25th, 2017

University of Melbourne students run Teddy Bear hospital

Recently, more than 1,200 medicine, nursing, dentistry, physiotherapy, audiology, biomedical, science, speech pathology and social work students from the University of Melbourne ran a Teddy Bear Hospital (TBH) to raise funds for the Royal Children’s Hospital Good Friday appeal.

University of Melbourne students run Teddy Bear hospital

University of Melbourne students run Teddy Bear hospital

Students aimed to reduce children’s fears associated with medical environments, procedures and professionals by familiarising them with health care in a fun, relaxed and interactive manner.

These interactions give future young doctors and health care professionals an excellent opportunity to further develop the specific communication and engagement skills required to successfully interact with children.

The students offered Teddy medical consultations to more than 5,000 children, making TBH the largest student volunteer event run by the University of Melbourne.

Professor Cheryl Jones, Stevenson Chair of Paediatrics and Head of the Department of Paediatrics in the Melbourne Medical School said students learn so much more when working as a team.

“The Teddy Professors from the university’s Department of Paediatrics who oversee this student-led program, are amazed at the passion and creativity of the students as they work together to create the toy machines and instruments for the day, and plan and execute this major event,” she said. “Apart from the fun and fundraising, our students learn more about each other’s multidisciplinary roles and provide practical advice to children and families about how to keep healthy and reduce children’s anxiety about medical environments, procedures and professionals.

“We are very proud to watch this group of students as they are our future health leaders of tomorrow,” Professor Jones said.

Children are asked to bring in a “sick” teddy bear or other toy for treatment at the “hospital.” There are many stations, including teddy triage, teddy doctor consultation, radiology, surgery, and anatomy. There are dedicated student volunteers to design and build the activities and equipment that are used inside the hospital.

Medical student coordinator Elliott Cope believes taking part in the TBH has improved his communication skills, leadership and confidence in interacting with children.

“One of the most memorable interactions was with a four-year-old boy who bought in his dragon teddy bear. The complaint: his dragon had stopped breathing fire,” he said.

Not having much experience with dragon medicine, Elliott was a little stumped, but after a look in the dragon’s throat and a feel of the neck, he diagnosed a dragon cold. After a good night’s sleep and lots of rest, the dragon was back to breathing fire and feeling much better.

University of Melbourne Doctor of Medicine

Program: Doctor of Medicine (MD)
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Semester intake: February
Duration: 4 years
Application deadline: June 22, 2017

The Melbourne MD is a four-year, graduate-entry medical program that builds on the university’s reputation for excellence in teaching and research. It enables students to become outstanding medical practitioners who will excel as world-class leaders in their chosen field.

Apply to the University of Melbourne Medical School!

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Questions about Melbourne Medical School? Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Friday, March 31st, 2017

Introducing the UWA Doctor of Medicine program

Every year, OzTREKK helps hundreds of Canadian students apply to Australian medical schools. And now we are pleased to say we now have another med school option: the University of Western Australia.

Introducing the UWA Doctor of Medicine program

Study medicine at UWA

Program Overview – Doctor of Medicine (MD)

The UWA Doctor of Medicine (MD) program at the University of Western Australia is a highly integrated and contextualised course with many innovative features to equip graduates with the capabilities to work as a doctor in Australian and around the world.

The overall aim of the MD program is to prepare students to become accountable, scholarly, capable and caring doctors, committed to the well-being of the patient, of the community and of society. This includes teaching in professionalism, leadership, advocacy, education and scholarly practice.

The Doctor of Medicine is structured around six core themes: Professional, Leader, Advocate, Clinician, Educator, and Scholar (PLACES). The PLACES curriculum structure encourages students to learn about the humanistic and non-technical aspects of being a doctor, while continuing to emphasise the importance of developing clinical competence and scholarly capabilities.

Program: Doctor of Medicine (MD)
Location: Perth, Western Australia
Semester intake: January
Duration: 4 years
Application deadline: May 30, 2017; however, candidates are encouraged to apply as early as possible.

Entry requirements

To be eligible to apply to the UWA Medical School MD, candidates must

  • have completed a bachelor degree with a minimum grade point average (GPA) of 5.5 out of 7;
  • have completed the GAMSAT or MCAT: 123/123/123/123 and an overall minimum of 492.

In addition, it is recommended that applicants have undertaken the following units/subjects:

  • Physics to year 12 level
  • Chemistry to first-year university level (including completion of Grade 12 level chemistry)
  • Biology or human biology at first-year university level

Test scores will not be considered if the exam results are more than 2 years old. Applicants will be shortlisted for interview based equally on GAMSAT/MCAT and GPA. Interview dates TBC.

Apply to the UWA Doctor of Medicine program!

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Find out more about the UWA Doctor of Medicine. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com.

Tuesday, March 28th, 2017

UQ medicine flagship research program to deliver health outcomes

Projects tackling key health challenges of antimicrobial use and skin cancer are the first to be funded under a flagship initiative by the University of Queensland Faculty of Medicine.

UQ medicine flagship research program to deliver health outcomes

UQ Centre for Clinical Research

Deputy Executive Dean and Associate Dean of Research, Professor Melissa Brown, said the faculty is committed to progressing worthy world-class research by providing operational support over five years to deliver health outcomes.

“Our Health Outcomes Programs, or HOPs, represent a strategic approach to faculty research, in collaboration with our hospital and health partners,” Professor Brown said.

“These are very specific and targeted programs of research that address an identified health problem and will produce a specific and visible benefit.”

The first project selected will address high rates of infection in critically ill patients by optimising antimicrobial therapy.

The research team will use whole genome sequencing to rapidly determine which bacteria are causing infection so the most suitable drug and dose combination can be given. Once the process is established, the research team will test it in the clinic and determine its benefits to individual patients and the health system.

The project led by Professor Jason Roberts and Professor David Paterson includes researchers from UQ’s Centre for Clinical Research (UQCCR) and School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences (SCMB).

The second program to be supported focuses on harnessing technology to address the problem of high melanoma incidence and mortality.

The research team will recruit high risk participants to test targeted screening using 3D total body photography and mobile teledermoscopy in the context of the Australian health care system.

Results will be used to drive evidence-based changes to clinical practice.

The project will be led by Professor Peter Soyer of UQ’s Diamantina Institute and Professor David Whiteman, QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, and includes collaborators from QUT, QIMR Berghofer and UQ’s Faculty of Medicine and Faculty of Business.

Professor Brown said both teams should be congratulated for working collaboratively to create change and translate research into tangible health outcomes.

“These projects were selected following a competitive application process engaging interstate reviewers in late 2016, and we look forward to seeing them make a difference to health care in the years ahead.”

About the UQ Medical School Program

The UQ School of Medicine conducts a four-year, graduate-entry medical program, the Doctor of Medicine (MD). The School of Medicine is a leading provider of medical education and research in Australia, and with the country’s largest medical degree program, they are the major single contributor to Queensland’s junior medical workforce.

Program: Doctor of Medicine (MD)
Location: Brisbane, Queensland
Semester intake: January
Duration: 4 years
Application deadline: Applications are assessed on a rolling admissions (first come, first served) basis. It is recommended that applicants apply as early as possible to increase their chances of timely assessment. This program can fill quickly!

Apply to the UQ School of Medicine!

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Find out more about studying medicine at UQ. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com, or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.

Wednesday, March 22nd, 2017

OzTREKK welcomes two more Australian universities!

Because we like to offer our students as many study options as possible, we now have two more Australian universities offering popular programs like medicine, dentistry, and law!

All of us at OzTREKK are pleased to announce that we are now an official Canadian representative of two additional Australian universities: Charles Sturt University, and the University of Western Australia.

Charles Sturt University

Learn more about CSU

Charles Sturt University

First, meet Charles Sturt University! Established in 1989, it was named in honour of Captain Charles Sturt, a British explorer who made expeditions into regional New South Wales and South Australia.

While CSU has many campuses located in New South Wales, Queensland, Victoria, and the Australian Capital Territory, OzTREKK students will be headed to Orange, New South Wales, for their Bachelor of Dental Science program. Nestled in the Central Tablelands of NSW, 260 km west of Sydney, Orange is a progressive city with a friendly country atmosphere. The city’s 38,000 residents enjoy excellent retail, sporting, educational and health services. With two movie cinemas, restaurants offering a range of cuisine, popular Farmers’ Markets, wineries and an annual FOOD Week, Orange combines boutique shops, sporting facilities, and quality educational and health services.

University of Western Australia

Learn more about UWA

University of Western Australia

How about heading to the west coast of Australia for a change? If so, you’re in for a treat: Perth, Australia is incredibly beautiful, and you get to enjoy stunning sunsets over the Indian Ocean!

The University of Western Australia is a research-intensive university and one of the internationally recognised Australian Group of Eight (which also includes the University of Queensland, the University of Sydney, the University of Melbourne, and Monash University).

OzTREKK students will be happy to know that UWA offers three in-demand degree options for Canadian students:

UWA’s picturesque Crawley campus is located on the Swan River just 10 minutes from Perth. The campus offers you a range of cafes, bookshops, banks, a vibrant cultural precinct, myriad clubs and societies, a supportive Student Guild, and on- and off-campus accommodation options.

We are thrilled to welcome you, Charles Sturt University and University of Western Australia!

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If you have any questions about our new Australian universities, please email info@oztrekk.com or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355. We’re here to help!

Monday, February 13th, 2017

Apply to the new Monash University medical program!

The new combined Bachelor of Medical Science Doctor of Medicine degree has replaced the Monash University Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (Honours) MBBS program as of 2017 entry. The Bachelor of Medical Science and Doctor of Medicine (MD) is an internationally recognised, higher-level qualification and has been accredited by the Australian Medical Association.

Apply to the Monash University medical program!

Learn more about the Monash University medical program!

This new Monash medical program has been designed in close consultation with doctors, health care professionals and leaders in the health and research sectors in order to give students the scientific background and clinical expertise needed for a successful career as a doctor.

Students who commence the Monash MD will undertake a Scholarly Intensive Project in the final year of the course. Medical students will undertake traditional research activities as well having the opportunity to increase learning opportunities around clinical and professional practice.

Monash will continue to offer the 5-year direct-entry medical program (from high school), as well as the 4-year graduate-entry program, with the same number of places available in both courses.

Interview Dates for Canadian applicants
September 4 & 5, 2017 (Toronto)
September 7 & 8, 2017 (Vancouver)

Dates are subject to change.

Program: Bachelor of Medical Science Doctor of Medicine (undergraduate entry)
Location: Clayton campus, Melbourne
Semester intake: February 2018
Duration: 5 years
Application deadline: July 21, 2017

Apply to the undergrad Monash medical program

Program: Bachelor of Medical Science Doctor of Medicine (graduate entry)
Location: Gippsland Campus, Churchill, Victoria (approx. 2 hours southeast of Melbourne)
Semester intake: February 2018
Duration: 4 years
Application deadline: July 21, 2017

Apply to the graduate Monash medical program

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Find out more about the new Bachelor of Medical Science Doctor of Medicine! Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com.

Monday, February 6th, 2017

UQ Medicine graduate shares 9 things he wishes he’d been told as a med student

Hailing from Canada, Shaun completed his medical degree at UQ before undertaking his fellowship at the University of Toronto and his residency with University of Calgary. He currently works full time as a Queensland Health registrar within intensive care and in his spare time he works for House Call Doctor— a 100% bulk-billed, after-hours, home GP service operating in Queensland. If you’d like to hear firsthand from a Canadian who is now practicing medicine in Australia, check out Shaun’s advice!

UQ Medicine graduate shares 9 things he wishes he'd been told as a med student

Canadian Shaun Hosein, now practicing in Australia! (Photo credit: UQ)

1. Study medicine for the right reasons.
Medicine is a highly rewarding career that has many opportunities in various sub-specialty fields. However it is a long road, requires intensive study, and at times can seem impossible. It is not a decision to be made lightly, and there are times I wish I could fix that leaky pipe in my kitchen. I chose medicine, because it not only helps people, but I enjoy thinking on my feet and problem solving. Reflecting a bit more, it has also developed my personal ethics and communication skills.

2. For international medicine students, you can’t beat UQ for education and lifestyle.
UQ is constantly improving their medicine course which I feel is important when choosing a university and medical school. When I was applying they were very approachable and efficient throughout the application process.  The case-based learning style made me nervous, but I think it is the best way to learn and study medicine. Brisbane is also an amazing city, it has the best climate of all Australian cities (none of this “four seasons in one day” stuff). Plus the Gold Coast and the Sunshine Coast are about an hour away! Perfect study and lifestyle balance.

3. Studying internationally is incredible, but it can be difficult when you return home.
I have spoken to numerous potential Canadian medical school candidates over the years, and my advice is the same. Studying medicine at UQ was a life-changing event for me, and provided me unique opportunities in an amazing country. I won’t lie—you will find it challenging being away from home, and to be honest, getting back into the Canadian system is difficult. UQ does facilitate opportunities to make this process easier, but it is still a challenge. Be prepared to finish internship training in Australia before considering the road back or please at least obtain and maintain general registration with AHPRA.

4. There are pros and cons to working in different health systems, so consider what’s important to you.
I can only speak in relation to the Canadian and Australian healthcare systems, but in my honest experience you get paid more, will have better shifts and rosters, and overall better work-life balance in Australia.  On the other hand, internship training is structured better in Canada: training is slightly shorter and there are no primary exams, but the programs are very difficult to get accepted into.

5. In medicine, you can have a “typical routine” but you’ll never have a “typical day.”
I currently work for Queensland Health and for House Call Doctor when I have extra time in the evenings, usually on nights off, or weekends. Being a home GP after-hours is very flexible and works well with my schedule. Working with House Call Doctor means I get to visit a wide variety of patients who need urgent after-hours care, treating everything from acute cold and flus to more serious conditions, such as gastro, home accidents or chronic illness. You really never know what kind of patients you’ll treat!

6. Sometimes taking the road less travelled will put you on the right path.
I always wanted to work in primary care, but it was quite difficult to get any experience and determine if it suited me. House Call Doctor has given me this experience but it’s also shown me another side to medical practice. I honestly feel after-hours care is becoming its own sub-specialty of medicine. I enjoy it because it allows me to have a simple chat with patients, to see children or speak with a young mum. It is very rewarding, and not something I could have experienced working in the adult system alone.

7. As a student, it’s easy to get run down from all that studying (and perhaps socialising). When you do get sick there are probably more healthcare options available to you than you think.
House Call Doctor offers 100% bulk-billed home GP visits to anyone with a Medicare or DVA (Department of Veteran’s Affair) Card.  Having a GP visit your home can be particularly useful in acute medical situations that don’t warrant an emergency department response, but can’t wait until normal clinic hours. House Call Doctor visits a wide cross-section of patients, including students living in shared accommodation. International students can also take advantage of the after-hours medical care, rebated if they travelling with BUPA, NIB, Allianz or Medibank insurance. For more information you can visit www.housecalldoctor.com.au, or you can phone the after-hours line on 13 55 66 to book an appointment.

8. Support networks and technology are invaluable for international students.
Having a strong family and supportive Australian peer group is extremely important throughout your medical degree. At the same time, don’t underestimate the impact of technology. Skype, FaceTime, and WhatsApp will ensure you can easily stay in touch with loved ones back home.

9. Your medical degree can take you anywhere and you’re likely to end up somewhere completely different to where you thought you would.
I have worked in numerous medical fields, and I have definitely not taken a straight path. Initially I was very keen on critical care (ICU), but when I worked in Haiti post-earthquake and again in Africa I got a better understanding of health and the need for public health medicine and primary care. I have since completed Canadian postgraduate training in public health medicine, and am now working towards translating my qualification here in Australia. I also have a public health interest in illicit substance abuse and drug use patterns and am completing a fellowship in toxicology. I tell everyone, especially medical students, to never discount the idea of being a GP; I’m still considering it, if I get time.

About the UQ Medical School Program

The UQ Medical School conducts a four-year, graduate-entry medical program, the Doctor of Medicine (MD). The School of Medicine is a leading provider of medical education and research in Australia, and with the country’s largest medical degree program, they are the major single contributor to Queensland’s junior medical workforce.

Program: Doctor of Medicine (MD)
Location: Brisbane, Queensland
Semester intake: January
Duration: 4 years
Application deadline: Applications are assessed on a rolling admissions (first come, first served) basis. It is recommended that applicants apply as early as possible to increase their chances of timely assessment. This program can fill quickly!

Apply to the UQ School of Medicine!

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Find out more about the UQ School of Medicine. Contact OzTREKK’s Australian Medical Schools Admissions Officer Courtney Frank at courtney@oztrekk.com, or call toll free in Canada at 1-866-698-7355.